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Technology Integration Research Review | Edutopia.com

Technology Integration Research Review | Edutopia.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Technology integration can be one of the most challenging topics to find quality research on. The term itself is a broad umbrella for numerous practices that may have little in common with each other. In addition, technology tools change rapidly, and outcomes can vary depending on implementation.

 

Edutopia's tech integration review explores some of the vast body of research out there and helps you navigate useful results. In this series of five articles, learn about three key elements of successful technology integration, discover some of the possible learning outcomes, get our recommendations on specific practices and programs by academic subject and promising tools for additional topics, find tips for avoiding pitfalls when adopting new technologies, and dig into a comprehensive annotated bibliography with links to all the studies and reports cited in these pages.

 

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M Donald's comment, March 21, 2013 5:32 PM
Your right, a very interesting article I must say. The technology integration is important and does provide students to use their initiative while learning however there are both negative and positive sides on an individuals learning
Richard Ott's comment, March 21, 2013 6:09 PM
I think this is an interesting article to include in IMC. Although not specifically a Brand or Marketing specific article it does provide an insight to the types of consumers marketers will be needing to engage in the future and therefore having an understanding of the styles of learning and development will definately aid marketers. As children are learning more about technology, and as the technology itself evolves marketers will need to continually work to upskill and stay in touch with new trends and adapt to the dynamic market which will be driven more by technology and social media. In Marketing Strategy we have just studied an article by Peter Senge on the "learning organisation" which discusses all kinds of changes in business structures and innovative and creative leadership. Business is already recognising the need for change and deeper understanding, so i think it is vital to try and discover what the next generation is learning aswell.
Matheno Landers's curator insight, July 11, 2013 1:14 AM

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Digital Citizenship: Developing a Culture of Trust and Transparency | Andrew Marcinek Blog | Edutopia.org

Digital Citizenship: Developing a Culture of Trust and Transparency | Andrew Marcinek Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An acceptable use policy is a document that is present in every school district around the country. The purpose of this policy is to provide safe parameters for exploring digital resources and using school-issued devices properly. It also ensures that schools do their very best to block out the darkest corners of the web. And while these policies are effective and required, they have not evolved in their semantics.

Within the development of these school-wide policies, several shifts need to happen. My observation about the need for a semantic shift, probably one of the biggest shifts requited, reflects how acceptable use policies are interpreted by students. Essentially, these policies read more like a legal document rather than a document that students can understand and carry out. Additionally, we need to shift the focus from "you shouldn't do that" to a sense of empowerment around technology. In short, schools should place a positive connotation around technology use.

Some districts have started implementing responsible digital use guidelines or empowered digital use policies. Regardless of the title you choose, it should provide a sense of purpose for using technology beyond the idea that "said devices may get me in trouble." Similarly, this policy should be something that all students can understand and interpret. It should be simple and direct without creating an air of fear when signing on the dotted line.

Here is an example that I've used to begin simplifying my district's Empowered Digital Use Policy:


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Five Science ‘Facts’ We Learnt At School That Are Plain Wrong | Mark Lorch | IFLScience.com

Five Science ‘Facts’ We Learnt At School That Are Plain Wrong | Mark Lorch | IFLScience.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Let’s start with a quiz…


  • How many senses do you have?


  • Which of the following are magnetic: a tomato, you, paperclips?


  • What are the primary colours of pigments and paints?


  • What region of the tongue is responsible for sensing bitter tastes?


  • What are the states of matter?


If you answered five; paperclips; red, yellow and blue; the back of the tongue; and gas, liquid and solid, then you would have got full marks in any school exam. But you would have been wrong.


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Facebook has totally reinvented human identity: Why it’s even worse than you think | Susan Cox | Salon.com

Facebook has totally reinvented human identity: Why it’s even worse than you think | Susan Cox | Salon.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Let’s face it: Feminism is hot right now. Like, actually fashionable. Chalk it up to a boom in online journalism critiquing tired media tropes and holding politicians accountable with acerbic wit. But there’s one related trend that doesn’t seem to be getting fashionable again: “Cyberfeminism.” Remember that?

Cyberfeminism envisioned the Internet as a new frontier beyond the oppressive bodily boundaries of race and gender where new understandings of identity could take root. Cyberspace was going to be the stage of cultural transformation! We were all going to be super-cool cybernetic avatars, existing in multiple dimensions with boundless potential. Sadly, all we ended up getting was a bunch of porn and misogynistic cybermobs. (Perhaps feminism has emerged with renewed relevance, because the Internet has actually worked to regressively reinvigorate damaging conceptions of gender and promote hateful divisions.)

But then again, it’s undeniable that the Internet really has been nothing short of culturally transformative. Communication technologies have become woven into the very fabric of personhood. With companies increasingly making employees sign “social media contracts” holding them professionally accountable for their online presence, digital identities are gaining recognition for their representative authority.

Our Facebook profile pictures have symbolic weight, strengthened through the repetitive labor of association. Have you ever changed your Facebook profile picture and not really liked it — but then, after a while, decided it was awesome? Like our face in the mirror after a weird new haircut, we need time to readjust our self-image through repeated association.

