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Innovation Mistake: Thinking Tools Will Fix Your Problem

Innovation Mistake: Thinking Tools Will Fix Your Problem | digitalNow | Scoop.it

… organizational success more likely occurs when all three critical dimensions – technology, organization, and human capabilities and dimensions – are taken into account concurrently. There are no silver bullets. Even excellent management actions, if restricted to a single dimension, can never have the same success as when all three dimensions are managed together. Fredrick Brooks, summarizing the issues in a classic 1986 article, notes “There is no single development, in either technology or in management technique, that by itself promises even one order of magnitude improvement in productivity, in reliability, in simplicity.

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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
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Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude

Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude
Authenticity is a courageous and generous gift while rudeness robs people of dignity. Generosity will always outpace robbery.

Authenticity connects while rudeness disconnects. Connection takes you places that disconnection can’t.

Authenticity builds trust while rudeness undermines it. Without trust, you’re nowhere. This is one of the most compelling reasons to be authentic not rude.

Authenticity removes people’s fears of being conned while rudeness is a form of conning others. Don’t be fooled into thinking that rude negative people are easier to trust.

Authenticity speaks the truth by filtering out personal bias. Rudeness dumps personal bias on others. Dumping never builds positive relationships.

Authenticity shows maturity and emotional intelligence while rudeness screams out selfishness and immaturity. How often do you want to be around selfishness?

Authenticity respects others and their views while rudeness disrespects them. Respect avoids inflicting scars that could otherwise haunt *you forever. The power of respect is one of the most compelling reasons to be authentic not rude.
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How to Motivate Yourself When You’re Exhausted

How to Motivate Yourself When You’re Exhausted | digitalNow | Scoop.it
If you’re feeling exhausted and discouraged by the mountain ahead I encourage you to gather your team and reflect on what’s better now than 6 months ago?

How has the customer experience improved?
What processes are more streamlined?
How is your team stronger (leadership, hiring, skills?)
What do you know now that you didn’t know then?
How are you showing up as a better human being?
What accomplishments are you most proud of?
Yes, yes, look up, and plan. But never underestimate the power of a good pause to look down the mountain.
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How to Create a Rising Tide of Talent Within Your Organization

Work together to determine which description best describes the current ranking of each department.

1. Talent Rich Departments
Talent rich departments employ mostly above average people, many of who are top talent in their fields of expertise. These people consistently do high quality work, often exceeding expectations and beating deadlines. Numerous advancement opportunities are almost always filled from within, creating new job opportunities. These jobs are filled quickly from a pipeline filled with high quality job candidates.

2. Talent Strong Departments
Talent strong departments employ people who are at least average at what they do. Some of these employees are top talent in their fields of expertise. They do quality work that meets expectations and deadlines. Advancement opportunities are frequently filled from within, creating new job opportunities. Some open jobs are filled quickly from a pipeline of talent. Other jobs take longer to fill, delaying promotions until new employees are found.

3. Talent Stable Departments
Talent stable departments have a mixture of average and below average performers. Just a few, if any, employees would be designated as top talent. The performance of these employees is typically adequate, although they can struggle to meet expectations and deadlines. Advancement opportunities, when they occur, are sometimes filled from within. When jobs become open, it usually takes days to fill some of them, weeks or months to fill the rest. Promotions are often delayed or even cancelled when backfilling a role takes too long.
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 In search of the minimum viable audience

In search of the minimum viable audience
Of course everyone wants to reach the maximum audience. To be seen by millions, to maximize return on investment, to have a huge impact.

And so we fall all over ourselves to dumb it down, average it out, pleasing everyone and anyone.

You can see the problem.

When you seek to engage with everyone, you rarely delight anyone. And if you're not the irreplaceable, essential, one-of-a-kind changemaker, you never get a chance to engage with the market.

The solution is simple but counterintuitive: Stake out the smallest market you can imagine. The smallest market that can sustain you, the smallest market you can adequately serve. This goes against everything you learned in capitalism school, but in fact, it's the simplest way to matter.

When you have your eyes firmly focused on the minimum viable audience, you will double down on all the changes you seek to make. Your quality, your story and your impact will all get better.

