Digital Media Lit...
Follow
28.6K views | +23 today
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Code.org Continues To Inspire | Marvin Ammori Blog

Code.org Continues To Inspire | Marvin Ammori Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last week, I received an update from Code.org, the group behind this well-known video, encouraging kids to learn to code:

 

According to Hadi Partovi, Code.org's founder, the organization has done a lot of good in the four months since its launch:

 

"Thanks to your sharing & tweeting, 3.5 million kids tried learning to code online, 12,000 schools asked our help to teach computer science, and 25,000 software engineers volunteered too!  We've connected thousands of schools with opportunities and helped set up hundreds of classes."

 

In a piece in The Atlantic from last year, Marvin described why it is so important for younger generations to learn this skill:

 

Click headline to read more and watch video--

 

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Teachers to Education Secretary Arne Duncan: Please Quit | The Nation

Teachers to Education Secretary Arne Duncan: Please Quit | The Nation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Given the choice between Republicans who are explicitly committed to doing away with collective bargaining rights and Democrats, public-sector labor unions tend to back Democrats at election time.


But that does not mean that unions are always satisfied with Democratic Party policies—or with Democratic policymakers.


This is especially true with regard to education debates. There are certainly Democrats who have been strong advocates for public schools. But there are also Democratic mayors, governors, members of Congress and cabinet members such as Secretary of Education Arne Duncan who have embraced and advanced “reforms” that supporters of public schools identify as destructive.


Duncan’s policies were so appealing to 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney—who explicitly praised the “good things” the education secretary was doing—that education writer Dave Murray wrote a 2012 article headlined, “Could a Romney Administration include Arne Duncan, President Obama’s education secretary?”


Former US Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch, who has emerged as a leading champion of public education, refers to Duncan as “one of the worst Secretaries of Education”— arguing that “Duncan’s policies demean the teaching profession by treating student test scores as a proxy for teacher quality.


Teachers are pushing back against Duncan and those policies.


When 9,000 National Education Association members from across the country gathered in Denver last week, they endorsed a resolution that declares:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Epiphanies on Learning in a 1:1 iPad Classroom | Alyssa Tormala Blog | Edutopia.org

5 Epiphanies on Learning in a 1:1 iPad Classroom | Alyssa Tormala Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last fall, my high school handed iPads to each student in the building, and I began my journey as the school's Instructional Technology Coach. Since our faculty had spent the previous year preparing for the rollout, I knew our classroom environment and teaching methods would evolve. I welcomed it. But I could never have imagined how vast -- and rewarding -- that evolution would be.


To provide some structure for my journey, I joined a cross-curricular group of my colleagues who were focusing on action research in their classrooms. Questions permeate good action research -- mine was: "What does learning look like in a fully-committed 1:1 iPad high school classroom?" I gathered data from my three freshman English classes throughout the year while we engaged in a rich, ongoing cycle of experimentation, feedback, and discussion.


As an English teacher, I use the word "epiphany" all the time. But this year I came to understand that term on a more personal level -- not just once, but again and again. The following are a few of the most meaningful epiphanies that I experienced.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

For Those in the Digital Dark, Enlightenment Is Borrowed From the Library | NYTimes.com

For Those in the Digital Dark, Enlightenment Is Borrowed From the Library | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Joey Cabrera stands for part of most evenings on the doorstep of the Clason’s Point Library, near 172nd Street and Morrison Avenue in the Bronx.


There, he taps into the Wi-Fi that seeps out of the library after it closes. He checks in on Tumblr, Snapchat, Facebook — “the usual stuff,” he said — and plays Lost Saga, a video game developed in Korea. “Formerly, I played Minecraft, but this is less mainstream, an inside thing with my friends,” Joey said.


Then there is a basic maneuver in skateboarding that he is mastering, the Pop Shove It. He studies the technique at the library doorstep.


“I’ve gone to YouTube multiple times to see how to do it,” he said.


Like most homes in his part of the Bronx, Joey’s apartment has no Internet access. Even before the library opens for the day, people stand outside, polishing résumés, then dash in at the crack of 10 a.m. to use the printers. “Then they get right on the train for job interviews,” said Wanda Luzon, the manager of the Clason’s Point Branch of the New York Public Library.


Joey, 15, who is going to be a sophomore in high school, arrives at the end of the day, after he is finished at the year-round academic enrichment program he attends in Manhattan. He walks a block from the Westchester Avenue el, then settles in at the library until closing time, which is 7 p.m. on Mondays. Then he continues his online session through the library’s network.


