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Speak Up! Costa Rican Bats Use Leaves as Hearing Aids | LiveScience.com

Speak Up! Costa Rican Bats Use Leaves as Hearing Aids | LiveScience.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Bats in Costa Rica have evolved a neat trick to help them hear their roost-mates flying above: They use leaves to funnel sound in a natural version of an old-timey ear horn.


The Spix's disc-winged bat (Thyroptera tricolor), named for suction-cuplike discs on its wings and feet, is found in South America. Unlike other cave-dwelling bat species, disc-winged bats roost each day in the unfurling leaves of plants outside of caves. These leaves form a tube shape as they go from folded-up to flat, meaning the bats can roost only for a day before having to find another leaf in the proper shape.


Spix's disc-wing bats are also cliquish. They form groups of five or six and stay together, despite their nightly evictions.


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Terrestrial Return Vehicle to provide parcel post for the ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Terrestrial Return Vehicle to provide parcel post for the ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

So much attention is paid to how to get into space that we often forget that getting back can be just as difficult. For example, getting experiment samples back from the International Space Station (ISS) is a logistical nightmare. Intuitive Machines' Terrestrial Return Vehicle (TRV) system may change that by making sending small payloads back to Earth as easy as mailing a parcel.

Getting samples back from the ISS currently means hitching a ride on a returning cargo or crew ferry craft, but this happens only a few times a year with every ounce already spoken for. That may be okay for most items, but what about the ones that can't wait?

The Terrestrial Return Vehicle (TRV) is a commercial service being developed by Intuitive Machines and NASA as part of a project under the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), which is responsible for installing the TRV on the space station and non-flight systems. It's designed to return small samples on demand from the ISS on the same day, and is suitable for critical and perishable materials that can't wait for the next ship home.


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On HBCUs, White House Moves From Disregard to Dismantling | CL Carter Sr. | HBCUDigest.com

On HBCUs, White House Moves From Disregard to Dismantling | CL Carter Sr. | HBCUDigest.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, historically Black colleges and universities were just a thorn in the side of the Obama Administration. We will soon long for those days, because signs of the administrative shift from disregard to attempts at dismantling HBCUs, are growing in frequency and impact seemingly every year.

The Department of Education last week appropriated more than $171 million to colleges and universities nationwide to bolster college access and equity for low-income and minority students. Several dozens of colleges and universities received First in the World grants to increase S.T.E.M. professional development for minorities, or smaller grants aimed at supporting Alaskans, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, African-Americans and Hispanics.

Of those dozens, just three HBCUs – Fayetteville State University, Hampton University and Prairie View A&M University, collectively received just over $3 million in federal support. Hampton’s FITW grant accounted for $3.5 million, while FSU and PVAMU received less than $250,000 each.

It would be easy to make the case that HBCUs should have received the lion’s share of the $171 million, but that would be doing HBCUs a great disservice in addressing their generational funding disparities. Howard University alone receives more than $230 million annual in federal support – a regrettably low number for the nation’s flagship institution serving the underserved and underrepresented, who typically fall into these categories after being marginalized by their race and/or economic status.

The White House has not matched resources with rhetoric, and its getting worse. For every HBCU Student All-Star that is named by the White House Initiative on HBCUs, there are hundreds of students denied the opportunity to matriculate or complete a degree at an HBCU due to a lack of financial aid. For every line of support for HBCUs and their students uttered by Education Secretary Arne Duncan, policy and funding consistently makes him, and those who echo his sentiments, liars.


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Building 3D printers capable of 3D printing in space | Janey Davies | Inside3DP.com

Building 3D printers capable of 3D printing in space | Janey Davies | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In mid September NASA launched a resupply capsule, the SpaceX Dragon with a 3D printer onboard, to the International Space Station (ISS). Since then we have been waiting for the astronauts to test the 3D printing technology under zero gravity conditions.

The Zero G Printer was manufactured by small startup Made In Space and had to pass several unusual tests before it got to board the space capsule. Devices constructed on earth are often built with gravity in mind, but with the Zero G, this thinking had to be abandoned.

When building machines for micro or zero gravity, there is a danger that some of the parts held in place typically by gravity may move, which could then easily destroy a print. The team realized they had to start from scratch and build a totally new machine, independent from gravity.

