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iPads and Arts Education: Rewriting Cultural Narratives with The 524 Project | Jeff Gilliland Blog | Edutopia.org

iPads and Arts Education: Rewriting Cultural Narratives with The 524 Project | Jeff Gilliland Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In recent years, much has been made of connected learning, and of new media's power to expose students to new ideas, perspectives, and communities of thought.


But what about those students given few opportunities to see beyond their own backyards, or for whom the 24-hour media cycle can seem like a relentless onslaught of violence, negativity, and stereotyping? How can we as educators use the tools of connected learning to empower students to take their stories into their own hands and speak out on behalf of the places and people they call home?

This was the core question posed by The 524 Project, a dynamic collaboration between arts educators in Washington, DC and Detroit. Inspired by a 2009 TED Talk given by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on "the danger of a single story," DC-based Young Playwrights' Theater (YPT) and Detroit-based InsideOut Literary Arts Project (iO) developed a hybrid curriculum of spoken word poetry, playwriting, and media arts that empowered our students to challenge the mainstream culture's prevailing narratives about their cities.


We called the program The 524 Project, after the 524 miles between DC and Detroit, and in the spring of 2014 we taught it simultaneously to a class at Ballou Senior High School in southeast DC and a class at Western International High School in southwest Detroit.


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Divided FCC Votes To Expand E-Rate | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com

Divided FCC Votes To Expand E-Rate | John Eggerton | Multichannel.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Amidst protestors over Title II, a politically divided FCC voted 3-2 (Republicans strongly dissenting) to approve an expansion of the FCC's E-rate program, which subsidizes advanced telecommunications for schools and libraries, including to raise the cap on E-rate subsidies by up to 16 cents per phone line—the current tax on consumer phone bills is 99 cents per month for all Universal Service programs, the chairman said in announcing the proposal.

In addition to the protestors, also speaking out were witnesses from schools and libraries who said the expansion was crucial to learning in the digital age.

The E-rate (or education rate) is the Universal Service Fund subsidy on consumer phone bills that goes to getting advanced telecommunications to schools and libraries.

The FCC voted to increase the cap on E-rate funding by $1.5 billion to $3.9 billion, with inflation escalations as well. Republicans called it an ill-targeted spending spree. Democrats called it the launch of a necessary digital upgrade for the nation's school kids, and Chairman Tom Wheeler called it a moral imperative.


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Teach tech basics to older adults - qualify for a $10,000 scholarship! | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Dosomething.org has a great opportunity for youth and seniors – teach a senior about the Internet and you may win a $10,000 scholarship.


I’m going to paste the info from the website here – but the quickest way to get started is to visit the Dosomething.org site.


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Paper: How much has our media ecosystem really been democratized? | Journalist's Resource

Paper: How much has our media ecosystem really been democratized? | Journalist's Resource | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

During much of the second half of the 20th century, Americans got their news and civic information primarily through a few dominant sources, usually a newspaper that had a relative monopoly on local information and one of three major television networks.


With the rise of the Web, there was a sense that things were changing, and many hoped that citizens would be better informed by a broader, richer and more representative and democratic array of media streams. The number of “filters” would vastly expand.

The advent of social media and peer-to-peer technologies offers the possibility of driving the full democratization of news and information, undercutting the agenda-setting of large media outlets and their relative control of news and information flows. We are now about 10 years into the era of the “social Web.”


Yet, despite a pervasive sense that “everything is different,” the current data do not suggest a radical shift or a totally linear march toward a diffused, distributed and “flattened” environment. Rather, a hybrid media ecosystem has emerged. What, precisely, are its contours?

A 2014 paper for the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, “The Challenges of Democratizing News and Information: Examining Data on Social Media, Viral Patterns and Digital Influence,” consolidates media industry data and perspective — from NPR, the Boston Globe and the Wall Street Journal — and synthesizes a growing body of social science and computational research produced by universities and firms such as Microsoft Research and the Facebook data science team, as well as survey findings from the Pew Research Center.


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Learn Immersive teaches languages in virtual reality | Richard Moss | GizMag.com

Learn Immersive teaches languages in virtual reality | Richard Moss | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The trouble with learning a foreign language is that to become fluent – or even just to be passably coherent in a reasonable timeframe – you need to be immersed in it. You need to live in a country where that language predominates. But cost or opportunity often make that infeasible. San Francisco startup Learn Immersive wants to create the next best thing. Its two-man team has built a virtual reality platform that transports you to real-world environments and helps you understand them in their native language.

