Digital Media Lit...
Follow
30.8K views | +3 today
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Are school closings the ‘new Jim Crow’? | WashPost.com

Are school closings the ‘new Jim Crow’? | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Arguing that school closures in cities across the country disproportionately affect African American students, community activists filed three federal civil rights complaints Tuesday challenging closures in Newark, New Orleans and Chicago and called on the Obama administration to halt similar efforts elsewhere.


“Children are being uprooted, shuffled into schools that are no better than the ones they came from,” said Judith Browne Dianis, co-director of the Advancement Project, one of several organizations that are calling their effort the Journey for Justice Alliance. “In each city, African American children’s hopes of equal educational opportunity are being dashed.”


The complaints, sent to the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights and the Justice Department, charge that students of color from Newark, Chicago and New Orleans have been disproportionately affected by school closures and charter-school expansions. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination in the use of federal funds by schools and other institutions.


In Newark, 13 public schools have closed since 2009. In Chicago, 111 schools have closed since 2001. In New Orleans, all the traditional public schools except five have shut down since 2003. The District of Columbia has closed 39 traditional public schools since 2008.


Those shuttered schools have been replaced by public charter schools, which are funded by taxpayers but are privately operated. Teachers in charter schools typically are not unionized.


In New Orleans, 79 percent of students attend charter schools, the highest rate in the nation. Next in line is Detroit, where 51 percent of students attend charters, and the District, where 43 percent of public-school students are in charters.


The activists called on the Obama administration to halt school closings and stop the spread of charter schools.


That seems unlikely for an administration that has consistently promoted the expansion of charters, making it a requirement for states that want to compete for Race to the Top funding or receive a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind law. In 2010, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Hurricane Katrina was the “best thing” to happen to the New Orleans public-school system because so many neighborhood schools never reopened and were replaced by charter schools. Duncan later apologized for his remarks, calling them “dumb.”


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Education Accountability We Can Believe In | Education Opportunity Network

Michelle Obama is very upset.


According to reports from CNN, the First Lady finds it’s “unacceptable” that Republicans lawmakers in the House are pushing to allow schools to opt out of nutrition regulations that were part of a 2010 law that established new requirements for the country’s free or reduced-price lunch program. The new regulations call for these midday meals to have less sodium laced junk food and more healthful fare like fresh fruit and vegetables.


Apparently, the First Lady considers the new standards as a “hallmark” of her campaign against childhood obesity. Her logic is hard to deny. For sure, unhealthy weight gains in children are linked to what they eat, and federal tax dollars should not promote unhealthy eating. Noting that one in three kids are obese, the first lady emphasized that, the report quotes, “folks in Washington should be on our side.”


Surely, here is a fight Democrats can understand: Upholding a federal effort to make sure the nation’s money is spent on positive inputs for our children, so there will eventually be positive effects on their lives down the road. The program is a taxpayer-funded endeavor that feeds “more than 30 million children,” according to the reporter. Eligibility is based on household income.


Of course, government policy can’t make students eat the more nutritious food, can’t control what students eat outside of school, and won’t ensure parents reinforce healthful eating in the home. But at least everyone should agree it’s foolish to wring our hands over children’s rising obesity levels, and then do nothing to address the actual causes.


If that logic seems sensible to you then ask yourself why it isn’t being applied to the rest of our education policy.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Turning Your Classrooms from Places to Control Students to Places to Engage Them in Learning | The 21st Century Principal

Turning Your Classrooms from Places to Control Students to Places to Engage Them in Learning | The 21st Century Principal | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

How we handle the details of designing our “learning spaces” ultimately determines what happens in our classrooms. As Jukes points out, for the first time in history students and teachers do not even have to be in the same place when learning. Also, the content is no longer confined to textbooks.


Still, our schools’ classrooms are designed for “imparting knowledge” not engaging in authentic learning. I would bet if you look at any recent plan drawn up for a new school, the spaces are still designed for traditional factory model learning.


The classrooms are arranged like so many pods with desks sitting in rows with a teacher desk placed at the front of the room with a whiteboard located behind.