There was also the question of safety. The gases generated from 3D printing, which normally would dissipate in the air, would linger because of the lack of air, and possibly harm the astronauts. The machine would also have to be robust enough to withstand the launch flight itself, while still functioning correctly once on-board the ISS.

Despite all these problems, Made In Space came up with a suitable device that NASA backed and the launch date was set. The astronauts had a list of experiments to put to the 3D printer, which would test its limits and capabilities.


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NYC: Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña dumps 36% of superintendents in biggest shakeup since taking office | Ben Chapman | NY Daily News

NYC:  Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña dumps 36% of superintendents in biggest shakeup since taking office | Ben Chapman | NY Daily News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Out with the old and in with the new.

A slew of high-ranking school officials have been pushed out of their jobs and replaced, as Education Department boss Carmen Fariña enacts a plan to fix the city’s troubled classrooms, the Daily News has learned.

Chancellor Fariña, who’s been blasted in recent weeks for failing to roll out a program for citywide school improvement, has just swapped 15 of 42 city school superintendents, or nearly 36%, in her biggest personnel shakeup since taking office.

The superintendents, who earn more than $150,000 on average, each oversee administrative supports for dozens of schools. They will report directly to the chancellor’s office.


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Copywrong: Crooner in Rights Spat | Louis Menand | The New Yorker

Copywrong: Crooner in Rights Spat | Louis Menand | The New Yorker | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Rod Stewart is being sued over the rights to an image of his own head.

In 1981, a professional photographer named Bonnie Schiffman took a picture of the back of Stewart’s head, which was used, eight years later, on the cover of the album “Storyteller.” Now a different picture of Stewart’s head, also from the back, has been used to promote his Las Vegas act and world tour. Schiffman claims that the resemblance between her photograph and the new image is too close—the legal term is “substantial similarity”—and she is suing for copyright infringement. She is asking for two and a half million dollars.

A copyright is, first and foremost, the right to make a copy. The first products to be protected by copyright—the statutory history begins in Britain, in 1710, with the passage of a law known as the Statute of Anne—were books. Once you buy a book, you can legally do almost anything to it. You can sell it to someone else, you can tear the pages out, you can throw it on a bonfire. God knows you can print terrible things about it. But you cannot make copies of it. The right to do that belongs to the author of the book and his or her heirs and assigns.

As with any right, the right to make a copy is a lot less straightforward than it sounds. As the person who wrote this article, I own the right to make copies of it. Since 1976, in the United States, that right has been born with the article, and there are few formalities still required for me to assert it. The belief that you have irrecoverably forfeited your copyright if you have not sent a copy of your book to the Library of Congress, or put a © on it somewhere, is obsolete.

I have granted The New Yorker an exclusive license to the article for a limited period, after which the magazine retains certain privileges (including printing it in a collection of New Yorker writings and keeping it on its Web site). If, a year from now, someone else, without my permission, reprints my article in a book called “The Most Thoughtful and Penetrating Essays of 2014, ” I can complain that my right to make copies is being violated and, if the court agrees with me, legally suppress the book. Theoretically, the court could compel the publisher to pulp all the unsold copies. Although not the author of this piece, you, too, would likely feel that the publisher of “Most Thoughtful Essays” was a bandit, and you would share my sense of righteous indignation.

But suppose that a Web site, awesomestuff.com, ran an item that said something like “This piece on copyright is a great read!” with a hyperlink on the word “piece” to my article’s page on The New Yorker’s Web site. You wouldn’t think this was banditry at all. You would find it unexceptionable.

This is partly because of what might be called the spatial imaginary of the Web. When you click on a link, you have the sensation that you no longer are at a place called awesomestuff.com but have been virtually transported to an entirely different place, called newyorker.com. A visual change is experienced as a physical change. The link is treated as a footnote; it’s as though you were taking another book off the shelf. The Web reinforces this illusion of movement by adopting a real-estate vocabulary, with terms like “site” (on which nothing can be built), “address” (which you can’t G.P.S.), and “domain” (which is a legal concept, not a duchy).

