The New Global Open Public Sphere
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The New Global Open Public Sphere
How the algorithmic medium transforms public opinion, politics and science: open data, open science, open public space, open living labs, open politics, open innovation...
Curated by Pierre Levy
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Anonymous Leaks the Accounts of Spain’s Governing Party

Anonymous Leaks the Accounts of Spain’s Governing Party | The New Global Open Public Sphere | Scoop.it

Global hacktivist group Anonymous has leaked the 1990-2011 financial accounts of the governing Partido Popular (PP) [People's Party] to the Internet.

Recently, the judge overseeing the Gürtel case, an ongoing political corruption scandal in Spain that implicates PP members, asked for access to the documents dated since 1990 on the suspicion of illegal financing. The PP refused, claiming that they were only obligated turn in documents from the last five years.


Via Andrea Naranjo
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Truth, Lies, and 'Doxxing': The Real Moral of the Gawker/Reddit Story | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Truth, Lies, and 'Doxxing': The Real Moral of the Gawker/Reddit Story | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | The New Global Open Public Sphere | Scoop.it
Photo: dave lewis 88 / Flickr Sitting U.S. President Ford was visiting San Francisco in 1975 when a woman attempted to shoot him. A former marine named
Pierre Levy's insight:

As the Gawker/Reddit story was unfolding, another seemingly disconnected case was playing out. In a town outside of Vancouver, a young woman named Amanda Todd committed suicide a few weeks after posting a harrowing YouTube video describing an anonymous stalker she felt ruined her life. The amorphous hacktivist collective known as “Anonymous” decided to make a spectacle of the situation by publishing personally identifiable information on – “doxxing” – Todd’s stalker. They identified a 32-year-old man, enabling outraged people to harass him. Yet it appears they got the wrong person. Earlier this week, Canadian police reported that Todd’s stalker was someone else: reportedly a 19-year-old.

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luiy's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:21 AM
The ‘Koan’: Technology as Tool and Technology as Weapon

By enabling the rapid flow of information, technology offers us a unique tool to publicly out people or collectively tar and feather them. Well-meaning people may hope to spread their messages far and wide using Twitter or Facebook, but the fast-spreading messages tend to be sexual, horrific, or humiliating.

 

Gossip is social currency. And in a networked world, trafficking in gossip is far easier than ever before.

 

When someone’s been wronged – or the opportunity arises to use someone to make a statement – it is relatively easy to leverage social media to incite the hive mind to draw attention to an individual. The same tactic that trolls use to target people is the same tactic that people use to out trolls.

More often than not, those who use these tools do so when they feel they’re on the right side of justice. They’re either shining a spotlight to make a point or to shame someone into what they perceive to be socially acceptable behavior. But each act of outing has consequences for the people being outed, even if we do not like them or what they’ve done.

 

This raises serious moral and ethical concerns: In a networked society, who among us gets to decide where the moral boundaries lie? This isn’t an easy question and it’s at the root of how we, as a society, conceptualize justice.

Governance and the construction of a society is not a fact of life; it’s a public project that we must continuously make and remake. Networked technologies are going to increasingly put pressure on our regulatory structures as conflicting social values crash into one another. In order to benefit from innovation, we must also suffer the destabilizing aspects of new technology.

Yet … that destabilization and suffering allow us, as a society, to interrogate our collective commitments. The hard moral conundrums are just beginning.