Digital Media Lit...
Follow
24.7K views | +13 today
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

NY: Education: It's all about getting back to the basics | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

NY: Education: It's all about getting back to the basics | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Improving the performance of Rochester’s consistently underachieving public schools can be as difficult as reversing decades of racially embedded disparities. Or it can be as simple as getting kids behind desks.

 

In a district that has seen too many well-intended but quickly forgotten programs come and go over the years, a back-to-basics approach — reinforced by involved families, engaged businesses and committed community organizations — offers the best chance to reverse flailing graduation and post-high school readiness rates.

 

And Basic No. 1 is attendance. Simply put, students have to be in school to learn. Too often, they’re not. In droves. Last year, an estimated 4,000 students missed at least a month’s worth of school — half of them in kindergarten through eighth grade.

 

Superintendent Bolgen Vargas has gone as far as to hit the streets in search of truants. It shouldn’t come to that.

 

Parents are clearly falling down on the basic responsibility of ensuring their children are in school. Extended family members need to step up and step in. The public can help. School-age youths out during school hours can be reported to the school’s truancy hotline at (585) 262-8105.

 

Consistent attendance will help students achieve Basic No. 2: Literacy.Vargas has set a goal of having all students capable of reading at grade level by third grade. He — and the district as a whole — must hold tight to this vision. Basic reading skills are the foundation of learning; failure to master them by third grade hangs a huge anchor on a student’s ability to eventually sail to graduation. The result: In Rochester, minority dropouts are more likely to join the already-swelling ranks of the unemployed.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Brain-Compatible Study Strategies | Edutopia.com

Brain-Compatible Study Strategies | Edutopia.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Driving my 15-year-old daughter home from cross country, I asked her where she learned to study. She replied, "Mom, I have never been taught how to study, we just do it because teachers have way too much to teach! They assume we know, and Cornell Notes are their idea of teaching us how to study!" I thought about this conversation and began to create a template that can hopefully assist students to organize, plan and create capacity in their working memories to learn content for the long term.


Below is a brief, simply-stated template on study skills for fifth grade students preparing for a math assessment. The brain's executive functions must be addressed even though our curriculum is full to overflowing, our days and hours are shortened instructionally, and we cannot afford not to integrate these mindful, researched strategies that invite the working memory and prefrontal cortex to engage in the learning process.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Frontier says E-rate funding should not fund middle-mile overbuilds | FierceTelecom.com

Frontier says E-rate funding should not fund middle-mile overbuilds | FierceTelecom.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Frontier Communications is ready to serve rural school districts with its own last mile services but says the FCC should not extend funding to other competitors to overbuild where they already provide service.


Last July, the FCC voted in favor of modernizing the 18-year-old subsidy program that brings Internet services to schools and libraries.


In an FCC filing, Frontier said that the regulator should take advantage of the fact that Frontier and other ILECs serving "rural areas have already deployed fiber deep into rural America."


"The Commission should not waste scarce E-rate funding to overbuild existing middle-mile fiber when companies like Frontier have already invested the intensive capital necessary to provide it," wrote Frontier in an FCC filing. "Instead, the Commission should focus its efforts on determining how the existing fiber facilities that Frontier and other ILECs have in place today can bring the desired services to all schools and libraries, including those in rural areas."


Being a provider that's focused primarily on rural markets, the company has a mix of both fiber and copper-based facilities that can support high-speed Ethernet services for schools.


In its territory, Frontier currently has 17,260 schools and libraries that are located in 2,242 of its 2,662 total wire centers.


It added that 95 percent of these schools and libraries are located in wire centers that can provide a fiber-based Ethernet connection. As long as each school has a last mile fiber connection, they can get a 1 Gbps speed.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Key Barriers to Educational Technology Adoption in the Developing World | EduTechDebate.org

Educational technology will continue to be implemented incrementally in many parts of the developing world.