“I’ve got an hour before sunset, when it gets dangerous,” Joey said.

As he spoke, a young woman nearby finished her online sidewalk session and moved on.


The branch library is the village well.


For most of the city, two companies, Time Warner and Verizon, provide broadband access, at an annual cost of close to $1,000 per home. For many houses, that means no access at all. About 2.9 million people in the city were in the digital dark, according to a 2010 study by the Center for Technology and Government at the University at Albany, part of the State University of New York. In the city’s libraries, 68 percent of the people who make under $25,000 and are using the computers do not have Internet access at home.


“Imagine that in the information capital of the world, kids are camped out on the stoops of libraries to do their online math homework,” said Anthony W. Marx, the president of the New York Public Library, the city’s leading provider of free Internet access.


Andrew Rasiej, the chairman of NY Tech Meetup and an advocate for broadband access at low cost, has lobbied Mr. Marx. “I asked him, ‘You let people check out books, why don’t you let them check out the Internet?’ ” Mr. Rasiej said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Iraq: Scientists Discover Long-Lost Temple in Kurdistan Region | HuffPost.com

Iraq: Scientists Discover Long-Lost Temple in Kurdistan Region | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Life-size human statues and column bases from a long-lost temple dedicated to a supreme god have been discovered in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq.


The discoveries date back over 2,500 years to the Iron Age, a time period when several groups — such as the Urartians, Assyrians and Scythians — vied for supremacy over what is now northern Iraq.


"I didn't do excavation, just archaeological soundings —the villagers uncovered these materials accidentally," said Dlshad Marf Zamua, a doctoral student at Leiden University in the Netherlands, who began the fieldwork in 2005. The column bases were found in a single village while the other finds, including a bronze statuette of a wild goat, were found in a broad area south of where the borders of Iraq, Iran and Turkey intersect. [See Photos of the Life-Size Statues & Other Discoveries in Iraq]


For part of the Iron Age, this area was under control of the city of Musasir, also called Ardini, Marf Zamua said. Ancient inscriptions have referred to Musasir as a "holy city founded in bedrock" and "the city of the raven."


"One of the best results of my fieldwork is the uncovered column bases of the long-lost temple of the city of Musasir, which was dedicated to the god Haldi," Marf Zamuatold Live Science in an email. Haldi was the supreme god of the kingdom of Urartu. His temple was so important that after the Assyrians looted it in 714 B.C., the Urartu king Rusa I was said to have ripped his crown off his head before killing himself.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Makes The Wall Street Journal Look Like The Wall Street Journal | TheAtlantic.com

What Makes The Wall Street Journal Look Like The Wall Street Journal | TheAtlantic.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On the morning of Sept. 12, 2001, The Wall Street Journal was missing what most other papers on the planet considered a critical element: Photography of what had happened the day before. 


The only image on the front page was a simple gray map of the East Coast, with black dots showing key places related to the terrorist attacks the day before. 


"We didn't run a photo, where I think every other paper in the world, including the international edition of the Journal, ran a photo," said senior visual editor Jessica Yu.


The Journal, which turns 125 today, long resisted photography. It was a numbers paper, the thinking went, devoted to covering the financial markets and forces that shape the economy. It was text heavy and serious and there was no room—nor any real need—for images.


Click headline to read more and view pix of WSJ and NYT cover pages--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Museums Curate the Digital Revolution | USTelecom.org

Museums Curate the Digital Revolution | USTelecom.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The digital world has rapidly changed many aspects of American culture, inspiring innovations that are broadly accepted and integrated into our daily lives.


Museums looking to capture the historical and artistic value of such achievements are increasingly incorporating digital art into their collections, as well as creating dedicated exhibitions that chart the evolution of the digital age. One such exhibition is the “Digital Revolution,” which recently opened at the Barbican Centre  in London.


The Barbican, advantageously located near East London’s technology corridor known as “Tech City,” presents a chronological showcase of digital developments. As The New York Times reports, the exhibition features the influential 1970’s game Pong, credited with helping to popularize computer games, and then moves forward in time highlighting the early development of home computers and websites as well as augmented reality, artificial intelligence, robotics and the influence of technologies across myriad industries.


A number of other museums are also embracing digital in terms of acquisitions, fostering artistic collaborations, and encouraging increased engagement with museum visitors.


