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Rescooped by Angélique NAZON from 1- E-HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK - E SANTE par PHARMAGEEK
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L’E-médecine, antidote à la pénurie médicale?

L’E-médecine, antidote à la pénurie médicale? | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Concepteur d’un médecin virtuel capable d’interagir avec les patients pour diagnostiquer les problèmes de somnolence, le docteur Pierre Philip explique l’intérêt de ces nouveaux agents animés pour la médecine et la santé publique.

Via Philippe Loizon, Coralie Bouillot, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Suède. Les enfants se préparent à l'hôpital sur internet

Suède.  Les enfants se préparent à l'hôpital sur internet | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Afin de calmer leur appréhension avant une intervention chirurgicale, les enfants suédois peuvent consulter un site où sont expliquées, avec des supports apaisants, toutes les étapes de l'opération. Une formule qui fait mouche et qui commence à se développer dans de nombreux pays.
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Social Media and Inherent Risks in the Pharmaceutical Industry

Social Media and Inherent Risks in the Pharmaceutical Industry | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
What we understand today as “social media” has been with us for about a decade now. And the use of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn, to name but a few, has been embraced by enterprises for various business purposes from the very beginning. Besides research and development, human resources, and sales, one of its major areas of application is marketing. Big companies from many sectors benefit from building strong customer relations and, thus, brand recognition by means of social media.Present Use of Social Media and its RisksWhile many industries like consumer goods or banking have been making extensive use of social media for some years now, the pharmaceuticals sector lags behind for the most part. Thus, forgoing a powerful tool to boost their businesses. With the rapid spread of mobile internet devices such as smartphones and tablet computers the importance of social media applications as a major source of information for consumers is bound to grow.By now, hundreds of millions of people and businesses around the world have connected via social media applications and built huge networks at low cost. They generate, share, and consume content that is spread in the twinkling of an eye. Such social dynamics can gain huge momentum and are hard to control. Once a piece of content goes viral, one better hopes it rebounds to one’s advantage. Particularly, since the internet doesn’t forget.This inherent reputational risk is not the only risk in social media engagement enterprises need to take into account when developing a successful social media strategy. Those risks are manifold and can be divided into risks of a corporate social media presence itself and risks induced by the use of social media by employees.Among the former, there is the risk of data leakage and identity theft by means of viruses and malware introduced into the corporate network. Likewise, customers or the enterprise can get publicly exposed through a hijacked or fraudulent organizational presence. This may result in adverse legal actions, customer backlashes, phishing attacks on the concerned parties and reputational damage. Poorly defined content rights to posted information pose the risks of the company’s loss of control and legal rights of the posted information. Moreover, a move to a digital business model can increase customer service expectations possibly leading to customer dissatisfaction with the responsiveness in the introduced social media channels. Fines and regulatory sanctions as well as adverse legal actions are risks posed by mismanagement of digital communications, which can be effected by retention regulations or electronic discovery.In addition to those risks of a corporate social media presence, there are a number of risks posed by the use of social media by employees, which need to be taken into account when building up an integrated social media risk management. Among those are the risks of privacy violations, damage to corporate reputation, and the loss of competitive advantage, in case personal accounts are used to post work-related information. Employees who publish content, which relates them to the company, can pose one more potential source of damage to the brand or corporate reputation. Likewise, the risks of network utilization issues, productivity losses and increased exposure to viruses and malware can arise through the excessive use of social media applications in the workplace. And furthermore, the access of employees to social media with company-supplied mobile devices can pose the risk of infections, data theft and leakage, and the circumvention of company controls.Those are a lot of risks, one may argue. But there is one more significant risk that every enterprise faces, which tinkers with the idea of missing out on taking advantage of this powerful instrument, and that is the risk of opportunity costs. The question is not whether or not to engage in social media. The question is which tools from this versatile set of social media applications best support the business purposes, and how it can be managed in a manner that guarantees that potential risks are being outweighed by material benefits.Social Media in the Pharmaceutical IndustryFor several years enterprises from various sectors have gained experience in this area. In collaboration with research institutions, associations, and consulting agencies, they have developed specific safeguards. Such measures include corporate strategies, frameworks, policies, as well as awareness trainings communications for employees, vendors, and customers, which address and mitigate potential risks. And, thus, empower enterprises to profit from engaging in social media.The relative reluctance of the pharmaceuticals industry may have prevented it from some teething troubles or other in the past. But it definitely prevents enterprises in the sector from taking huge opportunities.Of course, the pharmaceuticals industry is different from other sectors. Safety and quality management, risk management, marketing, and other areas of operations play a more crucial role than in other sectors. And the enterprises are object to strict laws and regulations and close monitoring. Some of this relative reluctance in the application of social media is certainly due to the legal and regulatory environment. In this field of regulatory compliance in the US, for instance, further clarification on the use of social media in the sector may facilitate a catching up. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made a move in addressing this by its January 2014 publication of a Draft “Guidance for Industry Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human and Animal Drugs and Biologics” (for comment purposes only).This draft FDA guidance is “intended to describe FDA’s current thinking about how manufacturers, packers, and distributors (firms), that may either be the applicant or acting on behalf of the applicant, of prescription human and animal drug and biological products (drugs) can fulfill regulatory requirements for postmarketing submissions of interactive promotional media for their FDA-approved products.”While such initiatives towards further clarification in the area of regulatory compliance are welcome and may be helpful, not all enterprises have waited to engage social media applications for their business purposes. A couple of enterprises are pioneering. Among them is big fish – realizing the huge potential of this dynamic set of tools.ConclusionTo allow for such engagement to fully and sustainably strengthen the company’s competitive position and satisfy stakeholder interests it is crucial to adequately address and prioritize inherent risks, develop an integrated social media strategy, and implement effective and efficient safeguards.
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Pharma Marketing Blog: Janssen Uses Digital Storytelling, Animation to "Bring Prescription Medicine Labeling to Life." But Not iPhone or iPad Life!

