Digital Media Lit...
Follow
30.9K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

MA: Digital-age teens bring ‘golden days’ of radio back to airwaves in Provincetown | WickedLocal.com

MA: Digital-age teens bring ‘golden days’ of radio back to airwaves in Provincetown | WickedLocal.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Over the years, Outermost Radio-WOMR has developed a terrific on-air feature that benefits the station by attracting new young audiences while providing area teens with a direct experience in public media.

 

Under the guidance of executive director John Braden and operations manager Matt Dunn, the station’s teen DJ program, hosted by a different student each Saturday morning it airs, has secured a place as part of the regular WOMR program line-up.

 

“Our goals for the high school disc jockey program are to get more young people excited about the station and [about] community service more generally,” Dunn says. “Young people are full of ideas and energy, so to have that influence in our station is extremely positive. We feel that the teens have something to offer us and the community, and we have something to offer them. [WOMR] gets the freshness of youth and the potential to reach an audience that might not otherwise be interested in our programming. The teens get a chance to share the music they love, be stars in the eyes of their friends and family and learn about the technology of our business.” Dunn adds that by working at WOMR, students learn more about responsibility and community involvement.

 

Until recently the station had drawn almost entirely on Provincetown schools for teen broadcasters, but of late they have extended their outreach to Nauset and points farther away.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Inventor Of Email: People Didn't Want To Credit A 'Dark-Skinned Immigrant Kid' | Emily Tess Katz | HuffPost.com

Inventor Of Email: People Didn't Want To Credit A 'Dark-Skinned Immigrant Kid' | Emily Tess Katz | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai was 14 years old when he developed the technology we now know as email. But despite having received "official recognition" of his creation by the U.S. government, some still question whether he was the veritable founder.


Ayyadurai's former colleague Robert Field explained the discrepancy and defended Ayyadurai in a blog on The Huffington Post. According to Field, "multi-billion dollar defense company" Raytheon BBN Technologies generated "their entire brand ... based on claims of having 'invented email,'" then unleashed a PR campaign to "discredit email's origins" as well as Shiva's claim to having invented it.


Ayyadurai explained in a HuffPost Live interview on Thursday that he thinks these allegations stem from people who are both economically and racially prejudiced.


"The reality is this: in 1978, there was a 14-year-old boy and he was the first to create electronic office system. He called it email, a term that had never been used before, and then he went and got official recognition by the U.S. government," he told host Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani, referring to himself.


Ayyadurai said his modest background prevented him from getting the recognition he deserved.


"After that took place, you have a sense of disbelief among people that comes from not so much the technology issue, but there’s a lot of economic issues associated here," he continued. "[The discovery] wasn't done at MIT; it wasn’t done at the military; it wasn’t done at a big institution. It was done in Newark, NJ, one of the poorest cities in the United States. It was done by a dark-skinned immigrant kid, 14 years old."


The creation of email falls under the pretext of the "American dream," Ayyadurai explained, and he feels that those who challenge him as the inventor are afraid of upward mobility and change.


"The narrative there is what changes and shocks certain people who want to control the narrative that innovation can only take place under their bastions," he said. "The truth is that the American dream is really about [the fact that] innovation can take place anytime, by anybody."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA telescopes study giant galaxy – provide a glimpse at star creation in the early universe | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

NASA telescopes study giant galaxy – provide a glimpse at star creation in the early universe | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer telescopes have been used to examine a distant elliptical galaxy known as Sparky. The observations represent the first glimpse at the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction, shedding light on an area of frenzied star production in the early universe.


The distant galaxy is just 6,000 light-years across, making it a fraction of the size of our own Milky Way, which measures some 100,000 light-years across. However, despite the huge difference in size, Sparky contains twice as many stars as our home galaxy.


The object’s galactic core is so far away that the observed light was created some 11 billion years ago, just three billion years after the Big Bang. It’s thought that the galaxy began as a dense core, then developed from the inside out.


