les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé.
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Exosquelettes : Comment Panasonic veut démultiplier les capacités physiques de l'Homme - SciencePost | GAFAMS, STARTUPS & INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK

Exosquelettes : Comment Panasonic veut démultiplier les capacités physiques de l'Homme - SciencePost | GAFAMS, STARTUPS & INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
La firme japonaise a conçu une série d’armatures motorisées pour accompagner l’Homme dans ses tâches physiques et ainsi réduire les effets du labeur. À l’heure où l’on parle du remplacement des humains par les robots, cette initiative est plutôt bienvenue. Travailler à l’usine, dans des entrepôts ou dans tout autre endroit où les tâches sont manuelles, répétitives et donc difficiles, est une base de travail pour la robotique, dont il est souvent évoqué la volonté de remplacement de l’Homme par la machine. Cependant, la société nippone Panasonic tente de travailler différemment, dans une logique qui se rapproche plus d’une préservation de l’Homme, en l’assistant dans des tâches qu’il pourrait donc continuer à effectuer, tout en forçant moins. Panasonic a élaboré … | GAFAMS, STARTUPS & INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK
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Which Industries Are the Most Digital (and Why)?

Which Industries Are the Most Digital (and Why)? | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
It comes down to workers having the right tools and using them well.
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Wearable health devices, mHealth apps aid patient engagement

Wearable health devices, mHealth apps aid patient engagement | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Health apps and wearable health technology helps patients manage their health, says John de Souza, president of the consumer health division of Aptus Health.

John de Souza is president of the consumer health division of Aptus Health and the former president and CEO of mHealth app vendor MedHelp, which was acquired last year by Aptus, formerly Physicians Interactive. Aptus provides mHealth apps and online and consumer clinical resources and software for healthcare.


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Chirurgie : la première ablation du sein avec un robot

Chirurgie : la première ablation du sein avec un robot | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ Première mondiale ou pas, elle n'a pas hésité. Le 1er décembre, Anna s'est remise en toute confiance aux mains du docteur Benjamin Sarfati, qui...”
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Content Standards by Google Search Guidelines | SEJ

Content Standards by Google Search Guidelines | SEJ | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

In November 2015, Google released its 160-page search guidelines. Julia McCoy discusses the two main acronyms Google now uses to rate content quality.


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SMARTfiches : des projets au top pour 2016 ! - Connected The Mag

SMARTfiches : des projets au top pour 2016 ! - Connected The Mag | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ SMARTfiches Médecine, première encyclopédie médicale digitale, n’a pas attendu la fin de sa collection pour atteindre le million de téléchargements”
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Google et Johnson & Johnson se lancent dans les robots chirurgiens

Google et Johnson & Johnson se lancent dans les robots chirurgiens | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ De plus en plus d’innovations concernent le domaine de la médecine et plus particulièrement la chirurgie. D’après Homero Rivas, l’impression 3D en est une qui pourrait transformer le secteur. Google et Johnson & Johnson, multinationale pharmaceutique américaine, misent sur une autre innovation. À travers leur entreprise respective : Verily Life Sciences (précédemment nommée Google Life Science) et Ethicon, les deux groupes lancent Verb Surgical, une société spécialisée dans la création de robots chirurgiens.”
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Healthcare SEO Basics For Doctors

Search engines can be hopelessly addictive. For going on 20 years, humans have had the luxury of finding information on nearly everything on the Internet, usually for free and typically nearly instantly. As a result, most of us are on Google multiple times daily.

Yet if anything is even more appealing than tapping into this unprecedented access to the body of knowledge, perhaps it’s the irresistible lure of checking out your own standing on the Internet. Enter the Google Narcissist (GN) – the Internet surfer who is constantly checking search-engine rankings to see where his own website ranks.

If you own a business or medical practice, it’s hard not to be a GN. Given the importance of a website to independent healthcare providers these days, you naturally want to monitor where your site stands among competitors.

In many circumstances, being on page one of Google search engine results pages (SERPs) is all but essential to attracting new patients.

And gaining or losing a few places in the rankings can make or break your success. In just the last decade, these realities have given birth to a massive industry in search engine optimization (SEO), the craft of managing web pages so they rank highly in Internet search results.

Becoming a healthy, well-informed GN

So if you’re going to be a GN, the best advice is probably to become a well informed GN. We see plenty of physicians despairing over their Google rankings needlessly. The main cause of despair is their choice of terms for Googling themselves – they pick search terms that don’t really matter much. A bit of SEO knowledge can ease despair considerably.