Pharma Marketing Blog: Janssen Uses Digital Storytelling, Animation to "Bring Prescription Medicine Labeling to Life." But Not iPhone or iPad Life! | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Pharma Marketing Blog: Janssen Uses Digital Storytelling, Animation to "Bring Prescription... http://t.co/fJFD57uZXO

Via eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Rescooped by Angélique NAZON from Veille Techno et Informatique "AutreMent"
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Wire : Le cofondateur de Skype lance une appli de messagerie multiplateforme

Wire : Le cofondateur de Skype lance une appli de messagerie multiplateforme | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Janus Friis, le cofondateur de Skype, vient de lancer en collaboration avec l'équipe suisse de Zeta Project, Wire™ (App, iPhone et iPad, VF, 10.3 Mo, Lien App Store), une application qu'il pense être le successeur de Skype.

Via L'Info Autrement
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7 Sneaky Tricks For Measuring Your Twitter Marketing

7 Sneaky Tricks For Measuring Your Twitter Marketing | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Twitter marketing can be a huge asset to your business but it can also be a colossal waste of time if it’s not done right. Here's 7 ways to measure success.
Via Kamal Bennani
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, November 7, 2014 11:28 PM

Smart measurement tips for Twitter from Melonie Dodaro

Thermodyne Boilers's curator insight, November 8, 2014 12:10 AM

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La pharmacie cherche sa place dans le digital

La pharmacie cherche sa place dans le digital | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Depuis septembre, les porteurs de prothèses cardiaques Medtronic (pacemakers, défibrillateurs implantables…) peuvent appeler un numéro vert...

Via Philippe Loizon
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13 Email Marketing Hacks That Can Help Double Your Response Rates

13 Email Marketing Hacks That Can Help Double Your Response Rates | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Get some tactical tips to improve your email marketing on the cheap.
Via Kamal Bennani
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Rescooped by Angélique NAZON from All about Pharma by Pharmacomptoir
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L’Italie adopte l’ordonnance numérique

L’Italie adopte l’ordonnance numérique | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
“Il y a un an, l’ordonnance numérique faisait son apparition, d’abord en Sicile, puis graduellement dans d’autres régions. Aujourd’hui, 5 ”
régions italiennes sur 21 l’utilisent.