And then, ironically enough, the word will spread.
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The Five Steps All Leaders Must Take in the Age of Uncertainty

The Five Steps All Leaders Must Take in the Age of Uncertainty | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Change in Perspective Needed

We believe business leaders need a new mental model to better understand the complex interplay between companies, economies, and societies. To do so, they must shift their focus to the broader business and social ecosystems in which their companies are embedded. These ecosystems are nested complex adaptive systems: multilevel, interconnected, dynamic systems hosting local interactions that can give rise to unpredictable global effects and vice versa. Acknowledging the unpredictability, nonlinearity, and circularity of cause-and-effect relationships within these systems is a notable departure from the simpler, linear models that underpin traditional mechanistic management thinking.
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Companies Must Prepare for More Ransomware Attacks

Cyber-security teams need to brace themselves for more action: Ransomware attacks are likely to increase during the second half of this year, according to a recent survey conducted by ISACA (Information Systems Audit and Control Association), a nonprofit group for IT and information systems professionals. More than four out of five survey respondents expect an upsurge in attacks, and most of them said they are at least somewhat prepared. Still, about one-fourth admit that they aren't ready, and fully half have not trained their employees to deal with ransomware. That's risky, warns ISACA CEO Matt Loeb, who says, "WannaCry, Petya, Cryptolocker … ransomware will continue to be news and become the norm. What's needed is protection before an attack—not just a swift recovery afterwards." Besides educating employees, enterprises should be more aggressive in applying software patches, which Loeb sees as critical to protecting an organization from the crippling consequences of an attack. The majority of organizations in the study have not yet experienced a ransomware attack, and only a very small minority of respondents said their organization would pay the ransom if it were hit. Still, complacency is dangerous. "Don't assume your enterprise 'might' be a victim of ransomware," Loeb stresses. "Assume it will. Every organization needs to focus on being prepared for the next ransomware attack, through training, frequent software updates or hiring highly skilled staff." The survey included 448 respondents. About half the participating organizations have fewer than 1,500 employees, 23 percent have 1,500 to 9,999, and 28 percent have 10,000 or more workers. They represent a wide range of industries, with financial/banking firms and technology services/consulting firms leading the way. The survey group covers the globe.
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Freeing yourself from "Tin Man" leadership

Here's how you lead from the heart:
Harmony. Leading from the heart begins with setting a tone of harmony in your team. Think of it as a team putting playing music together. For the music to be good, they have to be unified, focused and know and understand each other's role. Each person has to play her part to the fullest and have the desire to contribute to something bigger than herself. You are the conductor and your job is to bring the harmony that makes the music possible.
Empathy. Part of having a heart means having the desire to constantly learn and understand — both people and the work itself. When you can empathize with others, you'll be able to see what is it that drives and energizes them.
Adoration. In popular culture, the heart symbolizes love. We should have a sincere appreciation for our companies, jobs, teams, clients and communities. You'd be surprised the kind of positive effect thankfulness can have on your work life — even on the stormy days.
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Use These 3 Tips to Become a Stronger Negotiator

Use These 3 Tips to Become a Stronger Negotiator | digitalNow | Scoop.it
“People don’t fail in negotiations because they don’t know some tactic. … When they fail, it’s because of the things that come up with them emotionally.”
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How moments of boredom help us achieve more

How moments of boredom help us achieve more | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Many of our best ideas come to us during idle moments, such as while commuting to work, or taking a shower or a long walk. In fact, we may be at our most creative when we are bored.
In a study at Pennsylvania State University, psychologists Karen Gasper and Brianna Middlewood found participants who were bored performed better in creativity tests than those who were relaxed or feeling elated. They asked volunteers to watch video clips to evoke certain feelings, before testing their ability to think up words. The researchers found that when asked to think of vehicles, most people say “car,” but if someone was bored, their minds might wander, even as far as to respond with “camel".
The most tedious parts of our jobs may be harbouring a potential for creativity that might surprise us.
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The digital future of work: What will automation change?

The digital future of work: What will automation change? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
There are two main dimensions to how technology is changing work. One is that a lot of what humans used to do is increasingly being done by machines: robots, cognitive machines, simple software on your computer. The other side of it is digital technology is changing how we organize work. It’s taking us from fulltime employment, which was the predominant way of earning a living in the 20th century, toward a wide variety of non-employment work arrangements. What’s exciting and scary at this point is the confluence of these two forces.
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The digital future of work: Is the 9-to-5 job going the way of the dinosaur?

