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Disney tech lets users feel 3D objects on flat screens | GizMag.com

Disney tech lets users feel 3D objects on flat screens | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Our smartphones and tablets may be able to show us what things look and sound like, but with their flat glass screens, there's no way that they could indicate what something feels like ... right? Actually, they may soon be able to do that, too. Researchers at Disney Research, Pittsburgh have developed a system that lets users' fingertips feel a simulated bump through a flat screen, that corresponds to a bump in the displayed image.


Ordinarily, when we feel a bump as we're sliding our finger across a smooth surface, we do so because the increase in friction created by the bump causes the skin in our fingertip to stretch ever so slightly.


In order to simulate that friction, the Disney team uses a conductive display in which the electrostatic forces between the finger and the glass can be modulated by applying more or less voltage to the screen. An algorithm keeps track of the location and speed of the user's moving fingertip, and adjusts the "electrovibrations" to match the topography of the part of the image that's being touched.


So far, the images must be either 3D models or the product of scans done with depth sensors such as the Kinect, so the algorithm has depth data to work with.


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John Purificati's curator insight, October 10, 2013 10:25 AM

Great tool for tactile learners.

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Wash, DC: JC Hayward seeks dismissal from Options Charter case | Wash Post

Wash, DC: JC Hayward seeks dismissal from Options Charter case | Wash Post | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Local television news personality J.C. Hayward has asked a D.C. Superior Court judge to remove her from the list of defendants in a case involving allegations of a multimillion-dollar self-dealing scheme at a District charter school.


Hayward, an anchor at WUSA (Channel 9), was named in a civil complaint last week that sought to take over Options Public Charter School amid allegations that former top school officials had funneled millions of dollars to two for-profit companies they owned. The D.C. attorney general alleged that the former managers received “exorbitant” bonuses from the school before they resigned to run the companies full time and called into question large contracts the companies had with the school. Hayward was chairman of the school’s board of trustees — and, according to court documents, allegedly signed off on the contracts and bonuses in that role — before she stepped down in recent days.


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3D-printed attachment turns smartphones into sub-wavelength microscopes | GizMag.com

3D-printed attachment turns smartphones into sub-wavelength microscopes | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A team of engineers at UCLA has created a 3D-printed attachment that enables smartphone cameras to image particles as small as 90 nanometers. This makes it the first portable, cellphone-based imaging system capable of detecting single nanoparticles and viruses according to the researchers.


The wavelength of light measures on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Imaging objects that are smaller ("sub-wavelength") is a challenge because the signal strength and contrast become very low.


Nonetheless, the team led by Prof. Aydogan Ozcan at UCLA managed to build a 3D-printed microscope attachment that can do just that.


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Canada's math, science lag bad for economy, report says | CBC.ca

Canada's math, science lag bad for economy, report says | CBC.ca | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Canadians scored “significantly below the average” on a numeracy test compared with 24 countries, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development reported Tuesday, the same day another report concluded that Canada’s high math and science dropout rates are costly for the Canadian economy.


The OECD released its first survey of adult skills Tuesday, measuring the literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving skills of those aged 16 to 65 in 24 countries, including 27,000 people in Canada.


While Canadians scored far above average at problem solving in technology-rich environments and their average literacy score was around the average of OECD countries, their mean numeracy score was “significantly below the average,” the OECD said, putting Canada 13th out of 21 countries.


The Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, described the average score as “slightly below the OECD average,” but acknowledged the results suggested “this is one area that could be targeted by policymakers for improvement.


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Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:08 PM

Canada is searching for many other options and things to invest in in their economy and their sciences are failing them.

Cameron & Sam's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:39 AM

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Google climbs into bed with JANET, as new educational ICT infrastructure framework agreed | Computing.co.uk

Google climbs into bed with JANET, as new educational ICT infrastructure framework agreed | Computing.co.uk | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Google Education today announced an agreement with JANET - the organisation that provides networking services to the UK education sector - to work from a standardised framework contract when supplying Google Apps for Education.


