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Do computer simulations support the Argument from Disagreement?

Do computer simulations support the Argument from Disagreement? | Digital Wisdom | Scoop.it

"According to the Argument from Disagreement (AD) widespread and persistent disagreement on ethical issues indicates that our moral opinions are not influenced by moral facts, either because there are no such facts or because there are such facts but they fail to influence our moral opinions."


Via Louie Helm
Mark Waser's insight:

or, there is a third choice . . . . for example, that moral "facts" are interpreted differently by different moral frameworks and that therefore they can actually be *reinforcing* the differing opinions.  And, indeed, there is a fair amount of research that supports this third choice (for example, see Kahan DM, Braman D (2006). Cultural Cognition and Public Policy. Yale Journal of Law & Public Policy 24:147-170.)

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Louie Helm's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:34 AM

An ethics research found a way to use computer simulations to help shed light on real philosophical questions in a non-ridiculous way.

Mark Waser's comment, December 7, 2013 8:38 AM
or, there is a third choice . . . . for example, that moral "facts" are interpreted differently by different moral frameworks and that therefore they can actually be *reinforcing* the differing opinions. And, indeed, there is a fair amount of research that supports this third choice (for example, see Kahan DM, Braman D (2006). Cultural Cognition and Public Policy. Yale Journal of Law & Public Policy 24:147-170.)
Rescooped by Mark Waser from Philosophy Hub
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Eric Schwitzgebel on the Ethical Behaviour of Ethics Professors (Podcast)

Eric Schwitzgebel on the Ethical Behaviour of Ethics Professors (Podcast) | Digital Wisdom | Scoop.it

You might expect ethics professors to behave more morally than other sorts of professor. But Eric Schwitzgebel, who has conducted extensive research on this topic, has discovered that that isn't the case. What does this show about ethics generally? Philosophy Bites investigates.

 

Source : philosophybites.com


Via Yannick Kilberger
Mark Waser's insight:

To me, this shows far more about the ethics professors' depth of true understanding of ethics rather than anything about ethics (because it is either that or accusing them of being selfish).

(And Eric is always a lot of fun.  Check out his blog!)

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Pedro Tavares's curator insight, September 29, 2013 2:08 PM

Ainda sobre a Ética....

Rescooped by Mark Waser from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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How Money Affects Morality

How Money Affects Morality | Digital Wisdom | Scoop.it
A study by researchers at Harvard and the University of Utah finds that the simple idea of money makes people more likely to subordinate their ethical standards.

Via Joshua Sng, Lynnette Van Dyke
Mark Waser's insight:

"Sure enough, students who had been primed to think of money consistently exhibited weaker ethics. More interestingly, perhaps, they also framed their choices as products of cost-benefit analysis. In other words, they stepped out of morality."

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Shu Yi's comment, August 29, 2013 9:41 AM
Shakespeare once wrote that ‘temptation is the fire that brings up the scum of the heart'. During the Japanese occupation, inflation added on to the already-painful suffering of the people, leading to heavy police corruption amongst civil servants. This goes to show that in times of desperation, money often seems to override virtue.
T Yi Ling TunaSoup's comment, August 29, 2013 11:49 AM
I find it sad how all humans can throw aside their own moral values and give in to greed and temptation just to fulfill their monetary desires, all for those pieces of paper. In front of money, everything just becomes second-most important, and nothing can ever top it, not even kinship – which is the case for many people.
Jasmine Loh's comment, September 1, 2013 3:37 PM
The moment that money presides over ethics, is the day that humanity and conscience is lost. The very essence of living life is lost. Even in present reality, contract killings are evidence of how money has affected morality. To pay someone to kill another person puts monetary value above any forms of humanity.
Rescooped by Mark Waser from Philosophy Hub
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David Edmonds on Trolley Problems (Podcast)

David Edmonds on Trolley Problems (Podcast) | Digital Wisdom | Scoop.it

Is it ever morally acceptable to kill one person to save five? Most people think that it can be. But are we consistent in this? In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Nigel Warburton interviews David Edmonds (co-creator of Philosophy Bites) about the subject of his new book, Would You Kill the Fat Man?, an investigation of the ethics of killing and letting die.

 

Source : philosophybites.com


Via Yannick Kilberger
Mark Waser's insight:

Trolley problems are morality's white mice.

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