The team also studied archival infrared images from the two telescopes, determining that Sparky produces around 300 stars a year – significantly more than the 10 stars per year produced in the Milky Way. The team’s findings indicate that the galaxy has been producing stars for a billion years prior to observation.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA's SLS completes key development review | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's SLS completes key development review | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) program has received the green light to progress after the completion of a critical design review. The next generation heavy launch system, which is designed to lift the Orion spacecraft for manned missions into deep space, is NASA’s most ambitious project since the 1960s and the most powerful rocket ever built, with 12 percent more thrust than the Saturn V booster used to send the Apollo missions to the Moon.


Scheduled to fly its first mission with an operational Orion spacecraft in December 2017, the SLS is currently undergoing a series of reviews in anticipation of final construction. As part of this process, Wednesday’s announcement moved the rocket from formulation to development, which the space agency says is the first for a NASA exploration-class space vehicle since the Space Shuttle.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ESA's Rosetta narrows down potential comet landing sites | GizMag.com

ESA's Rosetta narrows down potential comet landing sites | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After you become the first spacecraft to orbit an asteroid, what do you do for an encore? For the European Space Agency (ESA)’s Rosetta comet probe, the answer is to get ready for the first soft landing on a comet nucleus. Only weeks after going into orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the unmanned Rosetta explorer is engaged in a fast-paced reconnaissance of the comet and has identified five candidate sites for putting down the Philae lander in November.


On August 6, Rosetta made history as it went into a triangular orbit around 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which circles the Sun once every 6.5 years and is about 522 million km (324 million mi) away from it at present. Simply achieving the remarkable feat of chasing a comet over many years in a trajectory that involved several flybys of Earth and a detour out beyond the orbit of Jupiter is cause enough for celebration, and going into orbit around 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is one for the books, but the ESA is planning to cap that all off by making a soft touchdown on the comet’s nucleus with the 100 kg (220 lb) Philae lander in November.


It wasn’t possible to study 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in detail from Earth, and there haven’t been any previous reconnaissance missions to provide maps. To make up for this, Rosetta is taking high-resolution images from a distance of 100 km (62 mi), as well as detailed measurements of the the comet’s rotation, mass, temperature, gas pressure and density, and surface gravity.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UK: BBC begins kids coding push with Bitesize and TV shows | Leo Kelion | BBC News

UK: BBC begins kids coding push with Bitesize and TV shows | Leo Kelion | BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The BBC has published computer programming study guides, quizzes and other support materials on its Bitesize site to coincide with the new computing curriculum's introduction in England.


The broadcaster also revealed several programming-themed children's TV shows will be broadcast in the autumn.


The BBC described the move as an "early start" to a wider coding initiative planned for next year.


That will come 30 years on from its last major programming campaign.


The project's organiser stressed it would be based on a wide range of partnerships. That contrasts with the 1980s' BBC Computer Literacy Project.


The previous initiative centred on the BBC Microcomputer, which was developed by Acorn Computers - a tie-up that was criticised for being detrimental to rivals, including the ZX Spectrum.


"It's about giving the next generation a chance to shape their world, not just be consumers in it," said Jessica Cecil, controller of the BBC's coding and digital creative initiative.


"Clearly this is all about partnerships, this is not about us saying, 'This is the way you do it because the BBC says so'.


"Partnership is absolutely the watchword. We know there is a fantastic landscape out there and we want to play our part in it."


Click headline to read more view pix and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Parents: 19 Meaningful Questions You Should Ask Your Child's Teacher | Terry Heick Blog | Edutopia.org

Parents: 19 Meaningful Questions You Should Ask Your Child's Teacher | Terry Heick Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Back-to-school content is usually focused on teachers and students, and as these two groups will have the largest workload ahead of them, that makes sense.


But for students, the ultimate support system is not an expert teacher, but an informed and supportive family. One of the most significant challenges facing formal education in the United States is the chasm separating schools and communities. The more informed a family is, the more seamlessly they'll connect to so many other edu-constructs, from extracurricular activities and tutoring to reading programs and school-related events.