JANET, which is part of the Jisc group educational charity, has said that it sees a distinct advantage for educational institutions that "did not have the time nor resources to explore and understand contractual complexities of cloud security, data and protection".


The education body's CEO, Tim Marshall, urged educators to be "in bed with" the web services giant.


Liz Sproat, head of education for EMEA at Google, said Tuesday, at the company's unveiling of the deal at its London offices, that the agreement should allow educators to "move forward with confidence".


A representative of a London higher education institution told Computing that they were "impressed" with the collaboration, and said they felt, as a current Google Apps for Education customer, that the framework would make signing a new contract "significantly easier".


Potential benefits to universities include saving time and money on hiring lawyers to check the small print on matters such as data privacy.


Bearing in mind Google's chequered past in terms of data privacy, having been accused - and taken to court - on matters ranging from Google Mail ad-skimming to SEO-fixing in search results, Computing asked the University of Sheffield's CIO, Christine Sexton, whether the new agreement now meant Google could be trusted.


"We do. And our contract is already pretty watertight with them," said Sexton.


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US in a 'real state of crisis,' education secretary says | NBCNews.com

US in a 'real state of crisis,' education secretary says | NBCNews.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The United States is in "a real state of crisis," Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said Tuesday, as findings of a study showed that American adults fare poorly in mathematical and technical skills needed for a modern workplace compared to their counterparts in most other developed nations.


Duncan's comments were made during a panel during NBC's fourth-annual Education Nation Summit, a gathering on the state of education in America.


"We have a real state of crisis. This is much bigger than education," he told NBC's Matt Lauer, adding that the economy was playing a part. "We have to close what I call the opportunity gap. The gap between the haves and the have-nots is far too wide."


The study, based on tests developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a coalition of mostly industrialized countries, may be the most detailed look at education around the world yet.


The exams were administered to 166,000 people, ages 16 through 65, in 23 countries in 2011 and 2012. Results show a startling pattern of the United States lagging behind several other countries, starting with test scores and young adults' graduation rates and later corresponding to a skills gap after graduation.


Young adults in the U.S. also did poorly compared to their international equals not just in technology and math, but literacy, too.


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Largely Unchecked, Tutoring Companies Got Millions Through Program, by Morgan Smith | TexasTribune.org

Largely Unchecked, Tutoring Companies Got Millions Through Program, by Morgan Smith | TexasTribune.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In late September, a lesser-known No Child Left Behind program that set aside millions in federal funding to provide remedial help for struggling students from low-income families quietly came to a close in Texas.


During a news conference to announce that the state had been granted a general waiver from the 2001 federal education law, Education Commissioner Michael Williams cast the change as one of many that would give districts more authority over their underperforming schools.


But his comments signaled more than a shift in policy. The state had also, intentionally or not, struck a blow against a once-bustling and virtually unchecked for-profit industry.


A Texas Tribune investigation has uncovered years of inaction by state officials while money flowed to tutoring companies, delivering few academic results and flouting state law. As companies racked up complaints — and school districts spent further resources investigating them — the state agency responsible for administering the program repeatedly claimed it had no authority to intervene.


“I look at it as an incredible opportunity that has been missed for our students,” said Jon Dahlander, a spokesman for the Dallas Independent School District, which has spent $18 million on tutoring since 2009. “It’s unfortunate all the way around.”


A provision in the federal education law requires low performing schools to set aside 20 percent of the federal funding they receive for economically disadvantaged students to pay for “supplemental education services,” or tutoring, in middle and high school. In the last six years, Texas school districts have spent $180 million on such services, primarily from private providers. 


As the academic standards that schools had to meet under federal law ratcheted higher each year, the number of schools required to set aside money for tutoring grew — and so did their troubles with the private companies providing the services.


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Crisis in California's schools: 250,000 schoolchildren need glasses | LATimes.com

Crisis in California's schools: 250,000 schoolchildren need glasses | LATimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There is a crisis in California's schools. More than a quarter of a million children, most of them from poor and minority backgrounds, lack the technology they need to succeed in school.


