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Facebook loosens its rules on teen privacy | NetworkWorld.com

Facebook loosens its rules on teen privacy | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Facebook announced Wednesday that it is loosening privacy rules for its teen users.


The announcement comes amid headlines about teenage bullying and cyber predators, and industry analysts expect the move to draw fire. The social network has frequently found itself criticized for its privacy policies, and this one could draw more attention than usual.


Until Wednesday, Facebook users between the ages of 13 and 17 were only able to share status updates, pictures and videos with their online friends or friends of friends. With the new policy, teenage users may opt to open up their accounts and make their posts public.


"Teens are among the savviest people using social media, and whether it comes to civic engagement, activism, or their thoughts on a new movie, they want to be heard," the company wrote in a blog post . "While only a small fraction of teens using Facebook might choose to post publicly, this update now gives them the choice to share more broadly, just like on other social media services."


Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy, said the new policy could be an issue or Facebook. "Historically, online privacy activists have gotten riled up about Facebook privacy issues but it never really ever got far," he said. "Now there is the chance child advocacy and parent groups will step in."


Facebook also is enabling teens to turn on a Follow feature, which allows their posts to show up in other's news feeds.


Adult users have always been able to choose how public or private their information is made.


"We take the safety of teens very seriously, so they will see an extra reminder before they can share publicly," Facebook noted. " When teens choose "Public" in the audience selector, they'll see a reminder that the post can be seen by anyone, not just people they know, with an option to change the post's privacy. And if they choose to continue posting publicly, they will get an additional reminder."


Zeus Kerravala, an analyst with ZK Research, said Facebook's move is all about advertising.


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ESA to record destruction of spaceship from the inside | GizMag.com

ESA to record destruction of spaceship from the inside | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Ever wonder if the light goes out when you close the fridge door? Or what it’s like to ride a spacecraft as it burns up in the Earth’s atmosphere? The fridge may remain an eternal mystery, but the European Space Agency (ESA) plans to answer the latter question when its unmanned Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV)-5 Georges Lemaître completes its six-month mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The space agency has developed a “black box” camera system designed to record the dramatic event and transmit the images back to Earth after the craft breaks up.


If on some clear night you see an unusually spectacular meteor flash across the sky giving off sparks as it goes, odds are that it’s an old satellite burning up as it re-enters the atmosphere. If you happen to be in the emptier parts of the South Pacific, you might even see one of the cargo ships used to resupply the ISS breaking up in a fireworks display at the end of its mission. It’s become a familiar sight over the past 50 years, but ESA plans to go one better by mounting European, American, and Japanese recorders inside the ATV-5 to beam back images of the last ATV freighter’s final seconds.


According the ESA, its infrared Break-Up Camera (BUC) will be bolted to a rack inside the spacecraft along with a JAXA i-Ball camera and a NASA Re-entry Break-up Recorder to provide a complete record of the event. The BUC, along with its Reentry SatCom capsule that works like a black box recorder, was designed, built, and tested in only nine months and is designed to record the break-up of ATV-5 and send the images back to mission control by means of an Iridium satellite link.


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LA: Inside Report: Iberville Parish to get charter school despite advance in performance grade | TheAdvocate.com

LA: Inside Report: Iberville Parish to get charter school despite advance in performance grade | TheAdvocate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Charter schools have become the talk of the town in Iberville Parish since it was announced earlier this year that the parish would have to welcome its first one this fall — Iberville Charter Academy.


School Superintendent Ed Cancienne responded to the news by calling it an intrusion on the school district’s rights and tax money.


That point was driven home recently when the school system’s Chief Financial Officer Jolain Landry said in a July 13 article that the Iberville Parish School System would have to fork over approximately $3.7 million in state Minimum Foundation Program funding to the charter school, which is scheduled to open Aug. 11.


That allocation is coming from a projected enrollment at the charter school of 376 Iberville students. The news sparked a spirited debate at the Iberville Parish School Board’s July 14 meeting.


Board member Nancy Broussard accused the state’s Department of Education and the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education of using underhanded tactics to greenlight the charter school’s move into the parish.