For co-founder Tony Diepenbrock, the thrust of the idea comes from frustration. "I studied French for 12 years, but when I tried to speak it in the country, often-times foreigners would respond to me in English," he tells Gizmag. The test-obsessed American schooling system doesn't work for learning languages, he feels. "You need to immerse yourself in situations where you need to figure out what to say."

That's what Learn Immersive is all about. "We're trying to simulate these scenarios, and [to] make anything and everything interactive," Diepenbrock continues. "You can click on any object around you in VR and receive the translation. We can create puzzles for you to figure out."


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Hachette to Experiment With Selling Books on Twitter | Alexander Alter | NYTimes.com

Hachette to Experiment With Selling Books on Twitter | Alexander Alter | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Do tweets sell books?

It has long been a question for publishers and authors, who have started relying heavily on social media to promote books as they search for new ways to reach readers in an uncertain retail market. Authors with large Twitter followings, like John Green and Paulo Coelho, have become publishing powerhouses.

Now, the Hachette Book Group is testing whether a tweet from an author can directly trigger a sale. Hachette, which publishes best-selling authors like James Patterson, Michael Connelly and Malcolm Gladwell, announced on Monday that it would partner with Gumroad, a company that allows creators to sell their products directly to their social media followers without leaving the Twitter platform.

Hachette is kicking off the experiment this month, with just a handful of books by authors who have large Twitter followings. The first batch includes “The Art of Asking,” by Amanda Palmer, who has more than a million Twitter followers, “You Are Here,” by the former astronaut and YouTube star Chris Hadfield, who has 1.2 million followers, and “The Onion Magazine: Iconic Covers that Transformed an Undeserving World,” a book from the satirical news site The Onion, which has 6.6 million followers.

A limited number of each of the titles will be for sale on Twitter, with a “buy” button, along with an exclusive bonus item, such as an original manuscript page from Ms. Palmer, with her notes and notes from her husband, the author Neil Gaiman, or a signed photograph of an aerial image of Corfu from Mr. Hadfield.

A Hachette spokeswoman said the company planned eventually to expand the effort to include more titles.


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Plastic phantom shows space travel may be safer than thought | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Plastic phantom shows space travel may be safer than thought | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A European Space Agency (ESA) experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) suggests that space travelers may have less to worry about when it comes to radiation ... thanks to a phantom. Called the Matroshka, the "phantom" is a plastic mannequin that is the key component of the first comprehensive study of the effects of radiation on astronauts on long-term space missions that indicates that the hazard may not be as severe as previously thought.

Of all the perils of space travel, the most pervasive as it is intangible is radiation. Each day that an astronaut spends outside the protective confines of the Earth's atmosphere brings an increased chance of cancer and other conditions. According to ESA, a person on the ground soaks up about 2.5 mSv/year, while an astronaut on the space station can receive up to 1 mSv/day. This is the reason the European Astronaut Corps limits its members to 500 mSv/year and 1Sv for an entire career. (Sv or sievert is a unit used to measure of the health effect of small amounts of radiation on the body).

Surprisingly, despite this awareness, very little is actually known about how exactly how much and what kind of radiation an astronaut is actually exposed to. It's to fill this gap that the Matroshka was sent to the ISS. Named after the famous Russian nesting dolls, it was built and operated by ESA in cooperation with Roscosmos and various European institutions, and was flown to the station in 2004. Its purpose was to measure the type and amount of radiation astronauts are exposed to both inside and outside the space station over a period of several years.


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3D Printers Cheaper, Getting More Use in Schools, Libraries | Jordan Wassell | Education News

3D Printers Cheaper, Getting More Use in Schools, Libraries | Jordan Wassell | Education News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When people think of 3D printing, many think of a new technology that is out of reach and too complicated to use even if they had access to it. However, the buying trends of 3D printers, particularly among schools and libraries, show that isn’t true.

Many libraries have purchased 3D printers allowing patrons to make items ranging from cookie cutters to replacement parts for tools. According to research firm Gartner, 3D printer sales will double over the next four years. The 2,100 percent increase in sales that is projected to happen by 2018 can be attributed first to automobile, aerospace, and consumer-good manufacturers.

