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Eight Ways to Model Technology Use | The Principalship | Educational Leadership | ASCD

Eight Ways to Model Technology Use | The Principalship | Educational Leadership | ASCD | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A well-kept secret in the main office is that principals can (and should) teach, too. In a well-led school, all members of the school community will see the principal in teaching action. This should include teaching with technology, because setting an example as a principal is important when it comes to preparing students to be tech-savvy citizens. Afshari and colleagues claim that "the leadership role of the principal is the single most important factor affecting the successful integration of technology.

 

School leaders should take every opportunity they can to show publicly that they value technology. Principals should incorporate technology into such everyday tasks as completing observations or giving presentations. Classroom modeling—delivering demonstration lessons in which students effectively learn through using technology—is an even more direct approach.

 

Here are eight ways school leaders can meaningfully show that they value technology in schools.

 

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The 2015 submarine cable map is here! | TeleGeography.com

TeleGeography is pleased to announce that our 2015 Submarine Cable Map, sponsored by PCCW Global, is now available!

This year’s map pays tribute to the pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were highly sought after works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers at sea. Such embellishments largely disappeared in the early 1600s, pushing modern map design in a purely functional direction. TeleGeography’s newest map brings back the lost design aesthetic that vanished along with these whimsical details, to provide a view of the global submarine cable network seen through the lens of a bygone era.

While the design is vintage, the data are fresh: the map depicts 278 in-service and 21 planned submarine cables. TeleGeography’s latest data on submarine cable latency and lit capacity by route appear alongside ornate illustrations depicting common causes of submarine cable faults, steps in the cable laying process, and mythical sea monsters.


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Fantastically Wrong: The Bizarre Mirages That Once Scared the Bejesus Out of Sailors | Matt Simon | WIRED

Fantastically Wrong: The Bizarre Mirages That Once Scared the Bejesus Out of Sailors | Matt Simon | WIRED | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Jesuit priests aren’t especially known for their heavy drug use, but it would seem that Father Domenico Giardina was tripping pretty hard on August 14, 1643. Looking out over the sea from Messina, Sicily, Giardina saw “a city all floating in the air, and so measureless and so splendid, so adorned with magnificent buildings, all of which was found on a base of a luminous crystal.” The metropolis suddenly transformed into a garden, and next a forest. And then in a flash it all descended into chaos. Huge armies sprang forth, as did the towns they had laid waste to, before the whole mess disappeared.


Father Giardina, you see, was high on life. The “great and marvelous theater” he had witnessed was the mysterious fata morgana, an incredibly complex mirage that has historically both fascinated and scared the hell out of sailors and landlubbers alike. Whether it be the work of necromancers or fairies or a god, few phenomena have captivated humankind quite so thoroughly as fata morgana.

It was Jesuits like Father Giardina, argues Marina Warner in her brilliant book Phantasmagoria, who made the first “careful” observations of fata morgana, that is, not freaking out about them and instead beginning to apply a dash of science to the matter. The good Father claimed, writes Warner, that the minerals and salts in the region “rise up in hot weather in vapours from the sea to form clouds, which then condense in the cooler upper air to become a mobile specchio, a moving, polyhedrical mirror.” It was wrong, but it actually wasn’t that far off.


At work here is some basic physics. When the sun heats up the atmosphere above the ocean, it creates a gradient of temperatures: Near the surface, it’s still relatively cool because the water is chilling that air, but sitting above that is a layer of warmer air. Now, light doesn’t always travel in a straight line. When it hits a boundary between two layers of the atmosphere that are different temperatures (and therefore different densities), it bends and travels through the new layer at a different angle. This is known as refraction. The change in the light’s angle of travel depends on the difference in density between the two layers.


How does bending light create a mirage?


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Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Middle School Math | Justin Reich | EdWeek.org

Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Middle School Math | Justin Reich | EdWeek.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is a guest post from Dr. Reshan Richards (@ReshanRichards), the director of education technology at Montclair Kimberley Academy and the co-creator of the Explain Everything screencasting app. This post previews his upcoming featured talk at the EdTechTeacher iPad Summit San Diego.

I have recently been writing about the qualitative formative assessment toolkit (QFAT for short) which is something that has come out of my research on and practice with mobile devices, multimedia, and formative assessment. It is comprised of four media authoring approaches available on most smartphones, tablets, and laptops: making photos, taking screenshots, filming videos, and screencasting.