The digital future of work: Is the 9-to-5 job going the way of the dinosaur? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The 9-to-5 corporate job may well go the way of the dinosaur, but I don’t think it’s going to do so as quickly as many people are predicting. For one thing, we’re social animals. And people like to get out of the house and go somewhere and be with other people. For another, all of the structures that we have in place are structures that support the 9-to-5 work life.
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How social entrepreneurs can solve the talent problem 

How social entrepreneurs can solve the talent problem  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The entrepreneurs reported that the most important barrier to growth is—surprise!—money. Almost half said raising funds was “very” or “extremely” challenging, even as the impact-investing industry continues to grow. Lack of early-stage capital remains a top challenge to the industry’s growth, according to a recent Global Impact Investing Network survey of 158 impact investors.

The second-most-important problem, finding and keeping talented people (36 percent), becomes crucial as entrepreneurs secure some funding. Three-quarters of funded, early-stage companies believe the inability to access the talent they need will have a critical impact on their businesses. And unlike other challenges they face (such as funding, logistics, or regulatory compliance), the talent gap is a problem that gets tougher as social enterprises scale
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When People Don’t Trust Algorithms

When People Don’t Trust Algorithms | digitalNow | Scoop.it
One of the areas was predicting student performance during an admission review. Dawes built a simple model: Take four or five variables — GPA, test scores, etc. — assign them equal weight, average them on a numerical scale, and use that result as your prediction of how students will rank against each other in actual performance. That model — which doesn’t even try to determine the relative value of the different variables — significantly outperforms admissions experts in predicting a student’s performance.
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How to Respond to "We’ve Tried That Before"

How to Respond to "We’ve Tried That Before" | digitalNow | Scoop.it
One of the most common statements you will hear about any change is: “We’ve tried that before.”

Sources of the Statement

There are several possible sources of this statement/sentiment, including, it really has been tried before! Often though, the resister sees similarities to what is being proposed and assumes it to be the same, or the communication about the change hasn’t been very successful and so the assumption is that the proposed change is the same as the past experience.

The Psychology

The basic psychology is pretty straightforward: if we view something as not having worked in the past, why would we want to try it again? Intellectually this is a bad plan!

Remember though, especially if you are the promoter/leader of the change, that your understanding of the change and theirs could be different. You may not have lived through what they are thinking about, or they may not really understand what is being proposed.
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Playing by the Brain’s Rules to Make Communications Stick

Your brain and mine operate at the level of ideas. If you were to sit through a long presentation, even a great one, and afterwards, I asked you “what was that all about?”… automatically, without even knowing you were doing it, you would reduce that hour to one or two big ideas. It’s how our brains work. They are reductionist. They traffic in ideas. They do NOT traffic at the level of facts and data (especially lots of fact and data).

Do you immediately see the problem? The overwhelming majority of communicators take an approach that is thoroughly at odds with this reality. We bombard our audiences with as much fact and data as we can, usually thinking that we are making the best case we can, when in fact we are likely making the worst.

In the famous OJ Simpson trial of 1993, the prosecution presented a mind-numbing seven months’ worth of fact and data. And yet, history clearly suggests that this was all undone by ONE simple idea of eight words…. “If the glove doesn’t fit, you must acquit”… and the fact that most of you reading immediately recognized the phrase (even after a quarter of a century) is huge testimony to the incredible brain-stickiness of an idea.
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How to Rapidly Resolve Crises in Your Business

To solve the hard problem at the root of your crisis, you need to take a different approach. It involves a strategic sort of patience. You need to do the work to understand the root cause behind your crisis in order to solve it effectively. To find the root cause, you need to stop guessing and use a different set of behaviors.

Know what problem you’re solving. Most crisis response efforts attempt to solve the problem without having defined it well in the first place. Often, problem definitions contain assumptions about the cause of the problem, causing your team to work on the wrong problem altogether. “Our supplier is sending us low quality materials,” or “our core assets are too old” are both problem definitions that assume you already know what’s wrong. Take a step back and define the problem based on what you can observe directly.

Smell the problem. Your first step during the crisis shouldn’t be to try implementing a guessed solution; it should be quickly getting out of the conference room and getting close to the problem to understand it. Pull up data that describes the pattern of the problem, or go to the site of the problem and get familiar with it. If you have unhappy customers, listen in depth to what they’re saying. If you have a supply chain problem, go to the site and record in detail what’s going on.

