Digital Media Lit...
Follow
37.2K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Ed tech teams compete for modest prizes from Gates Foundation, Facebook | GigaOM EdTech News

Ed tech teams compete for modest prizes from Gates Foundation, Facebook | GigaOM EdTech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Every time you unlock your phone, you likely type in the same, boring old code. But imagine if, each time you wanted to use it, your phone prompted you translate a Facebook friend’s status message into Spanish or French or another language of your choice. It might not make you fluent overnight, but it’s a clever way to get some educational value out of an otherwise mundane task.

 

That app, developed by a team from online learning company Quizlet, was one of three winners picked by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Facebook at their HackEd 2.0 challenge Tuesday night. The two organizations hosted 24 teams of developers, educators and others for a day-long event and hackathon at Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters focused on all things ed tech.

 

“[We wanted] to provide students with tools that are useful and actionable … and to get the best talent pointed at these big important problems in education,” said Emily Dalton Smith, a program officer at the Gates Foundation. Given Facebook’s popularity among young people and the social media giant’s connection to a technical crowd, partnering with them was a natural choice, she said.

 

An earlier hackathon hosted by the two organizations in September was a closed, invitation-only affair. But this week’s hackathon started in March with an open call for developers, educators and others around the country to submit app ideas related to college readiness, social learning and out-of-school learning. About half of the teams that applied were invited to attend and, at the event this week, they were given six hours to turn their ideas into a working prototype. Later this month in London, the organizations will host a smaller ed tech hackathon.

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How The TPP Agreement Could Be Used To Undermine Free Speech And Fair Use In The US | Mike Mashnick | Techdirt

How The TPP Agreement Could Be Used To Undermine Free Speech And Fair Use In The US | Mike Mashnick | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We've been writing a lot about the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement over the past few years. There are many, many problems with it, but the two key ones are the intellectual property chapter and the investment chapter. Unlike some who are protesting TPP, we actually think that free trade is generally a good thing and important for the economy -- but neither the intellectual property section nor the investment chapter are really about free trade.


In many ways, they're about the opposite: trying to put in place protectionist/mercantilist policies that benefit the interests of a few large legacy industries over the public and actual competition and trade. We've already discussed many of the problems of the intellectual property chapter -- which is still being fought over -- including that it would block the US from reforming copyright to lower copyright term lengths (as even the head of the Copyright Office, Maria Pallante has argued for).

And, last week, Wikileaks leaked the investment chapter, which is focused on corporate sovereignty provisions, officially known as "investor state dispute settlement" or "ISDS" (named as such, in part, because the negotiators know it sounds boring, so they hope the public won't pay attention).


As people go through the details and the fine print, they're finding some serious problems with it. Sean Flynn has a very in-depth look at how the combination of these two chapters -- the IP chapter and the investment chapter -- could very likely threaten fair use (and, with it, undermine the First Amendment).


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Astronomers discover supernova subset which could allow for more acurate galactic measurements | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Astronomers discover supernova subset which could allow for more acurate galactic measurements | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA astronomers may have found a way to take more precise measurements of the distances between galaxies. Currently, astronomers use a certain type of supernova, known as a Type la supernova, to gauge the distances between galaxies and from this, the rate at which the universe is expanding. The reason that this particular breed of supernova is singled out for this purpose, is that when they explode, they give out a very similar amount of light.

Type la supernovae occur in binary systems, when an incredibly dense white dwarf star feeds off the stellar material of its partner until it reaches critical mass. This point is known as the Chandrasekhar limit, which occurs when the white dwarf achieves a mass the equivalent to 1.4 times that of our Sun, after which a thermonuclear explosion is imminent.

Due to the consistency in the amount of light thrown off in these explosions, they have been granted the moniker "standard candles." Measuring the dimming of the light from such a supernova by applying the inverse square law allows astronomers to accurately ascertain the distance of the event, and also the galaxy in which it took place.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ESA tests the potential of grabbing derelict satellites using a simple net | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

ESA tests the potential of grabbing derelict satellites using a simple net | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Space Agency (ESA) has been testing the possibility of using one of mankind's earliest inventions to cope with one of its newest challenges, by testing a concept that would allow satellites to net and de-orbit space debris in a safe and controlled manner. Space debris is an ever-increasing problem, and agencies around the world are starting to take steps to preserve the low-Earth orbit environment vital for a sustainable space industry.