Some courts have questioned the use of links that import content from another Web site without changing the URL, a practice known as “framing.” But it’s hard to see much difference. Either way, when you’re reading a linked page, you may still be “at” awesomestuff.com, as clicking the back button on your browser can instantly confirm. Effectively, awesomestuff.com has stolen content from newyorker.com, just as the compiler of “Most Thoughtful Essays” stole content from me. The folks at awesomestuff.com and their V. C. backers are attracting traffic to their Web site, with its many banner ads for awesome stuff, using material created by other people.

An enormous amount of Web business is conducted in this manner. Most Web users don’t feel indignant about it. On the contrary, most Web users would feel that their rights had been violated if links like this were prohibited. Something that is almost universally condemned when it happens in the medium of print is considered to be just how digital media work. Awesomestuff.com might even argue that no one is harmed by the link—that it is doing me and The New Yorker a favor by increasing our article’s readership at no cost to us. But the publisher of “Most Thoughtful Essays” could say the same thing, and the court would be unmoved.

This almost instinctive distinction between what is proper in the analog realm and what is proper in the digital realm is at the center of a global debate about the state of copyright law.


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NASA Mars probes watch comet near-miss | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA Mars probes watch comet near-miss | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After a dramatic, one-in-a-million-years close encounter between Mars and comet Siding Spring on Sunday, all five functioning US Mars probes survived and are reportedly healthy. NASA confirms that the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) orbiter, along with the rovers Curiosity and Opportunity came through without a scratch and are returning valuable data on the comet.

According to NASA, C/2013 A1 Siding Spring is a newcomer to the inner Solar System as it makes its first ever visit from the Oort Cloud that lies on the outer fringes of the system. Discovered in 2013 by Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory, its trajectory was calculated to take it so close to Mars this year that astronomers at one time feared that it might impact the Red Planet. However, as it drew closer, more precise observations showed that it would only come within a cosmic hair’s breadth.

On October 19 at 11:27 am PDT, Siding Spring reached its closest point to Mars, passing within a mere 87,000 mi (139,500 km) of the planet. For comparison, that distance is about a third of the distance between the Earth and the Moon. NASA’s orbiting probes were in no danger of colliding with the comet, but with it traveling at a speed of approximately 125,000 mph (56 km/sec), the dust from its tail that reached Mars 100 minutes after the encounter posed a threat like a blast of shrapnel. To avoid this, NASA ordered the probes to carry out an orbital maneuver that placed Mars between them and the comet during the danger period.

NASA reports that during the encounter all but one orbiter maintained communications, and all were able to carry out observations that may provide scientists with a unique glimpse into what the Solar System was like four billion years ago.


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AP U.S. History: Why “Historical Thinking” Is Controversial | Lindsey Tepe | EdCentral

AP U.S. History: Why “Historical Thinking” Is Controversial | Lindsey Tepe | EdCentral | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In fourteen hundred ninety-two / Columbus sailed the ocean blue. […]

October 12 their dream came true, / You never saw a happier crew!

Last week, students throughout the country took the day off on Monday in honor of Columbus Day, one of several federal holidays that over the years has increasingly come under public scrutiny. The criticism is warranted: For one, even the novice student of history may recall that Christopher Columbus did not actually land on the continent of North America, but rather in the Bahamas. And that other Europeans likely made the trip before him. Also, Native Americans.

The story of America is a sweeping tale filled with these grand heroes, epic battles, and the continuing struggle for the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. But American history is also full of inconvenient truths pointing out the fallibility of our heroes and the injustices perpetrated throughout the course of building this nation.


For critical thinkers, considering America’s past sins are an opportunity to reflect upon the promises this country has made to its citizens, and the ways that it might do better to meet those promises for everyone. But for those who would rather fit U.S. History into a predefined triumphalist narrative, past sins are embarrassments to hide.

This tension between myth and reality, as Vox’s Libby Nelson pointed out last week, has long been a flashpoint for debate on how history is taught in public schools. Earlier this fall when the College Board—the organization that produces the advanced placement (AP) high school assessments, in addition to the SAT and PSAT—released a new framework for their AP U.S. History course, that flashpoint was quickly ignited on the national stage. Far from dethroning the Common Core State Standards as the most controversial issue in education, as Nelson suggested, this recent controversy proceeds directly from the critical thinking skills emphasized by the Common Core.