But what they need has nothing to do with mobile devices or educational apps. It's a technology nearly 800 years old: eyeglasses.


About 250,000 California schoolchildren don't have the glasses they need to read the board, read books, study math and fully participate in their classes. About 95% of the public school students who need glasses enter school without them. These students are likely to fall behind and to frustrate their teachers and parents.


It's often not a money issue. Eye exams and corrective lenses are covered by Medi-Cal and many insurance plans. But there is a huge gap between coverage and care. Sometimes it's that parents and teachers simply haven't noticed the problem. And then there are the logistical issues: Parents have to take time off from work, and often they must arrange and pay for transportation. And navigating the healthcare system can be daunting. These things often keep kids, especially those from low-income families, out of the doctor's office.


In 2012, we started Vision to Learn to help address this problem. The idea is simple. Instead of forcing families to go to where the glasses are — the eye clinic — we bring the glasses to where the kids are: the schools.


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A Force For Real Education Reform Emerges | EducationOpportunityNetwork.org

Education “reform” wasn’t supposed to turn out like this.

In an ironic coda to the No Child Left Behind era last week, Texas officially turned its back on George W. Bush’s policy triumph by opting out of his signature mandate for schools to achieve “adequate yearly progress.”


Topping the irony of The Lone Star State rejecting a policy based on the Texas Miracle, the leader of the Beltway’s newest brand of “education reform,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, lashed out at critics of his signature education policy, Race to the Top, by saying they … wait for it … “inhabit a Washington bubble.”


Along with those who want “government hands off my Medicare” and Congressional Representatives who insist on being paid while they cut off wages to other federal employees, purveyors of education policy have clearly descended into nonsense.


As the country pivots from the failures of NCLB, what’s needed is not an insistence on the same brand of policies or the outright rejection of those who believe there is a better way forward, but a new course for real education reform based on traditional values that made public education an enduring American institution to begin with.


That new course is indeed emerging in a movement coming not from a Washington bubble but from communities across America.


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Teachers: Staying Positive in Trying Times | Edutopia.org

Teachers: Staying Positive in Trying Times | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

She was a mentor. She was an innovator. She was a fighter for students, academic rigor, and achievement. I use the past tense not because my colleague has passed away but because her positivity has. And in so doing, administrators have lost a mediator, the staff has lost colleague, and the students have lost a guide.


All staffs are made up of great teachers, good teachers, indifferent teachers, teachers who are in progress, and teachers who should have never been kept on. Versions of these categories are in every industry. But there is also another category of teacher: the one whose heart was in the job, but who had that heart broken after years of professional disappointment. I have, for the first time, been witness to that de-evolution from start to finish.


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ESA set to begin Mars rover tests in Chile | GizMag.com

ESA set to begin Mars rover tests in Chile | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Atacama desert in Chile is so dry that parts of it are utterly devoid of life down to bacteria. That and its sandy, rock-strewn terrain makes it so similar to Mars that it's a perfect spot for ESA to trial its Sample Acquisition Field Experiment with a Rover (SAFER), which will this week carry out tests related to navigation, remote control and the use of scientific instruments. The agency’s goal is the latest in a series of tests to develop technologies and gain practical experience in anticipation of ESA’s launch of the ExoMars rover to the Red Planet in 2018.


ExoMars is a major multi-spacecraft mission intended in part to look for life on Mars. A key component is the ExoMars rover. The trouble is, ESA hasn't sent a lander to the planet since the disastrous Beagle 2 mission in 2003, which ended with all contact being lost with the lander after it separated from the mothership. Worse, Beagle 2 was a static instrument package, not a rover. This means that ESA has a lot of catching up to do.


NASA has been sending landers into space since the 1960s and has been working with rovers in one form or another for almost as long. This gives the Americans a lot of experience to draw on, which ESA must now acquire in a much shorter time. ESA has a lot of experience working with satellites, but satellites face a much different set of problems from rovers.


