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Kepler finds first known tilted solar system | Nature.com

Kepler finds first known tilted solar system | Nature.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Observations from NASA's Kepler spacecraft have uncovered a 'tilted' solar system, a finding that gives clues as to how some planets come to orbit their stars on paths that are misaligned with the stars' equators, astronomers report today in Science1.


The planets of Earth's Solar System formed from a flat disc of gas and dust revolving around the Sun's equator, so they all started out in nearly the same plane. Earth’s orbit makes an angle of just 7.2 degrees with the plane of the Sun’s equator.


Five years ago, however, astronomers were shocked to find planets orbiting at steep angles to their stars’ equators2. Some planets even went around their suns backwards — they orbit in the opposite direction to the star’s rotation3. But no one had seen a misaligned multiplanetary solar system until now.


For the latest study, astronomer Daniel Huber of NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, and his colleagues looked at Kepler-56, a star roughly 860 parsecs (2,800 light years) from Earth. It has two large planets that lie in the same plane4 and circle closer to their sun than Mercury does to ours. Kepler detected the planets as they blocked the star's light, so their orbits are oriented edge-on to our line of sight.


Kepler-56 is a giant star that's four times larger than the Sun and emits nine times more light. To determine the star’s orientation, researchers used Kepler to study variations in its brightness, which arise from the star's vibrations and look different depending on whether the star is viewed equator-on, pole-on or somewhere in between.


The observations revealed that the plane of the star's equator tilts 45 degrees to the planets’ orbits. “It was a big surprise,” Huber says.


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If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | WashPost.com

If you’re on the beach, this map shows you what’s across the ocean | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The map above shows the countries that are due east and west from points along the coasts of North and South America. Many small island nations are (perhaps unfairly) excluded for ease of reading. Many thanks to Eric Odenheimer for sharing the map with Know More.


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CA: Cardinal Studios seeks to combat lack of on-campus film production | Will Ferrer | Stanford Daily

CA: Cardinal Studios seeks to combat lack of on-campus film production | Will Ferrer | Stanford Daily | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You come to Stanford to play football. You come to Stanford to study computer science. You come to Stanford to be the next big thing in Silicon Valley.


You do not come to Stanford, however, to make films.


It’s an unfortunate truth, though one that has always been reflected in the construction of the University’s recently conceived Film and Media Studies program.


Launched back in 2005 by Kristine Samuelson, then-director of Stanford’s renowned graduate department for documentary filmmaking, the goal of Stanford’s Film and Media Studies program is not, nor was it ever, to provide students with a complete education in film and video production.


“This won’t be USC North,” said Samuelson in a 2005 Art History newsletter describing her original vision for the university’s first curriculum for the study of film. “In addition to fundamentals in film and video production, our majors will delve into cinema history, narrative analysis and screenwriting, film criticism and aesthetics, and film and media theory.”


The newsletter also described the University’s desire to oversee the development of an MFA program, which would be launched in autumn of 2006, the following year. This program, which would be grounded in production and would provide undergraduate students with the chance to engage with graduate-level fiction filmmakers, never came to fruition.


Jumping to the present day, Stanford’s film and media studies program is currently fully operational. With a staff that includes Professor Scott Bukatman, Associate Professors Jean Ma and Pavle Levi, Senior Lecturer Adam Tobin, and Lecturers Laura Green and J. Christian Jensen, Stanford’s young film program has just begun to find its feet. Yet, despite the program’s successful inception, the department continually struggles to meet student demand for production-based coursework.


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The Reason America Adopted Race-Based Slavery | Peter Wood | Slate.com

The Reason America Adopted Race-Based Slavery | Peter Wood | Slate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

During the second half of the 17th century, a terrible transformation, the enslavement of people solely on the basis of race, occurred in the lives of African Americans living in North America. These newcomers still numbered only a few thousand, but the bitter reversals they experienced—first subtle, then drastic—would shape the lives of all those who followed them, generation after generation.

Like most huge changes, the imposition of hereditary race slavery was gradual, taking hold by degrees over many decades. It proceeded slowly, in much the same way that winter follows fall. On any given day, in any given place, people can argue about local weather conditions. “Is it getting colder?” “Will it warm up again this week?” The shift may come early in some places, later in others.


But eventually, it occurs all across the land. By January, people shiver and think back to September, agreeing that “it is definitely colder now.” In 1700, a 70-year-old African American could look back half a century to 1650 and shiver, knowing that conditions had definitely changed for the worse.

