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Collaborative Curation and Personalization The Future of Museums: A Study Report

Collaborative Curation and Personalization  The Future of Museums: A Study Report | digitalassetman | Scoop.it

This report highlights a number of key trends that will have a significant impact on the user experience and design of future collections and museums.


Via Robin Good
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Jennifer Moss's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:47 PM

This is like the 'Horizon Report' for museums. 

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:04 PM

This is right up my alley. Looking forward to reading about trends and impacts.

Erica Bilder's curator insight, November 15, 2013 7:11 AM

I have nothing to add to Robin Good's terrific insights:

 Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Picture these scenarios:
 

The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
 The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report “Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  

 

The report projects that:

 

"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."

 

A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
 The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.

 

Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html ;

 The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating.  "Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation,allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.
Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time." 

 

My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.

 

Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx ;

 

PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 

 

Rescooped by digitalassetman from An Eye on New Media
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The Next Fifty Years In Technology: Here's What's Coming! | Simply Zesty

The Next Fifty Years In Technology: Here's What's Coming! | Simply Zesty | digitalassetman | Scoop.it
What will the next fifty years bring in the world of social media, mobile, robotics and more? Our fifty year timeline shows you just what could be in store

 

Technology is growing at such an exponential rate, it can be difficult to visualise what the next five years will look like, let alone fifty. We wanted to see just how the future is going to shape up for us. So we compiled all the best predictions for digital technology, mobile, social media, and big data over the next fifty years into a timeline so you can see exactly what’s in store.

 

The timeline covers expected growth in key markets including spend on digital and mobile, as well as big data so we can start to see exactly where this emerging industry will head. Data for the timeline has been gathered from a wide range of sources, in specialist areas to give as wide a view as possible of what’s coming up....


Via Jeff Domansky, Ken Morrison
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MTD's curator insight, May 17, 2013 5:15 AM

Fantastic look at how technology will develop, drive new advances, interact, and push the development of business and society in the medium future. 

Helen Teague's curator insight, December 9, 2013 3:02 PM

Singularity in a decade!

Carol Rine's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:07 PM

I am sooo ready for this future!

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Totally Addictive Education: The Future of Learning - Forbes

Totally Addictive Education: The Future of Learning - Forbes | digitalassetman | Scoop.it
Today, most educational systems are designed to work from the microscopic to the macroscopic. Students learn facts and figures and tiny fractions of knowledge long before anyone really puts things into a larger context.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown

Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown | digitalassetman | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, July 4, 2013 7:19 AM


Marco Arment the creator of Instapaper, has an excellent and provocative piece on why Google is closing down all of its RSS appendages (they just closed also the RSS feeds in Google Alerts) and the logic behind this strategy.


He writes: "Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people."


"The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).


Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4"


Provides better perspective on RSS, Google, FB and Twitter and your future relationship with RSS.



Must-read article. 9/10


Full article: http://www.marco.org/2013/07/03/lockdown


(Image credit - RSS logo - Shutterstock)



Ashish Rishi's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:49 PM

Love you Marco!!!  Agreed  and couldn't have asked for more. Internet to me was the ultimate democratization tool , a leveler, a ground playing field that challenged all institutions that had unnecessary walls around them - say educational institutions , you loved them, but they were for a fortunate few. Internet platforms  ( including google) were formed for the love of internet, they have milked it enough and why not ? but now these guys are trying to become to old school walled gardens, I just hope that in doing so , they don't lose the charm that defines them.

Laura Brown's comment, July 6, 2013 2:43 PM
This is like the AOL model of the Internet which they offered years ago. People thought they were online but they were only online via AOL which mean AOL controlled what they say, how they saw it, etc. Many people were fine with the AOL version of the Internet. People who just wanted to look at email and use chat forums for personal reason and put up a personal home page, etc. However, the people who did not like being restricted or confined choose to opt out of AOL and use other ISP's (Internet Service Providers). I'm not surprised Google wants to take several steps back and go that way, take control of what people are allowed to see and make sure the ads are featured versus having the option to block them. They have already gone several steps backwards in bringing back pop up ads. No one seems to protest those, or the video and other bulky ads which take up a lot of bandwidth. People had a large voice against all that when it was still the artists, scientists and other geeks who ruled online. Now it is the marketers and the Internet reflects the change in a big way. It's like one big ad soup. Google just wants to tie it all up in a neat bundle.
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Infographic: the Future of Big Data

Infographic: the Future of Big Data | digitalassetman | Scoop.it

Big data is not new. It has existed for ages and can be attributed even to the initial years of computing. However, one might do well to consider why is there an increased buzz around this now.

The answer is quite simple: Significant advances that have been brought about by x86 hardware have actually helped in bringing computing power to the masses. However, with new technologies, cloud computing has extended this power. Now, users have extended perimeters, while still being able to control costs effectively...


Via Lauren Moss
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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: The 21st century pedagogy teachers should be aware of

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: The 21st century pedagogy teachers should be aware of | digitalassetman | Scoop.it

Interpersonal learning , personalized learning, second life learning , 3d learning, collaborative learning and virtual learning , these are just some of the few buzz words you would be hearing so often in today’s educational literature.

 


Via Susan Bainbridge
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