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Preparing our Users for Digital Life Beyond the Institution

Preparing our Users for Digital Life Beyond the Institution | Digital rights | Scoop.it
About This Post This blog post provides background information on digital literacy and argues that digital literacy needs to go beyond student teaching and ensure that staff and researchers, who may wish to continue their professional activities...
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Digital rights
Everything to do with copyright and regulation in the digital world
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Wild Boys Sometimes Lose It: Duran Duran fail to reclaim their US copyright

Wild Boys Sometimes Lose It: Duran Duran fail to reclaim their US copyright | Digital rights | Scoop.it
This post is by David Brophy writing on the IPKat A few weeks after his eighteenth birthday, Duran Duran co-founder Nick Rhodes signe
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Corporations Have No Moral Rights over Works in France, Even if They Commissioned It

Corporations Have No Moral Rights over Works in France, Even if They Commissioned It | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The French Cour de cassation , France’s highest judiciary court , held on November 16 that a corporation cannot have moral rights over
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US music industry asks Trump for a fair deal (but less fair use!)

US music industry asks Trump for  a fair deal (but less fair use!) | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Nineteen US music industry organisations have come together deliver an open letter to President-elect Donald Trump (pictured left)
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Fair Use… The Final Frontier?

Fair Use… The Final Frontier? | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The Central District of California Court will hear on December 19 both parties in the Paramount v. Axanar case. Plaintiffs Paramoun
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U.S. Bill Would Introduce a Copyright Claims Board

U.S. Bill Would Introduce a Copyright Claims Board | Digital rights | Scoop.it
You may have heard that 2016 was an election year in the United States. Congress and life go on, and Representatives Judy Chu (CA-27) an
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2016 THE COPYRIGHT YEAR

2016 THE COPYRIGHT YEAR | Digital rights | Scoop.it
2016 - it's been another frantic copyright year - and buzz words and themes for the twelve months included 'the value gap' between th
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Universities ‘uncertain’ about lecture-capture copyright

Universities ‘uncertain’ about lecture-capture copyright | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Copyright and intellectual property policy on lecture capture ‘evolving’, says report, but institutions should provide supportive advice to academics
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The truth

The truth | Digital rights | Scoop.it
In a recent article Emily Bell wrote:

"Tweaking an algorithm to favour “family and friends” is the engineering
equivalent of “people have had enough of experts”, in that it acknowledges
that how people feel is a better driver of activity than what people
think."

Bollocks.

The only reason I read anything Emily writes is because my network links to
her. Yes some of that network are my friends but they link to her because
they have seen value in her "expertise". They have thought about what they
are linking to and why.

She writes for a newspaper whose output is so politically slanted that I
have learned not to trust it, along with all the others, and TV news has
become light entertainment info-porn. I trust my network of friends more.

Three points:

1. This only works if I am careful who my friends are and avoid ending
up in a self reinforcing echo chamber.

2. I totally concede the increasing influence of the ideology of
algorithms on our lives and Facebook should be no more blindly
trusted than the owners and editorial boards of newspapers.

3. If more of us become skilled at using our volume control on mob rule
we might arrive at something closer to the truth that Emily clearly
cares about than we do currently.

She arrives at a similar conclusion:

"If we tolerate a political system which abandons facts and a media
ecosystem which does not filter for truth, then this places a heavy burden
on “users” to actively gather and interrogate information from all sides -
to understand how they might be affected by the consequences of actions,
and to know the origin of information and the integrity of the channels
through which it reaches them. For this we are definitely better together."