It may not be as cool as we imagined it in sleek ’90s sci-fi, but we really are creatures existing in multiple dimensions, transcending space and time with our cybernetic reach. And who controls where your body ends and begins as this unholy fusion of man and machine? Those technologies through which you interface, of course, offering you the shape of your digital self, such as the Facebook profile. Sometimes the reduction of your person to Facebook’s arbitrary determinations can be uncomfortable and insulting.


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Eleven civil rights groups urge Obama to drop test-based K-12 ‘accountability’ system | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

Eleven civil rights groups urge Obama to drop test-based K-12 ‘accountability’ system | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Eleven national civil rights groups sent a letter Tuesday to President Obama, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and congressional leaders saying that the current standardized test-based “accountability system” for K-12 education ignores “critical supports and services” children need to succeed and discourages “schools from providing a rich curriculum for all students focused on the 21st century skills they need to acquire.” The groups make recommendations on how to revamp the system in a way that would improve educational opportunity and equity for students of color.

The letter comes a time of growing resistance to accountability systems based on standardized test scores among educators, parents, principals and superintendents. The Obama administration has expressed some support for the idea that districts and states should review their testing systems but has not said it would change federal mandates that help drive what districts and states do.

The groups signing the letter, which includes a list of recommendations on how to create a new accountability system, are: Advancement Project, Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, National Opportunity to Learn (OTL) Campaign, National Urban League (NUL), NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), National Council on Educating Black Children (NCEBC), National Indian Education Association (NIEA) and Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC).

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ESA postpones experimental spaceplane launch | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

ESA postpones experimental spaceplane launch | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

ESA has delayed the launch of its Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV), originally planned for Nov. 18. The decision to delay the launch was made to allow the agency time to gather further information on the unusual trajectory into which the Vega rocket will be launched.

Once underway, the test flight will see the IXV concept spaceplane catapulted into an eastward-heading sub-orbital course, representing a significant departure from the norm for the Vega launch vehicle. Until now, the rocket has only inserted spacecraft into a polar orbit, therefore ESA is keen to gain a better understanding of vehicle performance should any issues occur at launch.

The test flight will look to test a number of the IXV's systems, with the primary goal of putting the spaceplane's heat shield through its paces. The shield itself is comprised of a combination of ceramic plates and ablative materials similar to those being used in the construction of NASA's next generation Orion spacecraft.


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Alliance for Education Emphasizes the Need for Next-Generation Network Internet Speeds In Schools | Austin Allen | BroadbandBreakfast.com

An Alliance for Excellent Education webinar on Tuesday highlighted the integral role that high-speed internet access in schools plays in the success for both the institutions and their students. As highlighted in the Pew Research Center’s recent report, next generation high-speed networks will help to bring about the next generation of teaching and learning in schools across the country.

The Alliance for Excellent Education is a Washington -based national policy and advocacy organization focused on promoting the development and implementation of federal and national policies for effective high school reforms. The group aims to help graduate students who can succeed in college, work and public life. The organization specifically “focuses on America’s six million most at-risk secondary school students…who are most likely to leave school without a diploma or to graduate unprepared for a productive future,” as stated on their website.


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30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class | Todd Finley | Edutopia.org

30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class | Todd Finley | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One day, in front 36 riotous sophomores, I clutched my chest and dropped to my knees like Sergeant Elias at the end of Platoon.


Instantly, dead silence and open mouths replaced classroom Armageddon.


Standing up like nothing had happened, I said, "Thanks for your attention -- let's talk about love poems."

I never used that stunt again. After all, should a real emergency occur, it would be better if students call 911 rather than post my motionless body on YouTube. I've thought this through.

Most teachers use silencing methods, such as flicking the lights, ringing a call bell (see Teacher Tipster's charming video on the subject), raising two fingers, saying "Attention, class," or using Harry Wong's Give Me 5 -- a command for students to:

  1. Focus their eyes on the speaker
  2. Be quiet
  3. Be still
  4. Empty their hands
  5. Listen.


There is also the "three fingers" version, which stands for stop, look, and listen. Fortunately, none of these involve medical hoaxes.

Lesser known techniques are described below and categorized by grade bands:


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Will Education Ever Keep Up with Technology? | Mike Stucka | GovTech.com

Will Education Ever Keep Up with Technology? | Mike Stucka | GovTech.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The pace of technological changes are undermining traditional schooling and are costing billions of dollars to deal with, say panelists at Tuesday’s day-long Middle Georgia Digital Economy Summit.

People are both driving the changes and needing more help because of the changes, panelists at the summit told a crowd of about 230 people.


Mike Hall, director of information technology for the Bibb County school system, had an easy answer for how teachers can stay on top of technology.


“They’ll never catch up,” he said, suggesting veteran teachers can become facilitators of knowledge to help students find the information they need.


It won’t get easier once they’ve graduated, said Rebecca Lee, Central Georgia Technical College’s vice president for economic development.


