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The 6 Most Popular eBook Formats To Know About - Edudemic

The 6 Most Popular eBook Formats To Know About - Edudemic | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
There are half a dozen eBook formats that you should know about. From what works on a Kindle to XML-based OpenOffice formats, check these out.
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E-Books Aren't Killing Print

E-Books Aren't Killing Print | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
By the numbers.
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Samsung gives warning about talking in front of the Smart TV | Toronto Star

Samsung gives warning about talking in front of the Smart TV | Toronto Star | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Conversations could be transmitted to third party, company says.
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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Multitasking is an essential skill in the era of email, text messages, Facebook and Twitter. But, argues neuroscientist Daniel J Levitin, it’s actually making us less efficient
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How the Industrial Internet of Things will Support Future Supply Chains

How the Industrial Internet of Things will Support Future Supply Chains | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
My ARC Advisory Group colleague Sid Snitkin and I recently had a thought-provoking discussion on the future of the Industrial Internet of Things with Mark Morley, Director of Industry Marketing for Manufacturing at OpenText. The Industrial Internet of Things offers the potential to enable industrial organizations to improve performance and enhance [...]

Via Fred Thiel
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Fred Thiel's curator insight, February 9, 11:01 AM

IoT will touch all aspects of companies from production through marketing and finance

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 11, 1:27 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
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Privacy challenges: Just four vague pieces of info can identify you, and your credit card

Privacy challenges: Just four vague pieces of info can identify you, and your credit card | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Just four fairly vague pieces of information -- the dates and locations of four purchases -- are enough to identify 90 percent of the people in a data set recording three months of credit-card transactions by 1.1 million users. If someone had copies of just three of your recent receipts -- or one receipt, one Instagram photo of you having coffee with friends, and one tweet about the phone you just bought -- would have a 94 percent chance of extracting your credit card records from those of a million other people. This is true, the researchers say, even in cases where no one in the data set is identified by name, address, credit card number, or anything else that we typically think of as personal information.
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How do websites know what to recommend to you? - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

How do websites know what to recommend to you? - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
A new model for evaluating product recommendation algorithms suggests that they work through trial and error, writes Larry Hardesty.
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SEO Guide 2015

SEO Guide 2015 | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
The factors for search engine optimization are constantly changing. Our infographic 6 Steps of SEO is still a valid foundation.

Via massimo facchinetti, John van den Brink
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Antivirus and Compromised Device Report: January 2015

Antivirus and Compromised Device Report: January 2015 | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
OPSWAT’s latest market share report ranks Avast as the top vendor and finds that 90% of devices haven’t updated their antivirus definitions in the last seven days.
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What Teens Really Think About YouTube, Google+, Reddit and Other Social Media

What Teens Really Think About YouTube, Google+, Reddit and Other Social Media - Backchannel - Medium
By the “Actual Teen” who nailed Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat last week
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How Big Data Is Changing Medicine

How Big Data Is Changing Medicine | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Used to be that medical researchers came up with a theory, recruited subjects, and gathered data, sometimes for years. Now, the answers are already there in data collections on the cloud. All researchers need is the right question.

Via Tony Agresta
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Tony Agresta's curator insight, January 16, 1:20 PM

Through semantic analysis of free flowing text and the indexing of results, fine grained details about diseases, treatments, symptoms, clinical trials and current research can be made accessible to medical practitioners in real time.   How does this work?   It typically involves creating a text mining or natural language processing "pipeline" that is used to analyze the text, identify entities (even complex bio medical terms), classify them, develop relationships between them and then "index everything."


The way we have done this successfully is by using proven text mining algorithms and tuning them to highly specific domains like life sciences, healthcare and biotech.   We use curation tools and trained curators to read the text, annotate it and gain agreement on the annotations.  Then the results are used to refine the text mining algorithms, test and validate.