But 1.8 million of sales out of a projected 2.3 million are expected to be purchased by consumers, writes Melissa Workman for The Christian Science Monitor. This includes institutions such as public libraries, and schools that see the educational benefits of these ‘maker’ devices.

Now that 3D printers are popping up in more schools, companies are developing software that students can use to create their designs.

An Australian based start-up called Maker’s Empire has created a 3D printing program for tablets geared towards kids.


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EduClick_España's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:10 AM

Recomendamos este interesante artículo, del que adelantamos unas breves líneas. El artículo original está en inglés:

 

 

"

When people think of 3D printing, many think of a new technology that is out of reach and too complicated to use even if they had access to it. However, the buying trends of 3D printers, particularly among schools and libraries, show that isn’t true.

Many libraries have purchased 3D printers allowing patrons to make items ranging from cookie cutters to replacement parts for tools. According to research firm Gartner, 3D printer sales will double over the next four years. The 2,100 percent increase in sales that is projected to happen by 2018 can be attributed first to automobile, aerospace, and consumer-good manufacturers.

But 1.8 million of sales out of a projected 2.3 million are expected to be purchased by consumers, writes Melissa Workman for The Christian Science Monitor. This includes institutions such as public libraries, and schools that see the educational benefits of these ‘maker’ devices.

Now that 3D printers are popping up in more schools, companies are developing software that students can use to create their designs.

An Australian based start-up called Maker’s Empire has created a 3D printing program for tablets geared towards kids.

 "

 

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Obama Becomes First President to Write a Computer Program | Klint Finley | WIRED.com

Obama Becomes First President to Write a Computer Program |  Klint Finley | WIRED.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

President Barack Obama told the world that everyone should learn how to code. And now he’s putting his money where his mouth is.

Earlier today, to help kick-off the annual Computer Science Education Week, Obama became the first president ever to write a computer program. It was a very simple program—all it does is draw a square on a screen—but that’s the point, says Hadi Partovi, co-founder Code.org, an organization that promotes computer science education. “All programming starts simple,” he says. “No one starts by creating a complicated game.”

Last year, Obama delivered a YouTube speech to promote Computer Science Education Week, but didn’t write any code himself. “Learning these skills isn’t just important for your future. It’s important for our country’s future,” the president said in the video. “If we want America to stay on the cutting edge, we need young Americans like you to master the tools and technology that will change the way we do just about everything.”

Obama was echoing the sentiment of the growing code literacy movement, which seeks to expand computer science and programming education throughout the world. Code literacy advocates argue that with information technology embedding itself ever deeper into our lives, everyone should learn a bit more about how computers operate. A whole industry has sprung-up around the idea, with companies offering everything from children’s games that teach the fundamentals of programming to intensive three month full-time “bootcamps” dedicated to teaching people how to code well enough to land a job.


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NASA's Curiosity Rover finds new indications of water on Mars | Rachel Feltman | WashPost.com

NASA's Curiosity Rover finds new indications of water on Mars | Rachel Feltman | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

New information from NASA's Curiosity Rover suggests that Mars may once have had large, long-lasting lakes above ground. That would challenge the more popular theory that water on the planet was only underground, or only appeared in a few areas for a short amount of time.

The key to this latest theory is Mount Sharp, which stands 3 miles tall and sits in the red planet's Gale Crater. But Mount Sharp is a curious formation: The layered mountain is made of different kinds of sediment. Some layers were probably deposited by a surrounding lake bed, and other seem more likely to be the result of river or wind deposits.


Now, NASA scientists believe that a large lake in the Gale Crater — or even a series of lakes that evaporated and then reformed — caused the mountain's unusual formation.


To have liquid water on the surface, Mars would have had a much warmer, heavier atmosphere than it does now. NASA scientists still aren't sure how that atmosphere formed, or why it changed. But based on Curiosity's readings around the Murray formation — a section of rock 500 feet high — it seems that the crater lake filled with sediment (carried in by rivers) over and over. Once this sediment reached a certain height, the hardened sediment was eroded by wind, eventually forming the mountainous shape we now see.