What many still do not quite understand is a simple principle of classroom design: How you plan the learning space ultimately determines the kinds of learning that happens in that space. Even the furniture selections can impact the learning that happens.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Luxe Life of the School-Privatization Business | NationalJournal.com

The Luxe Life of the School-Privatization Business | NationalJournal.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In December 2013, after $2.3 million in tax dollars was diverted from public schools to student vouchers used at a single private school in Milwaukee, the founders abruptly shuttered the school in the dead of night and relocated to a home with an in-ground pool in sunny Palm Coast, Fla.


Here's what they left behind: Just one student enrolled in the now defunct LifeSkills Academy was found to be proficient in reading and math in the last full school year. Just one.

 

While privatization advocates say they want to give parents choices, they spend plenty of time vilifying our public schools and their teachers. Ironically, not a single public school in the United States has the appalling student performance record of LifeSkills Academy.


Stories like LifeSkills Academy's are not an exception. From heads of tax-credit-receiving private schools in Arizona and Florida purchasing luxury cars with public dollars, outsourced schools that fail to properly report revenues in Pennsylvania, to schools taking public dollars to teach creationism in Indiana, these stories are too common. Even worse are abuses and improprieties that are perfectly legal.


Take a look at the record of one of the largest virtual schools, K12 Inc. It was founded in 2000 by a Wall Street trader with help from Michael Milken, who made school privatization his second career after a felony conviction ended his career in high-yield bonds. K12 raked in more than $848 million last year, largely from taxpayer dollars.


Like LifeSkills Academy, K12 is paid based on enrollment, regardless of results.


In 2012, an in-depth study revealed that only 27.7 percent of K12 online schools met adequate yearly progress testing goals, compared with 52 percent of public schools. In some states, K12's "churn" rate of kids who drop out is more than half.


Even though independent analysis shows that these kinds of outsourced "cyber-academies" perform significantly worse than brick-and-mortar public schools, the money keeps rolling in. All too often, low-income and minority students—fast-growing parts of the nation's public-school-aged population and privatized school student bodies—pay the real price when these cyber-academies fail to ensure that most of their students actually learn.


Even more troubling, politicians who peddle school privatization often attack teachers' salaries and make unfounded claims of unionized educators' so-called gold-plated pensions, yet we don't hear any indignation from them about the excessive salaries of those reaping an increasing share of public dollars for private gain.


Take Ron Packard, K12's former CEO. In 2012, he earned a base salary of $625,000, a "performance" bonus of $584,375, a stock award worth $1.25 million, and stock options worth $1.5 million. But there's more. The company matched 25 percent of his salary for his retirement fund. Now that's a luxurious pension. And who funds this kind of deal? Taxpayers.


Contrast that with a public-school teacher's average salary of about $50,000 and an annual pension of about $40,000.


How did this happen?


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Blandin Foundation awards grant to Goodhue County Education District for access to online professional development | Blandin on Broadband

Blandin Foundation announced today that it has awarded six grants totaling $147,750 that assist rural Minnesota communities in advancing high-speed Internet access and use in their communities.


Goodhue County Education District will provide licensed staff members access to online professional develop courses available through high-speed Internet, with support of a $50,000 Blandin Foundation grant. Online courses can be tailored to staff’s individual needs and will be a more convenient option to earn required continuing education units rather than having to travel to conferences, classes, and workshops.


“This grant, and the online learning it supports, will provide us with an opportunity to build individual and collective capacity for our staff and support our strategic plans in immediate ways,” said Cheryl Johnson Director of Special Education for Goodhue County.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Technology Is Changing How We Teach | The Transylvania Times

Technology Is Changing How We Teach | The Transylvania Times | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In my last column, I reported some of the conversations I had with Brevard and Rosman Middle School students at the end of the Golden LEAF Foundation's 1:1 Teaching and Learning grant for Transylvania County Schools. You'll remember this is the initiative in which every middle school student received a Chromebook to use 24/7 throughout the school year. Today I want to share my focus group conversations with the adults who teach them.


Like their students, the teachers and principals acknowledge that teaching and learning is different with technology. First of all, there are so many more resources!


"I teach science," one Rosman Middle School teacher said, "and so much of what I teach isn't even in a textbook. It makes sharing with them [my students] easier."


