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Intelligent Content: Soon your media will know you better than you know yourself | paidContent.org

Intelligent Content: Soon your media will know you better than you know yourself | paidContent.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With the introduction of analytics into the visual design of written content, we are on the cusp of an era of incredible evolution: one where the design of information changes in real time in response to data about the readers consuming it.

 

New technologies from Amazon, Apple, Google, WordPress and Tumblr already provide a preview of Intelligent Content. In essence, it won’t be long before the media we consume knows us better than we know ourselves.

 

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Katrina's 'Golden Opportunity': 10 Years of Corporate Media Celebrating Disaster | Adam Johnson | FAIR.org

Katrina's 'Golden Opportunity': 10 Years of Corporate Media Celebrating Disaster | Adam Johnson | FAIR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Americans love, above all, a narrative. Preferably a moral one, marked by a clear good and evil. For many so-called “school reformers,” the tragedy of Katrina, which marks its ten-year anniversary today, provided that narrative. Its stark before-and-after provided a clear A/B test as to the righteousness of their cause. Before was a “broken school system,” and after is a glossy, privatized education system.

We’ll set aside the fact that this is largely a fantasy. Torture the data enough, and the “New Orleans miracle” can be teased out if one wants it enough. Despite studies and reporting showing otherwise, for the sake of this piece it doesn’t actually matter if radical post-Katrina New Orleans school reform was a “success,” a failure or somewhere in between. What is important is that so many corporatists think this “miracle” was not just an incidental positive but was, all things considered, worth it. Worth the 1,800 people killed and the 100,000 African-Americans permanently ejected from the city.

The most popular examination of this pathology is, of course, from Naomi Klein, who coined the idea of the ”shock doctrine” in her 2007 book of the same name. In it, she explores how Katrina and other manmade and non-manmade disasters are exploited to rush through a radical right wing corporate agenda.


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IL: Three 16-Year-Olds Hatch Production Company in Englewood Incubator | Andrea Watson | DNAinfo.com

IL: Three 16-Year-Olds Hatch Production Company in Englewood Incubator | Andrea Watson | DNAinfo.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Three teens from the South Side of Chicago, IL have come together to form their own production company, and they say they hope to encourage other black youths.

“I’m glad that we’re doing this because this can show young black kids that you can actually do something, that playing sports isn’t the only way you can make it in life,” said 16-year-old Devin Buckley, whose squad consists of 16-year-olds Chris Berry and Regis Luckett.

The idea to launch the Chicago-based company, VIP Productions, came after exposure to the new Blue 1647 Englewood Business Accelerator, which is housed in the U.S. Bank building, 815 W. 63rd St. The 1,600-square-feet business incubator opened its doors to the community in April, aimed at helping emerging entrepreneurs. The office has meeting rooms and private office space. Workshops, courses and technical assistance are also provided.


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NASA tests Orion parachutes to breaking point | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

NASA tests Orion parachutes to breaking point | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has been pushing the safety features on its next-generation Orion spacecraft to the extreme, as it carried out a dramatic parachute test. During the test, engineers staged the failure of various components of the descent system in order to see if it would still function, and save the lives of a potential crew in a worst case scenario.

The capsule that was dropped during yesterday's test was not a size-accurate representation of the Orion spacecraft. Instead, it was a squashed-down dummy version with dimensions that would allow it to fit in the hold of the C-17 aircraft that would transport it to the drop altitude of 35,000 ft (10, 668 m).

Whilst the dummy may have been slightly out of proportion, its key characteristics, such as weight and base surface area, were similar enough to the actual spacecraft to make it a viable analogue for the purpose of the test.


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School Leaders: Tips for Coaching Your Super Teachers | Ben Johnson Blog | Edutopia.org

School Leaders: Tips for Coaching Your Super Teachers | Ben Johnson Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Anyone who is willing to be a teacher is a superhero in my book. I admire and honor any person that is willing to interact with students of any age and openly engage with students who are interested, oblivious, and even antagonistic. Super teachers come in all shapes and sizes, but I would like to discuss three specific types:

  1. The super in-need teacher: Spiderman
  2. The super stoic teacher: Silver Surfer
  3. The super imaginative teacher: The Green Lantern.


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Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel

Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Discovery Communications is jumping into the virtual reality game with a new brand and a suite of cross-platform apps and services for iOS and Android devices, the Samsung Milk VR premium video service and on YouTube.