As an example, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York recently acquired the first digital typefaces and the first downloadable app, Bjork’s Biophilia.


Additionally, New York’s New Museum is currently developing its art/tech incubator, NEW INC, which will welcome artists, technologists and designers for yearlong residencies, and provide a space to showcase their work.


At the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., digital has become a larger focus of the museum experience. The current exhibit, “Standing Up By Sitting Down,”which focuses on the 1960’s student lunch counter sit-ins protesting segregation, invites users to engage with digital touch screens to learn more about many facets of the protests. The development of this interactive learning platform, which may be modified and used for future exhibitions, is being funded by a grant from the Verizon Foundation.


Museums are utilizing digital tools to bring greater context to diverse historical topics, including the growth and evolution of the digital world itself.  However, as Conrad Bodman, curator of the Barbican’s ‘Digital Revolution’ observes, “There’s so much happening in this field, but we’re only 50 years into it. People say we’re in a golden age of digital media, though we’re just at the beginning.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Republican Commissioners rip FCC's spendy school Wi-Fi plan | NetworkWorld.com

Republican Commissioners rip FCC's spendy school Wi-Fi plan | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A proposal by U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to pump billions of dollars into Wi-Fi deployment at schools and libraries has run into a snag, with the commission’s two Republican suggesting the money will come from U.S. residents’ pocketbooks


The commission is scheduled to vote Friday on Wheeler’s proposal to revamp the agency’s E-Rate program, but Republican Commissioners Ajit Pai and Michael O’Rielly questioned where the money will come from. E-Rate, a 17-year-old program funded through telephone service fees, helps schools and libraries connect to the Internet.


Wheeler’s plan to spend US$5 billion to improve Wi-Fi networks at schools and libraries over the next several years doesn’t add up, Pai said in a statement released Tuesday.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dumbing down the Internet of Things with Spark OS | Colin Neagle | NetworkWorld.com

Dumbing down the Internet of Things with Spark OS | Colin Neagle | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A little over a year ago, the people behind the Spark system for connecting everyday devices to the internet launched a Kickstarter campaign seeking a modest $10,000 in funding.


Today, the company announced $4.9 million in Series A funding, The Next Web reports. Maybe they’re onto something.


The funding coincides with the announcement of the Spark OS, which aims to make it easier for anyone – from seasoned network engineers and developers to hobbyists and designers – to build internet-connected devices.


The Spark Core, which has been available in beta since November and is already featured in a couple of commercial products, is a $39 board that runs Arduino code and provides connectivity to a previously disconnected device. The new cloud-based Spark operating system aims to make Core-enabled devices truly smart without becoming too expensive. Some examples, as shown in the ironic but sufficiently illustrative promotional video below, include programming lights to turn on automatically after sunset or doors to lock themselves after they've been shut.


The idea is not just to make it easier to connect the devices that people want to connect, but to make the best possible use of that connectivity. A cloud operating system, as pointed out in the above video, means this connectivity can extend beyond just the ability to control a light switch with a smartphone, and can make these newly connected devices communicate with each other in a way that makes them more useful.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

CapeNet and OpenCape Donate High-Speed Bandwidth to Provincetown, MA | Judy Sterling | CapeNet.com

CapeNet and OpenCape Donate High-Speed Bandwidth to Provincetown, MA | Judy Sterling | CapeNet.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

CapeNet LLC and OpenCape Corporation are pleased to announce that they are providing free fiber optic broadband service to OceansLIVE for their events at Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

The new high-speed bandwidth will enable high-definition Web broadcasts from Provincetown as Mystic Seaport sails the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from July 11 to July 13 during its 38th Voyage.

Morgan OceansLIVE productions needed higher bandwidth and better reliability than they’ve had in the past, and fast response to get it set up in time for this week’s events.

Matthew Lawrence, Maritime Archaeologist at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary said, “Having the fiber optic connectivity is important. It’s very stable, very high bandwidth, so we can send a high-quality signal out to the world. The previous bandwidth out of Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum wasn’t there to support what we’re doing now.”

To get film footage, the Morgan is accompanied by a second ship, the Roann, a restored wooden fishing vessel. Both ships will transmit their footage to Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum, now provisioned with fiber optic bandwidth.

OceansLIVE has set up a production studio in Provincetown Museum. From there, a production crew will edit the video and mix in other visuals and interviews, creating entire shows much like an evening newscast. Visit http://www.OceansLive.org for the high-definition broadcasts.