We adults remember field trips - and schools still take them. But virtual field trips offer alternatives. Not only can classes go to Asheville or Raleigh or even Washington, DC; they can travel anywhere in the world or out of it. Virtual field trips on the Chromebook allow teachers to show kids the view from the Great Wall of China (or lack thereof because of the smog) or visit Mars or the moon. They allow them to tour the N.C. legislative building or the old capitol before actually hopping on the bus; students know what to look for when they arrive.


What else is different? Remember how long it used to take to get back a test? Now teachers can grade tests as students take them. Students get immediate feedback on what they got right, and where they made mistakes. Remember how you would struggle with writing an essay only to have the teacher, days later, return it with red marks all over it? At Brevard Middle School, teachers can watch while their children write, offering real time suggestions as a student types her paper. No need for red marks when feedback is immediate and ongoing.


Many of us remember chorus; chorus was what happened second period, in the music room. Today students at Brevard Middle School have their music on their Chromebooks. They take it home, listen to how it should sound, memorize the lyrics, and practice before they come to class the next day. Music theory, sight singing-all are easier with Chromebooks.


"They read music as easily as they read children's books," said their middle school chorus teacher.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

10 Maya Angelou Quotes That Will Lift You Up | Mashable.com

10 Maya Angelou Quotes That Will Lift You Up | Mashable.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Maya Angelou passed away on Wednesday, the world lost not only a revered author and poet, but a guiding light for humanity.


Angelou's ability to inspire will live on in her prolific thoughts, proverbs and works; her words could be compiled into a guidebook for leading a fulfilling, successful life.


Though the world is less wise with Angelou's departure, her wisdom will continue to serve as an inspiration.


Click headline to view Maya Angelou's pix and quotes--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

White House Cites TWC, NBCU for STEM Efforts | Multichannel.com

White House Cites TWC, NBCU for STEM Efforts | Multichannel.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Time Warner Cable's ongoing Connect a Million Minds initiative to get kids involved in after-school STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities is getting a shout-out from the White House today, while Comcast's NBCU Hispanic Enterprises and Content is getting a nod as a "new partner stepping up in response to the President's call to action" for announcing a new program, Aprender es Triunfar, an effort to close the "Latino student achievement gap," with a focus on STEM. 


As part of that effort, NBCU's MSNBC, Telemundo and mun2 will simulcast a 44-minute TV version of theatrical documentary, Underwater Dreams about four teenagers, all sons of Mexican immigrants, who enter an underwater robotics competition.

 

In announcing some new elements of the President's Educate to Innovate STEM education program, the White House highlighted under the section on "ongoing momentum by existing partners the fact that TWC had already reached its goal of connecting those million students to community STEM programs.

 

"Through national and local non-profit partnerships, employee volunteers, original public service announcements, and innovative campaigns like "STEM in Sports" and "Wouldn’t It Be Cool If…," TWC has organized direct and in-kind investments of more than $100 million to-date to inspire student interest in STEM subjects," said the White House early Tuesday (May 27) in advance of the President hosting the White House Science Fair, which is focusing on girls and women excelling in STEM.

 

TWC announced in February it was donating $500,000 in cash and in kind support to help the Boys and Girls Clubs of America create a STEM program starting this summer. (http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/washington/time-warner-cable-bgca-...).


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Giant exoplanet imaged directly using infrared light | GizMag.com

Giant exoplanet imaged directly using infrared light | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Using an infrared camera, astronomers at the University of Montreal have discovered and directly imaged GU Psc b, a planet with a mass 10 times greater than Jupiter's and orbiting its star at 2,000 times the distance between Earth and our sun. This very rare find will encourage scientists to start looking for exoplanets in places where, thus far, they hadn't even thought to look.


Current theories predict that the vast majority of planets orbit their star at a distance up to 100 astronomical units (AU) – that is to say, one hundred times the distance between Earth and our sun. So, in their search for exoplanets, astronomers have mostly focused well within this boundary. They detect new planets indirectly by looking at how they affect their star's gravitational field or, very rarely, by imaging them directly with infrared light, using adaptive optics to tell them apart from their own star.