More rapid uptake and success are unlikely to occur unless five items are addressed – power, Internet connectivity and bandwidth, quality teacher training, respect and better pay for teachers, and the sustainability of implementations.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Charges dropped against PA teen who recorded himself being bullied | DailyKos.com

Charges dropped against PA teen who recorded himself being bullied | DailyKos.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Yesterday, I mentioned the appalling ordeal of Christian Stanfield, a 15-year-old boy with ADHD who finally had enough of the bullying he'd had to endure for most of the year at his high school south of Pittsburgh since at least October.  Back in February, he recorded several of his classmates bullying him in the middle of math class.


However, when his mom showed the video to school officials, it was Christian who ended up taking the heat--in the form of a criminal charge for disorderly conduct.  A local judge sided with the school and fined Christian $25 plus court costs.  Read all about this travesty here.


Well, this story has a happy ending.  Christian had been planning to appeal the judge's ruling in common pleas court on April 29.  But late yesterday, he learned that hearing won't take place.  The Allegheny County district attorney's office has announced that all charges against Christian will be dropped.


Mike Manko, a spokesman for the district attorney's office, said his office is not involved in the issuance of summary citations but gets the case at the appellate level in Common Pleas Court. He said the single count against Christian will be withdrawn.


"The behavior does not rise to the level of a citation," Mr. Manko said. "No one who is authorized to give advice on wiretap or school violation issues was contacted in our office by the school district or South Fayette police. Multiple attempts to contact the officer who wrote the citation have been made.


"We have not heard from him."


Cliff Notes version: the DA rightly concluded that these charges should have never been filed.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Magnificent Giant Tree: Sequoia in a Snowstorm | YouTube.com

The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael "Nick" Nichols for the December 2012 issue. The final photograph is a mosaic of 126 images.

More video can be seen in the magazine's digital editions on iPad, iPhone, and Kindle Fire.

To see Nick's photos, go to http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The new digital gap is not the one between parents and children | KidsAndTeensOnline.com

The new digital gap is not the one between parents and children | KidsAndTeensOnline.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Up to now the digital gap existed mainly between parents and children, between teenagers and adults, between those called the “digital natives” and the “digital immigrants”. Nevertheless, this is quickly changing. Nowadays there are many adults and parents who use ICTs. Most of them use e-mails everyday, participate in WhatsApp groups with their friends, download apps to their smartphones and tablets, upload photos to Pinterest or Instagram, etc.

On the other hand, we observe that many young people and teenagers are not actually becoming “2.0 users”, which would allow them to truly capitalise on the possibilities offered by ICTs. Many teenagers and university students use ICTs simply as consumers. They spend hours chatting on WhatsApp, they send e-mails and look information up to prepare their schoolwork, and they upload pictures to social media – although this is done less often now. This means that, in the end, they are not doing many different things and don’t have much more knowledge than adults and parents who are 30 or 40 years old. They are not creating, they are not generating contents that contribute with value to the Web. Very few of them use blogs, upload essays or material, develop web spaces, create discussion groups in forums or social media, etc.

The “classic” digital gap, the gap that still separates many teenagers from older people still exists. Another gap that still exists is the one separating those who have access to ICTs and those who don’t, although it is quickly becoming smaller. But these forms of digital gap tend to disappear… they are fading out quicker than we expected. The true DIGITAL GAP, the gap that will become increasingly obvious and that is constantly growing is the one that separates “digital consumers” from “digital producers”.

Click headline to read more--



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A Brief History Of Social Media (1969- 2012) | AllTwitter

A Brief History Of Social Media (1969- 2012) | AllTwitter | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

What’s your first memory of social media?


Twitter, perhaps? Or maybe Facebook?


If you’re of a certain age, you’ll likely remember when MySpace was very much numero uno amongst all social platforms. Roll the years back a little further, and you could have been one of the (relatively) few who were amongst the pioneers of modern social networking on Friendster.