Comments Broussard made in defense of the school system came after a resident chided the board on obsessing over the $3.7 million loss in state funding.


In August, BESE authorized South Louisiana Charter Foundation to launch up to two “Type 2” charter schools in school districts in the Baton Rouge area that were graded D or F in the annual district performance report issued by the Department of Education.


Type 2 charter schools are self-governed public schools independent of existing public school districts. They must obtain BESE’s approval to operate after an application and review process.


When South Louisiana Charter Foundation’s application was approved, the Iberville Parish school district had a D grade. When the department released school performance scores in October, Iberville Parish had inched up to a C grade for its districtwide score.


“At the point when the state approved this charter, they knew we were already a C district,” Broussard said during the meeting. “They did an end run around the law. That’s a fact. We were not a D school system at the time the charter was approved. Had they been willing to come out and say it, they couldn’t do it legally.”


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Student Passion and TEDx Talks | Nicholas Provenzano Blog | Edutopia.org

Student Passion and TEDx Talks | Nicholas Provenzano Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I instituted 20 Time in my classroom this year. I gave my students one day a week to work on anything they wanted as long as they were passionate about it. Here is a link to their blogs where they documented their journey. At the end of the year, they each needed to give an oral presentation focusing on what they had learned, not what they had accomplished.


As part of 20 Time, I decided to take on a project of my own. I wanted to see if I could organize a TEDx event that would allow my students to share their experiences with the world.


After filling out the paperwork and submitting my application, TEDxGrossePointeSouthHS was approved for June 7. This event really took 20 Time to another level.


Here are just a few things that stood out to me as I reflect on this awesome time with my students.


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The Most Effective Factor in Education | LinkedIn.com

The Most Effective Factor in Education | LinkedIn.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I've been a teacher for the past 15 years, and I've taught in several mediums including live classes and computer-based e-learning. I have come to the conclusion that the most effective factor in education and training is fostering emotional investment.


Simply put, students must care about learning the material. The more they care, the more they learn.


The notion of getting emotional investment from students might sound like simple common sense, but it is often not done . . . and often not even attempted. .


When I say that students need to care, I mean more than just care about the subject matter in an intellectual way. Students will certainly pay more attention if they find the topic to be interesting, but that will only go so far. Learning is not a purely intellectual process where people assimilate knowledge and information. Learning has an important and overlooked emotional dimension. Memories are most strongly forged when feelings are involved.


What generates emotional investment? The following things can help:


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4 Tips to Improve Video Conferencing Performance When You Have Unlimited Bandwidth | Internet2 Blogs

4 Tips to Improve Video Conferencing Performance When You Have Unlimited Bandwidth | Internet2 Blogs | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I recently read a well-written article entitled 3 Tips to Improve Video Conference Performance Without Cramping Bandwidth.


This article was a good one, and nicely emphasizes that there are many other important concerns beyond network performance when it comes to video collaboration. But it did get me thinking - what about when you have unlimited bandwidth? In the Internet2 community, our universities and other connected institutions have massive pipes between them such that it’s next to impossible to fill them up. (Am I connected?


We are running multiple 100Gbps links across the country and maintaining a minimum of 50% headroom to leave space for bursty traffic like big data transfers, experimental traffic, and, you guessed it, advanced video communications.


Institutions themselves are connecting to our backbone or regional networks more often at 100Gbps, with connections below 10Gbps becoming less and less common. Certainly you probably won’t see 100Gbps direct to your computer or video conferencing system anytime soon, but the point here is that if your system has a 100Mbps or 1Gbps connection on Internet2 it’s a waste to not be using more of it.


So - let’s talk about how.


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The Almost forgotten Story of the Amiga 2000 | AmigaLounge.com

The Almost forgotten Story of the Amiga 2000 | AmigaLounge.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Steve Jobs was quoted that he wanted to" Make a dent in the Universe", and now,everyone (other than Amiga users) wants to change the history books and erase Commodore and the Amiga from history, but, there actually was one Amiga that truly changed the world.


