Digital Media Lit...
Follow
25.0K views | +6 today
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Media Literacy in Austria | Media & Information UNESCO

Media Literacy in Austria | Media & Information UNESCO | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This report will complement the research carried out by Prof. Tapio Varis, University of Tampere, Finland on the State of the Art of Media Literacy in Europe and Claudia Alborghetti, Catholic University Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy in the framework of the “European Centre for Media Literacy”, a project funded by the European Commission under the e-learning initiative.


The aim of this report is to list the main institutions and stakeholders in the field in Austria, their responsibilities and contributions and main contact persons in order to give an overview on the Austrian situation to international experts.

 

Click headline to access hot link to report--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why Doesn't the New York Times Understand the Controversy Over Common Core? | Diane Ravitch Blog

Why Doesn't the New York Times Understand the Controversy Over Common Core? | Diane Ravitch Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In story after story, the New York Times consistently misses the essence of the controversy surrounding Common Core.

 

Today’s New York Times gives its lead article on page 1, column right, top of the fold, to the battle raging within the Republican party, about the Common Core. On one side is Jeb Bush, standing up for the Common Core standards (presumably a moderate, let’s not talk about his fight for vouchers and for the destruction of public education in Florida), while on the other are figures like Ted Cruz and other extremists of the party. Common Core, we are told, is now the “wedge issue” in the Republican party, with sensible people like Jeb Bush fending off the extremists.

 

A few weeks ago, the newspaper wrote an editorial enthusiastically endorsing the Common Core standards, while giving no evidence for its enthusiasm other than the promises offered by the advocates of Common Core.

 

Story after story has repeated the narrative invented by Arne Duncan, that the only opponents of the Common Core are members of the Tea Party and other extremists.

 

Occasionally a story will refer to extremists of the right and the left, as though no reasonable person could possibly doubt the claims made on behalf of the Common Core.

 

Of course, David Brooks’ column on Friday echoed the now familiar trope of the Times, that only extremists could oppose this worthy and entirely laudable endeavor.

 

Missing is any acknowledgement of the many researchers who have challenged the wacky assumption that standards alone will cause everyone’s achievement to rise higher and higher, despite no evidence for this assertion.

 

Missing is any recognition that there are reputable educators and scholars and parents who are disturbed either by the substance of the standards or by the development process (Anthony Cody, for example, just won the Education Writers Association’s first prize award for his series of blogs challenging the claims of the Common Core).

 

Missing is the pushback from teachers that caused the leaders of the NEA and the AFT to call for a slowdown in implementation of the standards (the media sees this only as teachers’ fear of being evaluated by tests).


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

In Ukiah, CA: Lights, camera, action! | Ukiah Daily Journal

In Ukiah, CA: Lights, camera, action! | Ukiah Daily Journal | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Mendocino Access Television is offering teenagers an opportunity to create their own short film, according to the organization's executive director, Erica Cooperrider.


A three-week filmmaking intensive is beginning this coming Monday. The course will run three afternoons per week: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, with an additional weekend of shooting and editing scheduled for May 3 and a community showing of the finished film on May 9.


"For some time, I've wanted to do a project focusing on teenagers," says Cooperrider. About five years ago, Cooperrider and Kate Magruder of Ukiah Players Theatre conducted a filmmaking workshop with students at Pomolita Middle School. That workshop proved to be very successful, and Cooperrider has been thinking about a way to incorporate that model into the television station. "We know there are a lot of kids who enjoy video, acting and filmmaking, and we know there are even more students who would love to learn more. We want to have more teens involved with the station and want them to know what our station can provide in terns of training," she continues.


Mendocino Access Television is a non-profit, membership-based organization created for the public to have access to a professional television station, to create television shows and broadcast them on the air and on the Internet. Members receive training and access to the studio and are encouraged to produce their own television programs. The station also broadcasts many governmental meetings for the County of Mendocino, offering opportunities to view government in action.


The workshop is designed to give novice filmmakers the opportunity to create one three-minute, professional-grade film that will be shown to the public on Friday, May 9 at the television station. The intensive will be structured into several sections.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

AfroFuturism: Algorithms in Contemporary Art & Design | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

AfroFuturism: Algorithms in Contemporary Art & Design | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Algorithms link 20th century Dutch artist M.C. Escher to afrofuturism pioneer Sun Ra. In mathematics and computer science the algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for calculations. Algorithmic art is also known as computer-generated art. However, Escher never used a computer and neither did the artist who created this album cover design for Sun Ra.