Each of these approaches allow teachers and learners to capture and create moments of learning, excerpts of understanding, and reflections of experience.


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MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Until now, it has been generally accepted that a meteor constitutes a time capsule – a relic of the early creation of the solar system that has fallen to Earth, allowing us to delve into the distant past by looking at the composition of the essentially unchanged material that formed the basis of planetary formation. However, a new study carried out by researchers from MIT and Purdue University seeks to challenge the established belief, asserting that rather than representing the kernel of planetary creation, that they are instead a by-product of the violent and often cataclysmic process.

The new research revolves around the creation of tiny spherical grains known as chondrules, that are present in meteorites. Chondrules are formed where molten droplets cool, leaving behind a glassy residue. The established theory on planetary formation is that the chondrules (then molten droplets), came into contact with gas and dust particles, resulting in larger clumps of matter that would form the basis for the planetary bodies that we have today.

However, this established view of the formation of the early solar system has been thrown into doubt by a series of complex computer simulations run by researchers from MIT and Purdue University. The simulations suggest that planetary bodies the size of the moon existed prior to the creation of the earliest chondrules, and that it was the enormous pressures produced by a collision between two such bodies that were responsible for the formation of the glassy spheres.

According to the research, a cataclysmic clash between the protoplanets would produce enough force to melt a fraction of the material, sending a molten plume jetting out into space, whereupon it would cool, and adhere to the surface of what would eventually become meteorites.

Whilst the new simulations may disprove the current leading theory on the role of meteorites in planetary creation, it provides valuable insight into this formative period.


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Mars Opportunity rover celebrates 11 years on the Red Planet with impressive panorama | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Mars Opportunity rover celebrates 11 years on the Red Planet with impressive panorama | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA's Mars Opportunity rover recently celebrated its 11th anniversary on the Martian surface, marking the milestone with a stunning panorama that doubles as a moving tribute to the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack in New York. Over the course of its tenure on the Red Planet, the tenacious explorer has broken the record for the longest distance traveled on another world, making countless groundbreaking discoveries along the way.

Opportunity's original mission was only scheduled to last 90 days, during which time it would scour the terrain near its landing site in Eagle Crater for any clues that would point to the existence of liquid water on ancient Mars. Over a decade later, Opportunity is still going strong (albeit with some memory problems), with last year seeing the audacious adventurer overtake the Russian lunar rover Lunokhod 2 to take the crown for the most miles traveled on another planet, racking up an impressive 25.9 miles (41.7 km).

In order to capture the image, Opportunity has ascended 440 ft (135 m) since traversing a low-lying section of the Endeavour Crater known as Botany Bay in mid 2013. Cape Tribulation represents one of the highest altitudes that the rover has visited, allowing it to image a large portion of the interior of the Endeavour Crater, in addition to the rim of another crater positioned close to the horizon, in a single panorama.


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Ancient Skull Adds New Insight to Story of Human Evolution | John Noble Wilford | NYTimes.com

Ancient Skull Adds New Insight to Story of Human Evolution | John Noble Wilford | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Anthropologists exploring Manot Cave in Israel have uncovered a rare 55,000-year-old fossil skull that they say has a story to tell of a reverberating transition in human evolution, in the time and place when some early humans were moving out of Africa and apparently interbreeding with Neanderthals.

The story is of when the Levant was a corridor for anatomically modern humans who were expanding out of Africa and then across Eurasia, replacing all other forms of early human-related species. Given the scarcity of human fossils from that time, scholars say, these ancestors of present-day non-African populations had remained largely enigmatic.

From the new fossil find, it appears that these people already had physical traits a bit different from other Africans they were leaving behind and many inhabitants along the corridor. In fact, they may have have already looked something like their descendants known later from fossils in Stone Age Europe.

Could this support recent genetic evidence that modern Homo sapiens and their Neanderthal cousins interbred, perhaps in the Middle East and most likely between 65,000 and 47,000 years ago? The discovery team urged caution on the interbreeding issue, but noted anatomical features of the cranium suggesting that some human-Neanderthal mixture had presumably occurred before any encounters with one another in Europe and elsewhere in Asia.


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NASA tests robotic helicopter that would act as Mars scout | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com

NASA tests robotic helicopter that would act as Mars scout | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The robotic rovers driving across the surface of Mars are limited by what their onboard cameras can see.

If they could see further ahead, they might be able to travel three times as far in a single Martian day, enabling them to better find sites to explore and gather more information, faster, than they can today.