A research team led by PhD student Marie-Ève Naud set out to look for distant planets with a new approach. Using an infrared camera, Naud and colleagues attempted to detect new planets directly, without adaptive optics, and looking well beyond the usual 100 AU boundary. To do so, they relied on patterns of infrared wavelengths that distinguish planets from galaxies and other celestial bodies. After surveying dozens of stars in this way, they finally laid their eyes on GU Psc b, a planet 155 light years away from our solar system, in the Pisces constellation.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Buildies bring stability to childhood forts | GizMag.com

Buildies bring stability to childhood forts | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As children, most of us would have constructed shaky fortresses out of pillows, mattresses and mom's best manchester. In the eyes of Illinois-based product designer Brian Lilly, these childhood constructions could benefit from a little more structural stability so he developed Buildies, a kit of cardboard blocks and connectors designed to teach kids about engineering, all while letting their imaginations run wild.


The jumbo-sized Buildies blocks are designed to interlock thanks to Lego-like bumps protruding from the top. Using both four plug and smaller, single plug blocks, kids can construct anything from the impenetrable walls of a castle to stages for their puppet shows.


The kit comes with pieces designed specifically for the roof, because we all know the best forts provide some form of shelter. These cardboard trusses use plugs on the underside to lock into place when sitting atop the walls. They are also adjustable, with a cardboard "crossbeam" to slide into one slot for a medium angled roof, with another slot allowing for a high angled roof when the kids get a little taller. Included are also block connector strips, which act as the "mortar." Placing these over the plugs in-between layers provides extra stability, overlapping conjoining blocks to hold them together.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why Women Don’t Study Engineering — And What 1 Mass. College Is Doing About It | WBUR.org

Why Women Don’t Study Engineering  — And What 1 Mass. College Is Doing About It | WBUR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A 2011 study by the American Society for Engineering Education found women accounted for only 18 percent of undergraduate students in engineering.


At the University of Massachusetts Amherst, that number is even lower: only 291 women out of 1,833 undergraduates, or 16 percent, at the College of Engineering this year.


Kelly Kennedy liked physics and math when she was growing up. But she found that was not the case with a lot of her classmates.


“For some reason, a lot of girls don’t take the AP Physics classes or AP Calc classes and more guys do,” she said.


Kennedy just graduated from UMass Amherst’s College of Engineering with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, an especially unusual field for women.


“A lot of guys will become interested in cars,” Kennedy said, “and then someone will tell them, ‘You should become an engineer and then you can design the cars,’ but I think as girls, we don’t get that as much.”


And it’s not just mechanical engineering. It’s engineering in general.


“Culturally, we tend to think that engineering is not for women,” said Yevgeniya Zastavker, an associate professor of physics at Olin College of Engineering, a small school of fewer than 400 students in Needham, founded in 1997. “Engineering is mostly for men.”


From its beginning, Olin wanted to attract more women to engineering.


Olin’s president, Rick Miller, said the way engineering colleges teach engineering turns women and other students away who might otherwise be great engineers. He views engineering as a performing art. But he compares the way most schools teach it to what would happen at a music school where students don’t touch instruments until their senior year.


“You’d be talking about point and counterpoint, harmony and melody and tempo and all the things that are behind the structure of the way music is created,” Miller said. “In the fourth year, if you’re still here, we’ll ask you to play a scale on a real violin and then we’ll give you a music degree.”


When those freshman and sophomore engineering courses are centered on theory and math and problem sets, they can be daunting.


Click headline to read more and listen to this WBUR radio program--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MIT tackled Earth's atmosphere to give the moon broadband | NetworkWorld.com

MIT tackled Earth's atmosphere to give the moon broadband | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Four transmitting telescopes in the New Mexico desert, each just 6 inches in diameter, can give a satellite orbiting the moon faster Internet access than many U.S. homes get.


The telescopes form the earthbound end of an experimental laser link to demonstrate faster communication with spacecraft and possible future bases on the moon and Mars. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will give details about the system and its performance next month at a conference of The Optical Society.


The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) kicked off last September with the launch of NASA's LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer), a research satellite now orbiting the moon. NASA built a laser communications module into LADEE for use in the high-speed wireless experiment.