The new initiative, called Discovery VR, launched today with a slate of original content, show extensions and plans for additional short-form programming that will be offered across several platforms.


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U.S. Education Department bars states from offering alternative tests to most students with disabilities | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

U.S. Education Department bars states from offering alternative tests to most students with disabilities | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A new rule issued by the U.S. Education Department requires all states to stop offering alternative standards and aligned standardized tests to nearly all students with disabilities after the 2015-16 school year.

As published in the Federal Rule, the rule is called “Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged; Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities,” and it requires states to give the same assessments to students without disabilities as to the vast majority of those with disabilities under the premise that nearly all students can “make academic progress when provided with challenging instruction and appropriate supports.”

Effective Sept. 21, 2015, the official rule summary says:


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University of Louisiana Lafayette ranks in top 25 for computer science grads' mid-career pay | Louisiana.edu

University of Louisiana Lafayette ranks in top 25 for computer science grads' mid-career pay | Louisiana.edu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is one of the top 25 universities in the nation for computer science majors, based on the mid-career salaries its alumni earn.

That’s according to PayScale, a research company that claims to have compiled the world's largest database of individual salary profiles. It analyzed the earnings of 1.4 million alumni to rank 187 colleges and universities that have computer science programs.

UL Lafayette tied with Carnegie Mellon University for No. 23. Both schools’ computer science alums reported mid-career median pay of $121,000. PayScale defines “mid-career” as at least 10 years of experience.

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Electroluminescent Art: Sound, Color & Light | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Electroluminescent Art: Sound, Color & Light | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Electroluminescence (EL) is an optical phenomenon and electrical phenomenon in which a material emits light in response to the passage of an electric current or to a strong electric field. Powder phosphor-based electroluminescent materials include “EL” wire, tape and panels, which consume relatively little electric power. These materials are coated in phosphor which glows when an alternating current is applied to it.


These materials are increasingly popular among artists, dancers, makers, and other creative communities. Japan-based Wrecking Crew Orchestra‘s Cosmic Beat show used video projection mapping and laser graphics. For projection mapping, they were using two 20,000 lumen projectors for the set projection and worked with a VFX company on the graphics for the mapping.


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SEPT 19: “Data DiscoTech” event to explore the impact of open data on grassroots communities | Allied Media Projects

SEPT 19: “Data DiscoTech” event to explore the impact of open data on grassroots communities | Allied Media Projects | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Detroit Digital Justice Coalition is comprised of people and organizations in Detroit who believe that communication is a fundamental human right. We have been working to secure that right for the past six years through activities that are grounded in the digital justice principles of Access, Participation, Common Ownership, and Healthy Communities.

In January 2015 the DDJC launched a “reboot” to bring more people and organizations into the urgent work for digital justice in Detroit and to foster more collaboration across existing digital justice projects.

The 14 current member organizations of the coalition span Detroit’s social justice organizing, social service, media arts, and civic technology communities. Our constituents include people on welfare, senior citizens, social justice activists, youth media makers and others.

As part of the reboot we restructured our work within four major areas: technical support for organizing, digital justice policy, discotechs, and mesh networks.


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Small Group Goes to Great Lengths to Block Homeschooling Regulation | Jessica Huseman | Pro Publica

Small Group Goes to Great Lengths to Block Homeschooling Regulation | Jessica Huseman | Pro Publica | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the fall of 2003, police in New Jersey received a call from a concerned neighbor who’d found a boy rummaging in her garbage, looking for food. He was 19 years old but was 4 feet tall and weighed just 45 pounds. Investigators soon learned that the boy’s three younger brothers were also severely malnourished.


The family was known to social workers, but the children were being homeschooled and thus were cut off from the one place where their condition could have gotten daily scrutiny — a classroom.


After the story of the emaciated boys appeared in national newspapers, New Jersey Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg was moved to introduce new legislation. “My question was, how does someone fall off the face of the earth so that no one knows they exist? I was told it was because he was homeschooled,” she said.

Her bill, introduced in 2004, would’ve required parents, for the first time, to notify the state that their children were being homeschooled, have them complete the same annual tests as public school students, and submit proof of annual medical tests.

Soon afterward, a small group of homeschooling parents began following Weinberg around the capitol. The barrage of phone calls from homeschooling advocates so jammed her office phone lines that staffers had to use their private cellphones to conduct business. “You would have thought I’d recommended the end of the world as we know it,” said Weinberg. “Our office was besieged.”