The spark was lit when the Republican National Committee (RNC), in a resolution concerning the framework, said that the College Board’s update “reflects a radically revisionist view of American history that emphasizes negative aspects of our nation’s history while omitting or minimizing positive aspects.” From there, the fire spread as conservative commentators and media outlets denounced the changes as unpatriotic, anti-American, and worse: Ben Carson, potential 2016 GOP presidential candidate and frequent contributor to Fox News, indicated that students exposed to the new course framework would be ready to join the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).


Acting on these public denouncements, a local school board member in Jefferson County, Colorado submitted a proposal to formally review school curricula and materials, emphasizing that materials “should promote citizenship, patriotism, essentials and benefits of the free enterprise system.” The proposal indicates that one of the initial projects would be a review of the new AP U.S. History framework. (Since the proposal was submitted, Jefferson County students and teachers have been protesting the board’s proposed actions as a potential avenue for censorship.)


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Librarians Are Dedicated to User Privacy. The Tech They Have to Use Is Not. | April Glaser & Alison Macrina | Slate.com

Librarians Are Dedicated to User Privacy. The Tech They Have to Use Is Not. | April Glaser & Alison Macrina | Slate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Adobe has made it extremely easy for unwanted eyes to read over the shoulders of library patrons. Earlier this month reports surfaced about how Adobe’s Digital Editions e-book software collects and transmits information about readers in plain text.* That insecure transmission allows the government, corporations, or potential hackers to intercept information about patron reading habits, including book title, author, publisher, subject, description, and every page read.

But the Adobe scandal is just the tip of the iceberg. Libraries sign contracts with technology companies to bring services to patrons all the time, and those contracts are not always favorable to library patrons. Whether it’s an agreement with an ISP to provide the library with Internet access, the publisher of a database of scholarly articles and primary source documents, or a children’s educational game vendor, these contracts are both commonplace and a relatively new development.

But problems arise when those contracts allow vendors to collect large amounts of user information, especially where, as we’ve seen recently, companies don’t always handle that information responsibly.

Libraries have long voiced a deep commitment to privacy in the digital age. In 2006 the American Library Association even issued a resolution on the Retention of Library Usage Records, which expressly urges libraries to avoid unnecessary collection and retention of personally identifiable data, and to transmit any such data over a secure protocol. However, all of this privacy-consciousness may be displaced when libraries are pressured to outsource user services to third parties that have different and inconsistent values.

And that pressure is mounting. Since the last financial crisis, library funding has been under attack. Indeed, in Camden, New Jersey, city officials actually proposed destroying library books. Yet that same crisis means library information services are in sharp demand. People who need to find jobs in a bad economy and can’t afford the steep cost of home Internet rely on libraries for information access, job searches, and email. Meanwhile, upper-middle-class patrons and library donors, less affected by the recession, are asking for library e-books and other digital services.

Facing the existential threat of closure and rumors of irrelevance, many library systems have invested in a digital update—which has led them to sign contracts with technology vendors. Unfortunately, the privacy policies and practices of these vendors aren’t always focused on protecting user data.


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Astronomers use astro-comb to seek Earth-like exoplanets | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Astronomers use astro-comb to seek Earth-like exoplanets | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Astronomers looking for exoplanets are using a fine-toothed comb – a fine-toothed astro-comb, to be precise. And just to make sure it works, the first planet they’ll be looking for is Venus. Developed by astronomers Chih-Hao Li and David Phillips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the astro-comb uses a new spectroscopic device installed in the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) in the Canary Islands that will detect the beclouded planet by its gravitational effect on the Sun as a test of a potentially valuable tool in the hunt for Earth-like planets beyond our Solar System.

So far, astronomers have detected over 1,700 exoplanets with many more candidates awaiting verification. Most of these have been detected by NASA’s Kepler space telescope using the transit method, where changes in the brightness of a star caused by a planet passing in front of it provide clues to an exoplanet’s presence and characteristics. Considering the number of planets this method has discovered, it can’t be called anything but successful, but it has its limits.