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RI libraries to benefit from federal grants | The Brown Daily Herald

RI libraries to benefit from federal grants | The Brown Daily Herald | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Three Rhode Island libraries will receive $800,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grants program, with the grants going to  Providence Community Library, Providence Public Library and University of Rhode Island Library System.


The initiatives funded by the grant — made possible by Sen. Jack Reed’s, D-R.I., Museum and Library Services Act of 2010 —  share a mission of fostering community collaboration to enhance literacy and learning.


Providence Community Library will partner with Ready to Learn Providence to head a two-year early learning literacy project called “Ready for K!” Providence Public Library will partner with statewide organizations to address digital literacy, adult education, learning resources and workforce services. URI will use the funds to integrate digital media with children’s libraries, according to a press release from Reed’s office.


School readiness is an issue important in Providence, where 46 percent of public school students do not read at grade level, said Michelle Novello, Providence Community Library program director. Kids “spend first through third grade learning to read, and then in fourth, they read to learn,” she said, adding that children who cannot read by the fourth grade fall behind.


Early learning literacy is largely affected by income level, Novello said, addingthat low-income children fall further behind over the summer when access to resources that would help them sustain their reading level is often limited. The IMLS grant will fund initiatives to ameliorate this backslide by attracting children to the city’s libraries during the summer and after school, she added.


Part of the initiative is “teaching parents and caregivers that the library has resources that would benefit and support them,” Novello said. Libraries should not assume families know what resources are available, accessible and free, she added. Providence Community Library will use the funds for community outreach to better inform residents about programs and help assess public school students entering kindergarten for literacy and preparedness problems.


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Joining the Surveillance Society? | NewAmerica.org

Joining the Surveillance Society? | NewAmerica.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Recent digital inclusion policies that aim to increase digital literacy of new Internet and computer users, promote civic engagement, and improve economic development do not currently address the privacy needs of new users.


This paper presents an in-depth look at surveillance and privacy problems faced by individuals who turn to digital literacy organizations for training and Internet access, including low income individuals, people of color, immigrants, the elderly, and non-English speakers. These individuals are coming online without adequate skills, know-how, and social support to confront digitally enabled government surveillance and corporate intrusions of personal privacy.


The paper also details the challenges, such as limited resources, time, and expertise, that providers face when teaching users how to stay safe online. New Internet users should not have to choose between going online and feeling safe, secure, and free from surveillance.


Now, more than ever, digital inclusion policies need to pay greater attention to developing providers’ expertise and capacity to handle privacy and surveillance concerns of new Internet users. Privacy advocates and developers also have a role to play.


Expanding “digital literacy” to include privacy education requires that privacy protecting tools become easier to use. Until then, the benefits of digital inclusion are at odds with the potential harms wrought by a surveillance society.


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AR: FSU's online radio station gives students hands-on experience | FayObserver.com

AR: FSU's  online radio station gives students hands-on experience | FayObserver.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Standing inside the state-of-the-art Bronco-iRadio studio on Fayetteville State University's campus, it's hard to imagine the humble beginnings of the student-run station.


In 2009, Ray Thomas had a vision. But Thomas, the operations director of the Internet-based station and faculty adviser to the students who run the station, also had a lot of work ahead of him. The station at that time consisted of a broken sound board, a nonfunctional computer and a supply closet.


On Oct. 10, 2010, after an exhaustive renovation fueled by federal Title III funding, Bronco-iRadio began its online broadcast in the station located in FSU's broadcast building.


"It's definitely rewarding to take an idea and see it come to fruition," Thomas said. "We have an incredible facility. And we're continuing to grow, improve and increase our brand."


The station plays a mix of music - hip-hop, soul, gospel, R&B, classic rock and Motown - through a variety of student-run programs. The station can be found online at bronco-iradio.com and also has become a destination for independent acts looking for a home to debut their music.


Thomas, with 30 years of broadcasting experience, knows about branding. Before coming to work at FSU, Thomas, an Emerson College graduate, worked at radio stations in Los Angeles, Boston and Durham. Thomas left Durham in 1991 to work as morning show host and interim program director at WZFX Foxy 99 in Fayetteville. Thomas also has worked for KISS FM and WRAL in Raleigh, and Magic 106.9 in Fayetteville.


