Digital Media Lit...
Follow
30.7K views | +1 today
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What will really happen when the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts? | io9.com

What will really happen when the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts? | io9.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Lurking beneath Yellowstone National Park is a massive underground reservoir of magma, capped by the park's famous caldera. 640,000 years ago, a super eruption rocked the region. What would happen if another such event blasted the park today? We asked USGS geologist Jake Lowenstern, scientist-in-charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory.


Most volcanic activity in Yellowstone would not qualify as "super eruptions," in which 1,000 km3 or more material is ejected from a volcano. Lowenstern told io9 that supervolcanoes are "very large, single eruptions" that usually last for about a week. But, unlike what you'll see in certain television specials and Hollywood films, even a super eruption at Yellowstone wouldn't endanger the whole United States. It also wouldn't cause the kind catastrophe you might expect.


A super eruption might come fast and the Yellowstone magma source is enormous. But don't expect walls of lava pouring across the continent. Lava flows would be likely be "within the vicinity of the park," Lowenstern said, limited to a 30-40 mile radius. When a volcano erupts, he added, at least a third of the liquid rock that's ejected falls right back into the volcano's maw. The rest lands nearby, or goes up into the atmosphere.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

This American Indian Rapper Just Became MTV's Artist of the Week | PolicyMic.com

This American Indian Rapper Just Became MTV's Artist of the Week | PolicyMic.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Christian Parrish Takes the Gun. Remember his name.


The Apsáalooke American Indian hails from the Crow Nation Reservation near Billings, Mont., and on March 21, the MTV Iggy blog named him Artist of the Week from among hundreds of competitors.


What makes him special? Well, he raps under the name "SupaMan," he sings, he makes crazy drum loops, he's a champion powwow fancy dancer and sometimes, if you're lucky, he does all four at the same time:


Click headline to watch video clip of his performance, read more and access audio clip archive--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

If Digital Literacy is a Basic Skill, Who's Responsible for Teaching It? | Center for Teaching Quality

One of my students, a 50+ grandmother, sat a full arm’s length away from the computer, recoiling from the mouse as if it were a snake. It was the first night of our Freshman Comp I class at the rural Drew, Mississippi campus of Mississippi Delta Community College, and I was trying to introduce her to our class website.


Like many of my students, younger and older, she does not use computer or Internet on a regular basis. In many cases, my students are learning to use the internet or their devices–beyond updating Facebook or texting—for the first time. I show them how to access our learning management system (Canvas), and how to access their essential student and college information on our administrative system (because there is no orientation or workshop for them on how to do that). But I also often end up teaching them how to use basic computer software (Word, Google).

      

There’s a misconception among some teachers and policymakers, especially at the college level, that students come to us already being tech-savvy. I recently learned that some of our secondary schools have done away with what was called “computer discovery” courses, based on that same reasoning. The truth is many of our students need teachers and schools to provide not only access but also direction and encouragement in navigating and using various tech tools.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Diane Ravitch Tells Bill Moyers Why School Privatization Is Turning into a Disaster | AlterNet.org

Diane Ravitch Tells Bill Moyers Why School Privatization Is Turning into a Disaster | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Public education is becoming big business as bankers, hedge fund managers and private equity investors are entering what they consider to be an “emerging market.” As Rupert Murdoch put it after purchasing an education technology company, “When it comes to K through 12 education, we see a $500 billion sector in the U.S. alone.”


Education historian Diane Ravitch says the privatization of public education has to stop. As assistant secretary of education under President George H.W. Bush, she was an advocate of school choice and charter schools; under George W. Bush, she supported the No Child Left Behind initiative. But after careful investigation, she changed her mind, and has become, according to Salon, “the nation’s highest profile opponent” of charter-based education.


Click headline to read transcript of discussion--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LA: Funding charters shouldn't hurt other schools | Editorial | The Advertiser

LA: Funding charters shouldn't hurt other schools | Editorial | The Advertiser | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the organizers of three new charter schools prepare to welcome students in the fall, the Lafayette Parish School System prepares for an attendant financial loss totaling about $7 million.