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Self-healing material could plug holes in space ships | Ben Coxworth | GizMag.com

Self-healing material could plug holes in space ships | Ben Coxworth | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the movies have shown us, space travel is an intimidating prospect, what with the possibilities of running out of air, the rocket engines conking out, or the shipboard computer deciding to bump off the crew. Another danger is fast-flying orbital debris piercing the hull. Scientists may be on their way to a solution to that one, however, in the form of a new self-healing material.

Developed by a team from the University of Michigan and NASA, the material is made up of thiol-ene-trialkylborane liquid resin, sandwiched between two polymer panels. As long as the resin is contained in the airtight space between the panels, it stays in its liquid form.


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Lockheed Martin's satellite cooler gets triple the power | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Lockheed Martin's satellite cooler gets triple the power | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Space is cold, but not cold enough. For satellites carrying sophisticated sensors, keeping the components at cryogenic temperatures is vital, but doing so while keeping down the weight and power requirements isn't easy. Lockheed Martin’s High Power Microcryocooler is designed with both of these things in mind, and it now packs three times the power density of previous systems.

Ever since the first high-resolution infrared sensors and similar components were sent into space the problem of how to keep them cold has vexed engineers. There are a number of ways of achieving this, such as cryostats containing liquid helium, but these are heavy, bulky, and expensive to launch.


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Stunning images document Saturnian moon Dione during final Cassini flyby | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Stunning images document Saturnian moon Dione during final Cassini flyby | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has marked its final close pass of the Saturnian moon Dione by capturing the rocky body in a series of stunning images as it sailed past the satellite on August, 17. Cassini had previously visited the moon five times, but had never before captured the moon in so high a resolution.

Dione is a relatively small Saturnian moon orbiting roughly 234,000 miles (377,400 km) out from the gas giant. With a density only 1.48 times that of liquid water, the moon's surface is characterized by heavy cratering, with some of the scars spanning over 60 miles (97 km) in diameter.


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48,000+ students refused the testocracy in Washington State by opting out. This isn't an "anomaly", it's an uprising | Carolyn Leith | Seattle Education

48,000+ students refused the testocracy in Washington State by opting out.  This isn't an "anomaly", it's an uprising | Carolyn Leith | Seattle Education | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

How many students opted out of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) in Washington State? Short answer: More than you probably imagined.

Now that the final numbers are out, let’s dig in and see what happened.

11th Grade

We knew the opt out numbers were going to be huge. Last week’s OSPI report confirmed that. Across the state, the opt out rate for 11th grade was 49.3% for ELA and 52.9% for Math. This translates into:

37,112 students opted out of the English Language Arts (ELA)

39,444 students opted out of Math


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How Too Much Electronic Screen Time Is Making Kids ‘Moody, Crazy and Lazy’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com

How Too Much Electronic Screen Time Is Making Kids ‘Moody, Crazy and Lazy’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Excessive use of electronic devices by children can have alarming effects that may lead them to become “moody, crazy and lazy,” according to a child psychiatrist.

Writing in Psychology Today, Dr. Victoria L. Dunckley argues for an “electronic fast” and offers a look at six physiological mechanisms to explain electronics’ tendency to produce mood disturbance:


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NASA versus Katrina: August 29, 2005 | Nathan Mattise | Ars Technica

NASA versus Katrina: August 29, 2005 | Nathan Mattise | Ars Technica | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina came, the federal levees failed, and chaos ensued in the New Orleans metro area.

By now the damage is well documented. So many people were displaced that New Orleans still only sits at approximately 80 percent of its pre-storm population a decade later. More than 1,200 people died—the most for a US storm since 1928. And 80 percent of the city flooded, causing property damage since estimated at $108 billion by the National Hurricane Center. Almost regardless of metric, Katrina stands as the most devastating Atlantic storm to ever hit the US.

Yet one day before Katrina, Malcolm Wood had to go into work.