To speed up the rovers’ work, NASA is considering sending a robotic helicopter to Mars that could act as a scout for their explorations.

“So why would we want to put a helicopter on Mars?” asks Mike Meacham, a mechanical engineer with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in a video presentation. “If I'm the rover right now, I can't really see the terrain behind me. But if I had a helicopter with a camera on it, all of a sudden, I can see a whole lot more.”

Dubbed the Mars Helicopter, the robot could be an add-on to future Mars rovers. Weighing 2.2 pounds and measuring 3.6 feet from the tip of one blade to the other, the helicopter would be able to detach from the rover and fly on its own.


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Apple education chief sees big data for education | Jonny Evans | ComputerWorld.com

Apple education chief sees big data for education | Jonny Evans | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Apple's vice president for education, John Couch, spoke at BETT 2015 about his company's offerings for education last week. And he noted the potential for data analytics in the sector.

"Steve Jobs saw technology as an amplifier for our intellect,” he said, observing that the current generation of university students were three years old when Google began and 13 when the App Store opened for business.

“This is the generation that is now sitting in our classrooms. We need a new learning environment that is going to meet the needs of this generation,” said Couch.

Apple studies have shown learning is most effective when it is engaging, collaborative and challenging – and isn’t so effective when confined to the simple regurgitation of facts.

"It's not so important that we know that Christopher Columbus discovered America in 1492; what's important is what was happening around the time, what impact it had and how did that change society,” he said.

Personalized education is a response to different students having different learning styles and reactions.

That’s more than just making information available. Apple offers a range of content and collaboration tools within iTunes U:


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NASA and Microsoft team up for virtual Mars exploration | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA and Microsoft team up for virtual Mars exploration | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Years before the first astronauts set foot on Mars, scientists will already be there – virtually. Thanks to a collaboration between NASA and Microsoft aimed at advancing human-robot interactions, the space agency's OnSight software will allow researchers to explore a virtual Martian landscape created from data sent back by the Curiosity rover.

NASA's Curiosity robotic explorer may be a nuclear-powered technological marvel, but looking at its data through a flat screen is a bit like trying to do surgery by postcard. Even 3D images created using stereographs are still very flat and lacking in perspective, depth, area, or context. What scientists want is a way to look at that data that allows them to recreate the area around the unmanned rover as a 3D virtual environment where researchers can meet and study phenomena in context.

The OnSight software was developed by NASA and Microsoft as part of an ongoing partnership to advance human-robot interaction. It works with Microsoft's Hololens, which is a wearable Windows 10 computer hooked up to a high-definition 3D head-mounted display with holographic lenses. With the headset on, the data sent back by Curiosity is mapped as a 3D-simulated environment where avatars of scientists can meet, walk around and study the area using augmented reality.

In addition to studying data, OnSight can also act as a more intuitive planning tool and as an operating system that allows scientist to manipulate the simulation using gestures and menu commands.


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Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture hires dean | Sonja Haller | The Arizona Republic

Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture hires dean | Sonja Haller | The Arizona Republic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the midst of major fundraising to ensure accreditation and forge independence, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, which has campuses in Scottsdale, AZ and Spring Green, WI, has hired a new dean.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation announced Monday that Aaron Betsky, most recently director of the Cincinnati Art Museum, will oversee the prestigious school's academics and finances. He takes over for Victor Sidy, who has led the school through previous accreditation and leadership issues since 2005 and announced more than a year ago that he wished to go into private practice.

Betsky, who received his master's of architecture from Yale University, assumes his duties immediately and at a time when the school is attempting to raise $2 million by the end of 2015. The money would demonstrate its financial resources to a national accrediting body, which has changed requirements in that area.

"I am honored and humbled to have the opportunity to continue the work that for so long made Taliesin into a workshop for reinventing American architecture," Betsky said in a news release. "I look forward to continuing its traditions and making the school into the best experimental school of architecture in the country."


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Creative AI: Computer composers are changing how music is made | Richard Moss | GizMag.com

Creative AI: Computer composers are changing how music is made | Richard Moss | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You've probably heard music composed by a computer algorithm, though you may not realize it. Artificial intelligence researchers have made huge gains in computational – or algorithmic – creativity over the past decade or two, and in music especially these advances are now filtering through to the real world.