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jean-bonno's curator insight, January 20, 2:47 AM

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NASA's Dawn space probe gets best look yet at dwarf planet Ceres | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's Dawn space probe gets best look yet at dwarf planet Ceres | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Dawn spacecraft has lifted the veil on another corner of the Solar System by taking its best image yet of the dwarf planet Ceres. The nine-pixel-wide image was taken from a distance of 740,000 mi (1.2 million km) from Ceres as part of the final calibration of Dawn's science camera as the unmanned probe approaches the 590 mi (950 km) wide planetoid, which it will rendezvous with and orbit in March of next year.

At its current distance from Dawn, Ceres is as bright as Venus as seen from Earth. Until now, the best images of Ceres came from the Hubble Space Telescope, but NASA says that as Dawn draws closer to its rendezvous, much higher resolution images will be sent back.

Dawn was launched on September 27, 2007 atop a Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. After making a flyby of Mars on February 4, 2009 in a slingshot maneuver, it went into orbit around the protoplanet Vesta on July 16, 2011, where it carried out a 14-month survey of the surface.


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jean-bonno's curator insight, January 20, 2:46 AM

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Why middle class are unplugging their kids | Naomi Schaefer Riley | NY Post

Why middle class are unplugging their kids | Naomi Schaefer Riley | NY Post | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

New York plans to build one the largest municipal Wi-Fi networks in the world, delivering Internet access to poorer areas and, Mayor de Blasio boasts, “bridging the digital divide.”

Setting aside how serious that gap really is — every fifth-grader I see, no matter what neighborhood they live in, has a smartphone — is this really the divide we should be worried about?

One of the most frequently passed around articles in the mommy blogosphere these days reveals Steve Jobs didn’t let his kids use the iPad. Writing in The New York Times earlier this fall, reporter Nick Bilton recalled asking Jobs when the device first came out: “So, your kids must love the iPad?”

“They haven’t used it,” he told me. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”

Jobs’ reply left the reporter in “dumbfounded silence.”

Bilton, who went on to interview other tech gurus and received similar answers, should not have been surprised at all. It’s not merely people in Silicon Valley, who as former editor of Wired magazine put it, have “seen the dangers of technology firsthand.” It’s every middle- and upper-class parent walking around with an iPhone.

We are all well aware of the effects of too much screen time on our own ability to concentrate and our social interactions. And we don’t want that for our kids.

A few years ago a friend who was a new parent told me that he never bought his kids anything that required a battery. He told the children’s grandparents to do the same thing. Having your kid press a button over and over again was not his idea of educational play.

Go into any upscale toy store, and you’ll find it littered with wooden blocks, Melissa & Doug pretend food and some simple costumes. The toys intended to teach science or math are not LeapPads, but microscopes and abacuses.


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:34 PM

very interesting article about limiting technology use at home. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:39 PM

If the tech gurus limit their children's use of digital technologies, why are others not?

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

Wayne Strydom's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:01 AM

You may think that I am changing tack here when I am advocating an article for less screen time, but I do think that children don't need to be spending every waking moment using tech.

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Scientists are making incredible movies of molecules using X-rays | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News

Scientists are making incredible movies of molecules using X-rays | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you thought you knew what high-res slow-motion video looks like, think again.

Researchers have recently captured images of biomolecular activity so slowly and in such detail that, lined up into a movie, they can reveal the activity of atoms, conceivably allowing us to peer into the world of biology on the world’s smallest scale.

Using the most brilliant X-ray flashes on the planet, an international team of scientists is reporting in the journal Science that they were able to capture images spanning just 40 femtoseconds (one femtosecond is a quadrillionth of a second), turning the blink of an eye into about a hundred million epic feature films. What’s more, they say they should be able to shorten the pulse duration further still, down to just a few femtoseconds.

They also achieved a resolution of 0.16 nanometers (a nanometer being a millionth of a millimeter), resulting in what they call the most detailed images of a biomolecule ever made using an X-ray laser. To put this size in context, the smallest atom, hydrogen, is about 0.1 nanometers.

The ability to watch proteins and enzymes at play does more than just give us insights into how these molecules perform various functions, biophysicist Marius Schmidt from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee told me by email. “If we know their function we can manipulate their function. We can completely shut them off, or enhance their functionality.”