Via Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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How social media can extend the care experience

How social media can extend the care experience | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

While shared medical appointments offer patients with like conditions the ability to support and learn from one another in person, emerging social media platforms can offer similar benefits from a distance. What's more, medical practices that embrace this trend can achieve better patient engagement while delivering a strong marketing message, according to an articlefrom Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News.

In the GI arena, examples of Facebook-like sites that allow patients and organizations to connect include RA Connection, GI Connection and Chronology.Cancer Connect is another popular online community, with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center among the institutions that use the site to offer patients and families additional support.

In addition, the site offers healthcare organizations unique branding opportunities. "On a practice's website, Cancer Connect is part of the patients' experience as it relates to that particular institution, an approach that may improve patient retention, increase patient referrals and enhance patient satisfaction," Charles Weaver, M.D., an oncologist and founder of Cancer Connect, told attendees at the 2014 GI Roundtable.

 

And while social media and the way healthcare organizations use it continues to evolve, experts contend that it's a mistake for providers to not get involved. "Historically, we've focused on the intervention, but patients want us to connect with them before they arrive at the clinic or hospital," M. Bridget Duffy, M.D., chief medical officer at Vocera Communications, said at the conference. "They want us to understand their preferences; they want a personalized plan and a path to their well-being; and they want a connectivity after they leave."

 


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Mesure de soi : Fitbit fait son entrée sur Windows Phone 8.1

Mesure de soi : Fitbit fait son entrée sur Windows Phone 8.1 | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
La marque Fitbit, qui propose des bracelets connectés dans la tendance du quantified self, vient de publier une application dédiée à Windows Phone 8.1.

Via Agathe Quignot
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Les Google Glass pour former les médecins en chirurgie à Stanford

Les Google Glass pour former les médecins en chirurgie à Stanford | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Nous avons déjà évoqué à plusieurs reprises l’intérêt des Google Glass dans le domaine médical, que ce soit en terme de gestion de dossiers électroniques ou encore comme outil pour les ambulanciers.

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European Commission asks for help from industry to regulate, encourage mobile health | mobihealthnews

European Commission asks for help from industry to regulate, encourage mobile health | mobihealthnews | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

Via Philippe Loizon
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La pharmacie de garde désormais à portée de clics pour les Franciliens

La pharmacie de garde désormais à portée de clics pour les Franciliens | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

(AFP) - Les Franciliens peuvent désormais trouver la pharmacie de garde de nuit ou les jours fériés en quelques clics, via une application pour smartphone et un site internet, présenté jeudi par...


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Rescooped by Angélique NAZON from 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING by PHARMAGEEK
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New Pharma Digital Marketing Benchmarks Show that Online Pharmaceutical Marketing Continues to Drive Brand Awareness, Favorability and Conversions

New Pharma Digital Marketing Benchmarks Show that Online Pharmaceutical Marketing Continues to Drive Brand Awareness, Favorability and Conversions | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
“comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), a leader in measuring the digital world, today released results from its eighth annual Online Marketing Effectiveness Benchmarks for the Pharmaceutical Industry, conducted in partnership with marketing innovation consultancy Evolution Road LLC.”
Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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"Seuls 5% des Français détiennent à ce jour un objet connecté !".

"Seuls 5% des Français détiennent à ce jour un objet connecté !". | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

Evolution de l'équipement, contenus les plus consommés et tendances à venir... Médiamétrie livre chaque année son bilan de l'année Internet écoulée. Le JDN a retenu les 10 chiffres les plus symboliques pour vous.


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Esposito Christelle's curator insight, February 20, 3:41 AM

Top 10 des objets connectés en #France !