That’s no small loss for any school system.


Charter schools offer an alternative to traditional public schools and receive public funding, although they are privately run and are not bound by all the same rules as traditional public schools.


While some charter schools have a reputation for outperforming traditional public schools on standardized tests, recent studies have shown that many do not.


Either way, one question remains: With a projected budget deficit of more than $10 million for the coming school year, can the Lafayette Parish School System afford them?


Charter schools receive a share of the the Minimum Foundation Program from the district they occupy. The MFP is a formula for calculating a district’s per-pupil allowance. Lafayette Parish receives about $9,200 per student per year.


The total projected amount leaving LPSS to fund the new charter schools next school year could be as much as $9.5 million, LPSS chief financial officer Billy Guidry said in a previous Daily Advertiser article.


There is a familiar argument that since the money follows the student to the charter school, the traditional public school breaks even. But that isn’t quite right.


Although the MFP money leaving LPSS will be partly offset by the loss of some teaching slots and savings on transportation and meal costs, among other things, the savings will amount to about $2.7 million. But each school that loses a handful of students will still have to pay about the same heating and cooling bills, will have the same maintenance and repair costs and will still have to pay their share of teacher retirement costs, which have gone up, as well as any bonds and other debts.


And that will leave nearly $7 million for the school system to absorb.


Superintendent Pat Cooper has said that in his estimation, the school district has gained three new buildings for $7 million.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Secrets of Ancient Roman concrete revealed | SmartPlanet.com

Secrets of Ancient Roman concrete revealed | SmartPlanet.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Ancient Romans were master engineers. Now, 2,000 years later, scientists have figured out the secret behind the creation of Roman concrete -- one of the world’s most durable man-made creations ever. The discovery may impact how we build cities of the future. Bloomberg Businessweek reports.


Roman harbors have always fascinated geologist and engineers. Breakwaters constructed out of Roman concrete are still perfectly intact despite constant pounding by the sea.


The most common blend of modern concrete -- Portland cement, used for 200 years -- doesn’t come close to matching that track record. In seawater, its service life is less than 50 years. “The building industry has been searching for a way to make more durable concretes,” says Marie Jackson from the University of California, Berkeley.


So, an international team of researchers analyzed the mineral components of a concrete breakwater sample dating back to 37 B.C., extracted from the floor of Pozzuoili Bay (pictured).


The secret to the lost recipe of superior Roman concrete lies in its unique mineral formulation (pictured below) and production technique. According to a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory press release:


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How Assessment Can Lead to Deeper Learning | Edutopia.org

How Assessment Can Lead to Deeper Learning | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Most educators, policymakers, and parents agree that today's students need a mix of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prepare them to be successful and engaged citizens. Given that students need a mix of these things, iknowledge, educators, policymakers, and parents are also askng, "How do we know if students are learning both what we are teaching and what they need to know to succeed?"


One key to addressing both of those issues that we understand at our Envision schools is the understanding that they are inextricably linked. While in some circles, assessment is a top-down process done by teachers who decide where students are on the continuum of learning, we engage students directly in assessing their own progress. This is part of our Know, Do, Reflect approach to learning. Here's an illustration of that process:

The reflection step in this on-going learning cycle is an essential element where assessment happens. Reflection invites students and teachers to recognize growth and accomplishments as well as identify opportunities for improvement and development. It is not separate from the learning process: It is an integral step on the path to deeper learning -- it's assessment as learning.


Having students play an active role in this step is distinctive for two reasons:


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MS Educator engages parents and community during discussion about school-to-prison pipeline | Education Votes | NEA.org

MS Educator engages parents and community during discussion about school-to-prison pipeline | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today Education Votes is reporting a follow up to a story that we told you about last week focusing on Mississippi educator Kevin Gilbert, who took part in a community-based discussion with educators, parents, and community and elected leaders about ending a national epidemic known as the school-to-prison pipeline. The school-to-prison pipeline is primarily putting students of color behind bars for minor school infractions and disciplinary matters.