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Rise of the MOOC: In the future you’ll never stop learning | Lucy Ingham | Factor-Tech.com

Rise of the MOOC: In the future you’ll never stop learning | Lucy Ingham | Factor-Tech.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The growing pace of technological change will result in workers needing to learn continuously, or face falling behind, according to Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s director of digital learning, Professor Sanjay Sarma.

Speaking at Innovisions 2014, the London-based yearly conference of NEF: The Innovation Institute on Thursday, Sarma said: “I anticipate a day where every employee at every company will spend two to three hours a week upgrading their skills.”

In some instances, Sarma indicated that his was already happening.

“People we recruited five years ago have become obsolete, and they know it,” he said. “So they are learning new things.”

This widening demand for training will – according to Sarma – increase the uptake of massive open online courses, or MOOCs.

Although MOOCs are a very recent development – emerging only two years ago – they have seen huge adoption worldwide.


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What Technology Will Revolutionize Education? | Rhett Allain | WIRED.com

What Technology Will Revolutionize Education? | Rhett Allain | WIRED.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In this video, Derek Muller (@veritasium and Veritasium on YouTube) makes a video about revolutions in education. I think he’s right. In the past, we have claimed new technologies would revolutionize education (films, radio, tv, the internet) but they didn’t.

What about YouTube? Will that revolutionize education? Maybe. Right now there many, many instructional videos on YouTube (like my introductory physics videos). But will YouTube videos replace the teacher? Here is a great quote from the video:

“Luckily, the fundamental role of a teacher is not to deliver information. It is to guide the student in the social process of learning.”

I’m not convinced that youtube will revolutionize learning, but Derek makes some great points about the learning process.


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Charles Nyakito's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:56 AM

I have personally found You Tube resources amazing. Nearly every video one may need for teaching whatever topic will be found there. We have never seen such a rich resource for teaching before. Not the radio, not the tv, nothing, nothing, but You Tube.

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Now Hiring: Flipped Learning Architects | Joe Hirsch Blog | Edutopia.org

Now Hiring: Flipped Learning Architects | Joe Hirsch Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After developing several dozen flipped lessons and guiding other teachers to create their own, I'm putting down my tablet and grabbing a bullhorn. It's time for "flippers" to set the record straight -- teachers who want to adopt flipped learning have to start thinking of themselves as architects, not video producers.

Knowing that difference is critical to unleashing the instructional power of flipped learning and sustaining a movement that can improve teaching and learning. The differences are simple, yet stark:

  • Video producers design splashy content. Architects build instructional value.
  • Video producers think about the power of images. Architects think about the power of ideas.
  • Video producers teach subjects. Architects teach students.


These roles are complementary, but not interchangeable. I've had the good fortune to connect with colleagues across North America who are just beginning or looking to start their flipped learning adventures. In our conversations about designing content for flipped learning, I can detect some role confusion.


Many of these teachers are focused on becoming video producers, but not architects. And that confusion may take well-meaning teachers on a detour from the authentic, standards-rich classroom learning spaces that flipped learning promises to create.


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Rosetta Comet Mission Reveals Clues About the Origin of Earth's Water | Marcus Woo | WIRED.com

Rosetta Comet Mission Reveals Clues About the Origin of Earth's Water | Marcus Woo | WIRED.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One of the theories for how Earth became a watery world suitable for life now faces doubt, according to the latest results from the Rosetta spacecraft that’s now orbiting a comet 326 million miles away.

Countless comet impacts were thought to have delivered water to Earth not long after the planet formed 4.6 billion years ago. But new measurements from Rosetta, which is studying comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, reveal that the chemical signature of water in the comet is nothing like what’s found in Earth’s oceans.

The discrepancy suggests that comets did not bring water to Earth and that the more likely water source was asteroids, says planetary scientist Kathrin Altwegg of the University of Bern in Switzerland.

The results, which are among the first from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission, were published today in the journal Science.

The young Earth was a hot place—so hot that most of its surface water evaporated. At the time, about four billion years ago, the solar system was swarming with asteroids and comets. They pelted Earth’s surface, prompting scientists to hypothesize that maybe it was these objects that helped supply Earth with its oceans. Because comets are known to contain water, they seemed a likely source.