When most people think of algorithms and art they usually think of M.C. Escher whose works were predominated by mathematical themes including algorithms. Although Escher was a traditional artist, his algorithmic artworks were done manually, not by a computer program. Escher’s Circle Limit with Butterflies (see image above) is algorithmic: the butterfly’s wings are colored in such a way that mutually orthogonal circles are formed, and this must be encoded in some way into the algorithm.


Infinity is of the temporal (and, according to Sun Ra, mythical) realm. Algorithmic patterns are called fractals – geometric designs that repeat in a pattern that gets smaller and smaller, sometimes to the point where you can’t see it anymore, and sometimes into infinity (beyond where it can be counted).


Click headline to read more and view pix--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

AZ: Educators, county collaborate for broadband project | The Verde Independent

AZ: Educators, county collaborate for broadband project | The Verde Independent | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Educators from kindergarten to college have joined the countywide pursuit for broadband, citing the need for Internet-based learning and the possibility of additional programming for rural schools.

Without broadband and leading in to the new, online PARCC assessment, county groups have been working to bring the most rural schools up to speed.

Century Link agreed to lay fiber out to the Oak Creek School in Cornville in exchange for the district staying with the company for a certain number of years, said Kathy Epperson, Cottonwood-Oak Creek School District technology integration coach.

COCSD was one of several who recently gave the computerized PARCC assessment a practice run, which the technology department had been anticipating.

"Our district has been keeping an eye on this from the very beginning," Epperson said. "The technology department has been watching the bandwith use."

Students are going to be working online more to conduct research and write papers, and even third graders who take PARCC are going to need typing skills. Mingus Union High School Students have an entire Mac lab equipped with 30 computers media students use to edit video shot on high-resolution cameras.

"It's one of those things where the more you get, the more you use," Epperson said.

The district invested $20,000 for each of its schools to install servers, allowing the campuses to be wireless for the Bring Your Own Device program.

"We're just trying to keep an eye out and be ahead," Epperson said. "Our department's always looking at increasing our bandwidth in the future."

Technology administrator Stan Goligoski works for the Yavapai County Education Service Agency and Educational Technology Consortium to help communities bargain for better rates from providers.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Brenau offers state's 1st completely online Early Childhood Education program | AccessNorthGa

Brenau offers state's 1st completely online Early Childhood Education program | AccessNorthGa | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Georgia Professional Standards Commission, the government agency charged with overseeing teacher education, has approved Brenau University’s undergraduate degree program in early childhood education – the first totally online program in that discipline in Georgia.

“It is quite an honor for Brenau to host the first totally online bachelor’s degree program with early childhood education curriculum,” said Education Dean Sandy Leslie.

“This will enable potential teachers who are in more distant counties in our state (or just can’t make it to class) to receive excellent teacher educational training fully online, preparing them for potential licensure as teachers for our state school systems. While other institutions have the ability to offer parts of this training online, Brenau was chosen to offer the entire program in this manner.”

Leslie said the university also will continue to offer the degree track “on ground” on various campuses around the state.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Anatomy of the PBL Process | EduNut

Infographic: Anatomy of the PBL Process | EduNut | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I created this Project Based Learning (PBL) infographic using Piktochart to help students and their parents visualize the anatomy of a project at my school.


Some have requested if they could use it, so here it is- have at it. 


Modidy as needed.


Click headline to view the infographic full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Mapping Monday: 9 Ways to Use State Maps in School | NationalGeographic.com

Mapping Monday: 9 Ways to Use State Maps in School | NationalGeographic.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place.


Amazing as information-rich maps are, sometimes students are in need of something more simple. Sometimes a map with less is one that teaches more.


Our NEW U.S. State Tabletop MapMaker Kits maps focus on mapping basics and include state boundaries, interstate highways, rivers, and the top ten most populous cities. Additional map details that might make a map too overwhelming for younger audiences, such as too many place-name labels, have been peeled off the map. If you work with older students and are missing these additional features, have your students add information to the map themselves for a more hands-on learning experience.


Click headline to read more, review the lesson plan and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Once again, WI public schools outperform taxpayer-funded voucher schools | Education Votes | NEA.org

Once again, WI public schools outperform taxpayer-funded voucher schools | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

New information has surfaced in Wisconsin that shows, once again, that the state’s voucher program—which uses public dollars to subsidize the cost of tuition at private schools—is a costly hoax on students, parents, and taxpayers.