This process may seem cumbersome to some but the reality is, when done by trained pros, it is not.  It has the added benefit of being done one time and then being applied for long periods of time without interruption.   Results are highly accurate.  


Seeing is believing.  You can try it for yourself here: 


  1. Go to:  https://console.s4.ontotext.com/#/home
  2. Click on "Demo for Free"
  3. Paste text into the box from an article or research paper on healthcare or life sciences - make sure the article is replete with complex bio medical terms that you don't think any automated algorithm can figure out.
  4. Select Bio Medical Tagger (by the way, you can also do this for general news or Tweets)
  5. Click Execute
  6. Analyze the results


Pretty cool.


Organizations that don't semantically enrich their content are operating at a disadvantage.  The benefits are real - saving patients lives, finding new treatment strategies, developing drugs faster and much more.


If you would like to learn more about semantics, we suggest you visit www.ontotext.com where's there's a wealth of information, demos, customer stories and news about this important subject. 


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2015: The Year of IoT Pioneers, Analytics and Data Privacy

2015: The Year of IoT Pioneers, Analytics and Data Privacy | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
This past year welcomed widespread Internet of Things (IoT) adoption and hype, big data implementation, and growing concerns around data privacy and cloud deployment.

Via Carla Gentry CSPO
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Carla Gentry CSPO's curator insight, January 17, 8:14 AM

The pace of innovation and entrepreneurship in IoT will peak in the next years. By connecting everything, IoT will democratize and mobilize a large mainstream of smart young people with bright ideas, building new technologies and business models for the IoT market. As a result, the cost of trying and failing will diminish when weighed against the potential rewards of changing the way we live, work and enjoy our lives today.

 
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Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk

Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Samsung's warning that its Smart TV may collect and send sensitive data online might seem alarming, but it's certainly not the only device in your house snooping on you.
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The Next Internet Is TV

The Next Internet Is TV | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Websites are unnecessary vestiges of a time before there were better ways to find things to look at on your computer or your phone.
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Adding Security to the Internet of Everything | Internet of Things | CyberSecurity

Adding Security to the Internet of Everything | Internet of Things | CyberSecurity | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Don’t panic just yet: but in a few years, your fridge could become a target for cybercriminals. As the number of devices in the Internet of Everything grows, so does the likelihood that connecting these devices and networking them together could increase the number and type of attack vectors we will see in the future. And that means we need to think differently about IT security and the levels of protection needed for this new, connected world. Protecting all of IoE interactions is crucial in enabling people and organizations to benefit from these advances.

The IoE builds on the foundation of the Internet of Things, or IoT. By comparison, the IoT refers to the networked connection of physical objects (doesn’t include the “people” and “process” components of IoE). IoT is a single technology transition, while IoE is a superset that includes IoT.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=wearables

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Internet+of+Things

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Internet+of+things

 

http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/why-is-it-a-must-to-have-basics-knowledge-of-cyber-security-in-a-connected-technology-world/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 9, 10:12 AM
Don’t panic just yet: but in a few years, your fridge could become a target for cybercriminals. As the number of devices in the Internet of Everything grows, so does the likelihood that connecting these devices and networking them together could increase the number and type of attack vectors we will see in the future. And that means we need to think differently about IT security and the levels of protection needed for this new, connected world. Protecting all of IoE interactions is crucial in enabling people and organizations to benefit from these advances.

The IoE builds on the foundation of the Internet of Things, or IoT. By comparison, the IoT refers to the networked connection of physical objects (doesn’t include the “people” and “process” components of IoE). IoT is a single technology transition, while IoE is a superset that includes IoT.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=wearables


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Internet+of+Things


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Internet+of+things


http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/why-is-it-a-must-to-have-basics-knowledge-of-cyber-security-in-a-connected-technology-world/


Spencer Tan's curator insight, February 20, 11:49 AM

Thus with the above news from Cisco one can be sure that with the increase of devices, internet security will be the next big thing and top investment from Small Business to Large Scale Enterprises? One could deny the need of investing in as simple as SSL certificates to DOS prevention  or even large scale hardware and Software firewall.