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2014: Google consacre 36% de ses investissements pour la santé

2014: Google consacre 36% de ses investissements pour la santé | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
2014 a été l'année de la santé pour Google. Le géant américain vient de révéler les chiffres des financements accordés par son fonds de placement Google Ventures. 36% des 450 millions de dollars investis sur le dernier exercice l'ont été dans le secteur de la santé et des sciences de la vie. En 2013, seuls 9% du budget lui avaient été alloués.Selon Bill Maris, président fondateur de Google Ventures, le pari a été pris de capitaliser sur les datas appliquées à la santé et leur analyse. Google veut faire des données un bien commun au service de la recherche médicale. Bill Maris est d'ailleurs fortement impliqué dans le recrutement par Google de l'expert en génétique Andrew Conrad, qui dirige maintenant l'équipe de scientifiques au sein de Google X, le laboratoire de recherche en sciences de la vie de Google.Avec 24 % des fonds, le troisième secteur d'investissement de Google cette année aura logiquement été celui des entreprises et startups spécialistes de la data, juste derrière les 27% accordés au secteur du mobile. Crédit Photo : Flickr par Steve Jurvetson

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Helene Decourteix's curator insight, December 18, 2014 5:35 AM

Quand Google investit autant en santé, c'est un signal fort pour le développement du secteur, notamment sur la génétique et la data

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Chronorea : application mobile pour urgentistes

Chronorea : application mobile pour urgentistes | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Une nouvelle application mobile pour accompagner les équipes d'urgence dans leurs interventions a été lancé : Chronorea. Présentation. Pour faciliter le travail des équipes d'urgence et les aider à...

Via Rémy TESTON
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Clinicians weigh the pros and cons of social media