Currently, there are around 12,000 objects exceeding 10 cm in size, and millions smaller orbiting Earth at speeds up to 15 km per second (9.32 miles p/s). If any such object impacted with an operational satellite, or possibly even the International Space Station, the results could be catastrophic. In order to prevent such an occurrence, any satellite due to be placed into an orbit of less than 2,000 km (1,243 miles) above the Earth are now required to incorporate technologies that would either de-orbit the satellite automatically, or push it in to a safe graveyard orbit upon reaching the end of its lifespan.

However the question remains, what can you do with the numerous defunct satellites that are already cluttering up low-Earth orbit? Such objects represent a significant long term hazard, as a collision between a satellite and another object could produce a cloud of smaller debris. To tackle the challenge, ESA has proposed placing satellites in orbit designed to capture large inert objects and manipulate them back into Earth's atmosphere.


However, there are inherent difficulties that make such an operation a daunting prospect.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Arizona school officials protest education cuts, so the legislature makes their protests illegal | Daily Kos

Arizona school officials protest education cuts, so the legislature makes their protests illegal | Daily Kos | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since 2008, Arizona has cut K-12 and university budgets more than just about every other state, to the point we now spend, in the public school classroom, roughly 70 percent of the national average per pupil: $7,382 in Arizona vs. $10,667 nationwide, one of the lowest rates in the country. For higher ed we're even worse, number 50 in per student spending.

Republicans like to say "education is not about the money," and that may be true to a point; but when you get down to the marrow, it is about the frickin' money, and the results here are predictable. For K-12 Arizona consistently ranks 40th or lower in nearly every performance category—graduation rates, teacher training, classroom spending, test results, and college and job preparation. The poor performance numbers ripple out into society at large, since we're not attracting high-value industries that demand an educated workforce.

In addition to reduced state funding, some K-12 schools find themselves in districts that include retirement havens, where residents historically turn out in droves to vote down budget overrides, the argument being, "I put my child through school in Michigan, why should I pay here?"


Twelve of 36 school bond elections failed in November, so a district like Dysart, which has the misfortune of being near Sun City, had to lay off 143 teachers. Mind-boggingly, the dunderheads who voted against the override because they have no children here don't see why it benefits them to have good schools in the community—and don't get the meaning of "citizen."

For public education, the one-two punch of less state funding and failed budget overrides, in the face of increasing student populations, means districts are barely hanging on. Combine that with the legislature's giveaways to charter schools, and the GOP's goal is all too clear: privatized education.


Also, the constant and very deep cuts to higher ed, including Arizona State, the largest university in the nation, have resulted in higher tuitions and increased corporate funding—making college less affordable to all but the wealthy and giving private industry more leverage in curriculum design.

More people are speaking out, many of them educators. I mean, really, what are they supposed to say when their profession is attacked and their budgets are dismantled year after year? "Thank you sir, stick it to us again!" Are responsible university presidents and district superintendents not supposed to inform the community about the effects of the legislature's dick moves?


But now any such criticism or perhaps even discussion is about to be outlawed.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA outlines Asteroid Redirect Mission | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA outlines Asteroid Redirect Mission | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has released new details on how it plans to boldly go to an asteroid and come back with a bit of it. The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is part of the space agency's Asteroid Initiative announced in 2013, which envisions the capture and return of an asteroid to lunar orbit for study by astronauts as a rehearsal for a later mission to Mars.

Scheduled to begin in 2020, the purpose of the ARM is to test new technologies and techniques that would be needed for later manned deep space missions while learning more about asteroids and how to defend the Earth against them. This involves sending a robotic spacecraft to collect a boulder from a near-Earth asteroid, then return it to lunar orbit, where a later manned mission will rendezvous to retrieve samples.