While schools (hopefully) work to update themselves and the way students learn within them, many parents have to work with what's available to them. With the exception of in-depth content like Edutopia's guides, much of the "parent stuff" you'll find through Googling is decent enough, but it can be surface level or otherwise completely unrelated to process of learning. Some common examples:


  • "Ask them what they did today."
  • "Help them with homework."
  • "Help them with separation anxiety."
  • "Talk to them about their struggles."
  • "Get them a tutor."


But these kind of topical interactions aren't always enough, nor do they do anything at all to create transparency between schools and communities.


So, in pursuit of that transparency, below are some questions to better clarify what's happening in the classroom, and then help you decide on the kind of non-superficial actions you can perform at home to truly support the learning of your child. Many of the questions may seem a bit direct, but I don't know any teachers who would take offense to them. In fact, most of my colleagues would welcome the kind of added capacity that questions like these could lead to. Many of these questions are rarely the subject of parent-teacher interactions, but -- well, that's kind of the point.


Just don't ask them all at once. In fact, maybe pick two and hope for the best.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Africa: UNICEF updating Uganda's Digital Kiosk computing platform | GizMag.com

Africa: UNICEF updating Uganda's Digital Kiosk computing platform | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For the past couple of years, UNICEF Uganda and partners have been designing, developing, prototyping and rolling out youth-focused community computers that can operate on mains power where available, or solar-power in remote rural areas. Work has just finished on the design of the second generation Digital Kiosk, and the UK's fanless computer specialist Aleutia is now working on a new open source, low power computer system to squeeze into the table-topped repurposed oil drum that will become the Digital Drum.


The aim of the Digital Kiosk project was to develop a rugged, multi-use computer kiosk to address the educational needs of young people, to be installed in established youth centers, community resource hubs, business centers, teacher colleges and other education hubs throughout Uganda. Though some community facilities have access to AC power and the internet, many do not, so the system needed to be able to operate on solar power and include sufficient offline digital content to cater for the educational and locally relevant needs of users.


The design brief called for systems that were easy to use and able to withstand the rigors of frequent use. They also needed to be pretty easy to repair on the ground. The first generation Digital Youth Kiosk comprises three computer workstations with small wall-mounted screens and input peripherals on a shelf-like table running the length of the installation.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Welcome the Internet Archive to The Commons | IA Flickr Blog | Flickr.net

Welcome the Internet Archive to The Commons | IA Flickr Blog | Flickr.net | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Over the past couple of weeks, The Internet Archive has already been uploading content behind the scenes, and today we are very excited to officially launch them into The Commons.


The Internet Archive (IA) is best known for its historical library of the web, preserving more than 400 billion web pages dating back to 1996. Yet, its 19 petabytes include more than 600 million pages of digitized texts dating back more than 500 years.


What would it look like if those 600 million pages could be “read” completely differently? What if every illustration, drawing, chart, map, or photograph became an entry point, allowing one to navigate the world’s books not as paragraphs of text, but as a visual tapestry of our lives? How would we learn and explore knowledge differently? Those were the questions that launched a project to catalog the imagery of half a millennium of books.


The Internet Archive processed more than 2 million volumes from its digital archive, compiling more than 14 million high resolution images spanning nearly every topic imaginable. Each image includes detailed descriptions, including the subject tags of the book it came from and the text immediately surrounding it on the page. The latter is especially powerful, as it allows to keyword search 500 years of images, instantly accessing particular topics or themes.


Searching for love yields a myriad images of cherubs and courtship, while mortis (death) offers a glimpse into the early modern period’s fascination with the subject. A search for bird offers a vividly colorful showcase of the world’s bird species, while searching for telephone traces the invention’s history from its introduction as an electric novelty to its widespread adoption.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA: New Horizons passes Neptune orbit on way to Pluto encounter | GizMag.com

NASA: New Horizons passes Neptune orbit on way to Pluto encounter | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Like a traveler on a very long road trip, a deep space probe has passed the last sign post before its destination. NASA has announced that its New Horizons probe has passed the orbit of Neptune – its last milestone before it flies by Pluto on July 14 next year. Launched in 2006, the piano-sized unmanned spacecraft is almost 2.75 billion mi (4.42 billion km) from Earth and is the fastest man-made object ever sent into space.