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Final antenna arrives at ALMA Observatory | GizMag.com

Final antenna arrives at ALMA Observatory | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The last 12-m (40-ft) antenna has arrived at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), pushing the project closer to its full operational potential. The final antenna was supplied by the European side of the venture, and completes the 66-dish array stretching across the Chajnantor Plateau in Chile's Atacama Desert. The telescope, which was inaugurated in March, has already made a number of significant discoveries despite its incomplete nature.


The ALMA project is one of the largest and most advanced of its kind. The telescope is a US$1.3 billion joint venture between Europe, North America and East Asia, and spans 16 km (10 miles) across the arid plateau. The high altitude and dry conditions of the Atacama Desert make it the perfect location for the array, which comprises 66 dishes designed to work as one telescope, collecting light from wavelengths found between infrared and radio waves.


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Applied Data Science Open Online Course - iSchool | Syracuse University

Applied Data Science Open Online Course - iSchool | Syracuse University | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the world's data grow exponentially, organizations across all sectors, including government and not-for-profit, need to understand, manage and use big, complex data sets—known as big data, a term spreading through forward-thinking business dialogue and building job market demand.


Data science is the answer to optimizing (or, for starters, simply dealing with) big data. However, the iSchool’s distinct perspective approaches data science with a view of the full data life cycle, going beyond what most discuss as data analytics.


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It’s about to get easier to 3D print with recycled plastic | GigaOM Tech News

It’s about to get easier to 3D print with recycled plastic | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

3D printers generally print in one of two types of plastic; either ABS, which is used to make Legos, or PLA, typically found in some types of food packaging.


Despite the abundance of ABS and PLA, it’s still expensive to buy the long strings of plastic filament that 3D printers require. A 2.2 pound spool of filament, which generally costs between $25 and $50, is enough to print nearly 400 chess pieces.


As printers get larger, people will want to print bigger objects to match. Add in regular print job fails that waste filament and material costs can add up quickly.


One emerging type of 3D printing tool could alleviate some of the cost. The Filamaker is a machine that takes in used plastic and outputs fresh strings of filament that are compatible with 3D printers.


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Corruption and bribery in the classroom | BBC News

Corruption and bribery in the classroom | BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Corruption in education is a serious blight that undermines the quality and availability of schools and universities around the world, according to an international report.


Anti-corruption campaigners Transparency International have published a global survey showing that about one in six students has had to pay a bribe for education services.


In parts of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia this might be requiring parents to pay a fee for a school place that should be free.


In Eastern Europe, it might be paying to gain an advantage in university admissions.


The Berlin-based campaign group is best known for its annual "global corruption barometer", which measures levels of dishonest payments in more than 100 countries, based on more than 114,000 household interviews.


This year's survey also asked questions about people's first-hand experiences and perceptions of dishonesty in education.


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FL : Lawsuit aims to increase education funding | MiamiHerald.com

FL : Lawsuit aims to increase education funding | MiamiHerald.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A group of determined parents from four Florida counties say the state’s public schools are unsafe, underfunded, inefficient and ineffective.


These parents from Alachua, Duval, Orange and Pasco have not taken their case to the court of public opinion — they have been fighting in court since 2009.


Their lawsuit, alleging that Florida lawmakers are shortchanging schoolchildren, is now moving forward. If successful, they could force the Florida Legislature to overhaul the state’s education system.


“The Constitution makes it the paramount duty of the state to provide an efficient, safe, secure and uniform high-quality education,” said Neil Chonin, a Gainesville-based public-interest attorney representing the parents. “I’m firmly convinced the Legislature and the [state] Board of Education are ignoring that.”


The Attorney General’s office and the state Department of Education declined to comment on the lawsuit.


A procedural hearing is scheduled for Oct. 9.


This isn’t the first time parents have questioned whether lawmakers are doing enough for Florida’s schools. Nearly two decades ago, a coalition of parents filed a similar legal claim focusing on education funding. But the state Supreme Court rejected the case, saying there was no constitutional basis to question the Legislature’s budget decisions.