Clinicians weigh the pros and cons of social media | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
There is considerable debate in medical circles as to whether healthcare practitioners should embrace social media, but online aficionados say they welcome the opportunity to exchange information, educate, connect, and potentially attract more patients.By P.K. DanielType “orthopedic surgeons” in the Twitter search window and “Dr. David Geier” is featured at the top of the results page. He’s approaching 5000 followers and has tweeted more than 10,000 times. The Charleston, SC-based orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist has this branding and social media thing down.Geier has company. Nearly three-quarters of the 275 million Americans online use a social networking site of some kind. And he has an audience. Of those online, 72% use the Web to find health and wellness information.1 The figure is even higher–82%–for adults aged 50 years and older seeking medical answers.2However, as a healthcare practitioner Geier represents a small demographic. Less than a quarter of physicians use social media on a daily basis for professional purposes.3 Even fewer are tweeting. Just one in 20 physicians uses Twitter in a professional capacity, according to a June survey by MedData Group.4A 2012 survey conducted by the Journal of Medical Internet Research found that 117 (or 24.1%) of the 485 physicians who responded used social media to scan or explore medical information on a daily or more than daily basis, whereas 69 (14.2%) contributed new information on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 (61%) scanned social media sites and 223 (46%) contributed to them.5According to the Journal of Medical Regulation, there were 850,085 active physicians in 2010 in the US.6 And yet, just over a thousand are registered with TwitterDoctors.net, a database of physicians who tweet. While only 5% of all US physicians use Twitter for professional purposes, nearly one-third, or 32%, use LinkedIn, 21% use Facebook, and 10% use Google+. Twitter ranked even below YouTube, which is used by 8% of US doctors.7To tweet or not to tweet?There is considerable debate in medical circles as to whether physicians and other healthcare practitioners should embrace social media as a platform to explore and exchange medical information. Patient privacy (and complying with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations) was the reason most cited by those physicians who are not using social media in the MedData Group survey.Other reasons included concerns about time, liability, unfamiliarity with social media, and viewing it as having little value professionally.“Unfortunately, not many of my colleagues are very active on Twitter,” said Sylvia L. Czuppon, PT, DPT, OCS, who is an assistant professor of physical therapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. “Part of this is fear of the unknown, fear of being misrepresented, and not understanding the power of social media for patient and community education.”For confidentiality reasons, Czuppon tries to avoid direct contact with current or former patients, although admittedly she has a few Twitter followers of this type.But with nearly 200 million Americans looking online for information about their doctors, their diagnoses, and their treatment options, online aficionados say it’s an opportunity for healthcare providers to exchange information, educate, connect, and, potentially, attract more patients.“[Patients] are paying attention to our digital presence–or online reputation,” said orthopedic surgeon Howard J. Luks, MD. “Having a digital presence is far more important for a physician than having a social presence. Having a website that is full of timely, interesting, and actionable information is what our patients are seeking and what they deserve.”Luks, who is associate professor of orthopedic surgery at New York Medical College and chief of sports medicine and arthroscopy at Westchester Medical Center in Westchester, NY, has been active in digital and social media for about seven years. His website, which includes his blog, gets nearly 140,000 unique visitors each month. He has more than 16,000 followers on Twitter and has tweeted almost 37,000 times. He also has a Facebook Fan Page and is on LinkedIn, YouTube, Google+, and Vimeo.Educating consumersA common theme among some proponents of utilizing social and digital media in healthcare is consumer education. A fringe benefit is added exposure for the practitioner.Luks, who serves as an advisory board member of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media in Rochester, MN, said serving the educational needs of the public through his digital and social media presence has had a significantly positive effect on his practice and his reputation. Notably, he was named one of the Top 10 Social Healthmakers for Osteoarthritis by Sharecare, an online health and wellness engagement platform.“Our increasingly [digitally] interconnected society has chosen social media as the means of sharing relevant information about food, friends, news, illnesses, doctors, and hospitals,” Luks said. “Therefore, the role of social media and a digital presence is changing constantly.”Julie Eibensteiner, DPT, owner of Laurus Athletic Rehab & Performance in Minneapolis, MN, has an affinity for Facebook because of its relative ease of posting educational information for patients in a user-friendly manner. However, she also has found a home on Twitter. She has tweeted 17,000 times since joining in 2010 and has more than 2500 followers.“The education piece is huge on the rehab side of things, and the more often you can get [information] in front of patients that connects with them, it’s a good thing,” Eibensteiner said. “Your patients can get to know your personality a little bit better while still maintaining professionalism. That helps build good relationships and rapport with your patients, which is another big piece of a successful rehab.”Czuppon also sees social media’s role in orthopedics as a tool with which to educate, communicate, and collaborate.“I think there is a great opportunity to educate the public regarding topics such as the importance of exercise, injury prevention, and rehabilitation,” she said.More than half—57.5%—of the Journal of Medical Internet Research study respondents perceived social media as beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information.5 Also, 57.9% said social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 60% said it improved the quality of patient care they delivered.