NASA says that the the craft passed the Neptunian orbit at 10:04 pm EDT on Monday, occurring on the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2’s flyby of Neptune in 1989. But where Voyager came within 3,080 mi (4,950 km) of the gas giant, New Horizons was still 2.45 billion mi (3.96 billion km) away.


Despite New Horizon’s vast distance from the planet, its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) was still able to capture images of Neptune and its giant moon Triton. NASA says that Triton may be very similar to Pluto and that the information gathered by Voyager 2 a quarter of a century ago may be helpful in the coming encounter.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA to reformat Mars rover's memory from 125 million miles away | TheVerge.com

NASA to reformat Mars rover's memory from 125 million miles away | TheVerge.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA's long-running Mars rover Opportunity is going to have its memory reformatted in an attempt to resolve a series of recurring errors that have been interrupting its work for a day or two at a time with some frequency over the last month. The rover, which is now over 10 years old and well beyond its original mission lifetime, reset itself over a dozen times last month because of what NASA says is likely an issue with worn-out flash memory that it's attempting to store data in. Pieces of flash memory can wear out after repeated use, and it's possible that the rover is still attempting to use these worn-out parts of its memory.


"The flash reformatting is a low-risk process, as critical sequences and flight software are stored elsewhere in other non-volatile memory on the rover," John Callas, project manager for NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Project, says in a statement. By reformatting the memory, NASA says that it'll be able to identify and disable use of the bad flash memory cells, hopefully avoiding frequent resets like these for the foreseeable future. All "useful" data remaining on Opportunity will be downloaded before it's reformatted, and the rover will communicate with NASA at a slower data rate during the formatting process in order to improve reliability of the transmission.


This will be the first memory reformat for Opportunity, which is currently about 125 million miles from NASA's California-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

LA, CA: First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy opens at LACMA | ArtDaily.com

LA, CA: First major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy opens at LACMA | ArtDaily.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it
African Cosmos: Stellar Arts is the first major exhibition to explore the historical legacy of African cultural astronomy and its intersection with traditional and contemporary African arts. Documented since the kingdoms of ancient Egypt, for thousands of years Africans throughout the continent have contemplated the celestial firmament and conceived stories about the heavenly bodies. People of many cultures have used such observations to navigate their physical environments and to regulate agricultural and ritual calendars.

African Cosmos considers how the sun, moon, and stars, as well as ephemeral phenomena such as lightning and thunder, serve as sources of philosophical contemplation in the creation of arts from historical times to the present. Far from abstract concepts, African notions of the universe can be intensely personal, placing human beings in relationships with earth and sky. This is expressed in the exhibition through a culturally diverse selection of works including 40 objects in wood, stone, beadwork, silver, gold, and bronze, and ranging from ancient Egyptian sculptures to traditional Dogon masks of Mali, Yoruba divination instruments of Nigeria to evocative creations by contemporary South African artists who still look to the cosmos for inspiration today.

African Cosmos also includes a time-based work titled Deep Survey (2009), which represents a remarkable collaboration among one hundred scientists and South African artist Karel Nel. The work was made using scientific data, video animation, and sound to evoke moving into deep space.

The exhibition originated at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art and was curated by Dr. Christine Mullen Kreamer, the museum’s deputy director and chief curator. LACMA’s presentation of African Cosmos is organized by Dr. Mary (Polly) Nooter Roberts, consulting curator of African Art at LACMA and professor in UCLA’s Department of World Arts Cultures/Dance, in collaboration with Dr. Nancy Thomas, LACMA’s senior deputy director and longtime Egyptologist. In December 2011, Dr. Roberts was appointed to launch a program and establish a gallery dedicated to the arts of Africa at LACMA.