LLCD has already proved itself, transmitting data from LADEE to Earth at 622Mbps (bits per second) and in the other direction at 19.44Mbps, according to MIT. It beat the fastest-ever radio communication to the moon by a factor of 4,800.


NASA hopes lasers can speed up communication with missions in space, which use radio to talk to Earth now, and let them send back more data. Laser equipment also weighs less than radio gear, a critical factor given the high cost of lifting any object into space.


The project uses transmitting telescopes at White Sands, New Mexico, to send data as pulses of invisible infrared light. The hard part of reaching the moon by laser is getting through Earth's atmosphere, which can bend light and cause it to fade or drop out on the way to the receiver.


One way the researchers got around that was by using the four separate telescopes. Each sends its beam through a different column of air, where the light-bending effects of the atmosphere are slightly different. That increases the chance that at least one of the beams will reach the receiver on the LADEE.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Is Citizen Science, and How Can You Get Involved? | Mashable.com

What Is Citizen Science, and How Can You Get Involved? | Mashable.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You don't need to be a '90s-bred Bill Nye fan to know science rules. Just look at the state of the Internet in 2014 — we f*cking love that sh*t.


Now, thanks to an outpouring of crowdsourcing calls from scientists and universities across the world, "citizen scientists" — like you, me and our Ph.D.-challenged friends — can brainstorm and partake in the grunt work for big-scale scientific research. It's a win-win way to help out and get introduced to some of the top researchers in the biz.


For years, scientists from a variety of fields have crowdsourced help from the public: retirees to advocates to former cheerleaders to inmates. But active participants say the social media age has opened up all new doors for its (hopefully ongoing) potential.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Boosting school funding 20 percent erased the graduation gap between rich and poor students | Vox.com

Boosting school funding 20 percent erased the graduation gap between rich and poor students | Vox.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Spending more money on educating children in poor districts can dramatically change the trajectory of those children's lives, according to a new working paper examining the effects of court orders that attempt to equalize funding for poor and wealthy school districts.


Additional money spent educating a child from a poor family made that child more likely to graduate high school, less likely to fall into poverty as an adult and more likely to complete an additional year of education, public policy researchers from Northwestern University and the University of California-Berkeley found.


On some measures, such as the high school graduation rate, the gains from a 20 percent boost in funding at all levels of education were enough to entirely erase the gap between poor students and students from wealthier families.


School funding has traditionally mostly come from local property taxes, which can lead to a wide gulf between poor and wealthy districts. Between 1971 and 2010, 28 state supreme courts have required states to change their school funding system to reduce those differences.


The researchers, C. Kirabo Jackson and Claudia Persico from Northwestern University and Rucker Johnson from the University of California at Berkeley, looked at the effects of these court-ordered changes. They compared students in school before the reforms were implemented to students who were in school when the reforms were passed and students who went to school after the reforms.


They used data from a sample of 15,000 children born between 1955 and 1985, part of a longitudinal data set that followed those children into adulthood and measured their income.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

For Aspiring Female Engineers, A Square Meal Of Code | TechCrunch.com

For Aspiring Female Engineers, A Square Meal Of Code | TechCrunch.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last year, high school student Michelle Nguyen had all but given up her hope of becoming an engineer. A Senior at Mission High School in San Francisco (which did not offer a computer science class), she thought she had to be smarter, more privileged, and be a male to be successful in computer science.


“I thought I had to be a guy to be an engineer,” she told me as she was siting in the Square offices nearby her home in the Tenderloin, only days away from taking the AP Computer Science test.


But Nguyen still held some small hope for being part of this world — she would read publications online that gave her an inside view into technology. She was reading TechCrunch last fall when she came across an article about payments company Square’s High School Code Camp, a 9-month long program that taught students from local San Francisco high schools how to program in Java; and gave them the opportunity to take the AP CS exam in May.


Nguyen, who applied and attended the class along with 7 other young women in high school, just graduated, and was accepted into UC Santa Cruz to study computer science.


“I knew I had to look beyond what I was offered at [high] school to get what I wanted,” she told me.