“I think social media and any form of communication is important,” said Geier. “In sports medicine, we are devoting more efforts to preventing sports injuries and not just treating them once they occur. If we can communicate these tips for athletes, parents, and coaches to prevent injuries in sports and exercise, we should. Social media helps us reach many more people than we can in our clinics.”Geier also sees the importance of interacting with the public online, whether it is with colleagues in the same field or with potential patients. However, he is cautious about interacting with current patients, and instead refers them to traditional methods of communication through his practice.“I do think providing the public with health information discussed in easy-to-understand language from a qualified medical professional is extremely valuable, as a huge percentage of adults go online looking for health information,” Geier said.Although Geier doesn’t use social media for patient interaction, he says he has patients who have chosen him after reading his articles online or listening to his podcasts.“They often tell me that they liked the way I explained injuries and surgeries, and chose to see me for that reason,” he said. “In that sense, it does help potential patients develop a relationship that can one day become an effective doctor-patient relationship.”Geier attributes, indirectly, an increase in patient volume to his social media efforts.“I don’t use my website or other social media accounts to promote my practice or to convince people to choose me as their orthopedic surgeon,” he said. “[However], the articles I write and post on my website help people learn how I discuss injuries, so they often become comfortable with me and choose to see me when they need a surgeon down the road.“Plus, my efforts writing articles on my website and recording my podcast have led to other opportunities, such as my regular newspaper column for the newspaper here in Charleston and regular TV and radio interviews. I expect those opportunities have increased requests for appointments as well.”Angela Smalley, MS, BOCPD, COF, who is in private practice in the Buffalo, NY, area, is the author of the “Walk well stay well” blog. She, however, is not too concerned about recruiting new patients from her social media endeavors.“My current patients tell me that they appreciate the fact that my posts are not just commercials for my own business but are more general information that they can find useful,” Smalley said. “Prospective patients can reference my writing and tweeting as evidence that I am maintaining and constantly updating my knowledge. They can therefore feel confident that their treatment will reflect the newest and best techniques available.”Networking opportunitiesBesides the ability to impart such information to the public and potential patients, digital and social media is a networking and educational breeding ground for medical professionals.“I have gotten a chance to interact, discuss, learn, and have my brain stretched from people I would never have otherwise met,” Eibensteiner said. “It’s been extremely positive.”Czuppon sees the potential impact of social media on healthcare and views this new tool as a “great opportunity to connect with researchers, practitioners, and academics across the globe to spread ideas, encourage collaboration,” she said. “I think this facilitates how quickly we can progress in the field.”While Czuppon originally joined Twitter to just see what all the hype was about, she quickly found that she could connect with people interested in similar areas of interest—anterior cruciate ligament injuries and other sports injuries, and particularly injury and reinjury prevention.“And not just in the US, but across the world,” she said. “I think we often get trapped in our own ideas and practice bubbles, and Twitter was a fantastic way to break loose from this and consider other approaches to treatment.”Eibensteiner also uses Twitter for information gathering and interaction with others.“I learned very quickly if I followed credible accounts I would have instant access to current research and interactions with those in my field and complementary fields without having to go through lit searches,” she said. “Instead of having to cast a wide net to see what’s being said about your area of research, it is a lot easier when a lot of the most recent research shows up on your computer screen or phone simply by getting on Twitter and checking the newsfeed during the day. It is such a time saver and invaluable for a clinician seeing patients daily as well.”Smalley values the interaction with other practitioners and the discovery of new research trends that social media has provided. She also said social media has the added benefit of being able to position a business, or the practitioner in private practice, as a subject-matter expert.“This is achieved through sharing information with other professionals, creating accessible resources for patients, [and] carefully considering the impression that is created by each social media interaction,” she said. “This allows referral sources to understand your area of expertise.”Luks’ echoed that sentiment. “[Social media] can bring you the attention you are seeking on a particular injury or topic,” said Luks.Tricks and tipsTo best position oneself in the spheres of Twitter, blogging, and the like, and reap the benefits, the key is knowing the tricks of the trade. The tip that gets the first nod is time. For the 51% who cited time limitations as a challenge, seasoned user Geier says to make time. He spends 10 to 20 hours per week writing articles, a newspaper column, and his blog (“Sports Medicine Simplified”), producing podcast episodes, tweeting, and posting to Facebook.“In terms of time management, I would point out that we are all busy with patients in clinic and surgery and hectic personal lives,” said Geier, who also is the chair of the public relations committee for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. “We can all find time to write blog posts, interact in TweetChats or participate in Facebook discussions, but we have to make the time.”Geier’s six tips for the online practitioner:
  • Network
  • Discuss interesting or difficult cases
  • Be aware of what’s trending
  • Promote local health events
  • Participate in TweetChats, and