But here’s the thing: the history of social media actually goes back a lot further, and its roots can be found in blogging, Google, AOL, ICQ, the beginnings of the world wide web and, perhaps surprisingly, CompuServe.


This infographic from Creative Ramblings takes a closer look at the history of social media, 1969-2012.


Click headline to view the infographic full screen--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Scientists verify world's largest single crystal piece of gold | GizMag.com

Scientists verify world's largest single crystal piece of gold | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the US have confirmed a 7.68 oz (217.78 g) piece of gold is in fact a singular crystal, increasing its value from around US$10,000 to an estimated $1.5 million. The specimen, the largest single crystal piece of gold in the world, was discovered in Venezuela decades ago, but it is only by using advanced probing instruments that experts can now verify its authenticity.


Gold found in the ground will generally have a polycrystalline structure, meaning it is made up of many crystallites, varying in shape and size. Gold of a mono-crystalline structure, where the material is unbroken, are rarer and of significantly higher value. The US-based owner provided geologist John Rakovon with four gold specimens, hoping to determine whether they were of a polycrystalline or mono-crystalline structure.


Using a single-crystal diffraction (SCD) tool and a high-pressure/preferred orientation (HIPPO) instrument at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rakovan was able to examine the minerals using a technique called neutron diffractometry. As opposed to other probes, such as x-rays or electrons, neutrons allow the scientists to peer deep inside the materials and evaluate their structure.


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What Happens When American Teenagers Can't Find Work | National Journal

What Happens When American Teenagers Can't Find Work | National Journal | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Most Americans love to reminisce about their first paying job, whether it was scooping ice cream, babysitting, or working behind a retail counter. It was rarely glamorous, but earning that first paycheck was a point of pride and marked a milestone in a teenager's life.


By the time Andrew Sum entered his teenage years, he'd already held a job delivering newspapers. Now as an economist, one of his chief concerns is the state of the labor market for today's teenagers. The employment rates for teenagers, ages 16 to 19, plummeted from 45 percent in 2000 to just 26 percent in 2011, according to Sum's recent research for the Brookings Institution. That's the lowest rate of teen employment in the post-World War II era.

 

The teens hardest hit by the tough labor market also happen to be the least fortunate ones: those with less education, from poorer households, or from minority backgrounds. Teens whose parents earned more than $40,000 a year boasted employment rates of 26 to 28 percent, while teens whose parents made less than that threshold, were employed at rates of less than 20 percent.


These signs foreshadow potentially another summer in which too many teenagers are unable to find work, years after the recession officially ended. "Kids are less likely to work now, and the range of industries they work in is smaller--like retail, trade, or fast food. That massively reduces the number of kids on the payrolls," says Sum, who also directs the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston. It does not help that teenagers now increasingly compete against adults for minimum-wage positions.


These data points about low teen employment spell terrible things for the long-term health of the American economy. Study after study shows that early work experience helps teens and young adults build confidence and pick up crucial soft skills, like how to arrive at work on-time and not irritate one's boss. Ideally, those are skills one wants to learn before the mid-20s. "The results are overwhelming," Sum says. "The more you work as a teenager, the more likely you are to work five years from now. That's true at the state or national level. When young people don't get work experience, it inhibits their wages."


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools | SSIReview.org

The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools | SSIReview.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Of the many competing plans to improve America’s schools, one overall agenda distinguishes itself in terms of its logical potential for fundamentally changing education. The innovative strategy of giving parents more choice of schools, of encouraging competition between those schools, and of granting schools more autonomy to satisfy parents—in short, “incentivizing” education—has taken hold as perhaps the most prominent and promising idea for improving American education at its core. This approach is evident in efforts such as charter schools, vouchers and tax credits for private schools, private management of schools, and privatization. All such “incentivist” approaches draw on market mechanisms modeled after the private sector, including the private education sector.