The ARM will begin with an unmanned Asteroid Redirect Vehicle being sent to a target asteroid, which has yet to be selected. The collector spacecraft will travel to the asteroid on a multi-year trajectory using Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP). This uses solar panels to power ion thrusters that provide a very low, constant thrust for years on end by charging xenon atoms and accelerating them. The system is currently being used on the Dawn mission and NASA hopes that it could one day be used to preposition supply craft for a Mars mission.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dancer Bends Light in Stunning Projection-Mapped Performance | Jordan Backhus | The Creators Project

Inside a cube fashioned from translucent veils, a dancer takes a visual journey into a 3D space between dreams and reality. Hakanaï is a digital solo performance from Adrien M / Claire B that made its debut at BAM’s Fishman Theatre on March 17, 2015.


The choreographed performance installation combines video projection mapping, CGI, and sensors to dynamically respond to the movements and proximity of its performer. Its visuals and sounds are generated and animated live, offering a uniquely different performance for each and every iteration.


Its appeal lies in the one-on-one exchange that takes place between performer and complex programming. Though Mondot and Bardainne, who in the past set a performance of 11 breakdancers against a digital backdrop, often mine theoretical and mathematical sources for inspiration for their work, they rely on the empirical study of the world around them as their guide.


We spoke to the artistic duo about the visual inspirations and computational approaches they took to Hakanaï, as well as their thoughts on bridging the gap between technology and art.


Click headline to read the interview, access hot links, view pix and watch video clip of a performance--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A grandmother’s trove of Civil War photos goes to Library of Congress | Michael Ruane | WashPost.com

A grandmother’s trove of Civil War photos goes to Library of Congress | Michael Ruane | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Abraham Lincoln’s home in Springfield, Ill., draped in black-and-white mourning cloth, following his assassination. African American mothers holding their babies, likely the first generation born into freedom. A battlefield in the Virginia wilderness a year after the war, with trees stripped of bark by musket fire.

Snapshots from the era of the Civil War, they are among hundreds of rare images gathered over four decades by an 87-year-old Texas grandmother. Now, partly through a family tragedy, they are the property of the Library of Congress.

The library announced Friday that it has acquired more than 500 stunning images from the collection of Robin Stanford of Houston. They depict a United States marked by the scourges of war, slavery and assassination.

And in some cases they show life before the war. One shot shows South Carolina slaves worshiping in a spartan, plantation church, in what may be the only prewar photograph of its kind.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery, access hot links and watch PostTV news segment--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

April Fool's Day in the Classroom: 8 Resources for Teachers | Matt Davis Blog | Edutopia.org

April Fool's Day in the Classroom: 8 Resources for Teachers | Matt Davis Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I still remember April Fool's Day when I was a fourth grader. A reading comprehension worksheet went out to the class, and in minutes, we were all dumbfounded. The story and questions were incomprehensible, written in complete gibberish. But our teacher went along with the joke. We had a half hour to finish it, and it was going to be worth a substantial amount of points.

I don’t remember how long the gag lasted exactly, but I do remember all of us sitting there, mouths agape, wondering if the assignment was serious. Then, once we’d all thrown our hands up, our teacher let us in on the joke: “April Fools!”

April Fool's Day is the perfect time to play some light-hearted pranks on your friends, family, and co-workers; and if you’re a teacher, pulling an unexpected fast one on your students can be entertaining -- and memorable -- for everyone. So if you’re looking for ideas for classroom pranks, or you’re hoping to bring a humor lesson into the classroom, these are a few of our favorite April Fool's Day resources and teaching ideas. Plus, we've also added some more general resources for using humor to reach students.

Do you have other ideas for classroom pranks? What resources are you using to bring April Fool's Day into your class?


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

10,000 Film Clips Now Available for Free in New Public Domain Database | Beckett Mufson | The Creators Project

10,000 Film Clips Now Available for Free in New Public Domain Database | Beckett Mufson | The Creators Project | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For filmmakers, designers, photographers, and just about any kind of creatives, the public domain is an important resource, full of copyright-free materials that can be used and remixed to create new art. The legal intricacies of copyright and public domain, however, can be daunting, and finding specific pieces of footage, for example, from organizations like the US National Archive can be a tedious and user-unfriendly experience.


Today, royalty-free video marketplace Pond5 launches the Public Domain Project in order to solve this problem, opening up to the public a massive, thoroughly-organized treasure trove of about 80,000 copyright-free video clips, photos, sound recordings, and 3D models.