Wood lived roughly an hour away in Picayune, Mississippi, and luckily the rest of his family had the means and access to get north to Hattiesburg for safety. But unlike most folks working in Greater New Orleans while living in the Mississippi Delta or Southern Louisiana, Wood’s company refused to shut down on the eve of the storm of the century—despite New Orleans' first-ever mandatory evacuation. It couldn’t. For starters, billions in prior and future work were on the line. The livelihood of Wood’s direct coworkers—more than 2,000 colleagues—was too. Heck, the entire national operation that Wood was a part of likely hung in the balance depending on whether his facility, just 15 miles east of the Lower 9th Ward, could survive.

So Wood, a large and capable man who’d already logged 20-plus years of employment at the same location, set out to do the job he was assigned. Facing direct impact from a 400-miles-across stormfront and 120+ mph winds, he was part of a 38-person team that had to ride out Hurricane Katrina on site to defend the company’s 832-acre water adjacent facility. The goal? Keep as much of it intact and online as possible.

This task was daunting—“We knew from the weather station it was going to be worse than previous storms,” Wood says. “It looked like the perfect storm”—but the stakes were literally out of this world. So Wood traveled the roughly 40 miles down to tiny Michoud, Louisiana, and prepared to spend the night at Building 320. The unassuming office space sits toward the back of NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility, where the organization's fuel tanks have been made since the 1960s.

It’d be the first night of roughly 30 straight that Wood and company would spend on the Michoud grounds.

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10 Ways Well-Meaning White Teachers Bring Racism Into Our Schools | Jamie Utt | Everyday Feminism

10 Ways Well-Meaning White Teachers Bring Racism Into Our Schools | Jamie Utt | Everyday Feminism | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Teachers are some of my favorite people in the world. I mean I really love teachers! They tend to be enthusiastic about changing society, and more often than not, they care so deeply about their work and their students. What’s not to like?

As a former teacher myself, I feel so very fortunate to meet teachers from all over the United States in my work. Despite all of the BS that teachers have to deal with in our political climate, they remain optimistic about the state of education, which honestly blows my mind.

It is from this place of love that I work with teachers to help them improve their practice. And with the realities of the “education debt” and considering that 80% of our teachers are White while nearly half (and growing) of our students are youth of Color, part of improving teaching practice means paying more critical attention to race in our schools.

Though I know there are actively racist teachers out there, most White teachers mean well and have no intention of being racist. Yet as people who are inscribed with Whiteness, it is possible for us to act in racist ways no matter our intentions. Uprooting racism from our daily actions takes a lifetime of work.

Thus, as we head into the first weeks of school all over the US, here are 10 ways that White teachers introduce racism into our schools paired with things we can do instead.


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Library Deputy Director Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner Talks About Kansas City's Digital Divide | Jen Chen | KCUR.org

Library Deputy Director Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner Talks About Kansas City's Digital Divide | Jen Chen | KCUR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

According to Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, the digital divide is the civil rights issue of the 21st century.

“Having internet access is essential. It’s not a luxury,” she says.

Kositany-Buckner, the deputy director of the Kansas City Public Library, has been working to bridge the digital divide in Kansas City. And the library is the place to do it, she says.

“We provide access to digital content — whether it’s e-books, audio books or research tools you can access online,” says Kositany-Buckner.

There’s more to the library than checking out books and using the computers to get online. It’s a gathering spot for the community -- offering meeting spaces, live concerts, film screenings, story time for infants and kids, video game nights and more.

It’s also a place for civic engagement that’s open to everybody — especially those with opposite views.

“I like to say that libraries are Switzerland,” she says. “We do not necessarily support one view. We support all views and we bring everybody to the table to have these discussions.”

But most importantly, says Kositany-Buckner, it’s a place that promotes reading.


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Wi-Fi Woo-Woo - Quack Science Convinces Boston Family to Sue School Over Wi-Fi/EHS Allergy | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Wi-Fi Woo-Woo - Quack Science Convinces Boston Family to Sue School Over Wi-Fi/EHS Allergy | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Boston area boarding school’s failure to accommodate a 12-year-old student’s allergy to Wi-Fi will force the Fay School to hire attorneys to defend itself in a lawsuit brought under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

All three plaintiffs have been kept anonymous, but their lawsuit clearly identifies what is responsible for their son’s headaches, itchy skin and rashes — the school’s Wi-Fi system.


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How emerging technology is changing K-12 classrooms | Kacy Zurkus | NetworkWorld.com

How emerging technology is changing K-12 classrooms | Kacy Zurkus | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Though implementing one-to-one initiatives such as having a laptop for every student continues to be a primary focus for many school systems across the country, those who have already a 1:1 program are discovering new ways to shape student learning. Impressive technology trends are transforming traditional classrooms for students at every grade level.