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Behold, A 3D Printed Sculpture Of Van Gogh's 'Sunflowers' | HuffPost.com

Behold, A 3D Printed Sculpture Of Van Gogh's 'Sunflowers' | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Believe it or not, patrons of the arts can spend as little as five seconds looking at a piece of contemporary artwork in a gallery or museum.


This short attention span, in part, inspired artists Rob and Nick Carter, to create a series of artworks that revisit historical game-changers -- classic works that historically have warranted more than a few seconds glance from onlookers. One such works is a three dimensional, sculptural interpretation of Vincent Van Gogh's "Sunflowers."


The London based married couple and artist team, with no relation to this Nick Carter, tapped into the burgeoning 3D printing trend to bring Van Gogh's beloved bouquet out of the frame and into the real world.


The team began by turning the paintings into completely three-dimensional files, then printing them in wax bronze. The process allowed for shocking levels of precision in the translation between brush stroke and sculptural shape.


Click headline to read more and view the Sunflower sculpture full screen and the Van Gogh pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Traditionally Male Jobs You Didn't Know Women Pioneered | Amanda Scherker | HuffPost.com

5 Traditionally Male Jobs You Didn't Know Women Pioneered | Amanda Scherker | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today, women make up nearly half of America's workforce, and counting. But even as women achieve new levels of success at work, some fields remain heavily male-dominated.


Many of these occupations are seen as stereotypically "masculine" work, yet some of the gentleman's club-type jobs we see today had early female influence.


These five occupations actually have long, often-forgotten histories of women helping to pioneer their early days:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A New Form Has Been Discovered in Sacred Geometry -- Meet The Chestahedron | Earth We Are One

A New Form Has Been Discovered in Sacred Geometry -- Meet The Chestahedron | Earth We Are One | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Apparently the heart doesn’t pump blood but is the vortex regulator of the blood as the blood flows  through the arteries and veins.  Frank Chester studied  Rudolf Steiner and discovered through his understanding of the  Platonic forms the geometry  of the heart.


The article below is titled  The Mysterious Heart and was published in a German Magazine,


The Discovery of the Chestahedron


A European journey in the 1990’s led Frank Chester, the San Francisco retired teacher, sculptor and geometer, to Dornach in Switzerland. Prior to this journey he had never heard anything about Rudolf Steiner or Anthroposophy. He was immediately impressed by Steiner’s two-dimensional, seven-sided planetary seals, and equally by his seven-sided capitals on top of the columns within the model of the first Goetheanum. While gazing upon these forms a question arose in him: Could a three-dimensional, seven-sided form exist that might also demonstrate the harmonic nature of a platonic solid?


Not being satisfied with existing seven-sided models, Frank Chester began to experiment: with clay, string, straws, wire, paper, soap bubbles, and all manner of forms. After many failures he discovered, in the year 2000, while artistically playing, an entirely new, never-before seen geometric figure that was simpler and more elegant than anything seen before. He called his discovery the “Chestahedron” (Chestaeder in German).


This solid has seven surfaces with exactly the same surface area. It consists of four equilateral triangles and three additional, four-sided surfaces which resemble kites. It shares the same property with the five regular platonic solids in that each of the seven surfaces has the same area. It is unique in that it contains two different shapes and two different side lengths while in the five platonic solids these are always the same. Interestingly, Chester could utilize two circles in the ratio of the golden section (Phi) to lawfully and reproducibly develop the surfaces of his form.


After he had discovered this new form, Frank Chester was not at all clear what its importance would be for the world. A quote from Rudolf Steiner guided him: ‘Geometry is knowledge that appears to be produced by human beings, yet whose meaning is totally independent of them.’ Chester continued to experiment for ten years more. Among the most important findings that he has discovered to date is the following:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1) | Larry Weber Blog | HuffPost.com

The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1) | Larry Weber Blog | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is the first article in The History of Email Series.


In 1978, a 14-year-old boy invented email.