The project includes digital models of NASA tools and satellites, Georges Méliès' 1902 film, A Trip To The Moon, speeches by political figures like Winston Churchill and Martin Luther King, Jr., recordings of performances from composers like Beethoven, and a laid-back picture of President Obama playing pool (below).


Since they existed solely in physical form within the National Archives, about 5,000 of the film clips had been nearly impossible to access for most filmmakers. The Public Domain Project directly digitized the footage themselves and combined it with 5,000 more copyright-free clips, making an easy-to-use marketplace that unifies a huge portion of the country's historical resources.


Artists can pick and choose from the helpfully labeled and tagged files to find just the right picture or clip to give their work some historical context, or to create a whole new artwork with its own unique meaning.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clips--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA's Opportunity runs marathon on Mars, only takes 11 years | Amanda Kooser | CNET

NASA's Opportunity runs marathon on Mars, only takes 11 years | Amanda Kooser | CNET | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last year, NASA's Opportunity rover broke a 40-year-old record by passing 25 miles of exploration on Mars. Not content with this accomplishment, the rover rolled on, eventually crossing the finish line of a Mars marathon. On March 24, Opportunity topped 26 miles of driving distance, a mark of pride familiar to many a long-distance runner.

It took the rover 11 years and 2 months (or 3,968 Martian days) to pull off the feat of endurance. A day on Mars is equivalent to about 24 hours and 37 minutes on Earth.


"This is the first time any human enterprise has exceeded the distance of a marathon on the surface of another world," said Opportunity project manager John Callas. The rover team plans to complete a marathon-length run relay at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Earth to celebrate the accomplishment.


Opportunity isn't resting on its laurels. The rover continues to explore the rim of the Endeavour Crater, looking for clues to Mars' early environment and whether it could have supported microbial life.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Scars on Mars: NASA finds landing blasts fade inconsistently | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com

Scars on Mars: NASA finds landing blasts fade inconsistently | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After a few years of watching over NASA’s Mars Curiosity landing site the space agency has found that blast marks made by the initial decent vehicle have not faded away as one might expect.

Rather, NASA said, after fading for about two years, the pace of change slowed and some of the scars may have even darkened again.

+More on Network World: 15 reasons why Mars is one hot, hot, hot planet; What is so infinitely cool about Mars?+

NASA employs the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to make the observations which the space agency says it will use to model the fading and predict how long it would take for the scars to disappear.

The idea is to help do prep work for NASA's next Mars lander, InSight, which could launch in March 2016.


NASA said the InSight mission will deploy a heat probe that will hammer itself a few yards, or meters, deep into the ground to monitor heat coming from the interior of the planet. The brightness of the ground affects temperature below ground, because a dark surface warms in sunshine more than a bright one does.


Spacecraft that land in dusty areas of Mars create dark blast zone patterns where bright dust is blown away by the landing. Monitoring with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows these dark patterns fade over time in a surprising way, NASA said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA's colossal crawlers mark half a century of service | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's colossal crawlers mark half a century of service | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Two veterans of the US space program have marked 50 years of service with in appropriately sedate style. In 1965, a pair of gigantic crawlers were built to move the Saturn V moon rockets to the launch pad. Half a century later, they are still in service and being upgraded to handle NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and other launch vehicles. To celebrate, the 6 million lb (2.7 million kg) Crawler-Transporter 2 (CT-2) made a rollout for a visitor and media day at less than one mph.

Once the largest land vehicles ever built and still the largest self-powered vehicles, NASA's crawler-transporters have had one of the greatest supporting roles in history, moving every Apollo, Skylab and Apollo Soyuz mission and all the Shuttle missions to Launch Pad 39 at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

They were built by the Marion Shovel Company in Marion, Ohio to transport the giant Saturn V boosters from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) because the inclement Florida weather precluded assembling the rockets on the launch pad. Measuring 131 ft by 114 ft (40 m x 35 m), the machines supported on eight tractor treads are driven by 16 electric traction motors run by two AC generators and two DC generators powered by diesel engines.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tech demo lets you visit the International Space Station in VR | Richard Moss | GizMag.com

Tech demo lets you visit the International Space Station in VR | Richard Moss | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Wondrous as today's technology is, there remains no feasible way to put ordinary people in space. Except, it seems, through virtual reality. Australian multimedia company Opaque Multimedia has combined an Oculus Rift headset with Microsoft Kinect 2 motion tracking to make it possible for every Tom, Dick, and Sally on the planet to get a first-hand (virtual) taste of life on – or rather just outside – the International Space Station. The comapny's new tech demo, Earthlight, lets players explore in first person around the outside of the ISS as it orbits the Earth, safe in the comfort of their living room.