Some people had experienced the first cold winds of enslavement well before 1650; others would escape the chilling blast well after 1700. The timing and nature of the change varied considerably from colony to colony, and even from family to family. Gradually, the terrible transformation took on a momentum of its own, numbing and burdening everything in its path, like a disastrous winter storm. Unlike the changing seasons, however, the encroachment of racial slavery in the colonies of North America was certainly not a natural process.


It was highly unnatural—the work of powerful competitive governments and many thousands of human beings spread out across the Atlantic world. Nor was it inevitable that people’s legal status would come to depend upon their racial background and that the condition of slavery would be passed down from parent to child. Numerous factors combined to bring about this disastrous shift—human forces swirled together during the decades after 1650, to create an enormously destructive storm.


By 1650, hereditary enslavement based upon color, not upon religion, was a bitter reality in the older Catholic colonies of the New World. In the Caribbean and Latin America, for well over a century, Spanish and Portuguese colonizers had enslaved “infidels”: first Indians and then Africans.


At first, they relied for justification upon the Mediterranean tradition that persons of a different religion, or persons captured in war, could be enslaved for life. But hidden in this idea of slavery was the notion that persons who converted to Christianity should receive their freedom. Wealthy planters in the tropics, afraid that their cheap labor would be taken away from them because of this loophole, changed the reasoning behind their exploitation. Even persons who could prove that they were not captured in war and that they accepted the Catholic faith still could not change their appearance, any more than a leopard can change its spots.


So by making color the key factor behind enslavement, dark-skinned people brought from Africa to work in silver mines and on sugar plantations could be exploited for life. Indeed, the servitude could be made hereditary, so enslaved people’s children automatically inherited the same unfree status.


But this cruel and self-perpetuating system had not yet taken firm hold in North America. The same anti-Catholic propaganda that had led Sir Francis Drake to liberate Negro slaves in Central America in the 1580s still prompted many colonists to believe that it was the Protestant mission to convert non-Europeans rather than enslave them.


Apart from such moral concerns, there were simple matters of cost and practicality. Workers subject to longer terms and coming from further away would require a larger initial investment. Consider a 1648 document from York County, Virginia, showing the market values for persons working for James Stone (estimated in terms of pounds of tobacco):


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Passion, need to contribute drive millennials | James OMalley | Times Leader

Passion, need to contribute drive millennials | James OMalley | Times Leader | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The millennials have arrived. And by all accounts, it looks like they’re here to stay.

Generally defined as the 73 million adults who in 2015 will be between the ages of 18 and 34, the millennial generation edged out Generation X this year to become the nation’s largest generation currently working, according to the Pew Research Center.

Pew analysis indicates the 53.5 million working millennials represent more than one third of the American workforce.

The development is in step with an October report from the U.S. President’s Council of Economic Advisers, which found millennials to be the most populous generation, making up about one third of the national population.

In Northeastern Pennsylvania, millennials are gradually becoming the people who, among other things, provide your healthcare and make your laws. And they refuse to be rivaled in their passion for what they do.

Soon-to-be obstetric nurse Taylor Wasilewski, 21, of Kingston, said passion is exactly what drove her into her chosen profession.

“It’s the kind of career that if you don’t have a passion for it, you should seriously not do it,” she said.

Wasilewski said nursing started calling her at a young age, when a nurse first taught her to help treat a family member’s wound. After toying with other options early on in college, she dropped out of Penn State University and applied to Luzerne County Community College the last possible day.

She’ll graduate this week with a nursing degree, and in June will start a job as a graduate nurse at the hospital where she’s worked for three years as a nurses’ aide.

Wasilewski said realizing the social contributions she was making as a nurses’ aide shuttered any uncertainties she had about her career choice.

“Sometimes people look at nursing as a trade,” she said. “Actually, it becomes your life.”

And Wasilewski isn’t alone in wanting to contribute. According to the economic advisers report, millennials are more likely than both Gen Xers and Baby Boomers to cite contributing to society as a “very important” life goal.


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Identify the Essential in Classroom Management | Alex Shevrin Blog | Edutopia.org

Identify the Essential in Classroom Management | Alex Shevrin Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When making classroom policies, rules, or guidelines, it’s essential to be able to answer the question: what’s the bottom line? When we go beyond our content, curriculum, or instructional methods: what is truly important about this space and this community as a place of learning?

The bottom line can be framed in a few different ways:


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School-as-Studio Immerses Students in Creative Problem Solving | Suzie Boss Blog | Edutopia.org

School-as-Studio Immerses Students in Creative Problem Solving | Suzie Boss Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

What might students accomplish if they could spend part of their K-12 education on challenges that took them outside the regular classroom? How might teaching and learning change if school became the place to interact with experts, use professional-grade tools, and immerse yourself in collaborative problem solving and prototyping?