Each program will have different content highlighting the Morgan and her whaling heritage, as well as the importance of ocean protection through special places such as national marine sanctuaries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Determining the age of stars with sound waves | GizMag.com

Determining the age of stars with sound waves | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One of the long-standing difficulties in astrophysics has been a way to accurately determine the age of a star. Brand new stars are obvious from their location in or near "star nurseries" of interstellar gas and dust, and "adult" stars can be roughly characterized through various methods, including a calculation based on their mass and luminosity. Unfortunately, these methods are approximations at best. Researchers at KU Leuven's Institute for Astronomy have now discovered a way to distinguish young stars from older ones by measuring the acoustic waves that they emit using ultrasound technology.


The result of the accretion of shrinking clouds of gas and dust particles, a star evolves from "newborn" to "adolescent" as growing gravitational forces cause it to contract. As these forces continue, the star becomes smaller, denser, and hotter until the core temperature is great enough to trigger thermonuclear fusion. Once this stage has been reached, and the star has stabilized in its size and fusion energy production over a very long period of time, it is classed as an "adult" and generally remains in this state for many billions of years.


As a general rule, as an adult star ages it becomes brighter. This means it is possible to approximate the ages of these stars using a calculation based on their mass and luminosity. This method works particularly well for stellar objects in their main sequence, where they are stable, adult stars falling within a particular range of mass, color, and luminosity.


Click headline to read more and view video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NC: RTP’s Books on Break Gives Students Summer Reads | Research Triangle Park Blog

NC: RTP’s Books on Break Gives Students Summer Reads | Research Triangle Park Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A few weeks ago in the Glenn Elementary School library, I stood in front of a sea of books that RTP companies had come together to donate. They had been neatly stacked over tables and chairs and the air was calm…too calm. Suddenly, the doors burst open and through them poured a hurricane of hairclips and Spider Man shirts; the third grade class had arrived. As books flew in every direction, the room began to light up with the excited smiles of 7-year-olds as books were claimed and backpacks were filled.


The purpose of the day was to help the children prevent summer reading loss, which can be defined as the lag in reading improvement that takes place in younger grade levels during the duration of the summer, mostly in houses where reading material is not readily available or encouraged. Although summer break usually surmounts to only 2-3 months, the cumulative impact of the loss in reading improvements adds up to 1.5 years between grades 1 through 6. As you can see, unfortunately all of those short summers begin to add up.


This achievement gap is what Book Harvest, based out of Chapel Hill, is trying to battle. Ginger Young, the founder and executive director, along with her devoted team, have taken it upon themselves to get books in as many tiny hands as possible.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ESA's Dropship quadcopter concept may offer precise, safe landings for Mars rovers | GizMag.com

ESA's Dropship quadcopter concept may offer precise, safe landings for Mars rovers | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Space Agency (ESA) has tested a novel system that may allow the agency to safely land rovers on Mars using a quadcopter-like dropship. A fully automated, proof of concept Skycrane prototype was created over the course of eight months under the ESA's StarTiger program, with the system's hardware largely derived from commercially available quadcopter components.


The primary challenge for the Dropter project development team revolved around creating a system that could successfully detect and navigate hazardous terrain without the aide of real-time human input. This is a vital feature for any potential rover delivery system, as it is impossible to create a directly controllable sky crane due to the distance between the operator and the vehicle that creates a time lag between command and execution.


Therefore the new rover delivery method had to be designed around an autonomous navigation system. Initially the dropship navigates to the pre determined deployment zone using GPS and inertia control. Once in the vicinity of the target zone, the lander switches to vision-based navigation, utilizing laser ranging and barometers to allow it to detect a safe, flat area upon which to set down its precious cargo.


Once such a site is identified, the lander drops to a height of 10 m (33 ft) above the surface and lowers the rover with the use of a bridle, gradually descending until the rover gently touches down on the planet's surface.


Click headline to read more and watch ESA video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Are you tired of passwords? | Martha Irvine | DurangoHerald.com

Are you tired of passwords? | Martha Irvine | DurangoHerald.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Good thing she doesn’t need a password to get into heaven. That’s what Donna Spinner often mutters when she tries to remember the growing list of letter-number-and-symbol codes she’s had to create to access her various online accounts.


“At my age, it just gets too confusing,” says the 72-year-old grandmother who lives outside Decatur, Illinois.