AI programs have produced albums in multiple genres. They've scored films and advertisements. And they've also generated mood music in games and smartphone apps. But what does computer-authored music sound like? Why do it? And how is it changing music creation? Join us, in this first entry in a series of features on creative AI, as we find out.

Semi-retired University of California Santa Cruz professor David Cope has been exploring the intersection of algorithms and creativity for over half a century, first on paper and then with computer. "It seemed even in my early teenage years perfectly logical to do creative things with algorithms rather than spend all the time writing out each note or paint this or write out this short story or develop this timeline word by word by word," he tells Gizmag.

Cope came to specialize in what he terms algorithmic composition (although, as you'll see later in this article series, that's far from all he's proficient at). He writes sets of instructions that enable computers to automatically generate complete orchestral compositions of any length in a matter of minutes using a kind of formal grammar and lexicon that he's spent decades refining.


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PLAY to Learn: 100 Great Sites on Gamification | Teachers with Apps

PLAY to Learn: 100 Great Sites on Gamification | Teachers with Apps | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Using incentives to encourage students to stay interested in educational pursuits is not a new idea. However, the incorporation of game mechanics, incentive systems, and other ideas borrowed from the game world to create a game-layer on top of existing educational systems is revolutionary, and many educators, students, and entrepreneurs are taking notice.

Gamification of education can help students be more motivated and engaged, and can make it easier to remember what they’ve learned. What teacher wouldn’t love that? Enthusiastic teachers from K-12 all the way up into college have started using game-based learning techniques in their classrooms, and there are loads of learning opportunities online for students who prefer a game-like experience.


Many companies are working on gamification platforms to make it easier to implement incentive programs and game mechanics in classrooms, online courses, and even in employee training and career development settings. This categorized and filtered list shows you the best of the best in gamified education info, in no particular order.

These sites have some of the most insightful information and best ideas about how to use gamification to significantly improve education for everyone.


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6 Design Principles Of Connected Learning | Terry Heick | TeachThought.com

6 Design Principles Of Connected Learning | Terry Heick | TeachThought.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In 2015, no one should be hurting for compelling ed content. Sites like edutopia, The Tempered Radical, Langwitches, Justin Tarte, Cool Cat Teacher, Grant Wiggins’ blog, and dozens of others offer outstanding reading on a daily basis to help you improve the things that happen in your classroom. (And this list is frustratingly incomplete–they’re just the sites on my radar that I’ve been reading since I entered education.)

A bit more “fringe” are sites like TeachThought, Jackie Gerstein’s UserGeneratedEducation, the Connected Learning Alliance and DMLCentral.net, MindShift, and so many more–“fringe” due to their thinking that seems as interested in understanding what’s possible in a modern learning environment as they are what is. Pursuing excellence in the box while demanding to know what’s going on outside that box.

You could even call this kind of content less immediately practical when you’re just Googling for a lesson idea for tomorrow, but there’s room for everyone in a digital and infinite world. There are already fantastic sites that offer worksheets and classroom management strategies and assessment policies. We’ll do that from time to time, but near and dear to our mission at TeachThought is to rethink learning in a modern world, however we choose to characterize those modern qualities.

Along with the others, CLA is on our short list of thought leaders that help push us to think about how education is changing in a modern world, which is why we’ve shared some of their models in the past, including their iconic Connected Learning model. Recently, we also discovered that they’ve shared the design principles of that model, along with a description of each.

These ideas appear below–and of course, check out CLA and DML for further reading.


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Jennifer Hudgens's curator insight, January 29, 7:20 PM

This puts the whole idea of the new NGSS into terminology that focuses on the student and allows them to create meaning for their learning.  Very exciting path for learning science!

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How To Choose A Learning Game | Jordan Shapiro | Mind/Shift | KQED.org

How To Choose A Learning Game | Jordan Shapiro | Mind/Shift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Many teachers are excited about trying games in the classroom but don’t know where to begin. The landscape of learning games is vast and confusing — and it’s growing and changing rapidly. Moving at the pace of the software industry, games are often updated and iterated so that new versions replace familiar ones before you’ve even had a chance to implement them in your classroom routine.

And teachers have busy schedules. We have barely enough time to complete our prep or even to provide students with as much written feedback as they deserve. Exploring such unfamiliar territory as games for learning takes a considerable investment of time and energy. For over-scheduled and underpaid teachers, available time and energy is already scarce and face-to-face classroom time is our top priority.