If this were the case, then the chemical signature of Earth’s water would match what is found on comets. Water, of course, is H2O: two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen. It can be made from regular hydrogen, which consists of a proton and an electron, or from a type of hydrogen called deuterium, which has an added neutron. If Earth’s water came from comets, then the ratios of deuterium to hydrogen would be the same in both Earth and comets.


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Building a space elevator starts with a lunar elevator by 2020 | Eric Mack | GizMag.com

Building a space elevator starts with a lunar elevator by 2020 | Eric Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Launching deep space probes is great, but to really explore space and unlock its secrets, it sure would be helpful if getting there were as easy as pressing a button. That's the vision of Liftport, which Gizmag first reported on back in 2012. Now, more than two years after Liftport raised over US$100,000 on Kickstarter, the team is sharing its progress towards creating an elevator from Earth to space, a journey that – interestingly enough – begins on the Moon.

Building an Earth-to-orbit elevator is beyond tricky at the moment due to the relative abundance of gravity, weather and water around our planet. We've yet to perfect the material that could create a ribbon long enough to support an elevator that won't collapse under its own weight or run into problems with ice in the upper atmosphere.

But those challenges are significantly lessened when you attempt to do the same thing from the Moon rather than Earth. Much less gravity and a lack of a wet atmosphere make the Moon the ideal testing ground for constructing a space elevator. Which is why Liftport is currently focusing all its energy on building a lunar elevator by the end of this decade.


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New IAU initiative gives you the chance to name an exoplanet | Dario Broghino | GizMag.com

New IAU initiative gives you the chance to name an exoplanet | Dario Broghino | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the organization in charge of naming celestial objects, has set up a public contest that will let people all around the globe pick the names of 20 to 30 well-characterized exoplanets and their respective host stars by August next year.

It’s been 20 years since the first planet outside of our solar system was discovered, and nowadays the observations of Kepler and other powerful telescopes are bringing the exoplanet count close to an impressive two thousand mark. Most of these worlds, however, are only known by very dry and unimaginative scientific names (such as "CoRoT-4 b" or "PSR 1257 12 d") that do little justice to giant rogue planets without a host star or distant worlds made largely of diamonds.

The IAU is aiming to remedy that with a worldwide contest that will let organizations around the world propose popular names for up to 30 out of 305 well-known extrasolar planets, and will then let people around the globe have the final say by means of online voting.


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Everyone should learn to drive in a simulator | Paula Vasan | The Verge

Georgia native Luke Pye was 18 years old, driving with his high school girlfriend on the highway when a van cut him off. He reacted by turning his wheel toward the guardrail, avoiding the surrounding cars and oncoming traffic.

The situation could have played out in many different ways that afternoon. The couple could’ve been among the more than 41,000 people to lose their lives to car crashes in the US that year in 2007. Instead, they walked away with only a couple of bruises. Today, they’re married and have a four-month-old son.

Pye credits his good fortune in large part to a driving simulator. “Driving on the simulator at my high school taught me to keep calm and think clearly in stressful situations,” he says.

Most schools around the country aren’t teaching any driving education, but the ones that do are teaching it based on a several-decades-old model. One man from Georgia has been trying to change that for over a decade. Following the death of Alan Brown’s 17-year-old son Joshua in July 2003, he architected and lobbied for a piece of legislation known as “Joshua’s Law.” Brown’s son, Joshua Brown, hydroplaned driving on the highway in the rain at 40 miles per hour and hit a tree. “Practically nothing” was offered to help train his son deal with these kinds of driving conditions, says the senior Brown, chairman of the Joshua Brown Foundation. “With simulation, teens can have that same crash over and over until they know exactly what to do.” In Joshua Brown’s case, such training may have meant knowing not to go 40 miles an hour in heavy rain. In Pye’s case, it was learning skid control and how to quickly maneuver the steering wheel when things go wrong.

Following the death of his son and the implementation of Joshua’s Law in 2005 in Georgia, Brown had placed six driving simulators at Cartersville High School, where Pye attended, which was the first high school in the state to receive them. Today, there are thousands of simulators in high schools around the state.


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Father of Video Games Ralph Baer dead at 92 | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com

Father of Video Games Ralph Baer dead at 92 | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Long before the Xbox came the Brown Box, a creation that defense contractor engineer Ralph Baer and colleagues built in the late 1960s that would become known as the first real video game system. The video game industry this week mourns Baer, a German-born American who has passed away at the age of 92.