He created a computer program, which he called "email," that replicated all the functions of the interoffice mail system: Inbox, Outbox, Folders, Memo, Attachments, Address Book, etc., the now familiar parts of every email system.


On August 30, 1982, the US government officially recognized V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai as the inventor of email by awarding him the first US Copyright for "Email," "Computer Program for Electronic Mail System," for his 1978 invention. This was awarded at a time when Copyright was the only way to protect software inventions.


Email, however, emerged from somewhat unlikely circumstances. Email wasn't created, with a massive research budget, in big institutions like the ARPANET, MIT or the military. Such institutions had thought it "impossible" to create such a system, believing it far too complex.


Email was created at Livingston High School in the heart of inner city Newark, NJ with little to no funding.


Shiva was given something that big institutions, however, may have found hard to provide: an ecosystem of loving parents, a wonderful mentor, dedicated teachers and a collegial environment where he was treated as an equal though his colleagues were 20 to 40 years older.


In that ecosystem, Shiva thrived, and the world got email!


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA's "swarmies" robots would team up to explore alien worlds | GizMag.com

NASA's "swarmies" robots would team up to explore alien worlds | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A collection of autonomous robots designed to scuttle around on distant planets looking for resources and materials in much the same way that members of insect colonies do on Earth are currently being tested by NASA engineers. The robots, dubbed "swarmies," are designed to individually survey an area, signal the others when they have found something of value, and then divide up the task of collecting the material and returning it back to base.


Currently, four of these robots have been built, each of which is fitted with a webcam, a Wi-Fi system to communicate with each other, and a GPS unit. Whilst the test terrain is a little less alien than they one day may encounter – the swarmies are being deployed in an empty car park at Kennedy Space Center in Florida – the tests are meant only to prove that the software is functioning as it should and that the robots are operating as expected.


In the tests the robots are searching for barcoded pieces of paper. However, in the future similar robots deployed on an asteroid, the moon or Mars could continuously scan the surface for water, fuel resources or other commodities vital to an away mission.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How the #FergusonSyllabus Can Help Teachers Talk About Race and Rights on the First Day of School | Yes! Magazine

How the #FergusonSyllabus Can Help Teachers Talk About Race and Rights on the First Day of School | Yes! Magazine | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With the first day of school just around the corner, teachers across the country are wondering how to incorporate discussions of the violent clashes between the Ferguson, Mo., police department and protesters in the weeks after the killing of unarmed 18-year old Michael Brown. How can teachers lead classroom discussions on such difficult and emotional topics as racism and police militarization? How do these types of conversations change based on students’ age or socio-economic background?


A growing number of teachers have connected on Twitter using #FergusonSyllabus, to share suggested readings, discussion topics, and classroom activities for students of any age.  Marcia Chatelain, a historian of African-American life and culture and assistant professor in the department of history at Georgetown University, started the hashtag to encourage teacher-facilitated discussions on the events in Ferguson.


Regardless of a student’s age, Chatelain hopes that the resources compiled through #FergusonSyllabus will give students the opportunity to ask questions about what happened in Missouri and make sense of what those events mean for the country on a larger scale.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Denmark: Bricks laid at BIG's new Lego House | GizMag.com

Denmark: Bricks laid at BIG's new Lego House | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In a curious case of architecture imitating toys which imitate architecture, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has begun construction on the Lego House. Located in Lego's hometown of Billund, Denmark, the building will resemble an oversized Lego structure and is expected to be completed in 2016.


The brick-laying ceremony included Lego matriarch Edith Kirk Kristiansen, who, along with other members of her family, laid ceremonial foundation stones which look like oversized Lego bricks.


Once it's completed, the Lego House will comprise a total floorspace of 12,000 sq m (129,166 sq ft), including a large covered square that measures 2,000 sq m (21,000 sq ft), and it will rise to 23 m (75 ft) high.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Moleskine Livescribe notebooks digitize your notes and drawings in real-time | GizMag.com

Moleskine Livescribe notebooks digitize your notes and drawings in real-time | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Drawing or making notes with a computer pen or stylus doesn't have the same feeling as using a paper and pen. Sometimes, however, you want to digitize something that you've drawn or written by hand. The new Moleskine Livescribe notebooks let you do both at the same time.