On the other hand, not exploring, updating and reinventing our teaching strategies can cause us to miss valuable opportunities to reach students. We all chose teaching because we love it, and a good teacher is constantly motivated to improve the classroom experience. Games are a great tool that can add a spark of new vitality. But how do you go about choosing the right game? What criteria should you use to pick a game for your classroom?

Selecting the right game can be like walking the teachers’ tightrope. Both engagement and academic rigor need to be priorities, but there is often tension between them.


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High School Teacher And His Students Re-Create 'Uptown Funk' Video In One Take

High School Teacher And His Students Re-Create 'Uptown Funk' Video In One Take | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is a great example of how a bunch of technology students let go of their fears, trusted their teacher, and got down to some "Uptown Funk!"

This could become the next "Happy" viral video idea where everyone starts creating their own version.


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Game-Based Learning | National Geographic

Game-Based Learning | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Using interactive games to facilitate learning in educational settings has a number of recognized benefits. For most students, games are highly engaging and motivating. Games provide real-time feedback and built-in goals that can motivate students to improve. In addition, students must make decisions as they play games, and they can see the results of those decisions right away and use that information to inform their next decisions.

Meaningful games embed educational content and require students to engage in a variety of 21st century skills in order to be successful. These games compel students to apply a variety of knowledge, skills, and strategies to solve problems. Such games provide a rich environment that promotes collaboration, problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication.

Some of the games in this collection include companion educator guides for using game-play to explore specific subjects and topics with students.


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ESA plans Integral satellite reentry 15 years in advance | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

ESA plans Integral satellite reentry 15 years in advance | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After 12 years in orbit, the European Space Agency (ESA) is in the process of enacting its retirement plan for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (Integral). However, while the agency is adjusting the orbit of the satellite now, the spacecraft will continue to make observations for some years, and won’t re-enter Earth’s atmosphere until the late 2020s.

The Integral satellite is one of ESA’s longest-running missions, having been placed in orbit in 2002. It’s achieved a great deal over its 12 years in space, making important observations of violent events including gamma ray bursts and black holes. Most recently, in August 2014, it made gamma-ray observations of a supernova, confirming that white dwarfs can indeed reignite and explode.

Looking towards its eventual demise, the team is in the process of adjusting the orbit of the satellite via four thruster burns, using around half of the estimated 96 kg (211 lb) of remaining fuel, and setting it up for safe re-entry in 2029 – a full 15 years down the line.

It might seem strange to plan the re-entry so far in advance, but making the adjustments now will ensure that Integral’s eventual entry into the Earth’s atmosphere will meet with the Agency’s guidelines concerning orbital debris, while allowing it to continue making observations for the next seven to eight years.


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Lensless space telescope could be 1,000 times stronger than Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Lensless space telescope could be 1,000 times stronger than Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Hubble space telescope has given us decades of incredible images, but it's reaching the end of its service life and the question is, what will come after? One possibility is the Aragoscope from the University of Colorado Boulder, which uses a gigantic orbital disk instead of a mirror to produce images 1,000 times sharper than the Hubble's best efforts.

The Aragoscope is named after French scientist Francois Arago who first noticed how a disk diffracted light waves. The principle is based on using a large disk as a diffraction lens, which bends light from distant objects around the edge of the disk and focuses it like a conventional refraction lens. The phenomenon isn't very pronounced on the small scale, but if the telescope is extremely large, it not only becomes practical, but also extremely powerful.

When deployed the Aragoscope will consist of an opaque disk a half mile in diameter parked in geostationary orbit behind which is an orbiting telescope keeping station some tens to hundreds of miles behind that collects the light at the focal point and rectifies it into a high-resolution image.

"The opaque disk of the Aragoscope works in a similar way to a basic lens," says CU-Boulder doctoral student and team member Anthony Harness. "The light diffracted around the edge of the circular disk travels the same path length to the center and comes into focus as an image." He added that, since image resolution increases with telescope diameter, being able to launch such a large, yet lightweight disk would allow astronomers to achieve higher-resolution images than with smaller, traditional space telescopes.


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No worries! Asteroid to safely pass Earth on Monday | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com

No worries! Asteroid to safely pass Earth on Monday | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An asteroid that will zoom past Earth on Monday poses no threat, but will be in a good position for scientists to study, NASA said.

The asteroid, dubbed 2004 BL86, will fly too far away to affect the Earth, the International Space Station or any orbiting satellites, according to the space agency.

At its nearest, the asteroid will be about 745,000 miles away from Earth, or about three times the distance from Earth to the moon.