Baer worked on what would become the first multi-player video game console while employed at defense contractor Sanders Associates, which licensed it to TV maker Magnovox. That company brought the system to market in 1972 as the Odyssey, and spawned what is now an industry worth tens of billions of dollars.


That original system, which worked on TV sets, included games such as ping pong, checkers and target shooting. Baer donated his early models and schematics to the Smithsonian Institution and the collection can be found at the National Museum of American History.


Baer told his own story in a book published in 2005 called "Videogames in the Beginning."


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Ralph Games's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:23 PM

Sad sad post but this is a very interesting post to video gaming history.

 

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A Scientist Found This Hidden In The Bottom Of The Ocean. And It’s The Stuff Of Science Fiction. | Boredom Therapy

A Scientist Found This Hidden In The Bottom Of The Ocean. And It’s The Stuff Of Science Fiction. | Boredom Therapy | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Underwater archeologist Frank Goddio has dedicated his entire life to searching for remnants of lost civilizations from the past. But even he wasn’t expecting what he found deep below the ocean’s surface in the Abu Qir Bay, on the coast of Egypt.

No, it’s not the lost city of Atlantis… but it’s close enough. Deep beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea, he has found the sunken Egytian city of Thonis-Heracleion, which has long been forgotten by time.


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Study Proves Why We Need Digital Literacy Education | John Jones | DMLcentral.net

Study Proves Why We Need Digital Literacy Education | John Jones | DMLcentral.net | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A few months ago, the Internet buzzed with the results of a study comparing students' note-taking on computers versus note-taking with paper and pen. In the article, authors Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer shared the results of three experiments comparing these two note-taking conditions, and their conclusion was signaled in the title: "The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard."

Following the authors' lead, most media reports treated these results as proof that using laptops for note-taking — or, some argued, any classroom use — was detrimental to learning. However, I think the results point in a different direction, suggesting that students do not need to be restricted from using laptops — or any other learning tool — in the classroom. Rather, the research underscores the need digital literacy instruction; that is, how to use their tools in a way that serves their learning goals.


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NASA's New Horizons Pluto probe awakes | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's New Horizons Pluto probe awakes | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you think it's hard waking up after a nine-hour plane flight, imagine doing so after a space voyage of nine years and three billion miles. On Saturday, NASA's New Horizons deep space probe woke itself up from hibernation mode as it began preparations for its flyby of Pluto and its moons next July. Having traveled 2.9 billion miles (4.6 billion km) from Earth and with 162 million miles (260 million km) to go, the signals announcing the awakening took four hours and 26 minutes to cover the distance to NASA’s Deep Space Network station in Canberra, Australia.

Monitored by the New Horizons team at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, the unmanned spacecraft came out of hibernation automatically due to its preprogrammed instructions on December 6 at 9:53 pm EST and the confirmation signal was sent 90 minutes later.

The US$650 million New Horizons mission was launched January 19, 2006 atop an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The unmanned 1,054 lb (478 kg) nuclear-powered probe was sent on a 9.5-year mission to fly by Pluto and then on to study selected objects in the Kuiper Belt. Sent on a slingshot trajectory using the gravitational pull of Jupiter, New Horizons passed the orbit of Neptune on August 24 and will rendezvous with Pluto on July 14 of next year, which it will pass at a distance of 8,000 mi (13,000 km).


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jean-bonno's curator insight, January 20, 2:46 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Barry Heild | CNN News

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | Barry Heild | CNN News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.

With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding.

Their fine detail has been captured in a series of breathtaking photographs by Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji, a 24-year-old physics student from Babol, a city in Iran's northern Mazandaran province.

What's equally incredible is that Ganji's skills behind the lens are largely self-taught from watching internet tutorials.

Add to that the difficulties of actually taking high quality photos in mosques, where using equipment such as tripods is heavily restricted.

Ganji says his project to document mosque interiors and other Iranian landmarks began in 2008 after he was inspired by images taken inside Egypt's pyramids.


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Marion Mundana's curator insight, December 9, 2014 2:24 AM

I love beautiful architecture.  Having recently visited Istanbul, I appreciate the symmetry and beauty of the mosques.  These mosques are in Iran...stunning photos! Enjoy!