The astro-comb provides another string in the exoplanet hunter's bow. According to the Harvard-Smithsonian team, its a form of frequency comb that detects exoplanets using the "radial velocity method." This is based on a common misunderstanding about how planets orbit their stars.


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TN: New course has Spring Hill High students getting down to business | Jay Powell | ColumbiaDailyHerald.com

TN: New course has Spring Hill High students getting down to business | Jay Powell | ColumbiaDailyHerald.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A new business communications course at Spring Hill High School aims to harness skills for the business world and help students get a leg up before college through customer call center training.

IBEX Global is one of the world’s largest customer contact center networks which, in Spring Hill, oversees customer service for DirecTV, Apple and AT&T. The class brings together all aspects of customer call center operations including Apple Computer basics, customer relations, conduct and video conferencing, although the course isn’t just early training for call centers.

“We’ve tried to tell the kids that it doesn’t matter if you’re going to work at a call center or not, you are learning skills that are going to help you in any work environment,” said instructor Pamela Thurman.

The course, titled “Business Communications,” was first discussed when The Tennessee College of Applied Technology in Pulaski noticed issues with incoming IBEX employees, mainly that they weren’t well-versed on Apple technology. The class, Thurman hopes, will give students the opportunity to be exposed and educated on the technology, nipping it in the bud early on.

“I assumed that most of them could use Macs because they all have iPhones. iPhones help because you know that the little compass means ‘Safari.’ They knew that Safari meant Internet and things like that, but that’s about all they knew and they struggled,” Thurman said.

TCAT initially donated 14 Apple computers to Spring Hill High School specifically for the course.

The course is broken down into two primary sections—electronic media and customer service.

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Instructional Design Models and Theories: Problem-Based Learning | Christopher Pappas | eLearning Industry

Instructional Design Models and Theories: Problem-Based Learning | Christopher Pappas | eLearning Industry | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Problem-based Learning (PBL) was introduced by Howard Burrows, an American physician and medical educator, in the late ’60s within the framework of the medical program at McMaster University in Canada.


The philosophy behind Problem-Based Learning is that knowledge and skills are acquired through a progressive sequence of contextual problems, together with learning materials and the support of the instructor. Its core lies in collaboration, as well as in personal reflection, as one of its main objectives is to foster independent and lifelong learners, where, however, teamwork substantially affects the quality of the work generated.

As a form of active learning, Problem-Based Learning encourages knowledge construction and integrates school learning with real life dynamics, where learners learn how to develop flexible knowledge, and effective problem-solving skills, acquire intrinsic motivation, exchange ideas and collaborate.


Through collaboration, learners are able to identify what they already know, what they need to know, as well as the way and the source of information they need, to successfully reach to the solution of the problem. Instructors facilitate learning, by supporting, guiding and monitoring their learners’ progress, building their confidence, encouraging them to actively participate and stretching their comprehension.


This method gives learners the opportunity to master their problem-solving, thinking, teamwork, communication, time management, research and computing skills.


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PA: Local public-access TV gets participants ready for prime time | Michaelle Bond | Philly.com

PA: Local public-access TV gets participants ready for prime time | Michaelle Bond | Philly.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The 25 or so people squeezed into a small television studio deep inside the Tredyffrin Township municipal building were told to relax, to accept not being ready for prime time.

"The worst problem I have is, people beat themselves up because they're not Steven Spielberg," Gene Donahue, studio manager and a township employee, said to his class of aspiring producers. "Well, guess what? Steven Spielberg wasn't always Steven Spielberg."

Most students don't have experience shooting with a professional camera. But to produce shows on the township's public-access TV station, they don't need any.

And most local-access cable stations carry public meetings, but Tredyffrin Township Television, or "Triple-T V," is one of the few in the region that offers original programming by residents.

The station does broadcast meetings - on a program called T-SPAN. But over the years, its content has included shows about cooking, sports, the environment, and health, even a short-lived sitcom. Donahue, who has been teaching the class for 18 years, has trained some of the producers.

The national trend toward statewide franchising among cable companies has led to a decrease in community-access stations during the last few years, said Gretjen Clausing, executive director of the Philadelphia Public Access Corp., which runs Philadelphia's public-access TV station.