  • Share health information with a larger audience.Luks advised avoiding such topics as politics and protected health information. Luks said he tries to make sure his blog includes information relevant to both consumers and his colleagues. He recently chimed in on a hot-topic discussion about icing with a blog titled “To Ice or Not To Ice.” Earlier, he addressed a concern of many athletes: “Can I Return to Sports After My ACL Reconstruction?”“Newsjacking,” which is injecting one’s ideas into a breaking news story to generate media coverage and social media engagement, can be a very useful tool when entering the social sphere or blogging.In a good use of newsjacking, the Radiological Society of North America capitalized on the blackout during the 2013 Super Bowl with its Facebook posting that read: “Well, at least radiologists can work in the dark. #superbowl13.” It got people talking, as well as 700 likes and more than 400 shares.“With Twitter, it’s simple to ‘schedule’ tweets, and because of the one-hundred and forty character limit, it’s pretty easy to quickly convey a message,” Czuppon said. “However, this simplicity also can lead to easy misinterpretation of statements.”Because she works for an academic institution, Czuppon says she has to be careful that the statements she makes are not construed to be the beliefs of the university or her clinic, but are her own. And, like many individuals, she has both a personal and professional Twitter account.Geier manages his accounts himself. However, he hired consultants to set up his website, and again to redesign it.“I oversee all aspects of what I do on my website, podcast, and social media accounts,” he said. “I do have a virtual assistant that helps to post my blog posts on my site and schedule the tweets that I write, but I create all of the content. In my opinion, there is value in working with a marketing consultant to help physicians get started and set up the website and accounts, but they need to learn how to do it themselves and not completely delegate it to a consultant.”Because Smalley uses each social media interaction as a learning experience, she doesn’t use a social media consultant.“I am the one that needs to know what it going on,” Smalley said. “I have worked for a few organizations that chose to assign this task to a ‘marketing’ staff member. I felt that the content was often inferior because the staff member was not the expert in the subject matter. Online content is often much more permanent and pervasive than people realize. I feel that it is super important to represent myself, rather than passing along that responsibility.”Smalley said she spends about an hour each day maintaining a presence on Twitter and answering comments on her blog.“I link my blog posts and some tweets to my Facebook account to keep postings fresh there as well,” she said.Robert J. Butler, PT, PhD, is an assistant professor of physical therapy at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, NC. While hesitant about the practice, he said the responsibility of managing social media in his department is a shared one.“It is a slippery slope placing marketers in charge of topics associated with promoting evidence-based practice [EBP], since EBP is not as attractive as the recent story on the five best things you can do to cure pathology X,” said Butler. “We try to have a collaborative approach where we promote the areas that differentiate us in the marketplace along with the topics that provide a lot of activity on social media.”Healthcare social media consulting company Symplur is working to make Twitter more accessible for the healthcare community through the creation of the Healthcare Hashtag Project. It is the first directory of healthcare-related Twitter hashtags and chats. It’s a streamlined resource for academics, healthcare practitioners, patients, and others. For example, entering “orthopedics” in the search window provides several Tweet hashtag suggestions, including#socialortho, which happens to be an alert about a Tweet Chat called Social Media Saturday co-moderated by Geier.For the medical professional who is apprehensive about “socializing” publicly, there are several physician-only online communities, such as orthomind.com and doximity.com. They tend to be viewed as safer while also providing a higher-quality source of medical information than the more public applications such as Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook.There are thousands of members on orthomind.com, which was created by orthopedic surgeons and restricted to orthopedic surgeons. The platforms allow orthopedic surgeons to collaborate privately and share information, such as emerging trends.Forty percent of US physicians use doximity.com, the largest medical network. The platform enables physicians to “connect with other healthcare professionals, securely collaborate on patient treatment, grow their practices and discover new career opportunities.”There are also numerous specialty-specific online forums, as well as state medical society forums with restricted access requiring membership.The amount of information available on social media exceeds the cognitive capacity of any one practitioner, but the benefits of social media can also feel very personal.“By having a network of like-minded individuals or people who share a common goal, we may serendipitously encounter an article or discussion about an injury pattern that we find interesting,” Luks said. “Any time a patient gets a chance to learn that we are people, too—that we share common issues, goals, and events to celebrate—it closes the gap that exists in the patient-physician relationship. It can foster trust.”Follow P.K. Daniel on Twitter at @pkdaniel.
    REFERENCES
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    1. Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project (Health Fact Sheet). Pew Research Center Web site. http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/health-fact-sheet/. 2014. Accessed 20 Sept. 2014.2. Resources – 50+ Facts & Fiction. Immersion Active Web site. http://www.immersionactive.com/resources/50-plus-facts-and-fiction/index.cfm. 2014. Accessed 24 Sept. 2014.3. McGowan BS, Wasko M, Vartabedian BS, et al. Understanding the factors that influence the adoption and meaningful use of social media by physicians to share medical information. J Med Internet Res 2012;14(5):e117.4. Physician Adoption of Social Media. MedData Group Web site. http://www.meddatagroup.com/wp-content/uploads/MedDataGroup-Physician-Adoption-of-Social-Media-Q22014.pdf. 2014. Accessed 18 Sept. 2014.5. McGowan BS, Wasko M, Vartabedian BS, et al. Understanding the factors that influence the adoption and meaningful use of social media by physicians to share medical information. J Med Internet Res 2012;14(5):e117.6. Young A, Chaudhry HJ, Rhyne J, Dugan M. A census of actively licensed physicians in the United States, 2010. J Med Regulation 2011;96(4):10-20.7. Physician Adoption of Social Media. MedData Group Web site. http://www.meddatagroup.com/wp-content/uploads/MedDataGroup-Physician-Adoption-of-Social-Media-Q22014.pdf. 2014. Accessed 18 Sept. 2014.