Unfortunately, The Amiga 2000 is one of the least favorite or collectible Amiga's . Even today, with the most "die hard" Amiga fans, the A2000 often is ignored and shunned as a "big, ugly, tank" of a machine. One look at Ebay (Canada or USA), on any given day, and you can see that the A2000 often doesn't sell at all, and most times goes for a lot cheaper than all the other Amiga's - even cheaper than an A500.


But, because of this, one can find awesome deals, because, most of the time, the seller has no clue of what Zorro cards are inside, and for next to nothing, you can pick up a fully loaded A2000 with an '030 or above for peanuts (the shipping is the killer here). This is the "North American" Market I speak of, I have no idea what the European market is for the A2000.


In fact, I get a lot of A2000 dumped at my door, because it is almost next to impossible to give them away here in Canada. Also, like all big box Amiga's, the A2000 has a "barrel" battery, that can and will eventually leak. The Acid can eat into and through the motherboard, so, if you are looking for one - Always ask to see the battery area.


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Liam Dann: Let's teach all our kids to code | NZ Herald News

Liam Dann: Let's teach all our kids to code | NZ Herald News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Imagine teaching every child in this country how to program a computer - from age 5. When you think about it, it is odd that we don't.


Don't get me wrong. I know we have computers in the classroom. The kids all get a go and some of them get the bug.


But shouldn't we be teaching them to speak the language? If we're looking for ways to really transform our economy and create well-paid jobs then equipping the entire population with the basic skills to participate in the technological revolution doesn't seem like a bad idea.


It probably sounds overly ambitious, but for many undeveloped countries so does teaching every child to read. In fact the concept of universal literacy is not much more than 100 years old. New Zealand led the way.


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MIT adds two robotic fingers to the human hand | GizMag.com

MIT adds two robotic fingers to the human hand | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, we heard about an MIT project in which test subjects were equipped with an extra set of robotic arms in order to help them perform tasks. While the technology is certainly intriguing, some people might find the concept of a four-armed cyborg to be a little ... much. If you're one of those people, then you might be more comfortable with another ongoing MIT project. It's just aimed at giving people two extra robotic fingers.


Developed by a team led by professor of engineering Harry Asada and grad student Faye Wu, the "supernumerary robotic fingers" extend from either side of the user's dominant hand, and are attached to a device that's worn around the wrist.


The idea behind them is that (among other things) they could allow users to perform tasks that usually require two hands, using only one. As an example, the extra fingers could grip a jar while the other fingers unscrewed its lid, or they could hold an envelope down while the others slit it open – both of which have already been demonstrated in the lab.


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Teaching robots to play Angry Birds helps children's rehabilitation | GizMag.com

Teaching robots to play Angry Birds helps children's rehabilitation | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If Angry Birds is known for anything, it's an ability to keep youthful eyes glued to the screen for extended periods of time. But a new study conducted at Georgia Tech has shown that teaching a robot how to play the video game keeps kids slinging those wingless birds through the air for even longer, a finding that could help in the rehabilitation of cognitive and motor-skill disabilities.


The study observed how school-aged children engaged with Angry Birds and how that engagement could be dictated depending on who was sitting alongside them. The kids were first asked to play the game as an adult watched on, and then to teach a robot how to play for themselves.


In preparation, the researchers had paired a small humanoid robot with an Android tablet. The robot was programmed to watch the child's movements and record snippets of useful information, such as where swipes are stopping and starting and how the objects were moving on screen. It then mimicked the movements and offered up life-like reactions to developments in the game, shaking its head following misdirected shots and dancing when it struck a target.


Whereas the children played the game for an average of nine minutes with the adults, session times almost tripled to an average of 26.5 minutes when playing with the robot. The researchers also observed a much higher level of interaction, as seven percent of the session with the adult included eye contact, gestures, while the robot's session drew nearly forty percent.


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Elephant Steady camera stabilizer uses iPhone gyro to stay on the level | GizMag.com

Elephant Steady camera stabilizer uses iPhone gyro to stay on the level | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One of the neat things about smartphones is the fact that when gadgets are designed to be used with them, those devices can make use of the phone's sensors and other electronics instead of incorporating their own. This, of course, means that those devices can thus be smaller and cheaper than would otherwise be possible. The Elephant Steady is a new motorized iPhone camera-stabilizing rig, that takes this approach.