She said the Tredyffrin station is one of the fortunate ones. "It definitely is a challenging environment, so it's great that they have the support of the township," Clausing said.

Over the last 30 years, Tredyffrin residents have produced about 50 individual shows.

Comcast Corp. said it has roughly 100 active channels for community access programming - public-access, educational-access, and government-access - throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and northern Delaware.

Kalen Wilson, 21, flew from where he lived in South Carolina to Tredyffrin, where he grew up, so he could take Tredyffrin Township's class.

"It's a beginning for what I'm going to be doing for, hopefully, the rest of my life," said Wilson, who is studying film and art and is staying with his family.

He plans to volunteer at the Tredyffrin studio, learning what he can and adding the experience to his resumé.


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Air Force’s super-secret space drone comes home | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com

Air Force’s super-secret space drone comes home | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Air Force’s acknowledged one thing about its secretive X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle today—it has returned from a 674-day trip into Earth’s orbit – or wherever else it might have snuck off too while it was up there.

According to the Air Force, the X-37B landed at California's Vandenberg Air Force Base on Friday (Oct. 17) at 9:24 a.m. local Pacific time (12:24 p.m.) EDT. It was the only update the public was given since the spacecraft took off on Dec. 11, 2012. It was the Orbital Test Vehicle program’s third mission.

The Air Force in a statement did say "the OTV-3 conducted on-orbit experiments for 674 days during its mission, extending the total number of days spent on-orbit for the OTV program to 1,367 days."

Beyond the take-off and landing, little else is known of this mission.


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3D printing and ham radio: A match made in heaven? | Mike Grauer | Inside3DP.com

3D printing and ham radio: A match made in heaven? | Mike Grauer | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As a member of the ham radio community, I have always been fascinated by the maker mindset which has existed since the early days of radio. From making radio equipment from scratch, to kits and even modifying commercially available equipment, the maker movement and radio go hand in hand.

The 3D printing community shares many traits with the ham radio movement. At the heart of it all is making, creating and inventing. And just like ham radio operators, those involved with 3D printing are constantly learning new technical skills that can be used in other areas of our lives.

Here are just a few ways ham radio operators can use 3D printing:


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Using Gaming Principles to Engage Students | Douglas Kiang Blog | Edutopia.org

Using Gaming Principles to Engage Students | Douglas Kiang Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Game designers understand how to make games memorable and "sticky" in the sense that, even when you aren't playing the game, you're still thinking about solving its problems and puzzles.


As teachers, how might we make our projects and content as sticky as games? How can we engage kids in thoughtful learning even after they leave the classroom? Here are game designers' top five secrets and some tips on using these same game dynamics to make learning in your classroom as addictive as gaming.


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Suvi Salo's curator insight, Today, 11:45 AM

"Find more ways to grade the process."

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Schools, Health and Libraries Broadband Coalition (SHLB) Submits CTC Study to FCC | ctc technology & energy

On October 17, the Schools, Health and Libraries Broadband Coalition (SHLB) submitted to the FCC CTC’s cost model study for fiber construction to schools and libraries.


SHLB filed A Model for Understanding the Cost to Connect Schools and Libraries with Fiber Optics in the E-Rate Modernization proceeding in support of its recommendation to the FCC to fund fiber construction to schools and libraries that are not currently connected with such state-of-the-art infrastructure.


The study creates a model for fiber costs across six different geographies of the United States so as to enable evaluation of the cost of construction in different regions of the country.


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41 ideas advance in News Challenge: Libraries | Chris Barr | Knight Foundation

41 ideas advance in News Challenge: Libraries | Chris Barr | Knight Foundation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last week 11 advisers helped us select a group of semifinalists for the Knight News Challenge: Libraries. Today, we are excited to announce that 41 projects have moved to the next stage of consideration. These semifinalists will have a week to fine tune their entries before we begin work with another set of advisers to choose the finalists.

We received 680 submissions to the challenge, which is focused on the question: how might we leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities?