But this is far from just a senior moment. Frustration about passwords is as common across the age brackets as the little reminder notes on which people often write them.


“We are in the midst of an era I call the ‘tyranny of the password,”’ says Thomas Way, a computer science professor at Villanova University. “We’re due for a revolution.”


One could argue that the revolution is already well underway, with passwords destined to go the way of the floppy disc and dial-up Internet. Already, there are multiple services that generate and store your passwords, so you don’t have to remember them. Beyond that, biometric technology is emerging, using thumbprints and face recognition to help us get into our accounts and our devices. Some new iPhones use the technology, for instance, as do a few retailers, whose employees log into work computers with a touch of the hand.


Still, many people cling to the password, the devil we know – even though the passwords we end up creating, the ones we can remember, often aren’t very secure at all. Look at any list of the most common passwords making the rounds on the Internet, and you’ll find anything from “abc123,” “letmein” and “iloveyou” to – you guessed it – use of the word “password” as a password.


Bill Lidinsky, director of security and forensics at the School of Applied Technology at the Illinois Institute of Technology, has seen it all – and often demonstrates in his college classes just how easy it is to use readily available software to figure out many passwords.


“I crack my students’ passwords all the time,” Lidinsky says, “sometimes in seconds.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NTCA Finds Fast Rural School Broadband | Telecompetitor.com

NTCA Finds Fast Rural School Broadband |  Telecompetitor.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It appears that the rural-rural broadband gap applies to schools as well as the broader Internet marketplace.


That seems the best explanation for two substantially different measurements of average school bandwidthin surveys conducted by NTCA- The Rural Broadband Association and EducationSuperHighway, an advocacy organization focused on bringing better broadband to the nation’s schools.


The NTCA yesterday released the results from a survey of its rural telecom service provider members which found that schools served by those companies, on average, purchase broadband connections delivering 65 Mbps downstream and 13 Mbps upstream. But EducationSuperHighway, which surveyed schools nationwide, found a median bandwidth of 33 Mbps.


These results might seem surprising, considering that broadband is generally available more broadly and at higher speeds in metro areas than in rural areas because it is less costly to deploy broadband in metro areas. That phenomenon is known as the rural-urban gap.


But FCC researchers also have noted a rural-rural gap: Rural areas served by small independent telcos generally have better broadband availability and higher speeds than rural areas where the incumbent local carrier is one of the nation’s larger carriers such as AT&T or Verizon.


“The results of this survey are a clear indication that NTCA members and other small, rural providers understand the importance of these anchor institutions having high-quality broadband service,” said NTCA economist Rick Schadelbauer in a press release about the NTCA survey.


A variety of factors contribute to the rural-rural gap.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Aspen Institute: The Public Library Reimagined -- Are Libraries Fundamentally Shifting? | YouTube.com

The Public Library Reimagined  -- As the institution continues to evolve, are libraries moving away from being mere repositories for books and increasingly becoming essential community centers? Panelists discuss the role of libraries as anchor institutions and centers of learning, and how they continue to innovate in radical ways after so many years.

Tessie Guillermo relates the important themes of "People, Place, and Platform" in public libraries, and how libraries connect people in a central, important community location, creating both a physical and virtual network that provides the platform basis.

"The Public Library Reimagined" took place on June 29, 2014 in Aspen, Colorado, as part of the Aspen Ideas Festival's Metropolis track. Sommer Mathis (Editor, Atlantic CityLab) moderated a panel with Brian Bannon (Commissioner, Chicago Public Library), Tessie Guillermo (President & CEO, ZeroDivide), and John Palfrey (President, Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America and Head of School, Phillips Academy).


Click headline to watch Part 1 or an 8 Part video of this panel full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Individualized Technology Goals (ITGs) for Teachers: A Fable of the Staff Development with No Clothes | Edutopia.org

Individualized Technology Goals (ITGs) for Teachers: A Fable of the Staff Development with No Clothes | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In a public school kingdom, the school year started typically for the instructional technology department, with a daylong meeting about school year requirements. This included a list of trainings the campus technology instructional specialists (TIS) were obligated to offer.


As one lowly TIS looked over the list, she saw that many of the trainings did not apply to her campus. Her teachers needed her help with integration, not the technology itself.


Basically, she felt that the list -- created by a district over-reliant on the group training model for a certain software or technology tool without including integration ideas -- did not reflect the needs of the teachers on her campus. After all, wasn't she an integration specialist? She also pondered what would happen if teachers were allowed to choose their own staff development goals and how they would be coached to reach these goals. She wanted to shout, "This Staff Development Plan has no clothes!"


