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To Sell Consumer Goods in China, You'll Need to Go Digital, but Chinese-Style - AdAge.com

To Sell Consumer Goods in China, You'll Need to Go Digital, but Chinese-Style - AdAge.com | digital product | Scoop.it
To Sell Consumer Goods in China, You'll Need to Go Digital, but Chinese-Style AdAge.com Journalists, consultants and others writing about China's future tend to focus on the potential of specific industries (such as automotive) or product...
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Should Your CIO Be Chief Digital Officer? | Harvard Business Review

Should Your CIO Be Chief Digital Officer? | Harvard Business Review | digital product | Scoop.it

We've all seen it. CIOs who do great things in leading IT soon gain extra responsibilities. By helping business leaders to improve their businesses, the CIO becomes an obvious candidate to fill any open role that involves technology, process, or strong governance.

 

Some CIOs become CIO-Plus-COO or CIO-Plus-Head of Shared Services. Others gain new responsibilities in strategy, M&A integration, or innovation. Still others move on to business roles including CEO. In the book, The Real Business of IT: How CIOs Create and Communicate Value, Richard Hunter and I coined the phrase CIO-Plus. In the four years since our book was published, the CIO-Plus idea has gained real traction, and there are numerous stories and cases studies on the phenomenon.

 

But there is another leadership role that has arisen in many organizations in recent years: the Chief Digital Officer (CDO). In many companies, "digital" is a cacophony of disconnected, inconsistent, and sometimes incompatible activities. One company had three simultaneous mobile marketing initiatives, conducted by different groups, using different tools and vendors.

 

Other companies have multiple employee collaboration platforms with different rules and technologies. The problem is exacerbated as business units do their own things digitally, or as companies hire vendors who can only do things their own way. If your company has wildly different digital marketing activities for each brand or region, you know what I mean.

 

The CDO's job is to turn the digital cacophony into a symphony. It's OK to experiment with new businesses and tools, but experimentation must be coupled with building scalable, efficient capabilities. The CDO creates a unifying digital vision, energizes the company around digital possibilities, coordinates digital activities, helps to rethink products and processes for the digital age, and sometimes provides critical tools or resources.

 

That's why Starbucks — an early leader in all things digital — hired a CDO last year. And it's why many other companies are naming CDOs before they get too far along the digital road.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Shades of Discoverability

Shades of Discoverability | digital product | Scoop.it
Many modern digital products enable complex, emergent behavior, not just pure task completion. We’re building habitats, not just tools; yet we often think of discoverability only in terms of task execution.

Via Mario K. Sakata
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RED Digital Cinema: Understanding Anamorphic Lenses

RED Digital Cinema: Understanding Anamorphic Lenses | digital product | Scoop.it

Posted by RED Digital Cinema on July 25, 2013 • 

 

"Anamorphic lenses are specialty tools which affect how images get projected onto the camera sensor. They were primarily created so that a wider range of aspect ratios could fit within a standard film frame, but since then, cinematographers have become accustomed to their unique look. This article discusses the key considerations with anamorphic lenses in the digital era.

 

OVERVIEW

Two classes of lenses are typically used in production: spherical and anamorphic. Spherical are more common and are the assumed lens type unless specified otherwise. Spherical lenses project images onto the sensor without affecting their aspect ratio. Anamorphic lenses, on the other hand, project a version of the image that is compressed along the longer dimension (usually by a factor of two). Anamorphic lenses therefore require subsequent stretching, in post-production or at the projector, in order to be properly displayed."

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RED.com


Via Thierry Saint-Paul
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