Some interesting answers are emerging from NuVu Studio, a break-the-mold school that occupies an inconspicuous spot on a busy street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Launched in 2010 by a trio of bold thinkers from MIT, the school initially attracted students from independent schools and from families that could afford enriching experiences for their children.

But with public schools starting to recognize NuVu as an ally, and with replication of the studio model cropping up around the globe, the ideas incubated in this creative space have a chance to move from the edges of education to the mainstream. Here are a few takeaways from a recent visit.


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The cliche of the lone male gamer needs to be destroyed | Keith Stuart | The Guardian

The cliche of the lone male gamer needs to be destroyed | Keith Stuart | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“The new video-game world encourages doing and acting and not really thinking. Video games are not so attractive to girls.”

The American psychologist Philip Zimbardo has a new book out. It is called Man (Dis)connected: How Technology Has Sabotaged What It Means To Be Male. In Saturday’s Guardian, he spoke to Stuart Jeffries about his fears for young men who – he asserts – are increasingly withdrawing from real life and from sexual relationships with women, into an online world of games and pornography.


“This thing with boys is really getting me down because I can’t think of a solution that is easy to entrain, that’s easy to realise,” he said. “It’s painful for me because I’m an optimistic person. Boys are in a mess.”

His book cites anecdotal evidence from teachers who are concerned about boys who play games into the night then turn up at school unable to learn. There is research from various academic institutions linking unregulated gaming with attention and behavioural problems.


I don’t doubt the veracity of these studies and I don’t question that they highlight problems that our increasingly technological society will have to deal with. Parents have some serious work to do when it comes to gating pervasive devices like games consoles and smart phones. But I take huge issue with the projection of minority cases into a societal norm. I don’t recognise the gamers that Zimbardo is worrying about.

Over the last ten years there has been a profound change in the way people play video games. The cliche of the teenage boy hunched alone over a console, competing in solitude against computer foes, is outdated.


The rise of broadband connectivity has engendered a new culture of shared experiences and co-operative play. These days, a game lives and dies by its ability to attract and maintain a talkative and engaged community. The whole meaning and purpose of video games has shifted: for many players, they have become venues for social interaction rather than solitary confinement.


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Technology’s Transformative Impact on Education | USTelecom.org

The rise and integration of technology in education is visible in many classrooms across the U.S. as teachers and students utilize a variety of online tools, resources and applications as part of the learning experience.


According to an advanced preview of the 2015 K-12 Horizon Report (link is external), 16 advanced technologies are key to shaping and transforming education and the classrooms of tomorrow.

An overarching pattern noted in the report is the shift from a less subject-driven approach to a greater embrace of multi-disciplinary methods of teaching. The classroom experience is becoming increasingly focused on student-centric learning, allowing more time for pupils to connect with projects through individual inquiry and challenged-based learning.


In addition, educators are creating a hybrid/blended learning environment that combines traditional classroom interaction with student-sanctioned digital tools such as tablets and smartphones.


This teamwork approach and interactivity is also encouraging more project collaboration, and strengthening engagement, hands-on learning and performance as students move from being simply consumers to content creators.


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9 programming languages and the women who created them | Phil Johnson | NetworkWorld.com

9 programming languages and the women who created them | Phil Johnson | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Software development has a well-known reputation for being a male-dominated world. But, despite this, women have made many important and lasting contributions to programming throughout the decades.


One area, in particular, where many women have left a mark is in the development of programming languages. Numerous pioneering women have designed and developed the languages programmers use to give computers instructions, starting in the days of mainframes and machine code, through assemblers and into higher level modern day languages.


Click headline to access the slide show and Use the arrows to read the stories behind 9 programming languages that have had a significant impact over the years and the women who created them.

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MA: Wired West broadband is essential for education in the Berkshires | Francoise Lartigue | The Berkshire Edge

MA: Wired West broadband is essential for education in the Berkshires | Francoise Lartigue |  The Berkshire Edge | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I am a mother of three elementary age children and a transplant to this area by happy choice with a background in business, technology and education. There is a semi-interesting story of how I navigated from one to the other, but for this article’s sake an opener informing why I feel equipped to talk about the need for Wired West to become a reality in many of our Western Massachusetts communities from an educational standpoint. This article will profile examples specific to the school district in which I reside – the Southern Berkshire Regional School District — but please remember that communities throughout the Berkshires and Western Massachusetts are sharing similar experiences.