The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction has just released new test results that show public school students in Milwaukee and Racine are outperforming those kids who attend voucher schools in both locations. Test results show the same is true even for those students who are categorized as “economically disadvantaged.”


Of course, this is not news to educators, who have known for quite some time that voucher schools—which are not held to the same accountability standards as public schools—miss the mark when it comes to providing students with the best education. Several studies, including the March 2011 University of Arkansas School Choice Demonstration Project, funded by the pro-voucher Walton Family Foundation, have reached similar conclusions.


Betsy Kippers, a teacher with 30-years experience with the Racine Unified School District, is the president of the Wisconsin Education Association Council (WEAC)—which represents teachers and education support professionals throughout the state.


Click headline to read more and view infographic--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

InSecurity: Race, Surveillance and Privacy in the Digital Age on April 30 | Blandin on Broadband

This looks like a potentially interesting event – it’s happening in DC but will be made available online as well…


Join us! InSecurity: Race, Surveillance and Privacy in the Digital Age!

Now more than ever, digital tools sit at a precarious tipping point. There are many question about whether they will be used to address pre-existing disparities, or further entrench them. 


Specifically, the Internet and new networked technologies have increased the threat of mass surveillance and digital discrimination against communities of color, migrant and low-wage workers, and low-income families–amplifying problems of criminalization, deportation, poverty and overall insecurity. As a result, data mining, location tracking, fusion centers and the brokering of sensitive financial profiles require a race forward analysis.


On Wednesday, April 30th, as part of the 2014 Knowledge Exchange, the Center for Media Justice, Consumers Union and the Open Technology Institute will co-host a conversation that stretches from intent to impact. Using contemporary examples from across the country, we’ll explore what digital rights and privacy safeguards are needed to ensure our nation’s most vulnerable communities are not placed at greater risk for violations of their civil and human rights.


RSVP now!


Click headline to read more and access hot link to watch online--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Earth Day 2014: Lesson Plans, Reading Lists, and Classroom Ideas | Edutopia.org

Earth Day 2014: Lesson Plans, Reading Lists, and Classroom Ideas | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earth Day 2014 is right around the corner, and this year the theme is "Green Cities." Are you planning on incorporating the annual event in your classroom?


There are many different learning opportunities on Earth Day, whether it's science-based investigations, thematic reading, or creative arts projects. To help teachers brainstorm some ways to incorporate Earth Day, we've compiled a list of resources that teachers can use to bring environmental education to students. There's a bit of everything, including lesson plans, tools and resources, and student reading lists.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Brain-Compatible Study Strategies | Edutopia.com

Brain-Compatible Study Strategies | Edutopia.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Driving my 15-year-old daughter home from cross country, I asked her where she learned to study. She replied, "Mom, I have never been taught how to study, we just do it because teachers have way too much to teach! They assume we know, and Cornell Notes are their idea of teaching us how to study!" I thought about this conversation and began to create a template that can hopefully assist students to organize, plan and create capacity in their working memories to learn content for the long term.


Below is a brief, simply-stated template on study skills for fifth grade students preparing for a math assessment. The brain's executive functions must be addressed even though our curriculum is full to overflowing, our days and hours are shortened instructionally, and we cannot afford not to integrate these mindful, researched strategies that invite the working memory and prefrontal cortex to engage in the learning process.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Frontier says E-rate funding should not fund middle-mile overbuilds | FierceTelecom.com

Frontier says E-rate funding should not fund middle-mile overbuilds | FierceTelecom.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Frontier Communications is ready to serve rural school districts with its own last mile services but says the FCC should not extend funding to other competitors to overbuild where they already provide service.


Last July, the FCC voted in favor of modernizing the 18-year-old subsidy program that brings Internet services to schools and libraries.


In an FCC filing, Frontier said that the regulator should take advantage of the fact that Frontier and other ILECs serving "rural areas have already deployed fiber deep into rural America."


"The Commission should not waste scarce E-rate funding to overbuild existing middle-mile fiber when companies like Frontier have already invested the intensive capital necessary to provide it," wrote Frontier in an FCC filing. "Instead, the Commission should focus its efforts on determining how the existing fiber facilities that Frontier and other ILECs have in place today can bring the desired services to all schools and libraries, including those in rural areas."


Being a provider that's focused primarily on rural markets, the company has a mix of both fiber and copper-based facilities that can support high-speed Ethernet services for schools.