The Internet search engine is arguably the greatest invention to date. It’s also an extraordinarily complex and constantly changing phenomenon.

Google, Yahoo, Bing and most other search engines evolve to a) respond to changing uses of the Internet, and b) to stay ahead of unscrupulous techies trying to game the system and cheat their way to the top of the SERPs.

An article in WIRED magazine several years ago quoted a Google executive as saying that the search juggernaut (more than two-thirds of Internet searches are on Google) expected to alter its search algorithm 550 times that year. To be sure, the rate of change provides some job security for digital marketing firms like Vanguard. It takes skilled and dedicated search marketing professionals to stay on top of it all.

But there’s no need for a clinician to be studying SEO strategies and techniques. Here are a few principles to keep in mind, along with insights into how search engines work, in hopes of offering words of comfort to the obsessive GN.

High Google rankings matter a lot

They’re critical to online marketing of healthcare. There are instances in which moving from page two to page one of SERPs doubled or even tripled the number of visitors to a web page.

But what’s important is not ranking for all search terms but ranking for the right terms, as defined by a combination of: a) what a practice offers and wants to promote among its services, and b) most importantly, what healthcare consumers are already looking for on the Internet.

No website can be on page one for all search terms

You have to pick and choose based on the above two criteria. The end goal for SEO is to rank well for a large enough group of keyword search phrases to grow new-patient volumes. You don’t have to rank highly for everything to achieve that goal.

The 20/80 rule generally applies here: 20 percent of the keywords will often generate 80 percent of organic website traffic (from unpaid search engine results). Let go of any notion of running the table on all possible search terms.

Organic search-engine rankings are ever changing

Rankings are just like the Internet itself. A web page may rank at number three on page one in one week, slide to position six the next, and then shoot to number two the following week.

The Internet holds an estimated 30 trillion web pages. Google indexes (evaluates and stores information) all of them 100 billion times per month. Additionally, Google handles 40,000 Internet searches per second.

Rankings change constantly, often by the hour, due in part to searchers changing searches. However, in most cases we’re able to hold a page-one ranking for our clients consistently for the more important search terms.

Human response is key to effective SEO

 

Google bases its rankings largely on what its users link to from other websites and on what they see and click on in search results. Each link and click is a vote. Each vote helps that web page move higher in the rankings.

Good content and optimization only take a website so far. It takes time to accumulate votes. Remember also that it’s the patient’s language and mindset that rule here. You can disappoint yourself by Googling keywords/search terms more familiar to doctors than patients.

Keyword choice should be a function of content

A common myth is that you should pick keywords for search engine optimization in order to bring visitors to a website. That’s not quite accurate. Instead, the idea is to pick content based on what you want to promote and what people are searching for already.

Through an online tool called Keyword Planner, Google will reveal the most popular search terms for any healthcare specialty. It’s free and easy to use. Once Keyword Planner has uncovered the most popular keyword combinations for your services, deciding what to put on your website is easy.

One reason to outsource at least some SEO responsibilities is to have an experienced search marketer monitor how website pages are faring in the rankings for individual keywords. At Vanguard, we also do a bow-to-stern website audit annually to see if there have been significant shifts in keyword usage that we need to accommodate by adjusting the website content and SEO on a broad scale.

Content is king, emperor and lord of all SEO

 

In the end, the quality of information on a web page is the ultimate arbiter. Google and other search engines only mimic human informational needs.

Humans want clear, accurate and relevant content. Provide that on a web page, and it will ultimately rank highly for a specific keyword phrase – but usually only for that phrase and very similar ones, which are merely an indicator of what the page is all about … like a book title.

No one ever tricks Google. Not for long anyway. Not even China pushes Google around, as evidenced by Google’s refusal a few years ago to yield to China’s restrictions on the Internet.

SEO is all about fulfilling human’s informational needs. Keep that as a top priority and you’ll be rewarded.

 


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Five tips for engaging with patients through social media

Five tips for engaging with patients through social media | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

Using social media in general practice can be rewarding in a number of ways: it helps you relay valuable preventative health advice directly into the homes of individual patients via their social media accounts.

It also creates opportunities for linking up with patient groups, for example with closed Facebook groups for patient participation groups (PPGs) or condition-specific patient groups such as the local Diabetes UK group (Watch our video relating to closed Facebook Patient Participation Groups).