Earthlight may not capture every element of the real experience, but it was designed to get as close to it as possible. Move your hands out in front of you and you'll see in your headset a space-gloved hand exactly where you'd expect it to be. Similarly, reach out to a handle or bit of scaffolding and give it a tug and your virtual self will begin to float forwards. And as you explore you might just see the Earth as it looks from 431 kilometers (268 miles) above.

It was difficult to make this work from a technical standpoint because even a millisecond delay or minor deviation between your movement and your avatar's movement can make the experience more horrifying than exhilarating. Project lead Norman Wang says that to keep it running smoothly they had to push both the software and hardware to their limit.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Publishers Actively Monitoring Testing Students' Social Media Posts For Possible Cheating | Tim Cushing | Techdirt

Publishers Actively Monitoring Testing Students' Social Media Posts For Possible Cheating | Tim Cushing | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Major corporations are actively monitoring social media during standardized tests. This is being done to "protect" the "integrity" of test questions and answers. None of this is particularly surprising, other than the fact that a member of school administration was the one to blow the whistle on it.

Students in New Jersey are in the middle PARCC testing right now. This is a new standardized test which is administered by Pearson. It's not without its detractors; many parents are opting their kids out of the test, and after what Pearson just did I'm sure the number will grow.

A blogger by the name of Bob Braun got his hands on an email one NJ school district superintendent sent out to a mailing list. Said email discusses a dire "security breach" in which a student tweeted a mention of the recent PARCC test.

The superintendent's email wasn't sent to remind teaching staff to keep a better eye on testing students. It was sent to inform the rest of them about a situation she (Elizabeth Jewett) found unacceptable. [all emphasis hers]


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Dark matter 'can't touch this' or even itself, researchers find | Eric Mack | GizMag.com

Dark matter 'can't touch this' or even itself, researchers find | Eric Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When we look out into the universe, we don't know what we're looking at for the most part. In fact, we can't even see most of what we're looking at – that's because the majority of the universe is made up of mysterious, practically invisible dark matter. But new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory have unraveled the mystery little bit, with the new revelations hinting that dark matter could actually be even darker than previously thought.

Dark matter is just what it sounds like: matter that does not emit, reflect or absorb light, so it is invisible. However, we know it is there because of its measurable gravitational effects on parts of the universe that we can see. As such, one of the best ways to study dark matter is to observe what happens when galaxies containing large amounts of the stuff collide with each other.

"We know how gas and stars react to these cosmic crashes and where they emerge from the wreckage. Comparing how dark matter behaves can help us to narrow down what it actually is," said David Harvey of the Swiss École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), lead author of a new study that looked at 72 galactic collisions using Hubble and Chandra data.

During these violent events, the stars of the colliding galaxies do not slow down because they are actually far enough away from other stars to travel through the crash without their progress being impeded. The researchers found that dark matter also does not slow down as galaxies collide, but this is not because it is far away from other dark matter as with stars – dark matter is believed to be spread evenly through galaxy clusters, meaning that the particles would often get very close to each other.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Lumo projects an interactive, motion-sensitive game experience onto walls and floors | Heidi Hoppes | GizMag.com

Lumo projects an interactive, motion-sensitive game experience onto walls and floors | Heidi Hoppes | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you've visited a trade show or children's museum lately, chances are you've seen an interactive, motion-sensitive exhibit projected onto a wall or floor. Lumo is the at-home version of this technology, developed by technologists Meghan Athavale and Curtis Wachs who began creating interactive environments for commercial settings. Seeing a demand for a cheaper and more user-friendly version of their product for interactive gaming at home, they're launching an Indiegogo campaign to fund the continued development of Lumo.

Lumo pairs a pico projector with movement detection to create games that are projected onto a floor and change as players move within the game. The existing game catalog of 100 titles delves into kids' favorites such as a fishing game and an alphabet learning aid, and also comes with 10 templates for kids to rejigger the game with custom art.