"Monday, Jan. 26 will be the closest asteroid 2004 BL86 will get to Earth for at least the next 200 years," said Don Yeomans, manager of NASA's Near Earth Object Program Office. "And while it poses no threat to Earth for the foreseeable future, it's a relatively close approach by a relatively large asteroid, so it provides us a unique opportunity to observe and learn more." The asteroid, which is about a third of a mile in size, was discovered in 2004.

Amateur astronomers in the northern hemisphere may be able to get a look at the passing asteroid using small telescopes and strong binoculars. NASA plans to obtain scientific data and radar-generated images of the asteroid using the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., and the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

"When we get our radar data back the day after the flyby, we will have the first detailed images," said radar astronomer Lance Benner of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "At present, we know almost nothing about the asteroid, so there are bound to be surprises."

Scientists are interested in asteroids because it is generally believed they brought water and other building blocks of life to Earth. Yeomans also noted that in the future, asteroids may be explored for mineral ores and other natural resources.


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Otto Piene’s Artistic Legacy — x 2 | Mark Favermann | The Arts Fuse

Otto Piene’s Artistic Legacy — x 2 | Mark Favermann | The Arts Fuse | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In recent months, two exhibitions have celebrated the art and life work of the late Otto Piene (1928-2014), the former director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT. Piene ran CAVS for 20 years and touched the creative lives of scores of artist fellows and students there.

The stunning Guggenheim Museum exhibition ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s was thoughtfully curated: this was the first large-scale historical survey in the United States dedicated to the German artists’ group ZERO (1957–66), which was founded by Heinz Mack and Otto Piene. The pair were joined in 1961 by Günther Uecker. Like-minded artists and collaborators included Lucio Fontana, Yayoi Kusama, Yves Klein, and Piero Manzoni. Technically provocative and often visually beautiful, the show, perhaps better than any but a very few previous exhibits in its 50-year history, filled the entire space of the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright spiral.

Having no political or ideological orientation, ZERO was an international network of like-minded artists from Europe, Japan, and North and South America. They all shared the group’s aesthetic and philosophical aspirations to transform and redefine art in the aftermath of World War II. Technical collaboration was also a key ingredient. The Guggenheim exhibition explored the experimental practices developed by ZERO’s extensive network of artists. Their creative approach — Otto Piene’s artwork in particular — anticipated Environmental Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and even Performance Art.

ZERO encompassed a diverse range of media: painting, sculpture, inflatables, light sculptures, works on paper, installations, and archival materials, along with publications as well as photographic and film documentation. The Guggenheim exhibition was organized around points of intersection, exchange, and collaboration. Among the themes explored was the establishment of new definitions of painting, monochrome (including serial structures), and Piene’s fire and smoke pictures. The introduction of movement and light as both formal and idea-based aspects of art was one of ZERO’s many breakthroughs.


The group also first organized the use of space as subject and material. This was done with specific reference to the relationships among art, nature, technology, and the viewer. In addition, participatory art was incorporated into the production of live action events, one of the major (and prescient) inspirations for ’60s “happenings.”


At once a period snapshot of a specific creative group and a portrait of energetic aesthetic experimentation, the show honored the pioneering nature of both the art and the transnational vision advanced by ZERO during two pivotal decades of the 20th Century.


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Microsoft’s HoloLens may be the least stupid pair of smartglasses yet | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com

Microsoft’s HoloLens may be the least stupid pair of smartglasses yet | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Microsoft showed off its HoloLens headset on Wednesday, a device that just may win the prize for the least stupid pair of smartglasses launched by a major tech company to date.

It's a dubious honor. But Microsoft ably handled its first reveal of the HoloLens with a mix of modesty, optimism and showmanship. And introducing a promising piece of future technology is pretty important for the company as it looks to make over its image as a stodgy firm that's unable to cope with changes in the industry.


What really worked for Microsoft was the fact that it showed admirable restraint by keeping its pitch for the HoloLens focused. It didn't claim it was a must-have product for everyone, at all times. Instead, Microsoft stuck to specific but relatable examples of when you would want to have holograms overlaid onto your vision, with just a few hints about how it could be useful to the everyday customer. It's the kind of pitch that Apple tends to be good at -- showing exactly how you'll use its products to fix particular problems that everyone has.