In its territory, Frontier currently has 17,260 schools and libraries that are located in 2,242 of its 2,662 total wire centers.


It added that 95 percent of these schools and libraries are located in wire centers that can provide a fiber-based Ethernet connection. As long as each school has a last mile fiber connection, they can get a 1 Gbps speed.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Key Barriers to Educational Technology Adoption in the Developing World | EduTechDebate.org

Educational technology will continue to be implemented incrementally in many parts of the developing world.


More rapid uptake and success are unlikely to occur unless five items are addressed – power, Internet connectivity and bandwidth, quality teacher training, respect and better pay for teachers, and the sustainability of implementations.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

You want to know what's wrong with Common Core? | DailyKos.com

You want to know what's wrong with Common Core? | DailyKos.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

How about you take a look at ten minutes of video.  David Coleman lead the language arts team for Common Core, even though he has never been a teacher.  


Due warning -  Coleman is now head of the College Board, and in that capacity responsible for both the SATs and the Advanced Placement examinations.


Thus how he approaches things will carry inordinate weight in shaping education for America's future.


So take a look, and then see what you think.


Click headline to read more and view video ciips--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Ancient Landscape Is Found Under 2 Miles Of Ice In Greenland | The Two-Way | NPR.org

Ancient Landscape Is Found Under 2 Miles Of Ice In Greenland | The Two-Way | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In a surprising discovery, scientists have found evidence of a tundra landscape in Greenland that's millions of years old. The revelation goes against widely held ideas about how some glaciers work, and it suggests that at least parts of Greenland's ice sheet had survived periods of global warming intact.


"Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander," a news release from the says. "As they move over the land they scrape off everything — vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock."


That's why researchers from several universities and say they were "greatly surprised" to find signs that an ancient tundra had been preserved beneath 2 miles of ice in Greenland, in a study that was published this week in the journal .


"We found organic soil that has been frozen to the bottom of the ice sheet for 2.7 million years," says University of Vermont geologist and lead author Paul Bierman.


The researchers studied 17 "dirty ice" samples from the bottom of an ice core taken in the area of Summit, Greenland, looking for the presence of the isotope beryllium-10, which would signal an exposure to the atmosphere in the 10,019-foot "" sample that was taken in 1993.


The ice core has been involved in many other studies — but few of those were focused on its very bottom.


"I was asking a really different question than people who look at ice cores," Bierman tells the site . "I was looking for a history of landscapes in ancient Greenland, and that mindset wasn't there 20 years ago. It's the evolution of science — you're always coming up with new hypotheses to test," he said.


The scientists believed they would find only trace amounts of beryllium-10. Instead, they found millions of the atoms, LiveScience says.


Bierman says that "we thought we were going looking for a needle in haystack." But, "It turned out that we found an elephant in a haystack."


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LA: Lafayette School Board to consider stand against legislation | The Advocate

LA: Lafayette School Board to consider stand against legislation | The Advocate | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Lafayette Parish School Board plans to meet Wednesday to consider taking a formal and unified stand against proposed legislation that singles out the Lafayette board.


State Rep. Nancy Landry, R-Lafayette, filed three pieces of legislation specific to the Lafayette board that are under consideration in the current legislative session. One bill — HB 786 — would move the board’s current election cycle to a gubernatorial election year. That bill received approval in the House in a 55-32 vote on April 10 and awaits consideration in the Senate.


Two more bills are related to how the board is structured. One bill — HB 980 creates a community commission to investigate other forms of school board governance beyond the current all-elected board member structure in Lafayette Parish. The bill also gives the commission the authority to recommend an election for voters to decide whether to make any governance changes. A second related bill — HB 593 — provides a constitutional amendment to make the governance change with voter approval. Both HB 593 and HB 980 have not yet been considered by the House Education committee.


Lafayette Parish School Board President Hunter Beasley questioned why the bills “single out” Lafayette Parish and criticized Landry for not discussing her intentions with the board. Beasley plans to bring a resolution that opposes the three pieces of legislation to the board at a special meeting planned for 6 p.m. Wednesday. A copy of the resolution was not readily available. Beasley said he felt it was necessary for the board to formalize its objections to the legislation.


“I don’t have a problem with her doing what she thinks she needs to do,” Beasley said. “The thing that I think myself and other board members have an issue with is that she never came to us to discuss her concerns or her thoughts about those bills.”


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc from Educommunication
Scoop.it!