Click headline to read more, access hot links, view pix gallery and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Barriers to Technology in Education | Suren Ramasubbu Blog | HuffPost.com

The Barriers to Technology in Education | Suren Ramasubbu Blog | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Despite the apparent proliferation of technology in the education sector, education experts often bemoan the languidness of technology insertion especially into conventional K12 classrooms. Such complaints arise from comparing education to the industrial sector.


In industry, the goals and effects of technology can be measured by quantifiable metrics such as productivity and net profit. In education, there are no such metrics. Is the goal of education reaching more children and teaching more existing material, or fostering creativity and independence among them? Any teacher would answer that it must be a mix of the two, but is there a golden ratio? Given the fuzziness of this ratio, how much technology insurgence will support this ratio, and how?

Educational technology is a vast interconnected web of specialties; digital lessons, scheduling, modeling and simulations, internet enabled interactions, virtual classrooms, identity and cyber security management systems, faculty evaluation systems and data analytics must interplay.


While there are numerous technology developers who cater to production of specialized digital tools for industry, the number of companies investing in educational technology is more modest. This is largely because the education sector hesitates to invest in technological innovation.


For example, for every dollar spent on education in 2005, only 3.5 cents was spent on technological materials, tools and services. The excuse for such poor investment in technology has been the unwillingness or inability of schools to free up teacher time for adequate training, a time that is taken as "sunk cost".


Furthermore, decision makers in education tend to view new ventures as risky, because education is time-constrained, and mistakes could be costly in terms of meeting educational milestones.

The situation has, however, improved over the years; in 2014, American K-12 schools were expected to spend $9.94 billion on educational technology. The proposed $125 million competitive-grant program by the Obama Government to promote high school redesign, with a particular focus on science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM also bodes well for educational technology as it could somewhat mitigate the budget issues that have, in the past few years, given rise to the "Bring your own device" or BYOD system in schools.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Learning Edge of Game Design | Erin Hoffman | GlassLab Games

The Learning Edge of Game Design | Erin Hoffman | GlassLab Games | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I often tell game developers that I came to GlassLab because I believe that the worlds of learning and education represent the next leap forward in game design. My feelings are mixed: I’ve loved “entertainment” games since I was a child; I’ve made playful interactive things on computers for longer than I can remember. My life — both work and play — has been connected to games forever. But the truth is that the mainstream industry got a little boring. A couple of years ago, games took a swerve into some depressing places: AAA teams where you spend 4+ years of your life on a tiny part of a huge (if magnificent) machine, startups that were making actual slot machines for iPhones, pay-to-win stacked-deck PvP tablet games.

Even if those were my kind of games (hint: I got into the industry for multimillion-player shared worlds, immersive narrative, and simulation games), it just seemed like there wasn’t a heck of a lot there to learn from about game design. Whereas prior years had led to explosive learning about game design, recent ones flattened out, and the challenge in the space was more about acquisition and monetization than design.

Enter: education. Not only was EDM (educational data-mining) on the rise (representing a new kind of game datastream analytics), educators were finally starting to see games as allies rather than enemies. Little companies were starting to show big results, and games like DragonBox were showing us that not only could learning games be elegant, beautiful, and usable, but they had the potential to reveal brand new game mechanics.

The truth is the learning world is a thinky game designer’s dream. It’s deeply hungry for new ideas, deeply hungry for engaging kids, and completely dedicated to making a better world. With Mars Generation One, we built mechanics around argumentation — that had never been done before. With SimCityEDU: Pollution Challenge, we set out to mine millions of game data points for hints about systems thinking — never been done before. At GlassLab I am ridiculously fortunate to be trying to solve problems in utterly uncharted territory every hour of every day.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

OH: School project helps lead city revitalization | Barrett Lawlis | Lancaster Eagle-Gazette

OH: School project helps lead city revitalization | Barrett Lawlis | Lancaster Eagle-Gazette | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With no substantial setbacks because of weather, the construction of the Lancaster, OH school district’s new elementary buildings are on schedule, with one building nearing completion and two under way.

