Changes caused by changing needs
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Changes caused by changing needs
Changes caused by changing needs
Change and Continuity


Stage 1, CCS1.2 point 7
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My Place Website

My Place Website | Changes caused by changing needs | Scoop.it
Julian Gonzalez's insight:

This is an excellent interactive resource provided by the ABC. Born from Nadia Wheatley and Donna Rawlin's picture book "My Place"(1984), the ABC produced a children's television drama series exploring a place situated in South Sydney that becomes the home of children throughout many generations.

When Used in conjunction with both the original picture book and television series, students can explore the multimodality of texts, and how meaning is conveyed across different media.

Using this resource, students can explore what it meant to “be a child” throughout the decades of history, engaging with similarities and differences such as school, friends, the natural environment and pastime activities.

This is a highly interactive resource, with a link to the ABC iView website on which students can at their leisure watch episodes of the television series, or participate in a number of interactive games or quizzes based on various time period Australian history, focusing on the Local History of the Newtown area.

There is also a link to a teacher’s website which provides several suggested activities, units of work and a teachers forum that has ideas and insights into integrating the “My place” world into the classroom.

 

This resource can provide stimulus for students to talk about “their place”.

As an assessment activity, students could select one of the characters from “My Place” and write 2 short paragraphs about how life as a child is similar and different for both them and their chosen character. Once this has been edited and completed, students can turn their written work into a multiple choice reverse cloze passage (Gibbons, 2009) for another member of class to complete. Various nouns, verbs or other word types would be removed from the text. This integrates literacy strategies because students would be assessed on their ability to comprehend grammatical items by finding the right missing word.

 

References: 

Gibbons, P. (2009). English learners, academic literacy, and thinking : learning in the challenge zon. Portsmouth: Heinemann.

Wheatley, N., & Rawlins, D. (2008). My place (20th Aniiversary ed.). Newtown: Walker Books Australia.

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | Changes caused by changing needs | Scoop.it
Julian Gonzalez's insight:

Using this resource allows a teacher to inquire with students about social justice and human rights (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 366) by gaining a global perspective that teaches students the privilege of living in Australia and also the value of sharing. The link contains a clip of Lucy, a young girl who lives in a family of 10 people and has to share everything- food, water and even the family skipping rope. This clip is tailored appropriately for young audiences by using positive, hopeful music while telling Lucy’s story and showing images of happy children. At the same time, the clip also addressed the very serious issue of poverty Uganda.

 

Students can compare their experience of growing up to that of Lucy’s and discuss as a whole class not just the importance of sharing, but also compare and contrast the needs both they and Lucy’s family have, as well as how are these respective needs met. Students could identify similar and different technologies for meeting these needs, eventually suggesting reasonable changes to their lifestyle based on the importance of sharing.

 

 

As a link to numeracy, basic multiplicative thinking (Bobis J. M., 2009) would be needed are the class explores how much water Lucy’s family would need in a day or asking how long it takes to collect a particular amount of water if Lucy has a limited number of containers. Students could also be encouraged to build their discrete sub-construct of fractions (Bobis J. , 2011) as they consider how Lucy’s family share various items (such as the skipping rope mentioned in the clip) among each other.

 

 

References:

Bobis, J. (2011). FRACTIONS: BEST EVIDENCE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE. In J. Way, & J. Bobis (Eds.), Fractions: Teaching for Understanding. Adelaide, SA: Australian Association of Maths Teachers.

 

Bobis, J. M. (2009). Mathematics for children: Challenging children to think mathematically (3 ed.). Fenches Forest: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia.

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Topics: Sites: Community | A History of Aboriginal Sydney

Topics: Sites: Community | A History of Aboriginal Sydney | Changes caused by changing needs | Scoop.it
Julian Gonzalez's insight:

This is an incredibly useful resource. The entire website was designed by the Australian Research Council and the Department of History, University of Sydney. It meets the selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Straight Islander studies by providing and authentic, balanced presentation of recent Aboriginal History in the Narrabeen area by actively involving Aboriginal people both in the creation of the resource and a source of detailed first hand historic information. The resource is therefore highly accurate and sensitive to the local Indigenous population. The website was created very recently created (2011) and is being continually updated. The entire website would be a great resource to explore changes and continuities in the local area of the North Coast and the impact of these changes and continuities on the Aboriginal community.