Designed by Japanese tech firm Adplus, the Elephant Steady latches onto the back of an iPhone 4S or higher (or 5th-gen iPod touch) using a built-in holder. It also has a hard-wired 3.5-mm plug, that goes into the phone's headphone jack.


Once the Elephant Steady is powered up and its accompanying app is launched, the iPhone's own processor and gyroscope come into play. As soon as any slight tilts or side-to-side movements of the phone are detected by the gyro, the processor instantaneously responds by triggering the Elephant's motor to move the phone correspondingly in the opposite direction, thus canceling out the initial movement.


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Deep-space radio waves 'heard' at opposite points on Earth | CNET.com

Deep-space radio waves 'heard' at opposite points on Earth | CNET.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A brief burst of radio waves from deep in space has now been picked up and "heard" by astronomers on opposite sides of the Earth.


Before you SETI enthusiasts get too excited, it's important to note that there's little reason to believe that the bursts -- only a tiny fraction of a second in duration -- come from E.T. The source of the enigmatic signal could be from an evaporating black hole or perhaps merging neutron stars.


Until recently, so-called "fast radio bursts" had only been detected by the Parkes radio telescope in Australia -- leading to speculation the Australian telescope was actually picking up pulses from or near Earth. But last week, an international team of astronomers published details on its discovery of similar split-second radio waves picked up in 2012 by the huge Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. Picking up similar FRB at a second location goes a long way toward validating the existence of the pulses, and it could help astronomers determine where these deep space radio waves are coming from.


"Our result is important because it eliminates any doubt that these radio bursts are truly of cosmic origin," Victoria Kaspi, an astrophysics professor at McGill University and principal investigator for the pulsar-survey project that found the radio waves, said in a release. "The radio waves show every sign of having come from far outside our galaxy - a really exciting prospect."


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3 Guidelines to Eliminating Assessment Fog | John McCarthy Blog | Edutopia.org

3 Guidelines to Eliminating Assessment Fog | John McCarthy Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Consider what it's like to drive through a heavy morning fog. It may be a busy highway where brake lights blink in and out of the haze, or a neighborhood road where the familiar details of buildings and trees are obscured by a gray curtain that implies shapes without clear form. Such driving conditions bring tension as we seek any details that will keep us on the road, and not hit a car or miss a sharp turn.


Assessment fog holds similar dangers of miscalculation for accurately diagnosing student needs. Unlike road fog, which is obvious (you know you're in it), assessment fog can be invisible. You have to be looking for it to notice. Once revealed, differentiation is easy and necessary to support learners.


Consider these three guidelines for finding and eliminating assessment fog so as to meet the needs of all students.


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Minnesota native elected to lead and advocate for 60,000 future educators | Education Votes | NEA.org

Minnesota native elected to lead and advocate for 60,000 future educators | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Chelsey Herrig was in high school, she was already advocating for her future classroom. She was part of Teens Against Tobacco Advertising, educating the community about heinous marketing practices used by tobacco companies.


“Without knowing it, my activism started as soon as I found issues that were affecting my future students,” said Herrig, a graduate of Southwest Minnesota State University in Marshall with a degree in elementary education.


Now, Herrig will speak out for future educators, students and public schools across the country as the newly-elected chair of the NEA Student Program, which comprises of 60,000 future educators and represents 1,100 college and university chapters in 50 states.


“If we enter the profession with a strong foundation that we are going to stand up for what is right because we are the professionals and we know what is best for our students, then we have already won part of the battle,” said Herrig.


After Herrig attended her first conference with the student program, she was hooked. She was very active in the program, serving on the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identification Committee and later as a member of the Student Program Board of Directors, which pushed her activism to an all-time high.