Much has changed since then.


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Fewer, Better Tests Can Boost Student Achievement | EducationWeek.com

Fewer, Better Tests Can Boost Student Achievement | EducationWeek.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Both Democrats and Republicans have submitted proposals to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the federal law governing K-12 education that has not been revamped since the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act—the latest iteration of the ESEA—was signed into law in 2002. Among the few things both parties agree on is continuing to require grade-by-grade testing and a new requirement that would focus the draconian consequences that once threatened all schools on the lowest-achieving schools exclusively; in other words, those schools that primarily serve low-income and new immigrant students. This is a big mistake.


Taken together, along with our continued failure to address equity in school resources, these two provisions would virtually guarantee that the overall performance of our students will never equal that of our toughest international competitors and would further widen the gap between the top performers and our disadvantaged students.


Here's why: Americans are addicted to multiple-choice, computer-scored tests, mainly because they are cheap and easy to score. However, these tests drive a rote curriculum that will not produce the skills students need to get and keep good jobs in the 21st century—writing and speaking well, using advanced mathematics, analyzing complex problems, and finding and synthesizing information from many...


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Recession Continues for Classrooms as School Funding Lags | Bloomberg.com

Recession Continues for Classrooms as School Funding Lags | Bloomberg.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As she hands out student papers to juniors in her English class at Nathan Hale High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, teacher Jessica West tells them she needs their help grading.


She has 216 students this year, up from 150 in past years. One class has 39. “I just realized, time-wise, I can’t do it on my own,” she said.


Tulsa’s public-school class sizes have swollen after state education cuts that linger amid the economic recovery. Oklahoma is one of 34 states spending less per pupil in kindergarten through 12th grade this year than six years ago, when adjusted for inflation, the Washington-based Center on Budget & Policy Priorities said in a report. Oklahoma’s 23 percent reduction was deepest, followed by Alabama, Arizona and Kansas.


“It is a recipe for massive, wasted human potential,” said Jonah Edelman, founder and chief executive officer of Stand for Children, a Washington-based public-education advocacy group. “It is a diminishment in the quality of K-12 education at a time when students need to make it to post-secondary education to get a decent-paying job.”


Facing declining revenue in the longest recession since the 1930s, states closed cumulative budget gaps of $600 billion in the five years that ended in fiscal 2012, according to an April report by the budget center. As the largest cost in many state budgets, school spending took a hit. U.S. school districts have cut 324,000 jobs since 2008, according to the center.


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NASA Jupiter-bound spacecraft will slingshot around Earth, gain 9,000 MPH tomorrow | NetworkWorld.com

NASA said its Juno spacecraft will swing by Earth tomorrow to grab gravity boosts that will slingshot it to its ultimate destination: Jupiter.

 

NASA said that on Oct. 9 the four-ton Juno will make its closest approach to Earth - 350 miles above South Africa at about 3:20 EDT. 


According to NASA, when  Juno was launched toward Jupiter on August 5, 2011, its rocket provided Juno enough speed to reach the asteroid belt, at which point the Sun's gravity pulled it back toward the inner solar system.


"While we are primarily using Earth as a means to get us to Jupiter, the flight team is also going to check and calibrate Juno's science instruments. As another bonus, Juno is approaching the Earth from deep space, from the Sunlit side. Juno will take never-before-seen images of the Earth-Moon system, giving us a chance to see what we look like from Mars or Jupiter. We plan to release a movie of this unique perspective of the Earth-Moon system shortly after the flyby," said  Dr. Scott Bolton of Southwest Research Institute is the Juno principal investigator in a statement.


Juno, once described as a flying armored tank because of its size,  is expected to arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. Once in orbit around Jupiter, the spacecraft will circle the planet 33 times, from pole to pole, and use its collection of nine science instruments to probe beneath the gas giant's obscuring cloud cover.