I deem ICT companies will make a big ding investing in specialization of deploying and implementing in Internet Security.


Also Read up on how to verify that the Website you visit or intend to make purchases is secure. 


Insights from Spencer Tan

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How to improve data security - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

How to improve data security - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Calculating the minimum-security guarantees for any given encryption scheme could allow more informed decisions about how to protect data.
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A breakthrough for quantum chips - Agenda - The World Economic Forum

A breakthrough for quantum chips - Agenda - The World Economic Forum | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Packing single-photon detectors on an optical chip is a crucial step toward quantum-computational circuits, writes Larry Hardesty.
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Colds are Caused by Conflicts

Colds are Caused by Conflicts | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
According to German New Medicine it is not a coincidence when you get sick with a cold. The cold is linked to events in your current life, and not the ones you are thinking about. Find out why you are getting sick and what you can do about it!
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Metadata Can Expose Person’s Identity Even Without Name | MIT Research | Privacy

Metadata Can Expose Person’s Identity Even Without Name | MIT Research | Privacy | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Shopping habits can expose a person’s identity even when he or she is a nameless customer in a database of anonymous credit-card records, according to a study that shows the power of so-called metadata to circumvent privacy protections.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/privacy-in-the-digital-world-shouldnt-we-talk-about-it/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 30, 3:32 PM
Shopping habits can expose a person’s identity even when he or she is a nameless customer in a database of anonymous credit-card records, according to a study that shows the power of so-called metadata to circumvent privacy protections.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/privacy-in-the-digital-world-shouldnt-we-talk-about-it/


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Content Strategy 2015: Marketing, Mobile, and the Enterprise

Content remains a fundamental challenge for all of our organizations. Instead of talking about "what's next," let's talk about what's needed. Find out what basic questions every company should ask in 2015 before committing budget to new content marketing and management programs

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, juandoming
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The 10 Best Technology Advances of 2014

The 10 Best Technology Advances of 2014 | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
From space travel to healthcare, these are the 10 technology advances from 2014 that make us the most excited about the future.
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13 ways technology will change your world in 2015 | Features | LondonlovesBusiness.com

13 ways technology will change your world in 2015 | Features | LondonlovesBusiness.com | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
London’s hottest tech entrepreneurs share their predictions
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The Dark Side of the App Store

The Dark Side of the App Store | Digital Technology and Life | Scoop.it
Roy Pessis explains why we should continue fighting for an open app store and not accept Apple and Google's app regime as ironclad.

Via Jan Bergmans
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Jan Bergmans's curator insight, January 16, 7:11 PM

Something great happened on July 10, 2008. The Apple App Store was born. Only six years down the road more than 60 billion apps were downloaded through the platform, making it one of the largest stores in history.

As Apple & Google are about to launch their app stores for the largest untapped screen in our homes, it’s worth pausing for a moment to address its dark side and understand the magnitude of its impact on our lives.

Is Apple the Supreme Court of our digital lives?


According to Nielsen, 89% of our time on media is spent via the use of apps. While apps occupy an enormous part of our digital lives, we remain indifferent to the fact that such an integral part of our online experience is entirely controlled by two companies: Apple and Google. Two companies decide what we do online, where we spend our time and who will be able to provide us with our sought-after content.

In their guidelines Apple states that the company “will reject Apps for any content or behavior that we believe is over the line. What line, you ask? Well, as a Supreme Court Justice once said, ‘I’ll know it when I see it’. And we think that you will also know it when you cross it.”

Where exactly is this line and which behaviors, according to Apple, are relegated to a place across it? Where will the line be in five years? As it currently seems, Apple has claimed a seat on the Supreme Court of our digital lives.

Both the Apple and the Google app stores control the flow of information. With every passing day, they tighten their grip over the content and delivery of our information. While this reality might seem harmless to many at the moment, in a few years time this could become a real threat over our freedom of speech and our freedom to create.