Stay on target. As you explore the problem, seek to quickly eliminate possible culprits. Investigate it like Sherlock Holmes: instead of trying to confirm a hunch about a suspect, look for evidence that eliminates the possibility that a suspect is the criminal. When you have eliminated all suspects but one, you’ve found your culprit. This relentlessness to eliminate possible root causes will quickly move you towards the true root cause.

When you’ve found the root cause to your crisis, the most effective and efficient solution will become readily apparent. You’ll be able to implement it with greater speed, confidence, and consensus than if you were trying out the best idea that bubbled up in your conference room. To rapidly resolve the crisis in your business, focus your resources on understanding the problem, rather than wasting them trying out guesses that may or may not work.

Learn what skills your team brings to the table in crisis resolution with our free online quiz.
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Anita Nason's curator insight, Today, 8:40 AM

"Rapidly resolving crises in your Business" showed a quirky take on steps to resolve crises in an organisation. When reading through this article, concepts mentioned with how to handle the crises also were similar with OHS techniques. Likewise with reading through OHS material in university courses, this has demonstrated the importance of business units in Organisations' taking responsibility with ensuring OHS is integral in many departments. Moreover why this is of such importance is OHS is everyone's responsibility, not just laying with the Workplace Health and Safety Manager. Likewise as much as possible, I believe all Managers must be present, throughout the workplace. As this keeps the manager at the forefront of business operations.

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The End of Corporate Culture as We Know It

The End of Corporate Culture as We Know It | digitalNow | Scoop.it
We are evolving toward the age of networked enterprise, in which the traditional hierarchies of the corporation will be supplanted by self-organizing systems collaborating on digital platforms.

It will be an era of entrepreneurship, distributed leadership, and the continual reorganization of people and resources. It will be a time of disintermediation both within and between organizations. Layers of management will fall; the need for centralized systems and trusted go-betweens will dissipate, if not disappear.

Or so many experts predict.

As for me? Yes, I do believe this is the future toward which we are slowly advancing. Those of us deeper into our careers may not see it come to full fruition during our organizational lives, but the trends are real, and they are already on display if you care to look for them.
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Inspiring Employee Creativity

Inspiring Employee Creativity | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Two types of leaders dominate today’s work environment. “Controllers” prescribe standards, closely drive execution, analyze data that’s produced to progressively refine the standards, and evaluate people on their past performance. “Empowerers” prefer forward-looking discussions with direct reports. They use these to decide what work needs to be done.

Controllers run call centers that record every word and keystroke and require employees to refer to supervisors when issues unanticipated by their scripts arise.1 They see early virtual reality technologies as a tool for shortening training, minimizing on-the-job errors, and avoiding travel for meetings.2 They use dashboard tools to monitor individuals and tasks in real time, ignoring the fact that normal variation, endemic in nature, doesn’t require immediate corrective action.
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The digital future of work: Policy implications of automation 

The digital future of work: Policy implications of automation  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The two areas that are critical for policy makers, but also that business leaders and academics should be worrying about are, number one, how do we actually accelerate technology adoption in commercialization? The problem is not that we’re automating so quickly that we’re going to put people out of jobs. The problem is that we need to automate more quickly to get the kind of benefits and productivity and in our standard of living that we would like to enjoy. So the first issue is how we unblock that so that companies are making the right investments in technology, building out new capabilities in their supply chains, et cetera? The second thing, which I think is an even bigger concern, is how do we really help the workforce transition? That’s people who are in existing jobs that will be dramatically changed, or people who are in locations that need to change.
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How crowds can avoid groupthink 

Equality is key

The key, they suggest is the equality of the network.  When the network is egalitarian and influence is spread equally throughout it, there’s a strong social-learning effect that makes everyone smarter.  This doesn’t tend to occur however when certain individuals dominate discussions.

This is bad because whilst influential people may indeed have well-earned subject matter expertise, their influence tends to persist even outside that area of expertise, thus reducing the smartness of the group.  Indeed, the authors suggest that opinion leaders were more likely to lead the group astray as improve it.