Robotics, makerspaces and wearables will be a few of the trends that join the ranks alongside teachers and students in the fall. “Research shows that this group of kids learns very differently from past generations,” says GB Cazes, vice president at Cyber Innovation Center recognized, Cazes says.


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Mentoring Girls in Computer Science | Shuchi Grover & Patricia Schank | SRI International

Mentoring Girls in Computer Science | Shuchi Grover & Patricia Schank | SRI International | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Despite the healthy buzz around introducing children to computer science and coding in the K-12 years, there is a stark reality with which we contend: precipitously low numbers of girls and underserved minorities are studying computing in the United States. Despite many efforts to close this gap, figures of test-takers from recent advanced placement exams (a rough measure of teens’ interest in pursuing computing in college) still suggest that we have a long way to go to level the playing field for women and minorities.

At SRI Education, we’re doing our bit, through research and outreach efforts, to move the needle by engaging in efforts that especially target t(w)eens in middle school––a key time for identity building and when many children develop or lose an interest in particular subjects, as is sadly often the case with girls and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Over the last year, we have connected with youth in highly interactive events that help bring STEM fields more into focus and as a tangible goal. Two of these events were the Design_Code_Build program and Technovation.


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The Wearable, Projection-Mapped Mask Is a Cyberpunk Masterpiece | DJ Pangburn | The Creators Project

With so much of ourselves, uploaded as images and videos to apps like Instagram and Snapchat, creating not one digital doppelganger but a multitude of them, what are we to make of our real biological selves? This question is at the center of visual artist, dancer, and choreographer Bill Shannon's latest project, a wearable, projection-mapped mask that displays a range of recorded facial expressions.

A blend of high and low tech, the digital mask looks like a kaleidoscope turned inside out, or a sculptural fusion of cubist and futurist styles. It also resembles the type of low-fi future tech often seen in such Terry Gilliam films as Brazil, 12 Monkeys, and The Zero Theorem.


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Breakthrough in world's oldest undeciphered writing | Sean Coughlan | BBC News

Breakthrough in world's oldest undeciphered writing | Sean Coughlan | BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The world's oldest undeciphered writing system, which has so far defied attempts to uncover its 5,000-year-old secrets, could be about to be decoded by Oxford University academics.

This international research project is already casting light on a lost bronze age middle eastern society where enslaved workers lived on rations close to the starvation level.

"I think we are finally on the point of making a breakthrough," says Jacob Dahl, fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford and director of the Ancient World Research Cluster.

Dr Dahl's secret weapon is being able to see this writing more clearly than ever before.


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Extreme pressure reveals new phenomenon in atomic nuclei | Richard Moss | GizMag.com

Extreme pressure reveals new phenomenon in atomic nuclei | Richard Moss | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Scientists have long believed that while an atom's outer electrons are highly mobile and often behave somewhat chaotically, the inner electrons close to the nucleus are stable. They move steadily around the nucleus and stay out of each other's way. But new research reveals that if the pressure is really extreme, like double that found at the center of the Earth, the innermost electrons of an atom change their behavior.

The international team of researchers that observed this anomalous, unexpected phenomenon managed to put a metal called osmium, which is almost the densest of all known metals and almost as incompressible as diamond, under static pressure of over 770 gigapascals. That's more than twice as high as the pressure at the center of the Earth and 7.7 million times higher than the mean atmospheric pressure at the sea level.


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Copenhagen Suborbitals dreams big with Spica rocket | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Copenhagen Suborbitals dreams big with Spica rocket | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Meet Copenhagen Suborbitals (CS), the small Danish organization with a big dream – launching a human being into space, and returning them safely to Earth in a shoestring-budget micro rocket. The CS website conveys a simple mission statement, to prove that access to space does not have to come in the form of an exorbitantly expensive government-subsidized project. CS is proving that a driven group of individuals can achieve what would at first glance appear to be the unachievable, and strike a blow for the democratization of space.

Operating out of a workshop situated in a closed shipyard, the crowdfunded outfit is staffed exclusively by volunteers, most of whome devote their time to the amateur space program after their regular 9 – 5 jobs. CS has already launched a number of unmanned rockets of increasing technological complexity from a mobile platform in the Baltic Sea.


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