On Wednesday, March 19th, Gilbert, who is on the executive committee of the National Education Association, which represents about 3 million educators nationwide, took part in a discussion on the matter in his home state. It was sponsored by U.S. Representative Bennie Thompson who represents the state’s 2nd Congressional District.


Education Votes caught up with Gilbert to discuss the issue and the event, which drew a standing-room-only crowd, and ask him why there now appears to be so much interest in the school-to-prison pipeline.


Click headline to read the interview--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ALEC clears path for for-profit charter companies to cash in after school closures | Education Votes | NEA.org

ALEC clears path for for-profit charter companies to cash in after school closures | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Memphis, Tenn., is no stranger to school closures. The Shelby County School District closed four schools in 2012 and 2013 each. And the district, despite a wave of parent- and clergy-led protests and a petition that generated 6,000 signatures, voted last month to close nine schools and combine two others.


At a recent school board meeting, the Rev. Dwight Ray Montgomery said, “If Dr. King were here today, he’d be standing where I’m standing today, unafraid.”


In Newark, N.J., parents and educators are organized and speaking out against a proposal by the state-appointed superintendent to close or consolidate more than a dozen schools.


Last week, special education teacher Marie Blistan, testifying before the state Legislature’s Joint Committee on Public Schools, called the plan “misguided, top-down and illegal.”


Whether in Memphis, Newark, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, or Chicago, communities hit by school closures bemoan the loss of a longstanding neighborhood asset. Residents say school board members and local elected officials give short shrift to displaced students, many of whom have to walk long distances through dangerous neighborhoods to reach their new schools, some of which have poor records on academics, discipline and safety.


In Chicago, where some 100 schools have been closed since 2001 and 88 percent of the affected students were black, students commute to their new schools through gang areas using “safe passage” routes designated by the police department.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New Student Initiative Asks Anchor Institutions to Rethink their Communities | Community-Wealth.org

New Student Initiative Asks Anchor Institutions to Rethink their Communities | Community-Wealth.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Democracy Collaborative recently sat down with Alan Smith of the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network to talk about their new Rethinking Communities Initiative. Inspired by the legacy of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, the Roosevelt Institute promotes the work of progressive economist and social policy thinkers and supports the next generation of leaders as they design solutions to current pressing issues. Their Campus Network is the nation’s largest student policy organization with 115 chapters at colleges and universities in 38 states, working to further progressive ideas, civic leadership, and long-term change.


As the Associate Director for Networked Initiatives, Alan Smith works with student leaders to coordinate projects across chapters and is leading implementation of the Network’s newest initiative. Using the Democracy Collaborative’s Anchor Dashboard as a framework, the Rethinking Communities Initiative evaluates colleges and universities as anchor institutions to determine how they can work best with their communities to improve economic development, civic engagement, and quality of life. In highlights from this interview, Alan talks about what inspired the initiative, how the Dashboard has influenced it, and what they hope it will accomplish. 


This weekend, Democracy Collaborative founder Gar Alperovitz will be keynoting the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities Mid-Atlantic Spring Conference at George Washington University.


Click headline to read the interview--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

TN: State Passes Bill “Allowing the Bullying of LGBT Students in the Name of Religious Freedom" | IssueHawk.com

TN: State Passes Bill “Allowing the Bullying of LGBT Students in the Name of Religious Freedom" | IssueHawk.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Tennessee State legislature has passed a bill titled the Religious Viewpoints Antidiscrimination Act and have sent it to governor Bill Haslam for his approval. According to LGBT news outlets, “the bill allows and encourages anti-gay bullying in the name of religious freedom.”


The ACLU has come out strongly against the bill, saying it “crosses the line from protecting religious freedom into creating systematic imposition of some students’ personal religious viewpoints on other students.”