In Stoke-on-Trent, 26 practices of the 52 practices are actively using social media, for example creating Facebook pages and groups. One particular practice has over 45 Facebook PPG members who operate alongside a PPG of 10 face-to-face members. Members of the Facebook PPG group do not want to attend face-to-face meetings and the group who meet up in the practice do not use Facebook. By using this flexible approach, the practice has a diverse PPG membership offering support and advice on practice business.

Social media use continues to grow. In Stoke-on-Trent, using Facebook to engage with GP practices is most popular amongst 35-55 year olds and more patients over 55 years old use Facebook this way than those under 20. Social media should be treated as an invaluable channel for GP practices (Watch our video showing how one of our GP practices benefits from Facebook).

However, if not considered as part of a wider engagement strategy, the use of social media can be time consuming and potentially damaging to your reputation. If staff aren’t upskilled appropriately and the use of social media is not taken seriously, patients can look upon social media profiles as amateurish.

Here are five tips to get the most out of using social media in your practice:

1. Train staff appropriately

Be clear as to which staff will manage your accounts and ensure that they are trained. Once trained, staff will be able to use the scheduling tool in Facebook which enables posts to go out at peak times rather than during the working day. The role of managing the accounts should be spread across at least two members of staff to ensure that content is regularly updated. Writing the posts and updating the pages should take up no more than 10 minutes, three times a week.

2. Don’t get into a row online with any patient commentator

Using Stoke-on-Trent’s example, we have engaged with thousands of patients. A handful of these thousands of posts have been difficult (for example patients saying they are struggling to get an appointment or get through on the phone) but this is far outweighed by the very many positive posts from patients. All responses to negative posts should be simple and constructive. If a patient has made a specific complaint they need to be referred to the practice’s normal complaints procedures. (Watch our video regarding managing negative social media posts).

3. Be clear about what your accounts are used for

Your practice’s Facebook page is for practice information and updates and not the booking of appointments. You will receive some messages to this effect from time to time but individual patients should simply be pointed in the right direction.

4. Be creative

Using social media provides a fantastic opportunity to get important health messages out to the public in creative ways. Some practices in Stoke-on-Trent are producing GP self-care tutorial videos on conditions such as asthma and stroke - the feedback from patients after watching their GP ‘talking to them directly’ is great. Other practices are publishing DNA information to spark discussions about the cost of people missing their practice appointments.

5. Use Facebook groups

Whether these are private or public, Facebook groups are an invaluable method of getting information out to patients with common interests (e.g. weight management) as well as developing peer-to-peer support.

 


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Étude de l’usage du smartphone en France #hcsmeufr

Étude de l’usage du smartphone en France #hcsmeufr | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Êtes-vous plutôt pouce ou index ?

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Pharma on LinkedIn How to Engage Healthcare Professionals Using LinkedIn Showcase Pages

Pharma on LinkedIn How to Engage Healthcare Professionals Using LinkedIn Showcase Pages | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
A powerful opportunity has emerged to publish content directly on LinkedIn in order to increase the visibility of a companys corporate narrative and services as part of an integrated marketing strategy that spans paid, owned and earned media.

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What are consumer attitudes to digital health?

What are consumer attitudes to digital health? | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Rock Health: What are consumer attitudes to digital health?

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2015 Survey of US Health Care Consumers | Deloitte US | Health Care

2015 Survey of US Health Care Consumers | Deloitte US | Health Care | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Health care consumer engagement
No "one-size-fits-all" approach

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Answers to Health Questions: Internet Search Results Versus Online Health Community Responses

The objective of this research was to investigate the strengths and challenges of various types of health information available online and to suggest what information sources best fit various question types.


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Intelligence artificielle : Google DeepMind se lance dans la santé

Intelligence artificielle : Google DeepMind se lance dans la santé | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ DeepMind crée une division entièrement dédiée à la résolution des problèmes de santé et met sa technologie, vainqueur du champion du monde de Go, au service du monde médical.”
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How digital health helps treat the whole patient

How digital health helps treat the whole patient | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

In the New England Journal of Medicine this month, Dr. Ken Mandl and Dr. Zak Kohane shared how “intersecting trends have set the stage for a fresh start” in health technology.