The notebooks have been created in partnership with smartpen manufacturer Livescribe, hence the name. They will work with any Livescribe smartpen, including its latest model the Livescribe 3, which Gizmag featured last year.


The Moleskine Livescribe uses normal paper with a special dotted pattern, which allows Livescribe smartpens to capture the location of what they write and draw. The pens link to an accompanying iOS app via Bluetooth and are able to duplicate anything that is written or drawn in real-time. This means that digital copies of notes or drawings can be created and saved with no extra time taken.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Adjunct Revolt: How Poor Professors Are Fighting Back | Elizabeth Segran | The Atlantic

The Adjunct Revolt: How Poor Professors Are Fighting Back | Elizabeth Segran | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Mary-Faith Cerasoli has been reduced to “sleeping in her car, showering at college athletic centers and applying for food stamps,” The New York Times recently reported. Is she unemployed? No, in fact, she is a college professor— but an adjunct one, meaning she is hired on a short-term contract with no possibility of tenure. 


A spate of research about the contingent academic workforce  indicates that Cerasoli’s circumstances are not exceptional. This month, a report by the American Association of University Professors showed that adjuncts now constitute 76.4 percent of U.S. faculty across all institutional types, from liberal-arts colleges to research universities to community colleges. A study released by the U.S. House of Representatives in January reveals that the majority of these adjuncts live below the poverty line.


Over spring break, Cerasoli publicly protested her working conditions on the steps of New York Department of Education wearing a vest emblazoned with the words “Homeless Prof” on it. Her efforts dovetail with a national labor movement in which thousands of adjuncts are fighting for change within the higher-education system. In the short-term, adjuncts are demanding a living wage, but they are also proposing long-term solutions to structural problems ailing universities. Many argue that the dependence on contingent labor is part of a larger pattern of corporatizing the university, which they believe is harming not just professors and students, but society more broadly.


 “While there are micro-tragedies in the lives of individual adjuncts, there is also a macro, systemic problem unfolding,” said Adrianna Kezar, co-founder of the Delphi Project which examines how the changing faculty affects student success. Her data consistently shows that students who take more classes with adjuncts are more likely to drop out.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Spheree takes a globular approach to displaying 3D models | GizMag.com

Spheree takes a globular approach to displaying 3D models | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Although viewing a 3D digital model of an item allows you get a sense of the "real" object, it certainly doesn’t help if you’re looking at that three-dimensional model on a flat screen. That’s why Spheree was created. The result of a collaboration between a group of Brazilian and Canadian universities, it’s a spherical display that users can walk around, viewing a model from various angles as if the object were physically in front of them.


Although it might at first appear to incorporate holograms, Spheree actually utilizes multiple mini-projectors located at the base of its translucent sphere. As the user moves around the display, infrared cameras track their position. The appropriate view of the model is then projected onto the appropriate area of the inside of the sphere, continually changing to adapt to the user’s shifting perspective.


An algorithm is used to keep the pico projectors calibrated with one another, so that their composite image of the object has a uniform pixel density throughout, and doesn’t contain any gaps or seams. Additionally, the algorithm allows for more projectors to be added, if a larger sphere is being used.


Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Formlabs Form 1+ review: a workhorse for 3D printer users who care about quality | Signe Brewster | GigaOM Tech News

Formlabs Form 1+ review: a workhorse for 3D printer users who care about quality | Signe Brewster | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As 3D printers morph from workshop machines to desktop tools, many are taking on forms that mimic the sleek laptops and other devices that already have a home on the average desk. The Form 1+, which was released in June by Cambridge startup Formlabs, is one of the most beautiful printers ever built. It’s also one of the most functional and reliable, and over three weeks of testing I found it to be a great choice for an advanced consumer 3D printer.