The ACLU released a statement, saying “Should this pass, students with a range of religious beliefs, as well as non-believers, would likely routinely be required to listen to religious messages or participate in religious exercises that conflict with their own beliefs. Conversely, if a student of a minority religious faith (e.g., a Buddhist, a Wiccan, etc.) or a non-believer were to obtain a ‘position of honor,’ as defined under this bill, that student would be permitted to subject all classmates to prayer and proselytizing specific to his or her faith tradition in connection with school events. In both cases, parents would have no recourse to ensure that their children were not coerced into such religious exercise.”


According to The New Civil Rights Movement, “At a basic level, a student could merely write “God” on a chemistry test as the answer to a question asking to where water comes from. A student could also stand in class and say their religion says that gay people are sinners and going to hell, and that speech would be legally protected. The bill states “a student may express beliefs about religion in homework, artwork, and other written and oral assignments free from discrimination based on the religious content of their submissions. A student would not be penalized or rewarded on account of the religious content of the student’s work.”


Click headline to read more--
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

StratoBus seeks to occupy the midpoint between airship and satellite | GizMag.com

StratoBus seeks to occupy the midpoint between airship and satellite | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Satellites may be very useful for communications, navigation and other applications, but they're awfully expensive to build and launch, and once they're in orbit ... well, there's no reusing them. That's why a consortium led by Thales Alenia Space is developing the StratoBus. It's a planned autonomous airship that can be launched like a regular blimp, but that will be able to hover at an altitude of 20 km (12 miles) – that's up in the stratosphere, hence the name.


According to the company, the StratoBus will be 70 to 100 meters long (230 to 328 ft), and 20 to 30 meters (66 to 98 ft) in width. Its envelope will be made mainly of UV-resistant woven carbon fiber, and its two fuel cell-powered prop motors will allow it to maintain its position, even when subjected to winds blowing at up to 90 km/h (56 mph).


The fuel cell will be located in its nacelle (the bottom part, that sits where the gondola would be on a manned airship), along with an electrolyzer for obtaining hydrogen from an onboard water supply, plus its communications and other electronics. Different nacelles will be swapped on and off of one airship body between missions, as each one will be specially outfitted for its intended purpose. Payloads of up to 200 lb (91 kg) will be possible.


The electrolyzer will be solar-powered. Sunlight will stream into the airship's "balloon" through a transparent section of the envelope, then reflect off an internal concentrating mirror, and onto a row of solar panels. That section will be able to stay aligned with the sun, as the balloon will rotate relative to the rest of the vehicle.


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Earthwatch Institute plans public expedition to Mars? | GizMag.com

Earthwatch Institute plans public expedition to Mars? | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For over forty years, Earthwatch has been sending ordinary people to extraordinary places in the company of top scientists to conduct hands-on research in over 50 expeditions. On Thursday, the international nonprofit organization announced its most ambitious and extraordinary public expedition ever aimed at sending volunteers to Mars in search for water and life. With its US$1.25 million ticket price, it seems too good to be true, and probably is.


According to Earthwatch, the purpose of the expedition is to measure environmental conditions and look for evidence of Martian microorganisms on Utopia Planitia on Mars. The organization says that the outing will lift off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, take 300 to 600 days to get to Mars, depending on orbit, spend four days (including an orientation day) on the planet, and, unlike the Mars One project, another 300 days to get home. The fact that the itinerary says you don’t meet your fellow expedition members until you reach Mars and that the trip includes a “recreational day” on day 305 makes us suspect that this is somewhat tongue in cheek, even if April 1st is still a few days away.


Accommodations on Mars will allegedly include a cabin constructed of "vintage space junk," and food will consist of "freeze-dried space delicacies." The expedition’s website also talks about the opportunity to climb the slopes of Olympus Mons, the Solar System’s tallest mountain, though how you’re supposed to travel the thousands of miles from Utopia Planitia for the day trip is a mystery.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

London skeletons reveal secrets of the Black Death | WashPost.com

London skeletons reveal secrets of the Black Death | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You can learn a lot from a tooth.