The reason reformers look to the private sector is obvious. The beauty of the logic is its simplicity. Governments and the bureaucracies they generate are thought to lead to overspending and ineffectiveness—whether the U.S. Postal Service, military procurements, or public schools. This is because governments typically administer enterprises on a monopoly basis, setting up barriers to potential competitors in order to protect their own entities in areas such as education. Hence, virtually all public funding goes only to “public” schools that are traditionally regulated by government bureaucrats, run by administrators who have obtained an official endorsement from the state, and staffed by teachers who have been certified by state-approved teacher training programs. As with all monopolies, this may lead to complacency, and even disincentives for employees to innovate or otherwise respond to the needs of their “customers.” But the private sector, driven by choice and competitive market incentives, is thought to produce better outcomes, such as those associated with FedEx, eBay, or private schools. There, school employees have built-in incentives to work harder, or at least more effectively, at providing a better education, for fear of losing students, losing tuition funds, losing their jobs, or even seeing their school “go out of business.”


At least that is what we thought. Indeed, that is the narrative of the market and, increasingly, public policy in the United States and around the globe. Yet the evidence we have found tells quite a different story than what theorists and the current crop of self-proclaimed reformers assert. Specifically, it points to a new, emerging view of the academic performance and impact of public schools in contrast to the outcomes of their more autonomous counterparts in the charter and private sectors. And the question of the impact of different types of schools, or schools in different sectors, is paramount in this era of choice, charter schools, and vouchers for private schools.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Are Teacher Evaluations Education ‘Reform’s’ Biggest Bust? | Education Opportunity Network

Would you like your job performance judged by a five-year-old?


That’s a relevant question for public school teachers in Hawaii, where the state’s new teacher evaluation system attributes ten percent of their job performance rating on what children as young as 5 years old think.


Although ten percent may not seem like a whole lot, in a metric based evaluation system where harsh judgments of “effective” versus “needs improvement” can swing either way based on a point or two, ten percent can be one hundred percent of the reason for a bad grade.


But the child’s portion is not the sole problem Hawaiian teachers are having with their new evaluation system, which will ultimately affect their pay and can subject them to penalties as severe as termination.


As the article cited above reported, a recent survey conducted jointly by the state Department of Education and the teachers’ union found that “as many as four in five” teachers responding to the survey have problems with the new evaluations, ranging from “confusion … to skepticism about its fairness”.


Hawaii isn’t the only state having problems with new teacher evaluation systems that are being rolled out across the nation at the encouragement – others would contend, coercion – of the federal government.


According to Education Week, at least a dozen states have asked the U.S. Department of Education to allow them delays in rolling out new teacher evaluations systems.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

British Pathé Publishes Archive On YouTube | SKY.com

British Pathé Publishes Archive On YouTube | SKY.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Film archive British Pathé has released its entire collection to YouTube, making more than 85,000 rare 20th Century videos available to the public.


History enthusiasts are now able to browse more than 3,500 hours of some of the most significant moments of the last century.


Included in the vast release is unique footage of both World Wars, the Titantic, boxing legend Muhammed Ali and England's glorious 1966 World Cup victory over Germany.


British Pathé says the films, which span from 1896 to 1976, cover every aspect of global culture and news.


The archive's general manager, Alastair White, told Sky News: "British Pathé is considered to be the finest news reel archive in the world. 


"It also covers a myriad of social history film items about how people lived, worked and played through the 20th century.


"We decided to publish our entire archive to YouTube to ensure the maximum number of people can enjoy viewing British Pathé films."


The YouTube channel has been set up in collaboration with the German company Mediakraft Networks, an online television network.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

IL: The Field Museum in Chicago Uses Advanced Technologies to Engage Visitors | Stockhouse

IL: The Field Museum in Chicago Uses Advanced Technologies to Engage Visitors | Stockhouse | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Field Museum in Chicago recently upgraded its Internet service to a 1 Gigabit per second (Gbps) Ethernet Dedicated Internet connection. The upgraded service gives the iconic natural history and research institution the bandwidth to support interactive technologies that give visitors new ways to explore and engage with its collections, content and exhibits, and helps enhance its business operations.