The specific film clip “Number One Black Fellas Camping Spot” was created in consultation with living Member of the local Aboriginal community Dennis Foley who revisits his family camping site. It provides insight into the life of the Gai-mariagal people of the Guringah language group of northern Sydney who are far from being an “extinct” race.

 

The resource allows students to see how members of the Gai-mariagal people in the recent history lived during winter, and identify several changes to their lifestyle due to urbanisation and Non-Indigenous people living in the area. In doing so, students will a holistic understanding of the concepts of land, relationship, place, language culture from an aboriginal perspective (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 388). Such a holistic understanding can only be achieved through community consultation.

 

As an assessment task, students could be asked to draw on an A4 sheet template that depicts the Narrabeen lake area: one half from past and the second from the present. Students will cut out various plants and animals that were native to the Narrabeen lake area, which were observed by Dennis Foley when he was a child in comparison to local features that are common today (some will be the same, some different). The artwork will show how people in the Narrabeen area meet their needs during winter and how this was changed due to Non-Indigenous people. A slit will be cut into the page so that a cutout figure can walk (glued to a paddle pop stick) from the past to the present. Success in this assessment will be based on whether students correctly place flora and fauna on the right segment of the page. 

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia.

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Julian Gonzalez's comment, April 22, 2013 6:57 PM
Select the link "North Coastal - View" and view the clip "Number One Blackfellers' camping spot: Narrabeen Lagoon.
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National Museum of Australia - What is this? Gramophone

National Museum of Australia - What is this? Gramophone | Changes caused by changing needs | Scoop.it
Julian Gonzalez's insight:

This resource came from the Education and Kids Website produced by the National Museum Australia. It comes from a unit of work “what is this” designed specifically for early primary school. It includes links to the National curriculum and suggested activities. However, the strength of this resource lies in its interactive nature to engage students with the ancestor technologies of modern day mp3 players and sounds systems that they would be more familiar with. The website include a video that uses simple, easy to understand English that could easily be watched, paused and rewound on an interactive whiteboard to create and interactive classroom session where students could ask various question and observations about the gramophone throughout the video.

 

Students can also listen to samples of popular music across the decades and associate particular styles with the audio technologies of that era. In doing so, Gilbert’s philosophy of active and experiential learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 143) can be employed by the teacher actually bringing in different music players (such as vinyl players, tape recorders etc.) to class for students to touch and feel the music players, as well as listen or even dance to music. 

This will encourage students to learn about technologies’ influence on the music industry and popular culture, for example students could explore the increase in popularity of recorded music and particular musical styles, the astounding improvement in the quality of audio recordings or the changing role of live music in popular culture.

Assessment: Students will work in pairs to complete a collaborative crossword based on the gramophone and it’s descendant technologies. One student will have all the answers to the horizontal words, while the other the answers to the vertical words. Students will then (without looking at each other’s work) take turns at questioning and describing the words to complete to crossword.

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia.

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Archibald Family: Family Scenes and Outings in Sydney

Archibald Family: Family Scenes and Outings in Sydney | Changes caused by changing needs | Scoop.it
Much like a family album, this home movie collection records events over a period of time. From baby shots in the backyard, to outings at the beach.
Julian Gonzalez's insight:

This Resource comes from the Australian Screen website’s archive. This clip is one of 5 short film clips taken by the Archibald family. It shows the Archibald family in 1932 enjoying themselves in a backyard swimming pool. This resource is extremely interesting because students can not only compare and contrast similarities and differences in the film, such as the types of clothing worn in the home video, but also investigate further, through great grandparents or other resources whether this was a common experience during the 1930’s (a period of great poverty for some, due to the Great Depression). 

 

The resource could be used as part of a whole class introduction to a unit of work called “Australia Today, The Past and Future. After watching the clip in the IWB, students can think-pair share with the person next to them the sorts of things they do in family time. What sort of games do they play together? A class list can be made to build a field of vocabulary that could be useful for exploring change and continuity throughout the unit of work.

This vocabulary list could progressively be collated into a concept map (Petty, 2009) throughout the unit work, displaying the relationships between the vocabulary words. That could be useful for exploring change and continuity throughout the unit of work. 

 

This approach is consistent with McDonald & Gilbert’s advice on planning for student learning because student learning experiences begin with what students already know, and flow from their own life experience (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 100). 

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Cengage Learning Australia.

Petty, G. (2009). Evidence-Based Teaching: A practical approach (2nd ed.). Cheltenham, UK: Nelson Thornes Ltd.

 

 

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