Things is, can we be bothered and can we handle the truth?
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Here are 6 reasons why newspapers have dropped their paywalls

Here are 6 reasons why newspapers have dropped their paywalls | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Sometimes it's a response to a public emergency; sometimes it's just to build audience.
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Understanding Copyright - A Life Skill

Understanding Copyright - A Life Skill | Digital rights | Scoop.it
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Supports a risk based approach to copyright that everyone can understand
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Imagining the future of workplace learning | Just do it! Digital participation at work

Imagining the future of workplace learning | Just do it! Digital participation at work | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Iriss was a partner in a conference organised for final year students and newly qualified social workers which was held on 26th February 2016 in Dundee. Entitled, Shaping our Future: Making a Difference, it focused on what it’s like to go from university into the world of work as a newly qualified social worker, and how to develop as an effective professional in a world that is ever changing. Alyson Leslie, who spent many years undertaking inquiries and case reviews across the UK into child protection and mental health fatalities, gave an impressive keynote presentation on the subject of entering the world of social work as a newly qualified practitioner. One of her key points that stuck with me – ‘You don’t suddenly get smart’, pertaining to the continuous and experiential nature of learning in the profession. This chimes very much with what Iriss advocates in terms of building personal learning networks – growing your personal and professional connections through social media to continuously learn and find information and knowledge to improve practice. Here’s a video animation that explains the concept of Personal Learning Networks. We were really pleased to have Jane Hart, an independent Workplace Learning Advisor, writer, speaker, and the Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT), present a workshop at the event. The workshop – Imagining the future of workplace learning – focused on encouraging people to use social media, such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to grow a personal learning network. We audio recorded Jane’s presentation, which gives a flavour of what it’s all about. In the coming year, we plan to run an Personal Learning Network course for students in Scottish universities, to support them build their own Personal Learning Networks and to continue to use evidence in practice as they transition from university to the workplace. A Storify of the Shaping our Future: Making a Difference conference is also available. Imagining the future of workplace learning by Michelle Drumm is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
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Security of big data systems in 'critical sectors' should be enhanced by guidance, says EU agency

Security of big data systems in 'critical sectors' should be enhanced by guidance, says EU agency | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) said that policy makers should provide guidance to organisations operating in critical sectors to help them use big data systems securely. "The policy makers and all experts involved in publishing guidelines should take a holistic approach towards big data security," ENISA said in a new report. "When the implementation supports systems vital to the wellbeing of the society then the security threat analysis and risk assessment should be done in each component separately follow[ing] a top-down approach." In a separate report published earlier this year ENISA had warned that businesses using software and systems to collect, analyse and use data were increasingly vulnerable to cyber risks. In its latest report ENISA said that regulators have a role to play in helping boost the security of big data systems in critical sectors. It called on "competent authorities" to "encourage vendors to offer security authentication mechanisms and protocols in their products". "More and more devices are becoming part of the cyber-physical world," ENISA said. "These devices require access to data in order to take action. Using devices which [do] not have the capabilities to provide necessary secure authentication mechanisms and protocols, could make the level of security unacceptable. Encouraging vendors and industry to use devices and applications with such capabilities will help make the big data system more secure." Businesses that provide big data solutions should also "invest in compliance with security standards for their products", ENISA said. It said if big data solutions complied with security standards it could help build user trust. SMEs could consider engaging with certification schemes to help demonstrate their big data products are secure, it said. ENISA said that standardisation bodies should consider creating new security standards to account for big data, or to adapt existing standards they oversee. Changes in standards should be facilitated through collaboration with businesses that provide big data solutions as well as those who use them and with regulators too, it said.
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Claim for defamation over Dylan Thomas photographs thrown out

Claim for defamation over Dylan Thomas photographs thrown out | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Welsh copyright expert loses case against widow over letter
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THE COPYKAT

THE COPYKAT | Digital rights | Scoop.it
This CopyKat from  David Liao Duran Duran lose copyright battle:  Under US copyright law, songwriters have an inalienable right t
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The CEIPI Publishes An Opinion on the EU Commission’s Copyright Reform Proposal

The CEIPI Publishes An Opinion on the EU Commission’s Copyright Reform Proposal | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The Center for International Intellectual Property Studies (CEIPI) which is part of my alma mater, the University of Strasbourg
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Open-access preprint book: Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Open-access preprint book: Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines | Digital rights | Scoop.it
There is a pre-print open access version of: D'Angelo, B., Jamieson, S., Maid, B. and Walker, J. (Eds) (2016). Information Literacy
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PRS led investigation results in prison term for chart pirate

