Digital Storytelling
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Children's Storybooks Online - Stories for Kids of All Ages

Children's Storybooks Online - Stories for Kids of All Ages | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
Many wonderful free childrens books are available to read at Children's Storybooks Online. Stories span age ranges from preschool, young children, teens, through young adult.
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Classroom Technology News | Educational Apps | Bloom's Taxonomy | techlearning.com

Classroom Technology News | Educational Apps | Bloom's Taxonomy | techlearning.com | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators.
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Classroom Technology News | Educational Apps | Bloom's Taxonomy | techlearning.com

Classroom Technology News | Educational Apps | Bloom's Taxonomy | techlearning.com | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators.
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Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching

Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
Digital Storytelling as a Pedagogical Tool within a Didactic Sequence in Foreign Language Teaching
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Digital storytelling in the classroom

When students create a movie or interactive slide show to tell their story, learning becomes personal.

Via Dorothy Black, Cecilia Cicolini
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Storybird

Storybird | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
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Jayashree's curator insight, June 7, 2014 10:51 PM

As a 7 year-old 3rd grader, I did not understand the true impact that my teacher, Ms. L. Anthony had on me. I knew I liked her. I trusted that she would help me do my best. I felt safe even when I made a mistake. I felt safe to tell her the truth even if it might make her unhappy. I knew she was special.

 

The inter-school recitation competitions were round the corner. Miss. Anthony worked with me at every recess. Ms. Anthony taught me how to wink. When practicing at home, I was careful to omit the wink. (I just winked as I recorded that thought!) Both my teacher and I would have been in trouble for 'a girl learning to wink, and that too, at school, in the India of 1964, a 17 year-old democracy, still writhing from the wounds of the British Raj.

 

The day of the competitions arrived. I got into my uniform rather nonchalantly and went to school like any other day. At 7, when you are trying to cope with your older peers, competitions don't figure in your thought process.

For the competition, we had to go to another school that had an enormous hall, enough to seat over 800 people. The hall was full of parents of all shapes and sizes as I recall. In seconds it was a blur of color.

The high schoolers performed first!! Their performance made me wonder what I was doing there. Watching the upper grade students perform made me more nervous than I care to remember.

 

Finally, it was over. I went up and recited my poem about traffic lights, winked my wink, and raced backstage into the open arms of my teacher. She was happy. I was....I don't know...relieved, maybe? Hungry? Yes! It was past 7 p.m. and we had a samosa and a banana for dinner. Yes, I was hungry. I went to drink water. At the water fountain, there were some kids who came up to me. They said, "What's wrong with your blouse?" I had a small, ever so small, hole on my left sleeve. One of them put a pencil in and made it larger. Tears welled in my eyes. I ran back to where my teacher was, swallowing hard, not wanting a tear to drop. It was difficult.

That was my first taste of schoolhouse bullying. I did not know what to do. Because they were from my school, I was afraid to tell my teacher. She asked me if I was okay. She'd sensed something amiss. I nodded, "Yes!" and sat down, covering my left arm waiting to go back to school where my Dad would pick me up and take me home. I did not want to have anything more to do with this prestigious competition. I wondered what was so prestigious. I was lost in my thoughts.

 

I felt my teacher grab my arm goad me to go amidst the plethora of thoughts swimming in my head. I had no idea where she wanted me to go. I was staying right there, where I was safe. She peeled me off my chair and started walking me toward the stage. My name was being called. I looked at her with tears in my eyes because I did not want to go on stage with a torn blouse. She reached into her pocket for a crisp white handkerchief and tucked it under my sleeve and into my pinafore, covering the gaping hole and shoved me on to the stage. No words were spoken. She stood right there. I realized that I had won the 2nd prize in the elementary grades. Miss. Anthony waited for me to be released and walked me back stage saying, "Your Dad is here to pick you up."

 

It was not until the next day when I met her that I realized the true import of what had happened. She was so happy. I was happy, too! It was then that I realized that I want to be a teacher when I grow up and make kids win and be happy. Today, as a teacher, I focus on the many faces that victory takes and leave the aggression of competition out. Today, when my kids say, "Oh, I get it!" I remind them that that's what I mean when I tell them that I believe they can do it. I give them kudos for winning over every 'problem', no matter how small. I am able to recognize bullying in its sneaky forms. I tell my students to come get me even at lunch if they are being treated unfairly.

 

As an adult each time I think of her, I think it must have been such a joy for her. All her hard work and belief in my ability paid off. In those days we competed just by elementary, middle and high. It was not by grades. That was a big achievement on the part of Miss. L. Anthony. Each time I think of her as a teacher, I ask that I be at least 10% of who she was, for even that is a lot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Digital storytelling in the classroom

When students create a movie or interactive slide show to tell their story, learning becomes personal.

Via Dorothy Black
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Comic Life

Comic Life | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it

This is an excellent comic creation tool that an be used for digital storytelling, but there is no narration or music capability. Nevertheless, some students may produce their best storytelling in this format.

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Story Me App

Story Me App | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it

Story Me is the awesome new app that lets you design personalized comic strips from your own photos. Create beautiful framed collages with speech bubbles and captions — then apply a unique cartoon filter! Turn individual images into a story in seconds.


Via Nik Peachey, Cindy Rudy
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 6, 2013 3:27 AM

This looks like a fantastic app to get students creating digital narrative from their own photographs.

Raquel Navarro's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:32 AM

Puede ser una perfecta herramienta para crear comics

Juan Fernández's curator insight, August 1, 2014 3:51 PM
Nick Peachey's insight:

This looks like a fantastic app to get students creating digital narrative from their own photographs.

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writing prompts

writing prompts | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
These are some of the daily writing prompts I use in class. If you have questions, comments, or...
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Storytelling and drama

Storytelling and drama | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
In this extract from 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom, Carol Read tells us how to incorporate story-based lessons and drama activities into the English-language classroom.
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Digital Storytelling in the Foreign Language Classroom | ELTWorldOnline.com

Digital Storytelling in the Foreign Language Classroom | ELTWorldOnline.com | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
by Hayo Reinders Middlesex University Abstract Digital storytelling is a compelling activity for the language classroom. Easy to use for both writing and
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technology4kids [licensed for non-commercial use only] / DigitalStorytelling

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wideo - Anyone can make cool videos.

wideo - Anyone can make cool videos. | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
A new tool to make cool videos. You just choose a template, insert objects, animate and share! Go meet Mr. Wideo :)
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BBC - A Guide to Digital Storytelling

BBC - A Guide to Digital Storytelling | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it

This is a complex guide to creating digital stories. See the column on the right.

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The 5 Levels of Digital Storytelling | Digital Play

The 5 Levels of Digital Storytelling | Digital Play | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it

Via Dorothy Black
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Tools for Using Digital Storytelling in the Classroom « Inside the ...

Tools for Using Digital Storytelling in the Classroom « Inside the ... | Digital Storytelling | Scoop.it
I know only one thing about technologies that awaits in the future: We will find ways to tell our stories with them.” By Jason Ohler Digital Storytelling is an important 21st century skill we need to be teaching in our classrooms.

Via Maxine McCall
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