Molars taken from skeletons unearthed by work on a new London railway line are revealing secrets of the medieval Black Death — and of its victims.


This week, Don Walker, an osteologist with the Museum of London, outlined the biography of one man whose ancient bones were found by construction workers under London’s Charterhouse Square: He was breast-fed as a baby, moved to London from another part of England, had bad tooth decay in childhood, grew up to work as a laborer, and died in early adulthood from the bubonic plague that ravaged Europe in the 14th century.


The poor man’s life was nasty, brutish and short, but his afterlife is long and illuminating.


“It’s fantastic we can look in such detail at an individual who died 600 years ago,” Walker said. “It’s incredible, really.”


The 25 skeletons were uncovered last year during work on Crossrail, a new rail line that’s boring 13 miles (21 kilometers) of tunnels under the heart of the city. Archaeologists immediately suspected the bones came from a cemetery for plague victims. The location, outside the walls of the medieval city, chimes with historical accounts. The square, once home to a monastery, is one of the few spots in the city to stay undisturbed for centuries.


To test their theory, scientists took one tooth from each of 12 skeletons, then extracted DNA from the teeth. They announced Sunday that tests had found the presence of the plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, in several of the teeth, meaning the individuals had been exposed to — and likely died from — the Black Death.


The findings didn’t stop there. Archaeologists, historians, microbiologists and physicists worked together to apply techniques from several scientific disciplines to the discovery.


Radiocarbon dating and analysis of pottery shards helped determine when the burials took place. Forensic geophysics — more commonly used in murder and war-crimes investigations — helped locate more graves under the square. Studying oxygen and strontium isotopes in the bones revealed details of diet and health.


Click headline to read more--


more...
Sanford Arbogast's curator insight, March 31, 6:51 AM

How cool is thsi

Kiara Cormack-Dunbar's curator insight, July 29, 5:07 PM

Some people want to be remembered after they die- keep your teeth shiny and you just might in a few hundred years! @MrNapes

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Understanding the Propaganda Campaign Against Public Education | BillMoyers.com

Understanding the Propaganda Campaign Against Public Education | BillMoyers.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This post first appeared on Diane Ravitch’s blog.


A few years ago, when I was blogging at Education Week with Deborah Meier, a reader introduced the term FUD. I had never heard of it. It is a marketing technique used in business and politics to harm your competition. FUD stands for Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. The reader said that those who were trying to create a market-based system to replace public education were using FUD to undermine public confidence in public education. They were selling the false narrative that our public schools are obsolete and failing.


This insight inspired me to write Reign of Error, to show that the “reform” narrative is a fraud. Test scores on NAEP are at their highest point in history for white, black, Hispanic and Asian students. Graduation rates are the highest in history for these groups. The dropout rate is at an historic low point.


Why the FUD campaign against one of our nation’s most treasured democratic institutions? It helps the competition. It makes people so desperate that they will seek out unproven alternatives. It makes the public gullible when they hear phony claims about miracle schools, where everyone graduates and everyone gets high test scores, and everyone goes to a four-year college. No such school exists. The “miracle school” usually has a high suspension rate, a high expulsion rate, a high attrition rate and such schools usually do not replace the kids they somehow got rid of. Some “miracle schools” have never graduated anyone because they have only elementary schools, but that doesn’t stop the claims and boasting.


It turns out that there is actually a scholar studying the phenomenon of the “the cultural production of ignorance.” He hasn’t looked at the attack on public schools, but his work shows how propaganda may be skillfully deployed to confuse and mislead the public. Michael Hiltzik of The Los Angeles Times writes about the work of Robert Proctor of Stanford University:


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Public Education: Who Are the Corporate Reformers? | BillMoyers.com

Public Education: Who Are the Corporate Reformers? | BillMoyers.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In an excerpt from her book Reign of Error, Diane Ravitch reveals the individuals and corporations behind education reform movement.


The education reform movement must be defined in terms of its ideology, its strategies and its leading members.