That TIS did not shout. She proposed that instead of just documenting technology group trainings, she should be allowed to document other types of staff development, including modeling, co-teaching, conferencing, finding resources, and mentoring her teachers.


She focused her time on individual teachers and their needs using Vygotsky's theory of the Zone of Proximal Development and scaffolding. After a year, she proposed that the whole district try her Differentiated Technology Staff Development Plan.


Several changes have been made to keep the plan continuously improving, but now in its third year of implementation, the following basics are currently being implemented in this district.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MN: Broadband brings baseball hall of fame to Kanabec County | Blandin on Broadband

MN: Broadband brings baseball hall of fame to Kanabec County | Blandin on Broadband | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This looks like a very fun event! I wanted to share the invitation for folks who might be interested but also to spur ideas in other communities. It’s a great way to use technology to start conversations…


Many of you have heard about the interactive video events (sometimes called video field trips) that our area schools have been involved with for many years (through services provided by our technology cooperative, ECMECC). You also may have heard about the KBI project that has installed multimedia equipment and high-speed Internet capabilities in Mora’s Life Enrichment Center – a community facility that is part of the Eastwood senior living complex in Mora.


Through this Blandin Foundation funded project, we have done two live video events from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.


Now, with the Major League Baseball All-Star game here in Minnesota, we thought we would focus an activity on Baseball. So….


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NYC: The big city library as Internet provider | WashPost.com

NYC: The big city library as Internet provider | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As our Brian Fung detailed last week, some of the United States' bigger urban library systems have begun lodging a public protest against the formula federal rulemakers are considering for the distribution of billions of dollars for wireless Internet infrastructure.


The Federal Communications Commission is thinking of divvying up so-called E-Rate funds to libraries based on square footage rather than users or some other metric, a calculation that city libraries argue gives an unfair advantage to their more sprawling suburban counterparts.


And now perhaps the biggest name in the U.S. public libraries has dipped into the debate. On Thursday, the New York Library system — a billion-dollar entity with 92 branches and some 17 million volumes — sent a letter to the FCC under the signature of Anthony W. "Tony" Marx, its chief executive and president. Marx reiterated the "smaller footprints but higher attendance rates" argument made by his peers in Hartford, Memphis, Seattle and elsewhere, but he put a local twist on it, writing that Internet access and Internet-enabled training programs, like ESL classes, are "essential in helping to address the inequalities we face in New York City and across the country."


NYPL’s outreach to the FCC is eye-catching for a few reasons. Putting aside the library’s sheer size, the 119-year-old system has a cultural significance that goes even beyond the opening scene of  "Ghostbusters." The library has long been a core part of New York life, only now it finds itself in a city where the mayor is aggressively trying to rework how people get broadband.


Mayor Bill de Blasio has talked about using his administration’s considerable purchasing power — the City of New York buys a lot of broadband — to help drive down costs for other consumers. In an interview, Marx said that the library has been doing something similar to bring digital resources to the public: "We negotiated with the commercial publishers to be able to offer e-books," and they now buy about 45,000 digital book copies a year.


“Increasingly, the library has so much more to offer online,” Marx said, “and people are lining up for hours for our computers at our branches.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The people who created E-Rate think the FCC’s going about it all wrong | WashPost.com

The people who created E-Rate think the FCC’s going about it all wrong | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Two of the Senate's most respected members on educational technology aren't satisfied with the FCC's plan to get schools and libraries wired with Internet and Wi-Fi.


Sens. Ed Markey and Jay Rockefeller are putting pressure on the Federal Communications Commission to vastly expand the amount of money the agency spends on E-Rate, the program that provides government subsidies to schools and libraries for broadband and phone service. In a letter to the FCC Wednesday, the two lawmakers demanded that the commission increase what it sets aside every year for the program.


"The E-Rate program has been frozen at a level designed for the dial-up era," the lawmakers wrote. "This type of thinking does our children a disservice."


The lawmakers object to how the FCC has suggested funding WiFi upgrades in schools and libraries according to a per-student or per-square-foot formula, arguing that it unfairly allocates more money to large and wealthy institutions over smaller, poorer ones where the need may be greater.