Youth, new media and violence: a manual for young people, parents, and teachers

Click headline to access the PDF of this document--


Via Manuel Pinto
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 19, 9:13 PM

This is helpful for teaching media literacy.

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Teaching Tools: Using Online Simulations and Games | Suzie Boss Blog | Edutopia.orb

Teaching Tools: Using Online Simulations and Games | Suzie Boss Blog | Edutopia.orb | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Students who are passionate gamers can talk a blue streak about the virtual online worlds where they invest their free time and energy.


Usually, of course, they get to play only when they're not at school. But why not bring gaming into the classroom? Could teachers tap that same passion to spark learning?


Gaming remains new territory for most schools. As the following examples show, educators on the frontiers are eager to share what they're learning.


Here are just a few examples.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Ten Tips for Replicating Project-Based Learning | Edutopia.org

Ten Tips for Replicating Project-Based Learning | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Five middle schools and one high school in the Whitfield County, Georgia school district are in their second year of a transition to project-based learning (PBL). Their model is High Tech High, a San Diego charter school renowned for its hands-on student projects that have real-world impact.


Whitfield educators have taken big risks, tried things that failed, and then improved their work based on those mistakes. They're still learning. Yet they've also succeeded in making a huge transition in a short time. The words they use for what it's like to see their students so thoroughly engaged include exciting, amazing, and fun.


Here are some key lessons from Whitfield County -- often learned the hard way -- on how to tackle the challenges of replicating a model PBL school.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MO anti-worker legislation: Running low on support? | Education Votes | NEA.org

MO anti-worker legislation: Running low on support? | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A recent vote on a bill that would limit the ability of educators to advocate on behalf of students is giving teachers and education support professionals new hope that the legislation–which is being pushed by out-of-state special interests–may fall short of the votes needed to pass the House.


The legislation is designed to attack workers and stop them from having a collective voice in the workplace. The anti-worker bill came up last week before the entire House for a key vote. It was approved 78-68.


However, this most recent vote—known as the perfecting vote—is usually a good indicator of what the final vote might look like. If that’s true, it appears the final vote may fall short of the 82 “yes” votes needed to win final approval in the House.


The so-called right-to-work bill is being pushed by right-wing, extremist politicians and outside groups, like the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC is made up of state politicians who betray their constituents by trading their votes for lavish vacation junkets paid for by big corporate interest groups. A key backer of one of the bills, Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones, is a member of ALEC.


The good news is the anti-worker legislation has met strong bipartisan resistance in the House, where lawmakers fear the ALEC bill will cause the wages of working families to plummet.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Corporate tax avoidance obliterates opportunity for millions of students | Education Votes | NEA.org

Corporate tax avoidance obliterates opportunity for millions of students | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For most Americans, it’s Tax Day. And while so many who play by the rules hustle to meet today’s filing deadline, some of the nation’s richest corporations won’t cough up a cent.


We’re talking about companies that have been profitable every year since 2008, with some of them seeing record profits. We’re talking about companies that are able to contribute to the common good, but don’t.


Instead, they pay lobbyists to do everything they can to stack the deck in their favor.


“Corporate lobbyists incessantly claim that our corporate tax rate is too high, and that it’s not ‘competitive’ with the rest of the world,” said Robert McIntyre, the director of Citizens for Tax Justice. The organization’s latest report,  The Sorry State of Corporate Taxes, debunks both of those claims.


“Most companies aren’t paying anywhere near 35 percent of their profits in taxes, and far too many aren’t paying any U.S. taxes at all.”

A new analysis from the National Education Association shows that in the end, students pay a hefty price for corporate welfare.


The $363.6 billion dollars that those companies alone did not pay between 2008 and 2013 would have resulted in an additional $15.6 billion to fund federal education programs that millions of students and their families rely on.


Here’s what it meant for four key federal education programs:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband | NYTimes.com

Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The federal E-Rate program has been a boon for schools and public libraries across the country, helping them acquire Internet access and telecommunications products at affordable or vastly discounted rates. But the sleek new computers, laptops and tablets do not mean much without high-quality broadband service to match.


At a public hearing on Thursday held by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the group said there was an urgent need to equip libraries with high-speed access to information. Without it, they say, the nation’s “opportunity gap” is growing.


“When people can’t apply for jobs or access government services because they don’t have access from home, public libraries must be there for them,” said Linda Lord, a librarian in Maine. “Where else are they going to go? Police station? Town hall? I don’t think so.”