The “reformers” say they want excellent education for all; they want great teachers; they want to “close the achievement gap”; they want innovation and effectiveness; they want the best of everything for everyone. They pursue these universally admired goals by privatizing education, lowering the qualifications for future teachers, replacing teachers with technology, increasing class sizes, endorsing for- profit organizations to manage schools, using carrots and sticks to motivate teachers and elevating standardized test scores as the ultimate measure of education quality.


“Reform” is really a misnomer, because the advocates for this cause seek not to reform public education but to transform it into an entrepreneurial sector of the economy. The groups and individuals that constitute today’s reform movement have appropriated the word “reform” because it has such positive connotations in American political discourse and American history. But the roots of this so- called reform movement may be traced to a radical ideology with a fundamental distrust of public education and hostility to the public sector in general.


The “reform” movement is really a “corporate reform” movement, funded to a large degree by major foundations, Wall Street hedge fund managers, entrepreneurs and the US Department of Education. The movement is determined to cut costs and maximize competition among schools and among teachers. It seeks to eliminate the geographically based system of public education as we have known it for the past 150 years and replace it with a competitive market- based system of school choice — one that includes traditional public schools, privately managed charter schools, religious schools, voucher schools, for- profit schools, virtual schools and for- profit vendors of instruction.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

April Fools' Day in the Classroom: Eight Resources for Teachers | Edutopia.org

April Fools' Day in the Classroom: Eight Resources for Teachers | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I still remember April Fools' Day when I was a fourth grader. A reading comprehension worksheet went out to the class, and in minutes, we were all dumbfounded. The story and questions were incomprehensible, written in complete gibberish. But our teacher went along with the joke. We had a half hour to finish it, and it was going to be worth a substantial amount of points.


I don’t remember how long the gag lasted exactly, but I do remember all of us students, mouths agape, wondering if the assignment was serious. Then, once we’d all thrown our hands up, our teacher let us in on the joke: “April Fools!”


April Fools' Day is the perfect time to play some light-hearted pranks on your friends, family, and co-workers, and if you’re a teacher, pulling an unexpected fast one on your students can be entertaining -- and memorable -- for everyone. So if you’re looking for ideas for classroom pranks, or you’re hoping to bring a humor lesson into the classroom, these are a few of our favorite April Fools' Day resources and teaching ideas.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

These Seattle Teachers Boycotted Standardized Testing -- and Sparked a Nationwide Movement | BillMoyers.com

These Seattle Teachers Boycotted Standardized Testing -- and Sparked a Nationwide Movement | BillMoyers.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Life felt eerie for teachers at Seattle’s Garfield High in the days following their unanimous declaration of rebellion last winter against standardized testing. Their historic press conference, held on a Thursday, had captured the attention of national TV and print media. But by midday Monday, they still hadn’t heard a word from their own school district’s leadership.


Then an email from Superintendent José Banda hit their in-boxes. Compared with a starker threat issued a week later, with warnings of 10-day unpaid suspensions, this note was softly worded. But its message was clear: a teacher boycott of the district’s most-hated test — the MAP, short for Measures of Academic Progress — was intolerable.


Jittery teachers had little time to digest the implications before the lunch bell sounded, accompanied by an announcement over the intercom: a Florida teacher had ordered them a stack of hot pizzas, as a gesture of solidarity.


“It was a powerful moment,” said history teacher Jesse Hagopian, a boycott leader. “That’s when we realized this wasn’t just a fight at Garfield; this was something going on across the nation. If we back down, we’re not just backing away from a fight for us. It’s something that educators all over see as their struggle too. I think a lot of teachers steeled their resolve, that we had to continue.”


Parents, students and teachers all over the country soon would join the “Education Spring” revolt. As the number of government-mandated tests multiplies, anger is mounting over wasted school hours, “teaching to the test,” a shrinking focus on the arts, demoralized students and perceptions that teachers are being unjustly blamed for deeply rooted socioeconomic problems.