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ESA prepares IXV concept spaceplane for maiden flight | Gizmag.com

ESA prepares IXV concept spaceplane for maiden flight | Gizmag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Space Agency is preparing to test the atmospheric re-entry capabilities of its new early concept spaceplane, the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV). The test flight is slated for launch in November atop a European made Vega rocket, with the hope that results will inform the design of future ESA spacecraft.


The overriding goal in pursuing the project is to lessen the ESA's dependence on the current generation of Russian made Soyuz return vehicles. Whilst the IXV test vehicle is designated as a spaceplane, you could be forgiven for thinking that, at least on the outside, it looks anything but. Instead, in its current stage of development the IXV resembles a simple fuselage.


The apparent simplicity in the design of the IXV is due to the fact that the spacecraft represents a preliminary stage of testing, with an emphasis on proving basic but vital technology for more advanced concepts in the future. The agency intends to take the lessons taken from the November launch and begin the process of creating a viable autonomous re-entry spacecraft with a focus on modularity and flexibility in orbital operations.


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S. James Gates — Uncovering the Codes for Reality | OnBeing.org

S. James Gates — Uncovering the Codes for Reality | OnBeing.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Are we in the matrix? Physicist James Gates reveals why string theory stretches our imaginations about the nature of reality. Also, how failure makes us more complete, and imagination makes us more knowledgeable.


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Bridging the Gap Between Education and Employment in the Arab World | edX.org

Bridging the Gap Between Education and Employment in the Arab World | edX.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Committed to increasing access to education for everyone, everywhere, we are pleased to announce a new collaboration between edX and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to create a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) portal to bridge the gap between education and employment in the Arab World. Courses are expected to begin in September 2014 with a first-of-its-kind pilot program for Saudi women, youth, the disabled and citizens in rural communities.


The new MOOC portal, powered by edX’s open-source platform, will be created exclusively for Arab audiences and will deliver vocational and employability skills to historically underserved learners in the region. As the private sector in Saudi Arabia grows rapidly, the demand for skilled workers continues to increase. Women and youth, in particular, are well positioned to contribute to this need by having access to high-quality vocational training in areas such as IT, healthcare, retail and manufacturing.


At the heart of the new initiative is the curriculum, which will include a combination of courses licensed from edX university members and translated into Arabic, as well as original courses developed exclusively for Arabic-speaking students, and will deliver access to online courses from some of the leading academic institutions worldwide to Saudi learners. Additionally, the initiative will include a research component focused on learning through innovative technologies and R&D.


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Teachers Cite Growing Diversity of Student Needs as One of the Most Challenging Parts of the Job | The Knewton Blog

Teachers Cite Growing Diversity of Student Needs as One of the Most Challenging Parts of the Job | The Knewton Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You may remember the teacher survey we released with our infographic, “What Does it Take to be a Teacher?” a few months ago. The results are in!


Survey respondents represented 14 different countries, ranged from pre-K to continuing education instructors (89% from K-12), and focused on eight subject matter areas (including 37% language arts, 14% math, and 13% social studies/history). The average participant had 13 years of professional teaching experience.


A common theme was the difficulty of finding enough time in the day to tailor lessons and provide personalized feedback. Here are some more findings:


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ZeroDivide | Latest News, Updates, Blog Posts - Building the Pipeline: #YesWeCode 2014 Hackathon

ZeroDivide | Latest News, Updates, Blog Posts - Building the Pipeline: #YesWeCode 2014 Hackathon | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

ZeroDivide's Vanessa Mason recently participated in the 2014 #YesWeCode Hackathon as a mentor for the youth competing in the gathering, this year held in conjunction with the Essence Festival in New Orleans.


#YesWeCode is the organization launched by Rebuilding the Dream's Van Jones that aims to address the current economic and demographic disparities at play in the tech industry by training 100,000 low-income youth to become coders and building the pipeline for high-skilled, well-paid workers in the digital economy.


For more reading, Vanessa also has a guest blog on the 2014 #YesWeCode Hackathon over at Women 2.0.


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Partner with Local Arts Organizations | Glenview Elementary Blog | Edutopia.org

Partnerships with local arts organizations can bring much-needed resources to your students without much cost, and can provide students with new outlets for creativity and ways to develop essential critical thinking and collaboration skills. Explore more resources from this school.