Mt. Pleasant Elementary is in the final stages of construction. The building is set to be done by the end of March, minus the kitchen. The grounds and the parking lot are on schedule to be completed by the end of June. Jerry Rainey, director of business for Lancaster schools, said the punch-out for the building is being completed at the site soon.

“Basically, the architect will go through the building to check the finishes and to see if there is anything that needs fixed,” Rainey said.

“The Gorsuch West Elementary and Tarhe Trails Elementary are at different stages of construction, with Tarhe Trails just a little further ahead,” said LCS Superintendent Steve Wigton. The buildings are on schedule to be completed by the end of July. These three buildings are set to open in August for the new school year.

Construction for Medill Elementary and Tallmadge Elementary will begin in the summer. Before construction can begin, however, the old sites will be demolished.

“In the first week of June, we will start by clearing everything out of the buildings, and then begin demolition. If everything remains on schedule, demolition will be finished by the end of July,” Wigton said. The two elementary buildings are set to open in January of 2017, after the holiday break.

The district’s new building plan has received positive reception from the community, which Wigton said was evident from an increased enrollment.

“These buildings are going to provide a better learning space for students, a more modern setting for enhanced education,” Wigton said. The curriculum has been updated for more technology-integrated learning. The new buildings also will have more flexible space for teachers and administrators compared to the present elementary schools.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

This Is How The Common Core ACTUALLY Works | Bill Barrow | HuffPost.com

This Is How The Common Core ACTUALLY Works | Bill Barrow | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the political uproar over Common Core, various myths are peddled as fact.

Do the learning standards really mean the federal government is serving as a "national school board," as Sen. Marco Rubio says? That's hard to square with the reality that the standards were developed by governors and state education leaders.

Should leaders "repeal every word of Common Core," as Sen. Ted Cruz demands? Actually there's no federal law -- or even federal program -- to repeal. Sen. Rand Paul slams "rotten to the core" propaganda forced on children by an initiative that has no curriculum at all.

Even so, the 2016 GOP presidential prospects who are criticizing Common Core have a point -- if an overstated one -- when they dispute the notion that it is strictly a voluntary initiative that bubbled up from communities and states. In complicated but unmistakable ways, the federal government does pressure states to live up to the standards.

Concerns about Common Core extend beyond the Republican politicians to many parents, some of them Democrats, who blame it for additional math homework headaches and extra time taking tests.

A quick primer on Common Core, followed by a look at the facts behind the rhetoric of some Republican hopefuls:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tell-All From A TFA and KIPP Teacher: Unprepared, Isolation, Shame, and Burnout | Julian Vasquez Heilig | Cloaking Inequity

Tell-All From A TFA and KIPP Teacher: Unprepared, Isolation, Shame, and Burnout | Julian Vasquez Heilig | Cloaking Inequity | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A few years ago a UT-Austin undergraduate student sat in my office and told me that she was joining Teach For America (TFA) and was going to teach in KIPP school. The essence of TFA’s pitch to her?

We recruit a diverse group of leaders with a record of achievement who work to expand educational opportunity, starting by teaching for two years in a low-income community.

In 2013, The University of Texas at Austin sent more of our graduates to Teach For America than any other university. We’re #1!?! How can you not feel good about Teach For America after watching this expensive and very professional YouTube promotion video?


Apparently, a half of a billion dollars buys some slick promotional material.


Also, how can you not fall in love with Teach For America when discussing their beliefs with their very intelligent and loquacious staff and lobbyist (Factoid: Did you know TFA has embedded paid ed policy staffers in the U.S. congress?).


A few weeks ago, after I spoke on a panel at the The National Hispanic Caucus of Hispanic State Legislators (NHCSL) conference in Orlando, I had a conversation with a Nevada State Senator about TFA and he told me:


"You should visit the TFA classrooms. You will be really impressed."


Check out this Dog and Pony show featuring Spanky the Miniature Horse and Dally the Parson Russell Terrier.