Phrases like “connectivity gap” and “digital divide” get used when discussing the state of Internet connectivity in rural areas. In January 2015 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) changed its definition of “high speed internet access” from 4 Mbps (megabits per second) to 25 Mbps due to the ever- increasing demand for data on networks. In the Southern Berkshire Regional School District (SBRSD) three of our four schools connect via fiber optic cables with the fourth using DSL.


While our students are seemingly adequately wired at school, many still do not have access to the Internet at home or their Internet is not capable of handling the data demand that a simple research project might place on it. Quite simply, 4 out of the 5 towns in our district (Sheffield is serviced by a cable provider) lack sufficient broadband access for the 21st century.


In a recent interview Chris Thompson, the Technology Coordinator for SBRSD, points out that a 21st century learning environment is imperative to students being able to compete on both a national and global scale. He notes that due to the ever-present nature of digital content, access to it must be easy and seamless with student access at school equally as important as student access at home.

Broadband access is thought to be one of the greatest educational equalizers of our time. However, we have our own digital divide not only with surrounding urban and suburban areas but also between home and school.


Currently, teachers are choosing to do one of two things to combat the digital divide. Some teachers choose to only utilize technology to the lowest common home access point, which for many is dial-up or nothing. While not using technology equalizes the situation, students are missing out on valuable and enriching activities. Lack of Internet connection outside of school creates a fundamental barrier to fully integrating technology into the curriculum.


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A Handful Of Bronze-Age Men Could Have Fathered Two Thirds Of Europeans | Daniel Zadik | io9.com

A Handful Of Bronze-Age Men Could Have Fathered Two Thirds Of Europeans | Daniel Zadik | io9.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Europe has surprisingly little genetic variety. Learning how and when the modern gene-pool came together has been a long journey. But thanks to new technological advances a picture is slowly coming together of repeated colonization by peoples from the east with more efficient lifestyles.

In a new study, we have added a piece to the puzzle: the Y chromosomes of the majority of European men can be traced back to just three individuals living between 3,500 and 7,300 years ago. How their lineages came to dominate Europe makes for interesting speculation. One possibility could be that their DNA rode across Europe on a wave of new culture brought by nomadic people from the Steppe known as the Yamnaya.

The first-known people to enter Europe were the Neanderthals – and though they have left some genetic legacy, it is later waves who account for the majority of modern European ancestry. The first “anatomically modern humans” arrived in the continent around 40,000 years ago. These were the Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers sometimes called the Cro-Magnons. They populated Europe quite sparsely and lived a lifestyle not very different from that of the Neanderthals they replaced.

Then something revolutionary happened in the Middle East – farming, which allowed for enormous population growth. We know that from around 8,000 years ago a wave of farming and population growth exploded into both Europe and South Asia. But what has been much less clear is the mechanism of this spread. How much was due to the children of the farmers moving into new territories and how much was due to the neighbouring hunter-gathers adopting this new way of life?

In recent years, new technologies, including the ability to read the sequences of DNA in ancient bones, have shed much light on such questions. Researchers have found evidence in the DNA of modern Europeans for ancestry from both groups, as well as from a third fascinating people known as the Yamnaya.


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Parent Talk Live: Literacy and Digital Literacy for All Public School Students | Forest of the Rain Education

Parent Talk Live: Literacy and Digital Literacy for All Public School Students | Forest of the Rain Education | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Dr. Mike Robinson, host of Parent Talk Lives discussed the value of "Universal Access to Literacy and Digital Literacy for all Public School Students". His guest Ms. Karuna Skariah is a National Board Certified Teacher, Maryland State Certified Teacher with Prince George’s County Public Schools, the 17th largest school district in Maryland.

Karuna Skariah is a National Board Certified Teacher, Maryland State Certified Teacher, and a teacher leadership coach. She has been an educator for twenty years. As a Maryland State Department of Education National Board Teacher Leadership Coordinator, she mentored teachers through the National Board Certification process with much success. She has an M.A. in Writing from Johns Hopkins University, B.A. in Sociology, Anthropology, Economics and English Literature. Karuna’s Equity Initiative for the students of Prince George’s County Public Schools advocates for literacy and digital literacy for every student.


She advocates for 21st century college and career preparedness by providing crucial infrastructure of reading, technology and library/media teachers in every school. Karuna has been trained in the Common Core State Standards and continues to provide professional development workshops for public and private school educators. Her expertise lies in education performance management, school needs assessment, and teacher training with a concentration on Common Core.