Susan Tham, whose school Raoul Wallenberg Traditional High School ,did offer an AP computer science course soon found herself to be the only girl left standing. Out of a group of 30 or so students, only 4 girls enrolled in the AP Computer Science class at her school, and the three other girls quickly quit the class because of the challenge and intimidation.


Tham herself just stayed in the class not because she had dreams of being a programmer but because she actually enjoyed coding and was good at it. In fact, she taught herself how to code initially by taking classes on Udacity. “It was easy to learn how to code. I love the instant feedback,” she told me.


Her CS teacher saw her potential and recommended she apply to Square’s program, though Tham says she was so surprised when she was admitted — she never thought she would have been chosen.


For Tham, Code Camp taught her that she could actually make a career out of being a software engineer. And that this wouldn’t mean working in a tan cubicle for a boring company. She’ll be attending UC Irvine this fall for Computer Science.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Poet Maya Angelou dies at age 86 | USAToday.com

Poet Maya Angelou dies at age 86 | USAToday.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Celebrated memorist and poet Maya Angelou, 86, who was found dead Wednesday at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C., was a high school dropout who became a professor of American Studies at Wake Forest University.


Angelou was an American Study herself. "I have created myself," she told USA TODAY in 2007, "I have taught myself so much."


She defied labels. She was a walking encylopedia of careers and passions. She wrote 36 books. She was an actress, director, playwright, composer, singer and dancer. She once worked as a madam in a brothel and as the first female and first black street car conductor in San Francisco.


She was best known for her debut memoir, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), which remains widely read in schools. She described being raped at 8 (by her mother's boyfriend) and becoming an unwed mother at 17. (She is survived by her son, Guy Johnson, a poet and novelist).


She was friends with Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X as well as Oprah Winfrey who hosted grand birthday parties for Angelou.


In a statement, Winfrey said, "I've been blessed to have Maya Angelou as my mentor, mother/sister, and friend since my 20s. She was there for me always, guiding me through some of the most important years of my life. The world knows her as a poet but at the heart of her, she was a teacher. 'When you learn, teach. When you get, give' is one of my best lessons from her."


Click headline to read more, scroll through of life timeline, view pix gallery and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

SpaceShipTwo to be fueled by thermoset plastic similar to nylon | GizMag.com

SpaceShipTwo to be fueled by thermoset plastic similar to nylon | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the still-to-be-announced date of the first commercial flight of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo approaches, more and more of the technology involved is getting nailed down. A case in point is the company's announcement that it has decided which fuel will be used in the first passenger-carrying flights of the suborbital spacecraft. The solid fuel grains that will fuel the world’s largest operational hybrid rocket will be a thermoset plastic similar to nylon.


When SpaceShipTwo launches after being dropped by the WhiteKnightTwo carrier aircraft, it will be powered into orbit by a hybrid rocket motor developed by Sierra Nevada Corporation that uses solid rocket fuel and nitrous oxide as an oxidizer. The gas oxidizer means that, unlike conventional solid rocket motors, it can be shut down at will.


Its predecessor, SpaceShipOne, used hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), which is a classic fuel for solid rocket motors. But after reviewing data collected from static test firings, Virgin Galactic has decided on an alternative fuel for the remainder of the test flights of SpaceShipTwo and for the first commercial flights.


Instead of HTPB, the rocket motor will now use a fuel based on polyamide, a class of thermoset plastics of which the most well known is nylon. It is used in everything from clothing to airbags and industrial plastics, and has the added advantage of not requiring any redesign of the motor, which was built to regard the two fuel grains as interchangeable.


Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clip----


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Associated Press

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Associated Press | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital.


They attest to a new class of indigenous nouveau riche, many of them merchants who converted street stalls into fortunes. Owners often sink a million dollars into the opulent edifices, lavishing funds on brilliantly colored ballrooms.


"They are a new Aymara bourgeoisie that migrated from the countryside and made it big," said Xavier Albo, a Jesuit anthropologist, referring to Bolivia's dominant indigenous group.


The mini-mansions mesh modern and traditional architecture and flaunt, above all, two things: their owners' wealth and their Aymara heritage. About 120 such buildings exist across Bolivia, most in El Alto, says architecture historian Elisabetta Andreoli, who calls their style "neo-Andean." And many more are under construction.