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Inventing Infographics: Visual Literacy Meets Written Content | Brett Vogelsinger Blog | Edutopia.com

Inventing Infographics: Visual Literacy Meets Written Content | Brett Vogelsinger Blog | Edutopia.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I'll admit it. In my early years as a teacher, I thought that encouraging students to improve their writing invariably involved encouraging greater depth, adding more detail, crafting more complex sentences. In short, I implied to my students that the most valuable revisions involved adding to our work and that writing better equaled writing longer.


Enter the infographic, the twenty-first century text/structure/genre/design that blows my earlier beliefs about "better = longer" right out of the water.


As texts compete for attention with soundbites, scrolling headlines, tweets, and vines, writers and readers alike are seeing the value of text that uses visual design features to organize ideas, provide background, and emphasize key facts in ways that make it easier for readers to engage a topic thoughtfully. I have always encouraged my student writers to "swim deeply" when they read and write, moving beyond the basics, braving the imposing waters at the "deep end of the pool." Reading and writing infographics is like cannonballing into ten feet of water -- you splash in deeper and more quickly.


I knew that this year I wanted to have students experiment in creating their own infographics, so I made an early decision to build infographics into our Article of the Week routine (inspired by Kelly Gallagher). I occasionally substituted an infographic or two instead of the news articles or essays they were accustomed to reading. Of course, the reaction was positive. The first thing students noticed was the substantial time savings in reading an infographic or two versus a traditional article. It was like asking them to read Animal Farm after completing Great Expectations -- there was an immediate “can do” reaction.


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How The Big 5 Publishers Hobbled The Amazon Unlimited Launch | TechCrunch.com

How The Big 5 Publishers Hobbled The Amazon Unlimited Launch | TechCrunch.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Amazon Unlimited was dubbed the Netflix of books. That is correct as long as you imagine a Netflix consisting of an endless array of low-budget indie releases and some major small-studio films. In truth, Amazon’s new $9.99 all-you-can-read service features no books by “big 5″ trade publishers, an issue on which Amazon has remained mum.


I’ve asked Amazon for clarification but haven’t heard back. However, if you look at the list of popular titles on the Unlimited list, all of them are either published by smaller publishers – “smaller” being a relative term – or independent entities. Take Life Of Pi, for example. It comes from Mariner Books, part of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, an educational publisher. Michael Lewis’ The Flash Boys comes from W. W. Norton & Company. And the real draw, the Harry Potter canon? That is owned by Pottermore Limited, J K Rowling’s business venture. In short, the big guys sat this one out.


In fact, most major publishers have been working hard to create and invest in other partners. Oyster Books, for example, is a beneficiary of this anti-Amazon sentiment while houses like Zola Books are funded by publishing insiders. Whether or not these services will bear fruit – or cash – is a different question.


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Honda's new ASIMO robot is all grown up | GizMag.com

Honda's new ASIMO robot is all grown up | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Humanoid robots are continually improving and Honda's ASIMO is no different. Honda's first two-legged robot was born in 1986 and since then, subsequent models have become increasingly advanced. Today's newly-announced version is autonomous, intelligent and responsive.


An increased understanding of robotics, ability to share knowledge and availability of requisite components have resulted in a proliferation of humanoid robots. Robots like the 3D-printed Poppy and the German Aerospace Center's TORO have been developed relatively recently. Few have the near 30-year heritage of Honda's ASIMO, though.


ASIMO was developed out of Honda's desire to create a robot that could help in human society. For that, it needed to be able to move around objects in a room and negotiate stairs and that, in turn, meant it needed two legs. Its first design, the Eo, could walk by putting one leg in front of the other, but did so slowly and took five seconds between steps.


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The July 20, 1969 Moon Landing: One Giant Leap For Mankind | NASA.gov

The July 20, 1969 Moon Landing: One Giant Leap For Mankind | NASA.gov | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It is only seven months since NASA's made a bold decision to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.