The letter from Markey and Rockefeller — two of the legislators who first shepherded E-Rate through Congress in the mid-1990s — is a sign that funding battles over educational broadband and WiFi are spilling over into the public eye, just as the FCC prepares to vote Friday on a proposal to modernize how it gets money to schools and libraries (and how much). It also reveals a bit about the internal politics of the FCC, which have gotten more fractious in the months since Chairman Tom Wheeler took office.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MA: Comeback kids | CommonWealth Magazine

MA: Comeback kids | CommonWealth Magazine | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Jazzmin Hernandez doesn’t fit anybody’s profile of a likely high school graduate, never mind a soon-to-be college student.

When she was 10, she and her older brother spent two years in foster care as their mother battled drug addiction. By the time she was in high school, Hernandez was back home with her mom, but in a bad relationship where she suffered domestic abuse at the hands of her boyfriend. She felt increasingly isolated at Revere High School. She got pregnant, and after Averyanna was born, Hernandez and her daughter were kicked out of her home by her mother, with whom her relationship had become increasingly strained.

Hernandez dropped out of school and stayed with friends for several months before getting her own apartment. She worked three jobs, putting in 80 hours a week to make ends meet. After three years out of school, however, she knew she was going to have a hard time keeping her head above water on low-wage service jobs, to say nothing of having little chance of getting beyond subsistence wages to give herself and her daughter a better life.

That’s when someone told Hernandez about an alternative high school in Chelsea that offered a solid curriculum for students who had dropped out. What’s more, Phoenix Charter Academy had an onsite child care center, so she and Averyanna could head off to school together each day. Last year, Hernandez decided to take the plunge.

“I was nervous,” she says. “My test scores were horrible. I could not read out loud without messing up the whole time. And then I met Mr. Chen,” she says of Yu Chen, a humanities teacher at Phoenix with whom she developed a quick bond. “He knew my background, he knew my story. And he didn’t just take that as an, OK, we’re just going to excuse you for everything. It was more of a reason to challenge me.”

In June, Hernandez was one of 29 students at Phoenix who received their high school diplomas. The poised 22-year-old has become a straight-A student, while holding down two part-time jobs and caring for her daughter. And she’s now on her way to the bachelor’s degree program at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Amazon makes a direct offer to Hachette authors: Here's the full letter | GigaOM Tech News

Amazon makes a direct offer to Hachette authors: Here's the full letter | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the negotiations with Hachette drag on, Amazon says it is “thinking of proposing” a path that would alleviate pressure on Hachette authors.


David Naggar, VP of Kindle content and independent publishing, sent a letter to a few Hachette authors, literary agents and Authors Guild president Roxana Robinson over the weekend suggesting that “for as long as this dispute lasts, Hachette authors would get 100% of the sales price of every Hachette ebook we sell. Both Amazon and Hachette would forego all revenue and profit from the sale of every ebook until an agreement is reached.” The idea, seemingly, is that that loss of ebook revenue would “motivate both Hachette and Amazon to work faster to resolve the situation.”


Hachette would need to agree to the proposal, of course, and the letter made it clear that as of its writing Amazon hadn’t actually suggested the idea to Hachette yet: Rather, it’s what “we’re thinking of proposing to them,” and it wants to “get feedback” from authors and agents first. It is likely that the company suspected — or hoped — the letter would become public as a means of putting pressure on Hachette: Amazon comes across as the good guy, looking out “for midlist and debut authors,” while Hachette’s “unresponsiveness and unwillingness to talk until we took action put us in this position.”


Hachette, for its part, showed no signs of capitulating Tuesday. “We invite Amazon to withdraw the sanctions they have unilaterally imposed, and we will continue to negotiate in good faith and with the hope of a swift conclusion,” the company told me in a statement (see the full statement at the bottom of the post, after the letter). In response to that statement, Amazon said, “We call baloney. Hachette is part of a $10 billion global conglomerate. It wouldn’t be ‘suicide.’ They can afford it.” (See Amazon’s full statement also at the bottom of the post, after the letter.)


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

HummingBoard is set to take a bite out of Raspberry Pi | GizMag.com

HummingBoard is set to take a bite out of Raspberry Pi | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since shipping in 2012, Raspberry Pi boards have found themselves the brains of such diverse DIY projects as a mobile phone, a touchscreen computer or even a treat dispenser for the family dog. Now there are three new boys in town that promise faster processing, more system memory and more connectivity options. Yes indeed, SolidRun's new HummingBoard family has all the makings of a serious Pi killer.