Her workshops focus on effective educational change through teacher driven discussions, trainings, and data driven planning. She provides teachers with best practices tools on how to generate critical thinking skills. As an adjunct professor, Karuna has taught graduate courses on teacher leadership at the National University, California.


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Sometimes Misbehavior Is Not What It Seems | Dr. Richard Curwin Blog | Edutopia.org

Sometimes Misbehavior Is Not What It Seems | Dr. Richard Curwin Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Sigmund Freud reportedly said, "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar," the key word was "sometimes," because sometimes a cigar is more than a cigar. So it is with understanding misbehavior. Sometimes the reason for misbehavior is very different than the obvious and requires a totally different intervention than the usual consequences. It is never easy to determine why children do the things they do.

The following are examples of seeing misbehavior from a new perspective. In each of these cases, diagnosis is very difficult -- as are the remedies. For chronic misbehaving students, pay close attention to their home situations, the type of misbehavior, when it occurs, and whether they behave differently with other adults. Be advised that the best responses to these situations sound easier than they are to put into practice.


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World of Warcraft halted an army of cheaters with a massive player ban | Abby Ohlheiser | WashPost.com

World of Warcraft halted an army of cheaters with a massive player ban | Abby Ohlheiser | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A "large number" of cheating World of Warcraft players were banned from the popular game for six months for using "bots" that allow players to automate some of their play, the popular game's maker announced this week.

Although Blizzard Entertainment's statement on the ban didn't include an exact figure, it's possible that more than 100,000 players are on an involuntary vacation from World of Warcraft. That number comes from a conversation between one player and a Game Master, an in-game employee of Blizzard. A Blizzard spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for confirmation.

What is clear from Blizzard's statement, however, is that many of the banned users were using the World of Warcraft equivalent of performance-enhancing drugs: "bots."

"We've recently taken action against a large number of World of Warcraft accounts that were found to be using third-party programs that automate gameplay, known as 'bots,'" the statement reads. "We’re committed to providing an equal and fair playing field for everyone in World of Warcraft, and will continue to take action against those found in violation of our Terms of Use. Cheating of any form will not be tolerated."

The statement also encourages people who spot other players using a "bot, exploit, or cheat" in violation with the game's terms of service to report them to Blizzard.


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Press, University Say Study Shows Link Between Gaming And Alzheimer's; Spoiler: No It Doesn't | Timothy Geigner | Techdirt

Press, University Say Study Shows Link Between Gaming And Alzheimer's; Spoiler: No It Doesn't | Timothy Geigner | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If I've learned any single thing covering technology news it's that you can blame absolutely anything on video games. Mass violence? Games. Failure at professional sports? Pssh, games, yo. Love life not as spicy as you might like? Those games, those games. But a study that supposedly claims a link between video games and Alzheimer's Disease? Come on.

“Call of Duty increases risk of Alzheimer’s disease”, said the Telegraph. “Video game link to psychiatric disorders suggested by study”, reported the Guardian. The Daily Mail posed the problem as a question, “Could video games increase your risk of Alzheimer’s?”, reminding us that whenever a news headline asks a question, the answer is no.

We know that when science news is hyped, most of the hype is already present in the press releases issued by universities. This case is no exception - the press release was issued by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, and unsurprisingly it focuses almost entirely on the tenuous link to Alzheimer’s disease.

Tenuous is being exceptionally kind in this case. The study in question, produced in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, barely focused on any link between gaming and the disease, in fact. Instead, the team of Canadian researchers were simply studying the difference in brain-wave activity with groups of gamers and non-gamers. They noticed specifically a significant difference in the activity of one type of brain-wave with gamers, N2PC, which can have an effect on attention spans. So, how did we get from that to a link to Alzheimer's? Were there clinical tests done? Was the team of researchers even in any way focused on the most famous form of dementia?


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The Robots are Coming: How a Caring Economy Is the Best App for a Shrinking Job Market | Riane Eisler Blog | HuffPost.com

The Robots are Coming: How a Caring Economy Is the Best App for a Shrinking Job Market | Riane Eisler Blog | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The tech and automation job-quake is finally gaining attention, with predictions that nearly half of American jobs will be lost within a couple of decades. Yet too many leaders still avert their eyes, making decisions through a rear-view mirror rather than planning for a horizon already upon us. Even worse, the only "solution" floated so far is that government hand everyone an annual stipend for doing nothing at all.