Located in Chicago's lakefront Museum Campus, the Field Museum has one of the finest natural history collections and is home to premier exhibitions and educational programs. Before the upgrade to Ethernet Dedicated Internet, the museum's entire staff and business applications had to share an Internet connection of 30 Megabits per second (Mbps). The slower speed was adequate but did not transfer data as quickly. With the upgrade to Ethernet Dedicated Internet, the museum's WiFi system now transfers more than 15.5 Terabytes (TB) of data a year to more than 113,000 individual users.


"Museums are expected to continually incorporate new digital technologies and make visitor experiences even more interactive. Comcast Business Ethernet Dedicated Internet has helped us meet these challenges by providing a reliable, high-capacity network that we can scale as needed," said Rob Zschernitz, director of technology, The Field Museum. "Further, it gives us the ability to provide a more interactive and immersive experience for our visitors."


With an eye towards the future, The Field Museum has implemented a number of updates to its technology infrastructure to support new applications. For example, it has expanded its core internal network, replaced its storage area network technology -- expanding its data storage capacity to over 120TB (to be further expanded to over 160TB by this summer) -- and expanded and upgraded its virtual server infrastructure. This will not only increase energy efficiency, it will support advanced features, such as server uptime and centralized management.


To enhance the visitor experience, the museum also released a mobile app last fall, which is loaded with exclusive content, experiences and curated tours, according to Zchernitz.


"Through video and sound, museum scientists give visitors greater insight into featured artifacts and specimens," said Zchernitz. "In addition, visitors can use the museum's WiFi to share their favorite tours with friends or create their own tours based on interest or theme. New objects and tours are added on a regular basis, so there is always something new to discover."


Click headline to read more--
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Academic Integrity: Cheat or Be Cheated? | Edutopia.org

Academic Integrity: Cheat or Be Cheated? | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Stories of cheating in schools often make national headlines and are frequently met with widespread shock. How could such actions occur on the campuses of elite colleges and high schools? What's going on with kids these days?


It's easy for us to throw up our hands and say this behavior is the inevitable outcome of our students seeing questionable standards and dishonesty in sports, government and businesses. Yet Challenge Success, the organization I co-founded at Stanford University, doesn’t subscribe to the conventional wisdom that this is a societal issue too large to combat. From our own work with schools and our white paper reviewing 15 years of research on academic integrity, we have found that schools can use a number of effective strategies to reduce cheating rates.


Indeed, the numbers are sobering, and the problem is widespread. Several studies indicate that 80 to 95 percent of high school students admit to engaging in some form of cheating. Kids still cheat in familiar ways -- copying from another kid's paper or sneaking in a cheat sheet on exam day -- but students are also cheating in new ways, using technology to plagiarize essays or text test answers. They stay home on the day of a test or forge excuses from parents or doctors to gain more study time.


Research also shows that academic integrity is a predicament on both ends of the achievement spectrum -- both high achievers and low achievers cheat. And, though students typically know that what they're doing is wrong, they justify their actions by saying that they just "didn’t have a choice -- it’s cheat or be cheated." They feel enormous pressure to get the grades and test scores they believe they'll need for future success, and they know the high stakes that are tied to their assessments.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting | Edutopia.org

5 Ways to Make Class Discussions More Exciting | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Classroom discussions have been a staple of teaching forever, beginning with Socrates. I have taught using discussions, been a student in discussions, and observed other teachers' discussions thousands of times -- at least.


Some have been boring, stifling or tedious enough to put me to sleep. Others have been so stimulating that I was sad to see them end. The difference between the two is obviously how interesting the topic is, but equally important is the level of student participation.