SolidRun, the firm behind the CuBox-i mini computer, says that the palm-sized HummingBoards can help create the next generation of Internet of Things gadgetry. They've been designed to "fit inside and utilize many of the existing enclosures and accessories available to members of the open source community" – which means that you'll likely be able to snap open your aging Pi project and throw in a HummingBoard without too much modification.


The baby of the bunch is the basic i1 board, which features a SolidRun scalable micro System-on-Module (microSOM) that's home to a Freescale i.MX6 1 GHz single-core processor based on the ARM Cortex-A9 architecture, GC880 graphics with support for OpenGL and 512 MB of DDR3 RAM. There's no internal storage, but the computer comes with a microSD slot for loading in platforms like Ubuntu, Android, freeBSD or XBMC.


It also boasts HDMI 1.4 for cabled connection to a TV or monitor, powered USB for peripherals and more, and 10/100 Ethernet. Rounding off the specs are digital and analog audio outputs, a CSI-2 interface for connecting camera modules and a 26-pin GPIO expansion header.


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google adds 13 more languages to Gmail | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com

Google adds 13 more languages to Gmail | Zach Miners | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Google has added 13 languages to Gmail’s interface to now cover 94 percent of the world’s Internet population, the company said Monday.


Previously available in 58 languages, the total is now 71, with the addition of Afrikaans, Armenian, Azerbaijani (Azeri), Chinese (Hong Kong), French (Canada), Galician, Georgian, Khmer, Lao, Mongolian, Nepali, Sinhala and Zulu, Google said.


The additional language support will roll out Monday in Gmail on the Web and feature-phone browsers, Google said. Users can try them out by adjusting their settings.


Changing Gmail’s display language does not change the language in which people send and receive their messages.


Google worked with linguists to make each language accurate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hammer Jammer brings a percussive twist to playing guitar | GizMag.com

Hammer Jammer brings a percussive twist to playing guitar | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With what's got to be one of the shortest campaign pitches on Kickstarter, Ken McCaw is putting second production run hopes for his Hammer Jammer percussive guitar attachment in the hands of players. Described as essentially turning the guitar into a new instrument, the fretting hand is still used to form chord shapes or single-note runs. But players tap, stroke or bash the big raised "buttons" at the picking end, causing soft or hard hammers to sound the strings.


The idea for a key-hammering mechanism for guitar first came to McCaw in 1985. He formed the Guitammer company to further develop his idea in 1990, helped along with input from folks like Chris Martin (Martin Guitars) and Ricky Skaggs. The first product debuted in the early 90s, but problems with manufacturing partners (not related to the product) and a change of focus (the development and release of the ButtKicker) led to the hammering project being shelved.


McCaw bought the remaining units from the manufacturer and has since sold them all to players in 60 countries around the globe. The video used for the Kickstarter campaign pitch was originally posted on YouTube back in January of this year and attracted over 400,000 views, encouraging McCaw to try for the mainstream market.


"Young, up-and-comers who are looking for a new way to enter the music world," McCaw told us when asked who he thought would appreciate the Hammer Jammer most. "And handicapped (including older players with arthritis) and disabled Vets, because it does enable them to still play guitar, with the chord hammering techniques at least."


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Existence of two potential Earth-like exoplanets disproven | GizMag.com

Existence of two potential Earth-like exoplanets disproven | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Those packing their bags for a trip to the two potentially habitable exoplanets previously claimed to be orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581 had better rethink their travel plans. Astronomers at Pennsylvania State University say the planets, Gliese 581 d and Gliese 581 g, don't actually exist.


In 2007, Gliese 581 d was being touted as first exoplanet discovered to sit in the habitable – or "Goldilocks" – zone, where water could exist on the planet's surface in liquid form. This was followed in 2010 with the purported discovery of Gliese 581 g, which was thought to lay right in the middle of the habitable zone. I say "purported" because astronomers weren't able to confirm its existence.


Both of the planets were detected indirectly using the radial velocity method. This is where the gravitational pull of an orbiting exoplanet causes variations in the velocity of its parent star, which can be detected using Doppler spectroscopy.


Now a team at Penn State led by Paul Robertson claims that the signals previously thought to indicate the existence of Gliese 581 d and g weren't due to the gravitational pull of these exoplanets, but were in fact signals that resulted from magnetic activity of the star, similar to the sunspots our Sun experiences.


The team arrived at this conclusion after making two observations.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.