Most have been built since President Evo Morales, the country's first indigenous leader and himself an Aymara, took office in 2006. Their emergence coincides with a modest economic boom coupled with a rise in Aymara pride. Bolivia's construction industry grew by 8.6 percent last year, double the economy's overall growth rate.


Rosario Leuca's seven-story manse, now being built, will have all the essential elements: A facade resplendent with symbols from the pre-Columbian Tiwanaku culture, plenty of plate glass and a luxury chalet penthouse with built-in barbeque grill and view of nearby snow-capped Andean peaks.


The lower floors of Leuca's castle are, as is the custom, dedicated to commerce. The ground floor will be a restaurant, the mezzanine a reception hall that fits more than 300 people. Higher up is a synthetic mini-soccer pitch and apartments.


"I am an Aymara woman, proud of my culture, happy and full of color. So why should my home not show what I am?" Leuca says as she does a few whirls to show off a puffy skirt, wool shawl and Borsalino hat that similarly bespeak her heritage.


Leuca capitalized on her culinary skills to rise from street vendor to restaurateur after moving to El Alto with her husband 10 years ago from a town near Lake Titicaca.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc from Educommunication
Scoop.it!

Digital skills and digital culture

Click headline to access and print the PDF of this document--


Via Manuel Pinto
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google to put 3D vision technology in experimental tablet | NetworkWorld.com

Google to put 3D vision technology in experimental tablet | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Google is developing a new tablet with advanced vision capabilities that can be used to capture 3D images.


About 4,000 of the prototypes will be produced at the beginning of next month for use by developers, reported the Wall Street Journal, citing people briefed on the company's plans. The new tablet could be ready before Google's developer conference Google I/O kicks off on June 25, the Journal said.


The tablet will have a 7-inch screen, infrared depth censors, two back cameras and software for processing 3D images, and will be part of Google's Project Tango, according to the newspaper.


Project Tango is Google's attempt to create a mobile device that shares a human's sense of space and movement and understands and perceives the world the same way we do.


A Google spokesman declined to comment on the tablet plans on Friday.


In February, Google launched a 5-inch Project Tango prototype Android smartphone combining technology from the worlds of computer vision and robotics to create a 3D model of the phone's surroundings.


This technology could for instance be used to quickly find the exact shelf where a product is located in a store or to make a 3D floor plan of a house before going out to shop for furniture. Project Tango could also guide the visually impaired around unfamiliar indoor places and provide step-by-step directions in stores.


These are all possibilities for the tablet too, reported the Wall Street Journal, adding that the technology could also be used for immersive videogames.


Two Project Tango phones are heading to the International Space Station during the upcoming Orbital 2 commercial resupply mission scheduled to launch on June 10. The phones will be attached to self-powered soccer-ball-sized robots called "Spheres" that will fly around inside the space station.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Ricky Herman
Scoop.it!

End of School Roundup: Using Creation & Curation in Education | Scoop.it

End of School Roundup: Using Creation & Curation in Education | Scoop.it | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

According to the Content Marketing Institute, original content should be the cornerstone of your content marketing. And curating content can raise your brand awareness and bring more visitors to your website. So how do these two fundamental marketing pieces work together? Very nicely. In terms of content marketing in any industry, how you marry creation and curation could mean your success or failure.

Specifically in education, EdTech consultants, teachers and librarians are doing a great job combining creation and curation to showcase student creativity, school information and thought leadership. We've pulled four worthy examples of users in the EdTech space who exemplify using powerful online tools to master creation and curation consistently.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dialtone claims first infinitely tone-adjustable guitar pickup | GizMag.com

Dialtone claims first infinitely tone-adjustable guitar pickup | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The “right” guitar tone is an elusive and personal thing, and many seasoned guitarists strive to achieve a particular tone that reflects their musical style or matches the genre in which they are playing. In response to this, Dialtone is set to launch its new guitar pickup aimed squarely at the musician who likes to adjust their sound on the fly. Claimed to be the world's first on-guitar version of an infinitely adjustable pickup, the Dialtone promises a lot of tone control without the need for further effects boxes or software control.