PRS led investigation results in prison term for chart pirate | Digital rights | Scoop.it
A Liverpool man has been sentenced to a 12 month prison sentence after pleading guilty to illegally distributing UK chart hits online
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The Competence of the European Union in Copyright Lawmaking

The Competence of the European Union in Copyright Lawmaking | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The title of this posting was also the title of a seminar organised by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies , University o
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The First CopyKat of the Year, Courtesy of Tibbie

The First CopyKat of the Year, Courtesy of Tibbie | Digital rights | Scoop.it
The first CopyKat of the year, written by Tibbie McIntyre .   Enjoy! Disney’s Lightning McQueen wins in Chinese Copyright case
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New French Act: Google Images will have to pay royalties - Kluwer Copyright Blog

New French Act: Google Images will have to pay royalties - Kluwer Copyright Blog | Digital rights | Scoop.it
A new French Law provides that search engines using thumbnails will have to pay royalties via a compulsory collective management for the reproduction of photographs and images. The French Act No. 2016-925 of 7 July 2016 on freedom of creation, architecture and cultural heritage contains several provisions on copyright that modify the intellectual property Code... Continue reading
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Inevitable?

Inevitable? | Digital rights | Scoop.it
I am enjoying reading Kevin Kelly's new book The Inevitable. It does a good
job of laying out the consequences of technological change in twelve main
themes. The themes are very familiar, have formed the basis of my own work,
and are still inspiring. I know, or have met, most of the people he
mentions in the book, from Tim Berners Lee to Jimmy Wales, Jochai Benkler
to Brewster Kale. Smart people doing good things.

But reading it I find myself swinging wildly between feeling reinvigorated
and affirmed - and tired and depressed. Why depressed? I met most of these
world changers more than a decade ago. Their ideas, which still feel
revolutionary, are glacial in their impact. There is a degree to which the
book feels like banging on about old news, rehashing ideas that have missed
their chance.

Most people still have no grasp of what is happening around them and to
them. They are unaware of ideas that are shaping our world, and in many
cases don't care. The utopian idealism of the early days of the web is
looking tarnished and naïve. Commercial interests have slowed, corrupted,
or assimilated many of the more potent innovations that we got so excited
about.

But...

It is so import to remember that we are just getting started. Kevin talks
in terms of thirty year horizons and most of you will have heard me saying
that it will be fifty years before we fully understand the true impact of
the internet. This is why it is important that Kevin wrote the book. It's
why I do the work I do.

On a good day I do believe that what he describes is inevitable - just not
imminent. Those of us still excited about changing the world have to be in
it for the long game. We have to be patient and yet at the same time help
others to catch up. We have to learn to go fast and slow.

No one said that the inevitable was easy!
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50 shades of risk at the CILIP conference - copyright and risk management

50 shades of risk at the CILIP conference - copyright and risk management | Digital rights | Scoop.it
When it comes to risk taking, librarians are a lot like lawyers, risk averse.  Whilst it’s sensible to avoid unnecessary and uninformed risks, avoiding all risk keeps you from growing and moving forward:  "By becoming more of a risk taker, focusing on those risks that are smart in terms of your career and whose results you can manage if things don’t turn out as hoped for, you’ll be able to more easily adapt yourself to new circumstances"
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Battling digital windmills in the cloud?