And it’s already happening: Consider the example of a company named Tawkon which created an app that tells you when your phone is emitting high radiation so users can stay safe. Apple rejected this app. When Tawkon founders asked Steve Jobs for an explanation, he simply replied “no interest.” Why would Apple block something that is good for us? I have a gut feeling that with the low cellular coverage in the US 4–5 years ago, Steve didn’t want his customers to stop using the phone because technically it is always emitting high radiation! This app could potentially harm the carriers that have lucrative partnerships with Apple.

Another interesting example is the blocking of bitcoin wallet apps, a policy which was only recently changed. Too late for bitcoin. The average user would much prefer using ApplePay. Blocking bitcoin wallets halts the spread of usage while Apple is building their ApplePay strategy, allowing them an unfair advantage. The ecosystem survives and we are trapped.

Again and again, Apple rejects apps not on the basis of malicious activity, but on the basis of pure capital gain.

We are willingly giving Apple and Google full control over our digital lives

The app stores are fun, endless, constantly updating and truly quite amazing. I love discovering new apps every Thursday when the Featured list is updated. The best part about it is the ease with which the app store works in enabling users to discover, purchase and install new apps. Just place your thumb on the screen and it’s already on its way.

Apple and Google have focused their strategies on creating a population of habitual app-store users. After all, no matter what you need, “there’s an app for that!” Getting us hooked on this experience is exactly what they want because with each purchase we make from their store, they extract an astounding 30% commission.

A 30 percent commission is an outrage (speak now or forever hold your peace)

At the beginning of this post, I mentioned that 60 billion apps have been downloaded until today (and that’s just on iOS). While a high percentage of them are free apps, this is nevertheless a huge market from which to reap 30% commission.

Of course, Apple and Google only aim to enlarge this market and their share within it. In fact, they would much rather prefer we stop using the Web and only use apps. They get their 30%, further tighten their grip over our digital freedom, and in return we get ease. What many don’t realize is that this ease we are so used to can also be available in an open format that is not so heavily controlled by our digital overlords.

The TV is Changing

Some day in the near future, Apple will hold an event announcing the opening of AppleTV to developers. Probably they will bring some developers on stage to talk about how amazing it is to port their successful iPhone games and apps on to the big screen. They will praise Apple and try to convince fellow developers that this is the next big thing that they all should be working on. And it probably is—when push comes to shove, we are talking about the last un-stored screen. While it is a huge opportunity for developers, we must keep our eyes open for Apple’s long term strategy behind the app store.

Apple is poised to control the TV. I hope that the new AppleTV will have a fully functioning browser so we can still enjoy the Web freely and to the fullest. Unfortunately, I am not so optimistic. After all, it did take Apple four years to make a decent browser for the iPhone. You can probably guess why.

The Web should be free and accessible for everyone.

Unlike the app-stores of our digital overlords, the Web does not filter or restrain our content. No single entity controls what goes online and what does not. Anyone can take a computer, plug it to the wall, and define it as a server. Without a court order, no one can take that away from you.

It goes without saying that Apple and Google should be transparent regarding their policy for refusing apps. While it is well within these companies’ right to seek maximum profit without the need to ascribe to any higher moral ground, it is important to remember that we as consumers also have the right and power to choose. We should continue fighting for an open app store and not accept their app regime as ironclad.

In March, James Robinson wrote “2013 was the first year that Americans spent more time online on mobile devices than on computers, and as mobile devices become our primary point of interaction, the online experience will gradually become synonymous with being inside an app. It’s just like the Internet, but reimagined as a branded experience and with new, less democratic power structures, like Apple, Google and Facebook ruling the information roost like the Chevron, Exxon and BP of the world wide web.”

An open app store based on the Web could be the cure for that.

For more about the end of the Internet read my previous article

This is how Google is Killing the Web