Having the opportunity to look at a multitude of ideas from the library community is immensely valuable to our work. It gives us the chance to understand the shared energy among those working to innovate in the field and the shifting role of libraries in the digital age. Here are some of the themes that emerged as we reviewed the 680 entries:


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Doing it right: Quality 3D prints are all about 3D printing materials | Philippe Chiasson | Inside3DP.com

Doing it right: Quality 3D prints are all about 3D printing materials | Philippe Chiasson | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When it comes to 3D printing there is a lot of discussion about which printer is the best. Anyone who has browsed the internet looking for a filament based printer (also known as Fused Deposition Modeling) has seen ample charts comparing kits to assembled models, delta to cartesian style printing and everything else in between. However, with the FDM 3D printer market quickly becoming saturated, the quality of the filament is often being overlooked.


Many people are unaware that one of the greatest contributors to a high quality print is not necessarily in the printer itself, but the base materials. Low quality filament can lead to many jams, inconsistent gaps in layers and sometimes it can even damage your printer. To help you overcome some of the pitfalls of low grade filament, here are a few tips to keep your printer running smoothly.


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5 Ways to Design Effective Rewards for Game-Based Learning | Vicki Davis Blog | Edutopia.org

5 Ways to Design Effective Rewards for Game-Based Learning | Vicki Davis Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Learning by playing games can be a powerful way to teach.


Just as drama coaches set the stage for a play, smart teachers set the stage for game-based learning.


I use these five easy elements in my classroom to get my students ready to learn as they play.


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Teachers enlivening classrooms with free role-playing game | Innovate My School

Teachers enlivening classrooms with free role-playing game | Innovate My School | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Classcraft, the first online educational role-playing game that teachers and students play together for free, recently announced the launch of a fully-updated version of their product for the new academic year. This revised version boasts new features such as free iOS apps for iPhone and iPad, interactive forums, student analytics and customisable characters, all of which will be useful for both teachers and students. Also included are French, Chinese, Dutch, German, and Spanish translations, which has made the game even more accessible to classrooms worldwide. To date, more than 30,000 students in 50 countries around the world are playing the game.

In order to keep students engaged, the Quebec-based team of education professionals are keen to inject the mechanisms of popular social games into learning. Playing in teams, students can become mages, warriors and healers, each with unique powers. The more a student excels, the more they gain points and real powers, like the ability to take notes into an exam. Teams can lose points by disrupting the classroom or submitting homework late; consequences can include detention and and less time to finish assignments.


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NASA's MAVEN spacecraft provides first look at Martian upper atmosphere | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's MAVEN spacecraft provides first look at Martian upper atmosphere | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After completing its 10 month-long voyage, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft is taking its first look at the Martian atmosphere. Part of the unmanned orbiter’s commissioning phase, it limbered up its sensors by observing the effect of a massive solar event and returned its first images of the fountain-like coronas that are slowly peeling away the Red Planet's atmosphere.

Launched in November of last year from Cape Canaveral, Florida, MAVEN arrived at Mars on September 21 and has since moved to a lower orbit. Its first observations included taking ultraviolet images of the tenuous oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon coronas in the upper atmosphere, and creating a comprehensive map of its ozone layers. During this process, NASA scientists say that the instruments are working better than expected.

MAVEN’s main mission is to study the effect of the Sun on the Martian atmosphere and has hit the ground running. On September 26, a flare erupted from the Sun, arriving at Mars on the 29th, where it was observed by MAVEN's Solar Energetic Particle instrument. These events occur at irregular intervals and scientists believe that they are a major reason why the Martian atmosphere is so tenuous. Energetic solar particles are powerful enough to strip away air molecules. Earth's magnetic field protects us from this, but the Martian magnetic field is extremely weak and spotty.


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US Air Force's top secret X-37B spaceplane breaks orbital endurance record | David Szondy | GizMag.com

US Air Force's top secret X-37B spaceplane breaks orbital endurance record | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A secret mission came to a public end this morning as the US Air Force’s top secret X-37B spaceplane landed at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.


The unmanned reusable spacecraft touched down on the runway like a conventional aircraft this morning at 9:24 am EDT after a record-breaking 674 days in orbit. According to the Air Force, the automatic landing was monitored by the 30th Space Wing and occurred without incident.

The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle mission 3 (OTV-3) launched on October 25, 2012 atop an Atlas/Centaur rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and has achieved the longest time in orbit by a reusable spacecraft; breaking the record set by OTV-2 in 2012, which launched on March 5, 2011 and returned to Earth on June 16, 2012. With Friday’s landing, the program has so far clocked up a total of 1,367 days in orbit.