Battling digital windmills in the cloud? | Digital rights | Scoop.it
I hadn’t really thought of a connection between Don Quixote and our ever increasing digitally connected world until earlier this week when I attended a guest #teplsig research seminar from Dr Caroline Roth Ebner, entitled ‘Office Work in the Digital Age’. You can find out more and access the slides here. The title was actually a bit misleading.  What Caroline has been researching are the new competencies required for effective work with what she has termed “dig-com” workers, people working in the digital communications industry.  As Caroline’s talk unfolded there were many parallels with education, and I’m sure many other industries. The increasing virtualisation of work, flexible and mobile work, the blurring of boundaries between professional and private life is all to common. So not surprisingly the new competencies coming through from Caroline’s work include digital literacy. What has also emerged from her research is that CPD and training opportunities are still predominately focused on technical capabilities and not the actually more important digital literacy skills the how to as opposed to why/where to – as I tweeted during the seminar so most training provided on how to use something not why and when you should use it #teplsig16 — Sheila MacNeill (@sheilmcn) March 15, 2016 One of the methods Caroline has been using is to get her research subjects to visualise their ways technology impacts on their working lives.  Many of her subjects talked about strategies for managing communications; for example using email rules and folders.  Get ready for the Don Quixote bit. The photo in the tweet below shows how one of her subjects (a senior manager) visualised their methods (futile battle?)  for managing effective communications.  Email rules could be seen as part of their lance! Caroline Roth-Ebner shows examples of research subjects visualising their digital work challenges. #teplsig16 pic.twitter.com/nsd6GDdF09 — Colin Milligan (@cdmilligan) March 15, 2016 As the seminar unfolded I was obviously drawn to the similarities and linkages of Caroline’s work to the other visualisations of digital work/life interactions such as Dave White’s Visitors and Residents mapping – could there be ways of combining both?  I’ll hopefully get a chance to speak more with her about that during her short sabbatical in Glasgow. The other image that kept flashing through my head was that of the Jisc Digital Capability framework – I suspect many of Caroline’s competencies would map to that – and in particular digital well being element of the framework. We all need to raise awareness of digital wellbeing and the need to for organisations (commercial/public sector) and the educational sector to support staff/students/ everyone in terms of managing digital engagement. Just because you have 24/7 access doesn’t mean that you have to be online all the time. But it is difficult to switch off. I know.  I am getting better at not checking emails over the weekends and a night – but ooh the temptation when you hear that beep on your phone as you post something to instagram.  If someone sends an email at 11pm and you see it why not just answer it there and then? Well if you’re anything like me if you answer work emails late at night, or on Saturday afternoon when you are trying to to half a dozen things that relate to “real’ not “work” life, or on the train home when you have had to get up at silly o-clock to get to a work meeting at the other end of the country,  you will probably answer too quickly, not read the email properly and on Monday morning realise that you’ll have to send another 3 emails trying to sort everything out. Having access to another half a dozen digital communication channels isn’t going to help with that. It all stems back to to why and when you want to use something – purpose not platform. I often go to meetings about restructuring things or creating new working partnerships with the organisation. More often than not better communication methods is raised as a key issue. More often than not there is an assumption that some new “digital” communication channel will automagically solve the problem. More often than not, we never actually spend time really investigation the route of the issues and where the communication blockages are. If we did, we’d probably find we didn’t actually need a new communication channel, just more effective and appropriate use of the ones we already have. It’s easier to try something new (“digital” of course) and put in a training plan for hardware, get everyone to download the app . . . Unless we all start to manage our digital well being and start to focus more on “the why”, learn to switch on and off at appropriate times, we may all lose our  battles with digital windmills. Cervantes words still hold true today. “Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind.” Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote
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Retro Punditry

Retro Punditry | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Like it or not, technology in all its forms is going to have an increasing impact on our lives. Most people and organisations are not ready for this. Attending the conferences that I do, even ones that are focussed on technology, I am amazed at how unaware people are and how many are actually in denial or resistant to the changes that technology is already bringing about. Don't get me wrong, I don't for a moment believe that we should passively accept technology and it's effects on society. Far from it, my "mission" is to get more people aware, thoughtful, and actively engaged in how we deal with the challenges. However, I get tired of pundits who make a virtue of resisting technology, harking back to a time when all we had was "good old fashioned face to face" relationships. Yes we need to make better informed decisions on how and when we use technology and certainly we need to remember the importance of the real relationships on which we depend for our success and happiness, but there is a real risk that these "experts" allow people to stay in their comfort zones and asleep to the enormous challenges we face. This is not a good thing.
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Dylan Thomas copyright claims thrown out by Irish court

Dylan Thomas copyright claims thrown out by Irish court | Digital rights | Scoop.it
Man suffers double blow after suing Welsh government over use of historic images and bringing libel case against photographer’s 93-year-old widow
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