The $3,299 Form 1+ is the successor to Formlabs’ first printer, the Form 1, and actually doesn’t look very different. But it is designed to print up to 50 percent faster than the Form 1 with a laser that is four times more powerful.


What’s a laser doing in a 3D printer? Well, the Form 1+ isn’t the same type of printer as a MakerBot or most other desktop machines, which rely on a technology known as fused deposition modeling (FDM). It’s a stereolithographic (SLA) 3D printer; that means instead of melting plastic and then allowing it to harden, it uses a liquid plastic resin as its “ink.” The laser cures the resin a layer at a time, slowly building a 3D object. Items actually print upside down while the build platform slowly raises out of the resin.


Even with user-friendly models, operating a 3D printer is about managing expectations. Not every shape works. It takes a lot of waiting. It’s also about understanding your own role in the printing process. Neglect regular maintenance and your print jobs will fail.


Click headline to read more, view video clip and watch the pix slide show--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What is the blue light from our screens really doing to our eyes? | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News

What is the blue light from our screens really doing to our eyes? | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An eye doctor says he’s recently seen a few 35-year-old patients whose lenses, which are typically clear all the way up until around age 40, are so cloudy they resemble 75-year-olds’. A sleep doctor says kids as young as toddlers are suffering from chronic insomnia, which in turn affects their behavior and performance at school and daycare. A scientist finds that women who work night shifts are twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those who sleep at night.


What do all these anecdotes have in common? Nighttime exposure to the blue light emanating from our screens.


You’ve probably heard the hype these past few years: being in the presence of light at night disrupts the body’s natural circadian rhythms by suppressing the production of melatonin, a sleep hormone. But melatonin does far more than help us get sleepy – it’s also an antioxidant that appears to play a pivotal role in slowing the progression of cancer and other diseases.


“I’ve been spending a lot of the past 20 years worrying about it,” said Dr. Richard Hansler, who clocked in 42 years at GE Lighting developing “all kinds of bright, beautiful lights” before his move to John Carroll University in Ohio, where he studied the effects of light at night on our health. It was the mid 1990s, and at that point, he said, his concern wasn’t widely shared.


“I discovered that using light at night is bad for people’s health and interferes with their sleep. I felt a moral obligation to do something about it, particularly when I learned it’s the blue component in ordinary white light that is suppressing the production of melatonin. And melatonin not only helps you sleep but is a marvelous material that has a very big influence on health in general; specifically, if you don’t have enough you may develop diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and even a couple kinds of cancer.”


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The five major world religions written and narrated by John Bellaimey | YouTube.com

Published on Nov 14, 2013


View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-five-ma...

It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam.

Lesson by John Bellaimey, animation by TED-Ed.


Click headline to watch YouTube video full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Lafayette, LA: The Cooper investigation must run its course | The Advertiser

Lafayette, LA: The Cooper investigation must run its course | The Advertiser | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The much-anticipated independent third-party investigator’s report regarding Superintendent Pat Cooper was presented last week, and despite comments to the contrary, it does not paint a flattering picture.


Several of the findings are extremely serious in nature and if proven, rise to the level of personal liability or even criminal violations. It is not a proud day in the history of Lafayette Parish education.


With the seriousness of the charges, the only option is for the School Board to proceed with the due process afforded the superintendent. If the charges are proven true, the Board must decide what action to take. That could be anything ranging from a reprimand to termination. If all of the charges are proven false, Cooper clears his name.


In his defense Cooper is asserting that his actions were warranted in order to move the district forward academically and the investigation was motivated by a board who wanted to control personnel and other issues. Quite frankly, the board-control issue is a worn-out straw dog and is nothing more than a toothless hound.


Contrary to the rhetoric, academic statistics from the Louisiana Department of Education show that Lafayette has gone backward in all major categories under Cooper’s leadership, not forward. Four of the five high schools have a lower graduation rate than the state. Prior to his tenure, we had four of the five high schools with a graduation rate higher than the state.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.