In the quest for the perfect sound, musicians will often mix and match combinations of amplifier, effects boxes, settings – even the thickness of the strings that they use. One aspect central to this quest is the pickup. Traditionally, the pickup is a combination of magnets and coils of wire whose job is to create electrical signals when the guitar strings vibrate.


However, these traditional pickups are relatively inflexible in the sound that they produce and so musicians often mix them up in various wiring configurations designed to give a particular sound; funk, jazz, rock, country and so on. Indeed, many musicians obsess so much about this that they look to more than just the pickup selection on standard guitars; they often wire and rewire their own in a quest for that “ultimate” tone.


Enter John Liptac, a musician sick of swapping out and rewiring pickups in his search for the perfect tone. Not content with the limited pickup selection for standard guitars, John decided to make one that would be adjustable, in situ, on the guitar itself.


Using his background in engineering and physics, and his knowledge of guitars, he designed an infinitely variable pickup that – with the judicious twiddling of the two knobs on it – could effectively tune the resonance (in this context, the ideal frequency at which the sound energy, or note, produced by the plucked string is at its most efficient) and the “Q” (simply, filtering the resonant frequency produced by the string to tune it to a narrow bandwidth thereby giving the note better “quality”). This allows the guitarist to fine tune the pickup for the best tone without having to pull it and rewire it.


Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Matter will be created from light within a year, claim scientists | The Guardian

Matter will be created from light within a year, claim scientists | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Researchers have worked out how to make matter from pure light and are drawing up plans to demonstrate the feat within the next 12 months.


The theory underpinning the idea was first described 80 years ago by two physicists who later worked on the first atomic bomb. At the time they considered the conversion of light into matter impossible in a laboratory.


But in a report published on Sunday, physicists at Imperial College London claim to have cracked the problem using high-powered lasers and other equipment now available to scientists.


"We have shown in principle how you can make matter from light," said Steven Rose at Imperial. "If you do this experiment, you will be taking light and turning it into matter."


The scientists are not on the verge of a machine that can create everyday objects from a sudden blast of laser energy. The kind of matter they aim to make comes in the form of subatomic particles invisible to the naked eye.


The original idea was written down by two US physicists, Gregory Breit and John Wheeler, in 1934. They worked out that – very rarely – two particles of light, or photons, could combine to produce an electron and its antimatter equivalent, a positron. Electrons are particles of matter that form the outer shells of atoms in the everyday objects around us.


But Breit and Wheeler had no expectations that their theory would be proved any time soon. In their study, the physicists noted that the process was so rare and hard to produce that it would be "hopeless to try to observe the pair formation in laboratory experiments".


Oliver Pike, the lead researcher on the study, said the process was one of the most elegant demonstrations of Einstein's famous relationship that shows matter and energy are interchangeable currencies. "The Breit-Wheeler process is the simplest way matter can be made from light and one of the purest demonstrations of E=mc2," he said.


Writing in the journal Nature Photonics, the scientists describe how they could turn light into matter through a number of separate steps.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

11 Reasosn Why You Should Integrate Games in Your Teaching | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

11 Reasosn Why You Should Integrate Games in Your Teaching | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Games are ubiquitous digital activities that students , regardless of their grade level, engage in online. They play them on their computers, smart phones, with each other and with others they have never met.


Several scientific studies published in this regard speak for the advocacy of game integration in education (see the list of resources at the end of this post).


I have spent sometime reading some of these studies and came up with the list below featuring the main reasons why you need to consider using games in your teaching.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What school reformers can learn from poker | WashPost.com

What school reformers can learn from poker | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

School reformers have made student outcomes the big focus of their efforts, targeting teachers for failure to improve student achievement. But teachers say they ignore the inputs — the issues students bring into a classroom and the training/resources of  teachers.


Here’s a look about the problem with outcome-based assessment, by Ben Spielberg,  a Teach For America alum and current math instructional coach in San Jose Unified School District who serves on the Executive Board of the San Jose Teachers Association.  Ben co-founded 34justice.com and blogs about a variety of social justice issues, where you can find a version of this post. He has a bachelors degree in Mathematical and Computational Sciences from Stanford University and has written several articles about education research and policy.


Click headline to read Ben Spielberg's article--

more...
No comment yet.