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Orange Healthcare - télémédecine, santé numérique, le chemin qu’il reste à faire

Orange Healthcare - télémédecine, santé numérique, le chemin qu’il reste à faire | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Orange Healthcare, entité dédiée à la stratégie santé du groupe Orange, concentre son expertise autour de trois domaines d’intervention : les services pour les professionnels de santé, les services de télésanté et les services de prévention.
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Infographic – Connected Physician – Cardiologist Q2 2014 | Digital Insights Group

Infographic – Connected Physician – Cardiologist Q2 2014 | Digital Insights Group | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

44% of US cardiologists are using patient education in the exam room, of which 43% are using tablets to share patient education material with patients


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Social Media – A Waste of Time in the Health Industry?

Social Media – A Waste of Time in the Health Industry? | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it

The availability of information at the click of a mouse has spawned a generation that goes online for explanations for the aches and pains that plague them. Often, these same users use the internet as a tool to locate and contact health professionals that can provide treatment.  It is, therefore, essential for Doctors, Hospitals and Clinics to incorporate social media into their business plans. It has been shown that more than 40% of consumers say that the way they deal with their health is directly affected by information obtained on the internet through social media.

The Mayo Clinic, a healthcare giant, boasts of more than 800,000 followers on Twitter and half a million “likes” on Facebook. This traffic resulted from the clinic’s 2010 establishment of the “Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media”, a department created to determine how social media could be used for the benefit of the organization. In its Mission Statement the Mayo Clinic states that “individuals have the right and responsibility to advocate for their own health, and it is [The Mayo Clinic’s] responsibility to help them use social media tools to get the best information, connect with providers and with each other, and inspire healthy choices.” Googles reports that with the launch of its social media campaign the Mayo Clinic podcast acquired 76,000 listeners.

As with any product being marketed, brand recognition of a healthcare provider is essential. Regardless of the advertising medium – a roadside billboard, an ad on the Yahoo homepage or a TV commercial –distinctive images, an appealing logo and eye catching colors must be employed to promote the product or service. When marketing a service in the healthcare arena an area of import often overlooked is the need to build trust between the patient and the doctor. When those in need of treatment can communicate directly with a doctor through social media, a particular brand can quickly gain the reputation as the ‘go-to’ company in its field. This doctor/patient communication also promotes transparency and ensures trust between doctor and patient. Through social media the Mayo Clinic was able to substantially increase its influence in the field of healthcare.

Google further reports that Youtube videos increase traffic to hospital websites by 119% annually. These videos, replete with patient interviews and “feel good” stories, convert traffic to leads because they have a personal touch and a human quality that can only be conveyed through film.

Health Watch estimates that penetration of the health industry to mobile devices is as high as 87% and that 19% of smartphone owners have at least one “health app” on their mobile device. Does this mean that health care providers need to develop an app to stay in the game? Not necessarily. What this trend does say, however, is that it is important to increase the direct communication between patient and doctor, building that trust, to effectively market to the health community, and that communication should be directed not only at the computer monitor, but at the mobile device as well.


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Study: Social media pages focused on chronic illnesses are mostly for marketing

Study: Social media pages focused on chronic illnesses are mostly for marketing | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
A new study has found out that only about 9.5% of Facebook pages about chronic diseases are used for actual support, while 32% are marketing ploys.

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Présentation du développement de l’Hôpital numérique en France

Présentation du développement de l’Hôpital numérique en France | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
Au cours des dernières semaines, vous avez suivi mes différents articles concernant la mise en place et le développement de l’Hôpital numérique en France.   A l’aide des exemples cités au fil ...

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40% of Patients Would Share Mobile Health Data With Their Physicians

40% of Patients Would Share Mobile Health Data With Their Physicians | Digital trends in marketing of health | Scoop.it
HIT Consultant 40% of Patients Would Share Mobile Health Data With Their Physicians HIT Consultant A new study released by mobile engagement provider Mobiquity, Inc has found that while 70 percent of people use mobile apps on a daily basis to track...

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