Back to that student that was in my office two years ago asking about TFA and KIPP. I’ll be honest, I advised her against it. But I asked her to keep in touch because I was very interested in hearing about her experience teaching for TFA and KIPP. Well, she was back in touch last week— midway through her second year. (It is anonymous to avoid retribution from you know who). Without further ado…


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clips mentioned above--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Robots: a Hands-On Approach to STEM Education | Hannah Kingsley-Ma | KALW.org

Robots: a Hands-On Approach to STEM Education | Hannah Kingsley-Ma | KALW.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

California eighth graders are ranked 45th in the country in math. That’s according to the most recent scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Meanwhile, the pool of jobs requiring math, science, and engineering experience is growing, especially here in the Bay Area. For people with the right skills, these jobs have become the latest iteration of the American dream -- steady, livable wages, and plenty of demand.

In San Francisco, a few high schools have started offering hands on tech experience to students in after school robotics clubs. George Washington High School in San Francisco’s Richmond District is one of them. They’ve entered a national robot-building competition of 3,000 teams. They have six weeks to build a robot that can lift and stack big plastic bins, for a regional contest in Davis.

Around week three, about twenty students are clustered in groups in a small classroom. They’re hunched over computer screens, with bucket-sized bubble teas on their desks. On the floor, there’s something that looks like a car battery got in a fight with a Roomba, scooting back and forth on command. The students have been working on it every day after school - all-day on Saturdays too.

“We don't come on Sundays - we would if we could,” said senior Sheldon Lau. “But they don't let us.”

Not only do these students have to build and design a robot from scratch, they have to write code to make it perform specific functions. Taxi Situ described the first time they made the robot move. “Everyone was cheering, everyone was taking their phones out and taking pictures of it,” said Situ. “SnapChat was a thing.”


Click headline to read more, access hot link and listen to this KALW radio segment--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

From Siberia with size: 'New species' of big dinosaur found, scientists claim | Chris Matyszczyk | CNET

From Siberia with size: 'New species' of big dinosaur found, scientists claim | Chris Matyszczyk | CNET | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It's a little like fracking. The more we dig, the scarier our findings.

And now, it seems, something terribly scary has been dug up, according to Russian scientists in the heart of Siberia.

My chillingly irregular reading of the Siberian Times tells me that bones boffins at Tomsk State University have unearthed what they believe is a new species of dinosaur.

The fossils were originally dug up in 2008. Having carefully extracted them from the rocks of Siberia, scientists have tried to piece them together and decided that this is a dinosaur of the Titanosauriformes, a group of sauropod dinosaur.

These were creatures with small heads and massive bodies. Perhaps they were the politicians of their day.

The Siberian Times quotes researcher Stepan Ivantsov, who said: "It was the first scientifically described dinosaur from this group in Russia. Now after work on the extraction of all the remnants and the restoration [of the bones] are almost completed, we can confidently say that we have found a new species, and maybe even genus."


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Scientists find brightest night light circling impossibly huge black hole | Eric Mack | GizMag.com

Scientists find brightest night light circling impossibly huge black hole | Eric Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Astronomers have discovered a distant, massive and ancient black hole that calls into question current models for the early expansion of the universe. A team of scientists from China and Arizona spotted the brightest quasar from the early universe, named SDSS J0100+2802, centered on a black hole 12.8 billion light years away and as bright as 420 trillion suns.

Quasars are celestial objects that are essentially very bright clouds of material being swallowed by a black hole. The material accelerates toward the black hole and heats up in the process, causing it to glow brightly.

The existence of such a powerful and ancient object presents something of a puzzle for scientists because it formed less than a billion years after the Big Bang, when the universe was relatively young.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ESA offers CubeSats a deep space ride on asteroid mission | David Szondy | GizMag.com

ESA offers CubeSats a deep space ride on asteroid mission | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

CubeSats offer a way to get into space on the cheap. They're compact, inexpensive, and they can piggyback on larger launch payloads to get into orbit. The trouble is, this piggybacking is often like trying to hitchhike cross country on a ride that only goes to the edge of town. The European Space Agency (ESA) is widening the scope a little by opening a competition for CubeSats to ride into deep space on its Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM).

The ESA competition is open to scientists and companies of its member nations member and is intended to provide room for six CubeSat units. A particular CubeSat could be made up of two or three units, so the ESA mission might for example carry two CubeSats of three units each.

According to ESA, the competition isn't just for a launch spot, but also to seek new sensors and other technologies that can complement the AIM mission, which is part of the international Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA), which is tasked with investigating how to deflect asteroids that might pose a hazard to Earth.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.