“In a situation where everyone is equally influential,” the authors say, “people can help to correct each other’s mistakes. This makes each person a little more accurate than they were initially. Overall, this creates a striking improvement in the intelligence of the group. The result is even better than the traditional wisdom of the crowd! But, as soon as you have opinion leaders, social influence becomes really dangerous.”

The question becomes of course, how likely is it that networks will ever be truly egalitarian?  It seems inevitable in any gathering of people that some will gain more power and influence than others, and thus dictate how information flows and opinions form.  That seems an inevitable facet of human nature.  So whilst the paper is undoubtedly interesting, I feel it is interesting primarily for the warnings it provides about allowing influential people to unduly dominate debates, especially when their input is not in an area of expertise.
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What's The Best Way To Get Your Audience To Love Your Idea?

What's The Best Way To Get Your Audience To Love Your Idea? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Every Speech Needs To Have Humor In It

I think that most of us have a love / hate relationship with humor. We do understand that humor has a power in it, if you can get your audience to laugh then they will be on your side. However, humor is a dangerous double edged sword – you can end up cutting yourself badly if you don’t make your audience laugh. We’d all like to use more humor in our speeches, but a lot of us are afraid of the consequences of something going wrong.

What we need to understand is that our audience’s brains love humor. The great thing about humor is that it has a tendency to lower an audience’s defenses and this will make it easier for you to get your message across to them. An added bonus of using more humor in your speech is that by doing so you will make yourself more likable to your audience and they will want to support what you are talking about. Remember, all you need to do is to get your audience to smile and this does not require you to tell jokes!
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How new CEOs can boost their odds of success

How new CEOs can boost their odds of success | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Although new CEOs transitioning into companies that have been performing well and CEOs transitioning into companies that have been performing poorly make similar moves with a similar frequency, that doesn’t mean those moves are equally effective. We measured the performance of companies by excess TRS over a CEO’s tenure. At companies where chief executives made strategic moves early on, we found striking contrasts between organizations that had been performing well when the new CEO took charge and those that had been performing poorly:
Organizational redesign was correlated with significant excess TRS (+1.9 percent) for well-performing companies, but not for low performers.
Strategic reviews were correlated with significant excess TRS (+4.3 percent) for poorly performing companies but were less helpful for companies that had been performing well.
Poorly performing companies enjoyed +0.8 percent TRS when they reshuffled their management teams. But when well-performing companies did so, they destroyed value.5
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The digital future of work: What skills will be needed? 

The digital future of work: What skills will be needed?  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The skills that I would recommend an 18-year-old think about, which may or may not fit in the traditional definition of skills, are to try stuff that you never thought about. If you try things that you never thought about, you may find that you have skills and talents that you never realized you had. Being able to challenge your own assumptions about what you’re good at and what you can do creates massive opportunities to put yourself on a path that’ll make you happy and successful.
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Mid-Year Business Review: A Company’s Path to Success

Mid-Year Business Review: A Company’s Path to Success | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The purpose of a mid-year review

Evaluate performance.
Reallocate resources to better achieve goals.
Make more money than you would have otherwise.
Take stronger corrective actions than you would have without a mid-year review.
Provide leadership for your team—too much silence taxes milestone goals.
Offer focus for your team.
 

Reasons a mid-year review might be unnecessary

Clearly meeting financial goals.
Your team has knowledge of their duties and expectations of them for the rest of the year.
Regular and sufficient monitoring of business performances.
A full sales/marketing pipeline.
Presence of all of the above.
There’s nothing quite like an abundance of cash in the checking account and a full sales and marketing pipeline to make a business owner comfortable and, consequently, ignore the need for business reviews. The goal of quality planning, however, is to prepare for the inevitable downturn while enjoying plentiful resources.
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Culture for a digital age 

Culture for a digital age  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Each obstacle is a long-standing difficulty that has become more costly in the digital age. When risk aversion holds sway, underinvestment in strategic opportunities and sluggish responses to quick-changing customer needs and market dynamics can be the result. When a unified understanding of customers is lacking, companies struggle to mobilize employees around integrated touchpoints, journeys, and consistent experiences, while often failing to discern where to best place their bets as digital broadens customer choice and the actions companies can take in response. And when silos characterize the organization, responses to rapidly evolving customer needs are often too narrow, with key signals missed or acted upon too slowly, simply because they were seen by the wrong part of the company.
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