“You’re seeing a tremendous backlash,” said Carol Burris, award-winning principal of South Side High School in New York City and an education blogger for The Washington Post. “People are on overload. They are angry at the way data and testing are being used to disrupt education.”


Last spring, New York became the first major state to implement Common Core State Standards testing, a key element of the Obama administration’s Race to the Top initiative. Burris has compiled data showing a dramatic increase in the time children and teens spend taking New York state tests. Fifth-graders are the hardest-hit, with testing time ballooning from 170 minutes in 2010 to 540 minutes in 2013.


Mark Naison, a professor at Fordham University in New York City, estimates that parents of about 10,000 students across the state joined the “opt-out” movement in April, refusing to submit their youth to Common Core tests. “Probably the largest test revolt in modern American history,” he said.


Inspired by New York’s grassroots revolution, Naison co-founded the Badass Teachers Association (BAT), which by mid-January had 36,443 members and chapters in all 50 states. Florida has the largest representation, with more than 1,575 BAT teachers.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas | NYTimes.com

Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Niede Guidon still remembers her astonishment when she glimpsed the paintings.


Preserved amid the bromeliad-encrusted plateaus that tower over the thorn forests of northeast Brazil, the ancient rock art depicts fierce battles among tribesmen, orgiastic scenes of prehistoric revelry and hunters pursuing their game, spears in hand.


“These were stunning compositions, people and animals together, not just figures alone,” said Dr. Guidon, 81, remembering what first lured her and other archaeologists in the 1970s to this remote site where jaguars still prowl.


Hidden in the rock shelters where prehistoric humans once lived, the paintings number in the thousands. Some are thought to be more than 9,000 years old and perhaps even far more ancient. Painted in red ocher, they rank among the most revealing testaments anywhere in the Americas to what life was like millenniums before the European conquest began a mere five centuries ago.


But it is what excavators found when they started digging in the shadows of the rock art that is contributing to a pivotal re-evaluation of human history in the hemisphere.


Click headline to read more, view pix and maps and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Minnesota educators, parents and congressman advocate for special education funding | Education Votes | NEA.org

Minnesota educators, parents and congressman advocate for special education funding | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Rep. John Kline (R-Minn.) and Denise Specht, elementary school teacher and Education Minnesota president, met with educators and students Friday for a round table discussion on the importance of increased federal funding for special education.


“There are a lot of champions for early childhood education, but every superintendent, Education Minnesota … everybody has said the most important thing is to fund special ed,” Kline said. “We’re mounting an effort to try to build support for starting that funding back up because I do believe absolutely that it is the most important thing.”


The discussion is particularly relevant as the U.S. House recently proposed a bill that would fully fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for the first time in 40 years. 


Joanne Olson has been a special education teacher in Northfield, Minnesota for 28 years and has seen a lot of changes in her classroom.


“Our building is seeing an influx of emotional behavior disorders. There is not enough staff, so kids are being shuttled between caseloads,” said Olson.


One of her major concerns focused on the growing paperwork and assessment that takes away time from her students. She spends nights and weekends keeping up with the required paperwork.


“Each student assessment under IDEA is two and a half hours away from direct instruction,” said Olson. She told Congressman Kline that with additional IDEA funding, they could at least have adequate staff to deal with the time-consuming student evaluations so she could prioritize time in the classroom with her students.


“As we’ve been doing legislation, one of the guiding principles is to streamline and simplify and get rid of as much paperwork as we can,” Kline said. “That’s just not for special ed, but it’s all over the place. Nobody takes any paperwork away, they just add.”


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Senate women call for fair minimum wage for women and families | Education Votes | NEA.org

Senate women call for fair minimum wage for women and families | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In communities across the country, “lunch lady” is a term of endearment.


It’s shorthand for “the caring, hard-working gals who make sure our kids have healthy food to eat in a safe, clean environment.”


But even after putting in full-time hours taking care of hundreds of students and working amid hot ovens and steaming dishwashers, those  women too often struggle to support their own families—especially those making only minimum wage. Fifteen percent of full-time food service workers in schools even qualify for public assistance.