Already, technology performs countless functions earlier done exclusively by people. When tablets on restaurant tables take people's orders, software guides our shopping online (while automation increasingly controls warehouses), and driverless cars presage huge job losses in the transportation sector, we see the convulsed employment markets of tomorrow.

Even now, jobs are polarized, with large numbers of people relegated to low-wage jobs that are often part-time and without benefits. And the U.S. industrial job base is predicted to shrink as radically as the agricultural job base shrank earlier. But unlike industrialization, automation does not offer large numbers of replacement jobs.

So, what are we to do with the "surplus" populations that technological advances such as apps, "sharing economy" business models, artificial intelligence systems, and automation leave in their wake? Long ago, the liberal economist Robert Theobald proposed a guaranteed annual income, and even conservative economic godfather Milton Friedman proposed a negative income tax providing people with no-or-low earnings a government stipend.

That these measures are being proposed again makes no sense. Neither gives recipients the opportunity to do meaningful work, robbing us of necessary contributions to our socio-economic life. Nor do they reward positive behaviors and discourage harmful ones, address irresponsible economic policies and business practices, take into account the damage to our health and natural habitat of such policies and practices, or address the power imbalances that lie behind chronic economic inequity and inefficiency.

In starkest terms: the Baltimore riots may have relaunched conventional discussions about economic opportunity for communities in crisis, but we've heard nothing new as entire segments of employment careen towards crisis.

Yet an effective response is available to the challenges of the postindustrial world: economic policies that support and reward activities that machines and high-technology devices, no matter how sophisticated, cannot perform: being creative, flexible, and caring.

A caring economy is the best app for solving the looming jobs crisis.


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NV: School, dealership continue Intern partnership | Keith Trout | Reno Gazette-Journal

NV: School, dealership continue Intern partnership | Keith Trout | Reno Gazette-Journal | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The partnership between Yerington High School and Wild West Chevrolet for an internship is reaching its second year with three Yerington seniors participating.

A new aspect this year is a pickup truck obtained by Wild West in a trade-in is being refurbished this year for a drawing to benefit the continuing the internship program.

This year, two students, Galen Moore and Matt Phillips, are sales interns, while a third, Carlos Rodrigues, is a service technician intern. They come every Tuesday and Thursday to Wild West.

The truck needed work, so the students began working on it while Wild West had the 1988 Chevy Silverado 4x4 painted as well, with new tires and wheels and a bed liner coating.

Jerry Bryant, Internet marketing manager at Wild West Chevrolet, said fixing the truck was assigned to the students.

"Here's your project; dig in," he said.

Now the students and the dealership are selling raffle tickets to win the pickup truck. Tickets are $5 each or 12 for $50. The winning ticket will be drawn at the Yerington High Senior Recognition Night on May 20.

Bryant said the pickup will be displayed around town at different locations, including last week at Financial Horizons Credit Union, so people can get a good look at it.

Yerington High officials said they were pleased with the intern partnership.


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Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google | Amien Essif | AlterNet.org

Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google | Amien Essif | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you were airdropped, blindfolded, into a strange town and given nothing but a bus ticket, to where would you ride that bus? You might be surprised to learn that there’s only one good answer, and that’s the public library. The library is the public living room, and if ever you are stripped of everything private—money, friends and orientation—you can go there and become a human again.

Of course, you don’t have to be homeless to use a library, but that’s the point. You don’t have to be anyone in particular to go inside and stay as long as you want, sit in its armchairs, read the news, write your dissertation, charge your phone, use the bathroom, check your email, find the address of a hotel or homeless shelter. Of all the institutions we have, both public and private, the public library is the truest democratic space.

The library’s value isn’t lost on us. A Gallup survey from 2013 found that libraries are not just popular, they’re extremely popular. Over 90 percent of Americans feel that libraries are a vital part of their communities. Compare this to 53 percent for the police, 27 percent for public schools, and just 7 percent for Congress, and you’re looking at perhaps the greatest success of the public sector.

James Palfrey, in his new book BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google, gives some truly bummer statistics on what’s happening to this beloved institution. A government report showed that while the nation’s public libraries served 298 million people in 2010 (that’s 96 percent of the U.S. population), states had cut funding by 38 percent and the federal government by 19 percent between 2000 and 2010. “It seems extraordinary that a public service with such reach should be, in effect, punished despite its success,” writes Palfrey.

Of necessity, he cites these tough economic times as a reason for this “punishment.” But according to Palfrey, one of the greatest threats to libraries is nostalgia—the way that we, the loving public, associate libraries with the pleasures of a bygone era, and assume that the growth of the Internet is slowly draining libraries of their usefulness.