It's not enough for students to simply pay attention -- they need to be active participants to generate one of those great discussions that end far too quickly for both the teacher and students.


The worst types of discussions are serial one-on-one talk between a student and teacher, leaving the rest of the class out of the process. Many students stop listening, begin to fade or disengage during this flawed procedure.


The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. Even those students who rarely, if ever, contribute can still participate in other ways. Here are five of my favorite ways to design discussions in a dynamic and exciting manner.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

These Are Some of the Oldest Living Things on Earth | Science | WIRED

These Are Some of the Oldest Living Things on Earth | Science | WIRED | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Animals sometimes sleep inside the hollows of giant 2,000-year old baobab trees inside Kruger Game Preserve in South Africa. Humans too, sometimes use the trees, for more dubious purposes — a jail, a toilet, a pop-up bar — as photographer Rachel Sussman discovered when she toured the park to photograph the trees for her new book, The Oldest Living Things in the World.


The very oldest living things on the planet, scientists believe, are Actinobacteria that have inhabited underground permafrost in Siberia for up to 600,000 years. But ancient life survives on every continent, from 5,500-year-old Antarctic mosses, to a 100,000-year-old Mediterranean sea grass meadow, to 12,000-year-old creosote bushes in the Mojave desert, to the Tanzanian lomatia, a 43,600-year-old tree so endangered that only a single individual exists.


The book includes a map to help place these ancient life forms, and a timeline to put them in cosmic, geologic, and anthropological perspective. Those Mediterranean sea grasses, for instance, were taking root just as our ancestors started spreading out from Africa.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Librarians' evolving digital roles | eSchool News

Librarians' evolving digital roles | eSchool News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As school increasingly incorporate digital technologies and strategies in classrooms, school libraries are changing, too, becoming hubs of communication, research, and technology-enabled teaching and learning.


Today’s school librarians work vigilantly to support both students in teachers when it comes to technology and digital content use, according to School Libraries in the Digital Age, a new report from EdNET Insight, published by MDR.


“Their role has really evolved, based on the inclusion of technology and the focus of the curriculum and the Common Core,” said Kathleen Brantley, director of EdNET Insight. “Those things have driven their role to change.”


Click headline to access hot link to read second page of this article--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

EU Sentinel radar satellite returns first images |BBC News

EU Sentinel radar satellite returns first images |BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Union's new Sentinel-1a radar satellite has returned its first images of Earth.


Launched on 3 April, the spacecraft is part of a fleet of orbiting sensors that will go up over the next few years to monitor the state of the planet.


Its maiden pictures depict Brussels, flooding in Namibia and one of the mightiest ice features on Earth - Pine Island Glacier in Antarctica.


The images give a flavour of the sort of work Sentinel-1a will be doing.


Radar data is particularly useful for urban planning purposes, for making maps following natural disasters, and for monitoring remote locations such as polar ice fields.


The sample of images released by the European Space Agency (ESA) is just a taster. The satellite's imager will require further calibration before full operational service can begin in about three months' time.


"It's going fine; the satellite is performing really well - as you can tell from the new images," confirmed Ian Shurmer, who leads the team that is operating the Sentinel from ESA's "mission control" in Darmstadt, Germany.


"We took the very first image just three days after launch, but that was just a functional test. We're now operating the Synthetic Aperture Radar instrument on a daily basis, with the input of [the mission planners]."


One task requiring attention is a refinement of the Sentinel's near-700km-high orbit.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Sustainability explained through animation | YouTube.com

Watch this short animated movie explaining sustainability created for RealEyes by Igloo Animations


Click headline to watch this YouTube animation full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Researcher uses Cyber Rodents to study evolution | GizMag.com

Researcher uses Cyber Rodents to study evolution | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it


A study has used rodent-like robots to look at the evolutionary development of different mating strategies over an extended period of time. In contrast to direct studies of nature, the observation of robots allows researchers to avoid inherent time-based difficulties of studying evolution, with the results suggesting something a little more complex than the classic one-beats-all natural selection hypothesis.