NASA has outlined a number of key challenges for Juno:

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It's bigger on the inside: Tardis regions in spacetime and the expanding universe | GizMag.com

It's bigger on the inside: Tardis regions in spacetime and the expanding universe | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Fans of the Doctor Who will be very familiar with the stupefied phrase uttered by all new visitors to his Tardis: "It's...bigger...on the inside." As it turns out, this irrational idea may have something to contribute to our understanding of the universe. A team of cosmologists in Finland and Poland propose that the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe, usually explained by dark energy or modified laws of gravity, may actually be the result of regions of spacetime that are larger on the inside than they appear from the outside. The researchers have dubbed these "Tardis regions."


Perhaps the most surprising cosmological observation of the past few decades was the 1998 discovery by Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess, that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating for the past five billion years. This result, which won the 2011 Nobel Prize, was quickly corroborated by observation of independent phenomena such as the cosmic background radiation.


Why the acceleration is occurring is not currently understood, although it can be described. In terms of conventional cosmological theory, it calls for the existence of a "dark energy," an energy field permeating the universe. However, because gravity attracts normal mass-energy, dark energy would have to have a negative energy density, something unknown as yet in nature. In addition, roughly 75 percent of the contents of the universe have to be made up of dark energy to get the observed acceleration of expansion. Even though dark energy provides a reasonable description of the universal acceleration, its value as an explanation is still controversial. Many have the gut reaction that dark energy is too strange to be true.


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Brilliant Maps Reveal Age of the World's Buildings | Wired Science

Brilliant Maps Reveal Age of the World's Buildings | Wired Science | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Justin Palmer stumbled across a dataset that included the year nearly every building in the Portland metro area was built, he was curious how old the buildings on his block are. Instead of just searching the data for his neighbors’ addresses, he made the beautiful map above.


He posted the map on his website, and it soon caught the eye of other mapmakers. Just a few days later, Thomas Rhiel published a similar map of Brooklyn, spurred by New York City’s release of a huge dataset known as PLUTO. Pretty soon, more maps began popping up. Soon there was a map of all of New York City, one of Reykjavik, Iceland, and one of Ljubljana, Slovenia, each with its own amazing colors, patterns and stories.


These maps make more than just pretty pictures. Palmer learned from his map that Portland’s oldest building identifiable by name was built in 1851. Only 942 structures are left from the 1890s while 75,434 built in the 1990s are still standing. Palmer graphed the steep and steady decline of new buildings since 2005.


Inspired by Palmer’s map, Marko Plahuta made a map of building ages in his home town of Ljubljana, Slovenia. When he plotted the number of buildings built each year, the graph had some huge spikes in it, and he set about discovering why. One spike occurred four years after a major earthquake hit the area in 1899 when people were able to rebuild. Similar periods of rebuilding show up after the two world wars. Plahuta made a really nice video of his map that shows the growth of the city from 1500-2013.


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 8, 2013 8:09 AM

Virtual composition  that shows ages of building with the use of technology.

 

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Troubling Stats on Adult Literacy | Inside Higher Ed

Troubling Stats on Adult Literacy | Inside Higher Ed | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Eight years ago, a national survey on adult literacy offered data on the extent to which Americans -- even those with college credentials -- were declining in their proficiency to do the basic kinds of reading people use in everyday life. The finding, published just as President Bush and his education secretary, Margaret Spellings, were cranking up a national commission on the state of higher education, was often cited as evidence of the failings of colleges and universities.


A study released today could have a similar effect, because it not only questions Americans' literacy, but also taps into concerns in some quarters about the country's declining standing in the world.


The Survey of Adult Skills by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development shows that despite having higher than average levels of educational attainment, adults in the United States have below-average basic literacy and numeracy skills.


The U.S. ranked 16th out of 23 countries in literacy proficiency, 21st in numeracy proficiency, and 14th in problem solving in technology-rich environments, according to the OECD survey.


“It’s a worrisome result and it’s another reminder that we are not doing our job when it comes to education here, particularly with adults,” said Mary Alice McCarthy, a senior policy analyst for the education policy program at New America Foundation.


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