For example, when being instructed on how to fix something, or when collaborating on a project that requires everyone to look at -- and possibly edit -- the same thing:


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ESA's Rosetta reveals comet secrets | David Szondy | GizMag.com

ESA's Rosetta reveals comet secrets | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A generation ago, Astronomers thought of comets as simple things – huge dirty snowballs of rock and ice with a few organic chemicals thrown in. But after six months orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the unmanned Rosetta probe has shown them to be far more complex and active than previously thought.

To mark a special issue of Science, the European Space Agency (ESA) has released some preliminary findings from the data sent back by seven of the 11 instruments on the Rosetta comet orbiter. Far from being a static homogeneous collection of ice and stone, 67P shows a varied collection of terrains and processes that change their behavior as the comet moves closer to the Sun.

The most striking things about 67P is the shape it presented as Rosetta approached. Instead of a compact ball or an irregular cylinder, the comet turned out to be a "rubber duck" with a small lobe measuring 2.6 x 2.3 x 1.8 km (1.6 x 1.4 x 1.1 mi) and the larger one 4.1 x 3.3 x 1.8 km (2.5 x 2.0 x 1.1 mi). Linking them is a narrow neck marked by a 500 m (1.640 ft) crack running parallel to it. According to ESA, similar cracks on 67P are due to stresses caused by the comet heating and cooling, though whether the larger crack has a similar origin or is due to stress that may one day split the comet has yet to be determined.


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LOOK! The Asteroid That Flew Past Earth Tuesday Has Its Own Moon | Eyder Peralta | NPR.org

LOOK! The Asteroid That Flew Past Earth Tuesday Has Its Own Moon | Eyder Peralta | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In celestial terms, asteroid 2004 BL86 pretty much buzzed Earth, coming within 745,000 miles of our planet.

As NPR's Sam Sanders explained, it's the closest this asteroid will pass by Earth for at least the next two centuries. So when it flew by yesterday, scientists trained their instruments on it.

Scientists using the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., captured a stunning set of images that revealed 2004 BL86 has a small moon.


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NASA's Dawn probe data indicates ancient flowing water on Vesta | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's Dawn probe data indicates ancient flowing water on Vesta | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The last place you'd expect to find signs of water erosion is in the Asteroid Belt, but researchers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) say that data collected during the Dawn spacecraft's visit to the protoplanet Vesta indicates that it not only once had water, but that it formed gullies and other erosion features on its surface.

Vesta was originally thought to be bone dry, but images and instrument readings from the unmanned Dawn probe's visit to Vesta, during which is orbited the protoplanet (or giant asteroid) from 2011 to 2013, indicate that water may once have been present on the asteroid and that it had a part to play in forming its features. In particular, Dawn sent back images of young craters with curved gullies and fan-like deposits. About 100 ft (30 m) wide and stretching half a mile (900 m), these gullies are especially prominent in the 9 mi (15 km) wide Cornelia Crater.

The JPL team is quick to point out that what happened wasn't flowing rivers running across the face of Vesta. The extreme cold, hard vacuum and extremely weak gravity wouldn't allow liquid water to exist on the surface – once exposed above a certain temperature, it would immediately sublimate into gas. Instead, the water had a more indirect role to play.


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Why I Am Not a Maker | Debbie Chachra | The Atlantic

Why I Am Not a Maker | Debbie Chachra | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Every once in a while, I am asked what I “make.” A hack day might require it, or a conference might ask me to describe “what I make” so it can go on my name tag.

I’m always uncomfortable with it. I’m uncomfortable with any culture that encourages you take on an entire identity, rather than to express a facet of your own identity ("maker," rather than "someone who makes things"). But I have much deeper concerns.

An identity built around making things—of being “a maker”—pervades technology culture. There’s a widespread idea that “People who make things are simply different [read: better] than those who don’t.”

I understand where the motivation for this comes from. Creators, rightly, take pride in creation. In her book The Real World of Technology, the metallurgist Ursula Franklin contrasts prescriptive technologies, where many individuals produce components of the whole (think about Adam Smith’s pin factory), with holistic technologies, where the creator controls and understands the process from start to finish. As well as teaching my own engineering courses, I’m a studio instructor for a first-year engineering course, in which our students do design and fabrication, many of them for the first time. Making things is incredibly important, especially for groups that previously haven’t had access. When I was asked by the Boston-based Science Club for Girls to write a letter to my teenaged self (as a proxy for young girls everywhere), that’s exactly what I wrote about.

But there are more significant issues, rooted in the social history of who makes things—and who doesn’t.


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