According to conventional evolutionary theory, a single, optimal phenotype, or mating behavior, should predominate all others, with natural selection taking care of the less efficient strategies. However, in nature we witness a great many populations where this is not the case, and instead see a variety of successful behaviors co-existing. Due to our short life spans, developing an informed theory on why this is the case is decidedly problematic when looking directly at long-term evolutionary cycles in nature.


The study, conducted by Dr. Stefan Elfwing of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, was designed to tackle this long-standing problem of evolutionary theory through the use of robots. Known as Cyber Rodents, the wheeled robots were equipped with cameras for visual detection of energy sources (colored blue) and the rail lamps of other robots (colored green), and infrared communicators for the exchange of genotypes. In biological terms, the Cyber Rodents were hermaphrodites, with all robots in the test able to produce virtual offspring.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

‘Going to sleep hungry, it’s kind of a lonely feeling’ | WashPost.com

‘Going to sleep hungry, it’s kind of a lonely feeling’ | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Paul Vaughn, an economics major, was in his third year at George Mason University, he decided to save money by moving off campus. He figured that skipping the basic campus meal plan, which costs $1,575 for 10 meals a week each semester, and buying his own food would make life easier.


But he had trouble affording the $50 a week he had budgeted for food and ended up having to get two jobs to pay for it. “Almost as bad as the hunger itself is the stress that you’re going to be hungry,” said Vaughn, 22, now in his fifth year at GMU. “I spend more time thinking ‘How am I going to make some money so I can go eat?’ and I focus on that when I should be doing homework or studying for a test.”


A problem known as “food insecurity” — a lack of nutritional food — is not typically associated with U.S. college students. But it is increasingly on the radar of administrators, who report seeing more hungry students, especially at schools that enroll a high percentage of youths who are from low-income families or are the first generation to attend college.


At the same time that higher education is seen as key to financial security, tuition and living expenses are rising astronomically, making it all the more tempting for students to cut corners on food.


“Between paying rent, paying utilities and then trying to buy food, that’s where we see the most insecurity because that’s the most flexible,” said Monica Gray, director of programs at the College Success Foundation-District of Columbia, which helps low-income high school students go to college.


As campuses look for solutions, the number of university food pantries has shot up, from four in 2008 to 121 today, according to the Michigan State University Student Food Bank, which has advised other campuses on starting them. Trinity Washington University in the District opened one in September, and the University of Maryland at College Park is looking into opening one.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Vast Digital Divide Exists in K-12 Schools, E-Rate Analysis Shows | EdWeek.org

Vast Digital Divide Exists in K-12 Schools, E-Rate Analysis Shows | EdWeek.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Applications for federal E-rate money show broad gaps between wealthy and poor school systems' access to high-quality technologies, and varying abilities among districts to purchase connectivity at affordable rates, a new analysis reveals.


The research, released today by Education SuperHighway, a San Francisco-based nonprofit that advocates for improved school connections, is based on data the organization says it collected and analyzed from more than 1,000 school districts in 45 states, which had collectively made $350 million in requests for E-rate funding.


The organization evaluates the status of technology in those districts in part against the goals set out in President Obama's "ConnectED" initiative, which calls for giving 99 percent of the nation's students access to high-speed broadband within five years, and providing one gigabit of connectivity to every school. It also uses other standards, such as those put forward by the State Educational Technology Directors Association, said Evan Marwell, Education SuperHighway's CEO.


A synopsis of its findings is available here, and a fuller report is expected to be released later today. [Update: Here's the full document.]


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Education: States' standardized tests have a negative impact on parents' civic engagement | ScienceDaily.com

New research from a political scientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has found that parents of public school students in states with more extensive and stringent student assessment systems express lower trust in government, less confidence in government efficacy, and more negative views of their children's schools, thereby threatening civic engagement and the potential for future education reform.