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CES de Las Vegas : les clones 3D d’Anatoscope séduisent les acteurs médicaux

CES de Las Vegas : les clones 3D d’Anatoscope séduisent les acteurs médicaux | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ Après la clôture du CES 2016, le 9 janvier, Objectif Languedoc-Roussillon fai...”
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New FDA policy gives its staff wide latitude on social media. Could pharma freedom follow?

New FDA policy gives its staff wide latitude on social media. Could pharma freedom follow? | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

Tweet at will, FDA employees. One of the most liberal social media policies in the federal government now belongs to the FDA. Just last month, the FDA finally set out its own departmental policy that encourages its scientists and other employees to use "social media technologies to enhance communication, collaboration, and information exchange in support of FDA's mission to protect and promote public health."

While many would argue that the guidelines for pharma and other medical regulated products on social media outlined so far by the FDA have had a chilling effect on the industry's social media use, especially Twitter, its own FDA employee guidelines should have quite the opposite effect.

On the Union of Concerned Scientists' grading scale, the new policy earns an A, or 90 out of 100 points, which puts the FDA "near the top of the class in terms of policy quality," according to the nonprofit group. UCS points out that the FDA allows its employees to tweet personally and to use their FDA titles, something that is not always allowed by federal agencies. Employees are, however, required to use their personal emails and note that the opinions and views expressed are their own.

Gretchen Goldman

"To round out its strong policy, the FDA social media policy also specifies to whom the policy applies, which includes contractors … and includes a comprehensive list of links to relevant policies and information from within the agency and across the government. I commend the FDA for developing a strong social media policy," wrote Gretchen Goldman, the lead analyst in the Center for Science and Democracy at UCS.

When asked for comment about what the ruling might mean, if anything, to FDA's future pharma social media actions, an FDA spokeswoman said, via email, "We can't speculate on any future agency actions in this area."


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Une application e-santé révolutionne la collaboration entre laboratoire et infirmiers de la région

Une application e-santé révolutionne la collaboration entre laboratoire et infirmiers de la région | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
“ Une application pour smartphone permet désormais aux infirmiers libéraux d’optimiser et de sécuriser la fameuse fiche du patient lors d’un prélèvement biologique en dehors du labo. Une centaine de professionnels travaillant avec Gen-bio en sont équipés.”
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Pharmacovigilance et réseaux sociaux : le projet de l'association Renaloo retenu par l'Agence du Médicament (ANSM)

Pharmacovigilance et réseaux sociaux : le projet de l'association Renaloo retenu par l'Agence du Médicament (ANSM) | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

La possibilité d’utiliser les médias sociaux comme source d’information pour la pharmacovigilanceétant peu évaluée en France, ce projet permettra à l’ANSM d’en mesurer sa pertinence et sa transposabilité à d’autres pathologies, pour les autres communautés de patients ou autres plateformes Web 2.0.


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GHT: la télémédecine doit être intégrée dans les projets médicaux dès leur définition - Article Tic Santé

GHT: la télémédecine doit être intégrée dans les projets médicaux dès leur définition - Article Tic Santé | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Premier site français d’information en continu sur les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC, NTIC) dans la santé

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6 Outils Gratuits pour Identifier des Hashtags Twitter

Si vous souhaitez augmenter la portée et la viralité de vos messages, je vous propose de découvrir 6 outils gratuits qui permettent d'identifier des hashtags populaires ou à la une. Certaines solutions présentées vont bien au-delà de cette fonction et sont indiquées par exemple pour découvrir des influenceurs, analyser les performances d'une campagne autour d'un hashtag ou encore suivre les conversations en temps réel autour d'une marque.

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Le premier glucomètre qui échange sans contact avec les smartphones #hcsmeufr

Le premier glucomètre qui échange sans contact avec les smartphones #hcsmeufr | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Le lecteur de glycémie Glucofix Tech, mis au point par le Laboratoire Ménarini, s’inscrit dans la digitalisation de la e-médecine, mais il présente la particularité d’être équipé des technologies sans contact NFC (near field communication ...

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Using Social Media During a Healthcare Crisis

Using Social Media During a Healthcare Crisis | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it

The healthcare world loves to talk about “patient engagement,” and how important it is for professionals to improve the industry.  That’s a good thing. There can be no hope of reforming a system if those who use it aren’t onboard with the changes and aren’t actively participating in their own care.

Establishing social media channels and engaging with patients online can help drive patient engagement. But social media can be a double-edged sword. Prudent health care organizations realize this and have established protocols to deal with a potential crisis. 