Raising the minimum wage is one crucial step in bettering the lives of working women and their families, a point emphasized on Capitol Hill by a group of U.S. Senators supporting passage of the Minimum Wage Fairness Act.


Nearly two-thirds of minimum wage workers are women, and raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour as the Act proposes would especially help 15 million American women.


Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said at a press event on Tuesday that now is the time for Congress to pass the increase. “I truly believe that it’s part of making our economy work,” she said.


“Republicans have to decide whether they are really going to block giving 15 million American women a raise,” Senator Patty Murray (D-Wash.) said at a similar event in January.


“My hope is that … our Republican colleagues do a little soul searching as they prepare for this vote. I also hope they talk to the millions of American women who are struggling to get by on $7.25 an hour, particularly at a time when many of these women are the sole caregivers and breadwinners in their families.”


The focus on families is welcomed by Edith Kimball, a food service worker from Lee, Florida, who traveled to Washington in February to tell a Senate Committee how raising the minimum wage would help families just like hers.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram – Social Media Security Tips | MediaBistro.com

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram – Social Media Security Tips | MediaBistro.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the past 5 years social media growth has exploded around the globe and, as platforms such as Twitter and Facebook expand and begin to increasingly mirror and reflect “real life”, they take on many of the problems of the offline world, too.


For example: security. With millions of social media views, updates and registrations taking place literally each and every minute, the potential for identify thieves, hackers and good, old-fashioned burglars to exploit your personal information has never been greater.


Which means it’s solely your responsibility to ensure you’re protecting yourself when using these channels. Courtesy of Security Coverage, here is a wealth of data and tips to help boost your social media security.


Click headline to read to view the infographic full screen--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

"Mom, What is Project Management?" | Edutopia.org

"Mom, What is Project Management?" | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This question -- "Mom, what is project management?" -- was posed to me by one of my sons last year. It's a simple query, but crafting the answer to accommodate a child's lens of my career was a bit more challenging. So here was my response:


"It's the profession of planning, organizing and managing many things, including people and projects, for example."


A follow-up question by my other son within earshot was, naturally, "What's a project?"


OK, another fair question.


I explained to my sons that a project is, simply, a temporary and unique set of tasks that have a definite beginning and end -- a specific example being a book report.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

DJ Sessions: Off The Radar Festivals | Here & Now | WBUR.org

DJ Sessions: Off The Radar Festivals | Here & Now | WBUR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Many have heard of Bonnaroo and Telluride, but what about Asheville, North Carolina’s Moogfest?


WFPK music director Kyle Meredith and Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson look at some smaller niche festivals across the country, and music attendees can expect to hear.


Click headline to listen to this episode of DJ Sessions and view the music video clips of the songs heard in this segment of Here & Now--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Gizmag visits "3D: printing the future" at the London Science Museum | GizMag.com

Gizmag visits "3D: printing the future" at the London Science Museum | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

London's Science Museum is wildly popular, hosting over 2.9 million visitors a year. It's currently showing 3D: printing the future, an exhibition about 3D printing and how it will impact our lives. Gizmag payed the exhibition a visit.


The first thing to say is that 3D: printing the future is not especially big – or at least not in relation to some of the other vast exhibitions on display at the Science Museum. It comprises one large wall and a number of display cabinets. It's also not pitched at an especially tech-savvy audience – as with all Science Museum exhibitions, it is aimed at families and kids. What the exhibition does provide is a clear and coherent introduction to the subject, illustrated with a broad variation of 3D printed examples.


The exhibition (which has been running since October last year) was inspired by the increasing availability and decreasing cost of 3D printing. It recognizes that 3D printing is already taking off, from home enthusiasts all the way up to big business, and aims to explore what the impact of 3D printing will be on society.


Exhibits are split into three main groups – industry, medicine and small-scale projects and businesses. Amongst the items on display are 3D-printed replacement body parts, personalized drugs and artworks.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and access hot link to the exhibit website--


more...
No comment yet.