Now, on the morning of July 16, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sit atop another Saturn V at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The three-stage 363-foot rocket will use its 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel them into space and into history.


At 9:32 a.m. EDT, the engines fire and Apollo 11 clears the tower. About 12 minutes later, the crew is in Earth orbit. (› Play Audio)


After one and a half orbits, Apollo 11 gets a "go" for what mission controllers call "Translunar Injection" - in other words, it's time to head for the moon. Three days later the crew is in lunar orbit. A day after that, Armstrong and Aldrin climb into the lunar module Eagle and begin the descent, while Collins orbits in the command module Columbia. (› View Flash Feature)


Collins later writes that Eagle is "the weirdest looking contraption I have ever seen in the sky," but it will prove its worth.


When it comes time to set Eagle down in the Sea of Tranquility, Armstrong improvises, manually piloting the ship past an area littered with boulders. During the final seconds of descent, Eagle's computer is sounding alarms.


It turns out to be a simple case of the computer trying to do too many things at once, but as Aldrin will later point out, "unfortunately it came up when we did not want to be trying to solve these particular problems."


When the lunar module lands at 4:18 p.m EDT, only 30 seconds of fuel remain. Armstrong radios "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." Mission control erupts in celebration as the tension breaks, and a controller tells the crew "You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue, we're breathing again." (› Play Audio)


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MA: 'Visual symphony' classes offered at Easton's Learning Center | WickedLocal.com

MA: 'Visual symphony' classes offered at Easton's Learning Center | WickedLocal.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Advances in technology mean a few simple clicks of a mouse can create a symphony of sight and sound on a computer using VDMX software, turning the user into a VJ of visual performance.


OK, if that isn’t clear, lets try this. You are at a computer with software that manipulates and projects images – pictures, video, images from radar screens, whatever – onto a monitor, a movie screen, a wall or any surface. You also mix sound or sounds with the visual image you create, and blend them, twist them. All this is happening live – in real time, practitioners say – and you are VJing, which is sort of an up to the moment version of being a disc jockey.


While even that streamlined definition of the process may seem complicated, Bret Silverman, 12, who attended the Ames Free Library’s first VDMX class on Tuesday, worked his way through screens, layers, images and effects like he was a pro even though it was his first experience with the software. VDMX is one flavor of the various software packages that can be used to create a visual and auditory performance.


Bret was able to change images on various screen levels, change the size of images and change the opacity and sharpness of images after a basic tutorial.


“I’m familiar with technology in general. I was curious what that type of technology can do,” Bret said. “I didn’t know it was live; you can change it as you go.”


That is exactly what Jason Daniels, executive director of Easton Community Access Television (ECAT), hoped would intrigue people enough to come out to the six-week course.


The VDMX software also allows for mapping the projected image onto geometric shapes – say an automobile – so creations do not have to be projected onto a flat surface, Daniels said.


“I work in TV, but part of me hates video editing,” Daniels said. “(Video mixing) is more about manipulating video and audio in real time.”


Students who join the class will bring five images or short video clips – along with a song or two they like – to the next class on July 22. The goal is to begin working on their own performance using the software.


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The Education System Is Failing Native American Students. Here's Proof. | HuffPost.com

The Education System Is Failing Native American Students. Here's Proof. | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Early last month, Barack Obama made his first visit as president to Indian Country, where he announced plans to revamp the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) in an effort to improve the agency’s federally funded Native American schools. Acknowledging a “crisis” in Native American education, Obama proposed giving local tribes more control over education so that “you can direct your children’s education and reform schools here in Indian Country.”


As it stands, the BIE, an agency within the U.S. Department of the Interior, directly operates 57 schools for Native American students and supervises 126 tribally controlled schools. The BIE schools educate less than 10 percent of Native American and Alaska Native students in the country, but these students tend to perform substantially worse than Native students in regular public schools and public school students in general.


Still, the performance of Native students in regular public schools is no cause for celebration, either. When taken together, Native students in BIE schools and regular public schools are some of the lowest-performing students in the country.


Below we have compiled a series of charts outlining the state of education for Native students around the country in all types of public schools.


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