We really don’t need a better crisis case study than how the recent fear of an Ebola epidemic spread far and wide on social media, leading to unfounded rumors taking flight and challenging organizations to be as responsive as they could to what was happening in their hospitals.

This article is featured in O'Dwyer's Oct. '15 Healthcare PR Magazine

The Centers for Disease Control, for example, set up a Twitter chat to let the public ask and get their questions answered by experts. A medical crisis like the Ebola virus was an opportunity to ensure that patients got accurate information and unwarranted fears were tamped down as quickly as possible — somewhat like putting out small brush fires before they explode. 

Whether you’re a physician, the head of a health system or a hospital, you’re currently part of the social media conversation, regardless of whether you have a voice on those channels or not. Patients, local officials, staff and members of the community are talking about you online. As a result, it’s critical to have an established presence on social media so your organization’s voice is represented in the conversation — especially when crisis strikes.

Here are are few tips to help navigate a healthcare crisis online.

Involve social media teams in crisis planning. This is key. All too often, organizational silos prevail and the crisis planning arm of an organization collaborates with the social media team only after a crisis strikes. Without drills to practice responding to potential crises, there is often a lack of clarity about who is doing what when it comes to responding on social media.

Keep in mind that in an emergency, patients, staff and members of the media will turn to your social media channels for updates and information. Make sure your team is at the table and in the loop.

Establish a chain of command. Is a patient in the hospital and live-tweeting a bad experience to thousands of followers? It’s critical that your social media team can contact a member of the patient advocate team to set things right. Is someone making threats on your Facebook wall? You’ll want to notify security of the posts so they can investigate. It’s also good to have a dedicated email address for social media complaints.

Take it “offline.” If someone posts to one of your channels in anger, don’t ask follow-up questions in public. It makes far more sense to tell the user you want to know more specifics, and ask him or her to email you privately. It demonstrates to the individual and others that your organization is being highly responsive, and most users who are after more than simply venting in public, will take advantage of the address to voice their concerns specifically.  This can also help make it less likely that any HIPAA rules would be violated.

Know that some issues will start on social media.  And you never know what will set it off. It could be something as basic as a patient who had a bad experience or had to wait more than an acceptable amount of time to be seen by a doctor, or an employee union organizing a protest, or a beloved doctor being laid off.

All it takes is one post to damage your organization’s reputation. The “see something, say something” adage certainly applies in this situation, just as it does in the airport. If you are actively “listening” you will be better able to deflect and deflate the issue quickly and effectively.

Monitoring is critical. Obviously, it’s wise to keep an eye on patients posting to your Facebook wall or tagging your Twitter handle. But there are patients who may be talking about you without you being aware of it. There are effective monitoring tools available, such as Nuvi or Topsy, so you can see more of the online conversation and chime in as appropriate. They may be a worthwhile investment for your organization.

Don’t hide. It’s tempting to delete or hide a negative comment on Facebook. Don’t do it.  Rather than helping to dampen the criticism, it can do quite the opposite, because now the crisis will be two-fold: not only do others believe your organization did whatever first inspired the negative comments, users believe you have something to hide.

Consumers respect an organization when it replies to negative feedback — no matter how unreasonable — by asking for more details. There are some possible exceptions, however, including racist, homophobic, or otherwise offensive images or posts. Your organization may want to compile some clear community guidelines to which they can later refer if angry users asks why his or her post was deleted.

Plan ahead. Is your facility undergoing renovation or expansion? Will you be reducing your workforce or cutting back on nursing shifts? Are you closing a unit of your hospital? Your patients will notice these issues and want answers.

Be proactive and prepare responses or provide information in advance. This goes back to the first point — make sure that the social team is aware of an upcoming issue. With enough advance notice and planning, they can prepare tweets, Facebook posts and potential responses to the negative comments that may come their way.

Social media is an incredible tool to engage patients in their own healthcare, and professionals working in this industry can use these platforms to share information and improve the health system. But it’s important to remember that social media is just that — social. You will have to answer questions and critics on these channels, and may have to address a crisis or two. The risks of social media are well worth the reward of reinforcing the relationship between the healthcare industry and patients.


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DMP: la création "automatique" testée dans quatre territoires de santé en avril 2016

DMP: la création "automatique" testée dans quatre territoires de santé en avril 2016 | les tendances du digital dans le domaine de la santé. | Scoop.it
Premier site français d’information en continu sur les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC, NTIC) dans la santé - TIC santé

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