In a study published by the journal Political Behavior, associate professor Jesse Rhodes merged data from an original survey of public school parents with quantitative measures of the scope and alignment of state standards, testing, and accountability policies, to determine whether and how education reforms influence the parents' political attitudes and behaviors.


He found that highly developed assessment policies alienate parents from government and discourage parental involvement in education, an effect he terms "demobilization." Parental trust in government was 11 percent lower in states with the most extensive assessment policies, and parental assessments of government effectiveness were 15 percent lower, compared to states with less developed testing polices.


Over the past decade, federal education policies such as No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top have led states to develop and adopt education reforms, including content standards specifying what children should know and be able to do, assessments measuring student progress toward those standards and systems of policies holding schools accountable for performance. As years have passed these policies have extended to a greater number of subjects and a wider range of education levels, but there is considerable state-by-state variation in the policies.


While previous studies have examined how these policies affect student achievement, Rhodes' research is the first to assess how they affect the citizenship practices of public school parents -- a key education stakeholder.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Layayette, LA: Groups supporting Common Core out of their element | The Advertiser

Layayette, LA: Groups supporting Common Core out of their element | The Advertiser | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the movie "Network" Peter Finch said a line that has now become immortal: "I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore."


Frankly, that's me, right now — and here's why.


The Greater Lafayette Chamber of Commerce recently listed its priorities for the legislative session, and among them is its support for Common Core.


If I were to write a manual telling doctors how to operate, people would laugh and doctors would rightfully ignore me. I have not attended medical school, nor received the training a doctor needs.


Yet, organization after organization with little or no educational background think they are experts on education. The Council for a Better Louisiana, Stand for Children Louisiana and the Louisiana Association for Business and Industry, just to name a few, have all published their support for Common Core.


Apparently, merely having attended school or college — or simply having a child — affords everyone a seat at the table to determine the future of education. Worse, everyone listens to these organizations and not the teachers.


I am a highly-qualified teacher with two bachelor's degrees and a masters in history. I was chosen the Outstanding Sophomore, Junior, and Senior in UL's College of Education, not to mention the Outstanding Graduate of its 1992 Spring Commencement. I have experience writing curricula and have taught Algebra I and II for 23 years, as well as numerous history and English classes. I am an expert on education — not these various groups.


I have a right to explore the qualifications and biases of every organization that supports Common Core.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

SpaceX Dragon CRS-3 launch scrubbed for third time | GizMag.com

SpaceX Dragon CRS-3 launch scrubbed for third time | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Unfortunately, it wasn't third time's a charm for the SpaceX CRS-3 mission to send an unmanned Dragon cargo ship to the International Space Station (ISS). In a statement today, SpaceX announced that the Monday launch of the Falcon 9 rocket has been rescheduled until April 18 because of a helium leak in the first stage. However, weather forecasts show conditions around Cape Canaveral deteriorating as the week progresses, so even that date is tentative.


This marks the third attempt to launch the CRS-3 mission and the third time that it has been scrubbed. The first delay was due to a contaminant found in the unpressurized cargo bay of the Dragon cargo ship, and the second occurred when a tracking radar was put out of action by a major malfunction.


The Dragon spacecraft had been scheduled to dock with the Earth-facing port on the Harmony module two days after launch. However, in the run up to Monday’s aborted launch, the ISS suffered a malfunction in an external computer called the Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM). An emergency spacewalk is scheduled to repair this, but it is not clear whether this will cause a further delay for the docking of the cargo ship.


The Dragon spacecraft is carrying 2.5 tons (2.26 tonnes) of experiments and supplies to the ISS, including a new spacesuit and parts to repair the spacesuits already on the station. In addition, the Falcon 9 booster was scheduled to deploy microsatellites as part of the mission.


Click headline to read more--


more...
No comment yet.