Though 62 percent of libraries offer the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, only 9 percent say they have the high-capacity connections needed to support the computers, Wi-Fi and technological training necessary for an increasingly paperless world. Some libraries connect to the Web at speeds that barely allow them to stream video services — less than 3 megabits per second — though many are now operating at up to 10 mbps. The goal is to upgrade all connections to at least 100 mbps.


Chris Jowaisas, a senior program officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has long partnered with public libraries to help fill the funding gaps, said that all people now had access to technology through their libraries. “It’s time to turn our attention to a new vision,” he said, “ensuring that people have access to all the opportunities technology has to offer.”


Library groups and advocates are calling for updates to the E-Rate program that include greater enrollment efficiency and a bigger effort to include Native American and tribal libraries in the program as well.


The connectivity problems in both libraries and schools have also caught the attention of President Obama, who promised to provide better broadband service for about 20 million students, with libraries getting an upgrade to their systems.


The Federal Communications Commission is restructuring the E-Rate program to double the amount of money it devotes to adding high-speed Internet connections in libraries over the next two years, doubling the money for broadband service, to $2 billion.


But the challenges brought on by the struggling broadband infrastructure are already here.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Clay Aiken running to be a voice for students, educators and North Carolina | Education Votes | NEA.org

Clay Aiken running to be a voice for students, educators and North Carolina | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While Clay Aiken may be better known for his career as a singer, he’s been advocating for students for well over a decade.


“I recognize that when you get into the public eye, you can either use the microphone to do better for yourself, or you can use it to do better for more people,” said Aiken in an interview with Education Votes.


Before his rise to stardom on American Idol, Clay Aiken was running a YMCA after school program when he was first given the chance to work in a classroom.


“The principal at the school knew I wanted to work with kids with special needs, so when she had a teacher in one of her special ed classrooms who was going on maternity leave, she wanted to know if I’d be willing to fill in for her, and I said yes.”


He ended up staying at the elementary school for the next two years. He eventually went on to become a qualified special education teacher, for much the same reason he is now running for Congress in North Carolina’s 2nd District.


“The reason I did it is because I fell in love with these kids, and I recognized that they needed someone, an advocate for them. I thought it was an opportunity to work with some kids who needed help. So I guess to tie it into Congress, this was an opportunity for me to do the same thing. To be an advocate for not just students, but teachers, workers and the entire population of this state who are not effectively being advocated for.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Academic Integrity: Cheat or Be Cheated? | Edutopia.org

Academic Integrity: Cheat or Be Cheated? | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Stories of cheating in schools often make national headlines and are frequently met with widespread shock. How could such actions occur on the campuses of elite colleges and high schools? What's going on with kids these days?


It's easy for us to throw up our hands and say this behavior is the inevitable outcome of our students seeing questionable standards and dishonesty in sports, government and businesses. Yet Challenge Success, the organization I co-founded at Stanford University, doesn’t subscribe to the conventional wisdom that this is a societal issue too large to combat. From our own work with schools and our white paper reviewing 15 years of research on academic integrity, we have found that schools can use a number of effective strategies to reduce cheating rates.


Indeed, the numbers are sobering, and the problem is widespread. Several studies indicate that 80 to 95 percent of high school students admit to engaging in some form of cheating. Kids still cheat in familiar ways -- copying from another kid's paper or sneaking in a cheat sheet on exam day -- but students are also cheating in new ways, using technology to plagiarize essays or text test answers. They stay home on the day of a test or forge excuses from parents or doctors to gain more study time.


Research also shows that academic integrity is a predicament on both ends of the achievement spectrum -- both high achievers and low achievers cheat. And, though students typically know that what they're doing is wrong, they justify their actions by saying that they just "didn’t have a choice -- it’s cheat or be cheated." They feel enormous pressure to get the grades and test scores they believe they'll need for future success, and they know the high stakes that are tied to their assessments.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting | Edutopia.org

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least.


Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation.


It's not enough for students to simply pay attention -- they need to be active participants to generate one of those great discussions that end far too quickly for both the teacher and students.


The worst types of discussions are serial one-on-one talk between a student and teacher, leaving the rest of the class out of the process. Many students stop listening, begin to fade or disengage during this flawed procedure.


The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. Even those students who rarely, if ever, contribute can still participate in other ways. Here are five of my favorite ways to design discussions in a dynamic and exciting manner.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.