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50% of Universities will be Bankrupt in 10-15 years, a Second Look | Chris Hilger | ExtensionEngine.com

50% of Universities will be Bankrupt in 10-15 years, a Second Look | Chris Hilger | ExtensionEngine.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One of our most popular posts this summer was “50% of Universities Will Be Bankrupt in 10-15 years”. This article was a summary of one of Clayton Christensen’s talks on Disruptive Innovation.


As a follow-up, we wanted to take a deeper look into one of the famous charts Christensen uses to demonstrate disruptive innovation, and describe its relation to Higher Ed.


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The university experiment: Campus as laboratory | Nature.com

The university experiment: Campus as laboratory | Nature.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Modern universities are heirs to a thousand-year tradition of scholarship. But they are also being buffeted by twenty-first-century upheavals in technology, economics and society. Through trial, error and experiment, they are now trying to find new ways of thinking and acting that will help them to prosper.

GERMANY: The innovative universityBy Alison Abbott

When chemist Wolfgang Herrmann began his first term as president of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in 1995, he was determined to challenge an academic status quo that had prevailed for more than two decades.


Germany had responded to the social upheaval of the 1960s by declaring that all universities were equivalent and taking steps to prevent the development of a privileged elite, a move that tended to undermine any competitive spirit in the faculty. New rules had also guaranteed a place for any student with a school-leaving certificate — which meant that universities had no say in who took their courses — and kept faculty members bound to bureaucratic civil-service laws. The result was an inward-looking ivory-tower culture that had stagnated intellectually and financially.

Herrmann's vision was to turn the TUM into a nimbler, more internationally competitive 'entrepreneurial university' that would encourage innovation, risk-taking and business initiative among students and faculty members alike. To do that, he restructured the TUM along the lines of successful US institutions such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. In 1999, he made one of his first — and, within Germany, pioneering — reforms by installing a board of trustees that replaced the Bavarian education ministry's direct control of the TUM and allowed for much quicker decision-making.


Since then, he has used that freedom to introduce some of the first German graduate schools: institutions that provide PhD candidates with rigorous common standards for coursework, instead of leaving them to the vagaries of individual supervisors. Herrmann has also created a private fund-raising foundation to allow flexible and independent financing of some university projects; formed an institute of advanced studies; and launched a tenure-track system that obliges the university to promote and permanently employ academics who make the grade, and sack those who do not. The latter system is a familiar concept in the United States, but revolutionary in Germany.


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Ohio Manufacturing Institute's curator insight, October 21, 8:40 AM

Culture changes in regard to applied research and industry outreach are part of the recipe.

Shawn Nason, Director, Xavier Center for Innovation's curator insight, October 21, 8:49 PM

This is an amazing story of a culture change on a university campus. I know this will not be easy, but I look forward to the day that Xavier is being talked about within the community and impacting the community in such an amazing way.

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Guide to Creating Tech-Friendly Classroom Management Strategies | Edudemic.com

Guide to Creating Tech-Friendly Classroom Management Strategies | Edudemic.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you’re a teacher who grew up in the pre-Internet era, you understand how tech innovation has revamped the educational landscape. Gone are the days of the blackboard and mimeograph. Teachers today carry a heavier (and more complicated) toolbox than ever before. The question is, how efficiently are you using your tools?

One of your jobs as a modern-day teacher is to invite your students to the technology table. Since most kids get a lot of their at-home entertainment from computers, tablets, and smartphones, it’s not hard to entice them. The trick is to convince them that tech gadgets aren’t just for entertainment; they’re also for learning.

But how do you convince a die-hard Zelda fan that algebra games are fun on the iPad? How do you persuade a Facebook addict that Edmodo can be just as fun when shared with friends?

Your kids won’t reach their learning goals if you don’t lure them in. Also, once you hook them, there’s also a question of keeping them under your control. Any teacher with experience knows that classroom management is a delicate dance that often crumbles at the first misstep.

Relax. Take a deep breath. Hold the following strategies close to your heart as you lead your students on their next high-tech adventure.


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