“Nostalgia is too thin a reed for librarians to cling to in a time of such transition,” Palfrey writes. “Thinking of libraries as they were ages ago and wanting them to remain the same is the last thing we should want for them.”

In our heartfelt but naïve fondness for “quiet, inviting spaces” full of books and nothing else, we fail to realize that libraries are becoming more important, not less, to our communities and our democracy.


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The first Memorial Day was Black | James DeWolf Perry | BayView.com

The first Memorial Day was Black | James DeWolf Perry | BayView.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As we pause to remember the nation’s war dead, it’s worth remembering that Memorial Day was first celebrated by Black Union troops and free Black Americans in Charleston, South Carolina at the end of the Civil War.


As historian David Blight recounts in his masterful book, “Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory” (2001), Charleston was occupied by Union troops in the spring of 1865, most white residents having fled the city. In this atmosphere, the free Black population of Charleston, primarily consisting of former slaves, engaged in a series of celebrations to proclaim the meaning of the war as they saw it.

The height of these celebrations took place on May 1, 1865, on the grounds of the former Washington Race Course and Jockey Club, an elite facility which had been used by the Confederates as a gruesome prison and mass grave for unlucky Union soldiers. Following the evacuation of Charleston, Black laborers had dug up the remains of Union soldiers, given them a proper burial, and built the trappings of a respectful cemetery around the site to memorialize their sacrifice.

To dedicate the cemetery to the Union’s war dead, Black and white leaders came together to organize a parade of 10,000 people, described in a New York Tribune account as “a procession of friends and mourners as South Carolina and the United States never saw before.” At the front of the parade were 3,000 Black children, laden with roses and singing “John Brown’s Body,” while bringing up the rear were a brigade of Union troops, including the Massachusetts 54th Regiment and the 34th and 104th United States Colored Troops. (The commander of the 21st United States Colored Infantry had been the one to formally accept the city’s surrender.) Following the parade and dedication in the cemetery, the crowd settled down to picnic, listen to orators and watch the troops march.


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These Women Get IT | Frank McCoy | Black Engineer & Black Entrepreneur

These Women Get IT | Frank McCoy | Black Engineer & Black Entrepreneur | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The digital transformation is revving up. Information Technology (IT) is a field that must hire millions of well-prepared undergraduates, and recent grads, that can work with, on, and for the emerging digital world.

In 2013, Maria Barragan was hired as an Area Manager by Amazon.com. Previously, she worked for PepsiCo from 2009 until 2013 in areas of increasing responsibility. These in ascending order were Operations Manager Trainee for Pepsi Beverages Company, Production Supervisor, Product Availability Supervisor, and Supply Chain and Logistics Associate. As an undergraduate, she was a member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and the recipient of more than $50,000 in academic funding for undergraduate and graduate study by the Bill Gates Millennium Scholarship. Barragan learned of the Gates scholarship from the non-profit Path to Scholarships program.


In 2014, Apple hired Connie Bustillo away from eBay. She had been with the global ecommerce company for six years and rose to Manager - Talent Acquisition. Previously, she had worked for Intel, eBay, 3Com, and StarMine. Before hiring engineers, Bustillo worked as one at Apple for six years. To get a sense of how she views STEM hiring, check out two articles Bustillo wrote for SourceCon. They are: Strategic Sourcing: Should I Wear a Lab Coat or Deerstalker?, What is required to successfully source strategically, and Fast Track Sourcing: Does it make sense to always seek the low-hanging fruit? When should we reach for that high-hanging fruit? Rocky Torres is a Talent Acquisition Recruiter/Partner at eBay Inc. Torres worked with Bustillo for three years and says "in this time frame, she was a sourcer, lead, and manager. Her contributions to the eBay Marketplaces team will echo far beyond her departure."


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Broadband in Education: A Roadmap to 21st Century Learning Environments | Frank Gallagher | NCTA.com

Broadband in Education: A Roadmap to 21st Century Learning Environments | Frank Gallagher | NCTA.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It seems like everyone, from the President, the Secretary of Education and the Chairman of the FCC to local newspapers, is saying schools need more broadband. And prestigious panels like the Aspen Institute and LEAD Commission are calling for a different kind of learning environment in schools to foster new 21st century skills.

As the nation’s largest broadband provider, the cable industry certainly appreciates the value of a robust broadband network and quality digital content for education, but we also realize that simply pumping up capacity, or dropping a bunch of laptops into students’ hands isn’t going to fundamentally change what happens in the classroom or create that new learning environment.

That’s why Cable Impacts, the industry’s foundation dedicated to corporate social responsibility, teamed with two leading education organizations, the Partnership for 21st Century Learning and the State Educational Technology Directors Association, to create an new resource for schools and educators, Building Your Roadmap to 21st Century Learning Environments, www.roadmap21.org.


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Another Voice: Program is helping to close the digital divide | Hilary Shelton Opinion | The Buffalo News

Another Voice: Program is helping to close the digital divide  | Hilary Shelton Opinion | The Buffalo News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

President Obama recently announced a TechHire program that will invest in high-tech job skills training for America’s labor force. Because tech wages continue to rise faster than other sectors, initiatives like this not only help catapult our tech leadership into the 21st century but also help address income inequality.

And as important as these initiatives are, they are only part of the puzzle. If the United States wants to truly be the global tech leader, then all Americans must have broadband and other digital tools in their own homes.

This is no longer an option for Americans, especially for communities of color hardest hit by the recent recession. Eighty percent of all U.S. jobs will require digital fluency within the next 10 years and 80 percent of Fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. But today, African-American and Hispanic families lag some 15 points behind whites in broadband adoption.

Four years ago, the FCC teamed with the nation’s largest broadband provider to initiate the largest experiment ever attempted to close the digital divide.


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What Major University Charges $71K a Year and Epitomizes Corporatism and Self-Dealing? | Michael Arria | AlterNet.org

What Major University Charges $71K a Year and Epitomizes Corporatism and Self-Dealing? | Michael Arria | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A new report released by members of New York University’s faculty shows that NYU gouges students to raise billions for real-estate transactions and compensation packages for its top executives.

Concerned about the economic situation of many students, the professors spent an entire academic year interviewing people and researching the school's finances. They discovered that NYU students pay the highest tuition in the United States (almost $71,000 for the year after living expenses are included), but are bilked further via "phantom fees" that are associated with health care and insurance. Here are a couple of the testimonies:


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Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" | Andrew Miller | Edutopia.org

Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" | Andrew Miller | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We all have students that just want to "get it right." We all have students that constantly seek the attention of the teacher. "Did I get this right?" "Is this what you want?" Now while it's certainly a good thing to affirm students in their learning, many times we want students to be creative with their learning. We allow them to own their learning and create assessment products where they can show us what they know in new and inventive ways. Because of this, there isn't "one right answer," yet our students are often trained to think that there can be only one.

Similarly, we want students to be reflective, to ask themselves, "How do I know if I'm on the right track?" or "What could I do next?" Instead of coming immediately to the teacher, we want students to experiment on their own. Many of us wonder why students constantly do the opposite instead. I've got news for you. It's our fault. We, as educators, are often responsible for learned helplessness, and we have a responsibility to change it! How can we empower our students to be self-directed learners?


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Yes, and… Thoughts on print versus digital reading by Kristin Ziemke | Nerdy Book Club

Yes, and… Thoughts on print versus digital reading by Kristin Ziemke | Nerdy Book Club | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I come from a place of pedagogy. Raised by teachers who were readers and nurtured by principals who believed their most important job was to place text in the hands of kids. I come from classroom libraries and nightly book checkout, from teacher book clubs and living like a reader. I come from conversations about what’s on your nightstand and passion for poetry and periodicals.

I am a reader. I have seen the power of books as a just-right title is placed in the hands of a child, and how that changes everything for that student from that day forward. I love paper books and spend a significant portion of my time and salary procuring them for students. In fact, my first graders often joke I visit the local bookstore so frequently that my car sometimes takes me there against my will.

As an author and someone who has spent the last several years exploring best practices in thinking and learning, I have the opportunity to collaborate with teachers and schools around the country. Whether it’s working on one-to-one initiatives or inquiry circles, in classrooms with just one device or those employing the workshop model, I’m often asked my thoughts on digital reading.

I’ve heard many conversations recently that push back on digital reading and identify factors for why it’s a less effective mode for comprehension. Starting with citation of the Nielson Norman F Study (2006) that tracked eye patterns for reading web content emphasizing a skim and scan technique over deep reading to Anne Mangen’s work on comprehension and cognition in print versus digital text, we can find reasons for why we should NOT use digital tools to teach kids how to read.

In education, we can find data that will defend nearly any claim we want to make. From standardized test scores to student surveys we can collect metrics and architect statements to say, “Research shows…” But rather than make the print versus digital debate be an either / or conversation I’m advocating for a narrative shift to “Yes, and…”


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