“The need to skill, retool and reskill the workforce will never end,” she said.


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A Hacking Contest to Promote Digital Literacy | Lynette Owens | Internet Safety for Kids & Families

A Hacking Contest to Promote Digital Literacy | Lynette Owens | Internet Safety for Kids & Families | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This year, we are proud to sponsor a great competition designed to promote online safety and digital literacy among our nation’s youth.

Carnegie Mellon University’s annual “capture the flag” contest called picoCTF2014 is a computer security game with a story line, where students are challenged to solve a mystery and find someone who is missing using a limited amount of time and very few clues.

This is a great way for middle and high school students in the U.S., with any level of computer programming knowledge, to work in teams and get first-hand experience in reverse engineering, decrypting, and hacking in a legal environment and gain an appreciation for computer security as a potential future career path. For us, it’s another chance to encourage a positive use of the Internet while supporting our mission of promoting online safety and digital literacy as early and as often as possible among youth.

Oh, and there’s the chances of winning some nice cash prizes – the top 10 teams can win up to $6,000 for their team and an additional $4,000 for their school.

The contest opens today and runs through November 7, 2014, so please encourage your students, kids, and local schools to participate!

Read more about the contest at these links:


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Here is the news: children love language, writing and wordplay | Elli Narewska | The Guardian

Here is the news: children love language, writing and wordplay | Elli Narewska | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“Ours is bangin’!” The words of a 17-year-old student at the Guardian Education Centre, describing the front page he and his friend had just completed, said with a big grin on his face and a congratulatory pat on the shoulder for his colleague. Every day we run sessions on news media for classes of schoolchildren from year 5 to the sixth form. The most popular is a workshop using the day’s breaking news stories to make their own front page. They spend four hours researching, writing and subediting. And they love it.

The overriding message in many reports on young people’s literacy skills in Britain is that standards are falling. There are warnings that school leavers are not equipped with the skills they need for the world of work; that students are illiterate, evidenced by the UK falling behind other developed nations in literacy scores in Pisa tests; that somehow children’s reading and writing skills are not good enough before they have even started school. But that is not what I encounter in the Education Centre. I see children who are itching to start writing and are completely absorbed by language for a whole day, whose delight in achieving a clever piece of wordplay can have them fidgeting in their seats, desperate to share their wit.

The most common comment I hear from teachers is “I’ve never seen them work so hard,” as their students buzz around them, motivated by a tight copy deadline and the promise of seeing their front page printed at the end of the day. Getting a story researched and written within the time available is an achievement that both students and teachers are equally proud of.

Headline writing gets classes really excited. There are small triumphs every day, condensing a complex story into a four-word phrase or finding a verb that provides both power and clarity. But the times they are most proud, when they beckon me over to show off their cleverness, are when they have come up with a brilliant pun.


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Parents saying no to too much homework | Jay Matthews | WashPost.com

Parents saying no to too much homework | Jay Matthews | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Prince George’s County reader who identifies herself on my Web page as JenPam2003 did not like my suggestion that parents enforce a reasonable amount of time for their children’s homework. I said their kids should do something else when that time expired, even if the assignments are not finished.


Her daughter, a junior in the demanding science and technology program at Eleanor Roosevelt High School, has between three hours and four hours of homework each night. “If a student leaves work undone, she is left unprepared for the next day,” she said. “Further, she is penalized by the teacher and her grade takes a hit.”


The kind of passive resistance I was proposing, inspired by a new book “The Learning Habit,” would be messy in high school, as JenPam2003 correctly pointed out. But what about younger grades? The book’s authors, Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman, Rebecca Jackson and Robert M. Pressman, say 10 minutes of homework a day based on grade level — 20 minutes in second grade and 80 minutes in eighth grade — would work.

The little-known truth at the heart of their suggestion is this: We know from decades of research that the amount of homework our children do in elementary school has no effect on how much they learn. Competent teachers can get their messages across during class. Homework in that age group does little more than make parents feel better about the school.


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Apple details how its $100 million pledge to Obama's ConnectED will help schools | Chris Welsh | The Verge

Apple details how its $100 million pledge to Obama's ConnectED will help schools | Chris Welsh | The Verge | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, Apple pledged $100 million to President Obama's ConnectED program, an initiative that aims to bring reliable, high-speed broadband to 99 percent of schools across the United States. And today the company published a new website that gives the full details on where that money is headed. Apple's grants will be distributed to 114 schools located in 29 states.

Every student at participating schools will receive an iPad, with teachers and administrators also given Macs and Apple TV set-top boxes for classroom use. "A lack of equal access to technology and knowledge puts entire communities and populations of students at a disadvantage, especially minorities," reads the new site outlining Apple's contribution. "We want to do our part to change this." Apple says its pledge, which the White House described in February as "an unprecedented commitment for the company," as an "important first step" in advancing the cause of modern technology in every classroom. During a speech at the Alabama state capitol today, CEO Tim Cook touched on the subject. "Education is a fundamental human right for everyone," Cook said.


And with that first step, Apple is focusing on schools that are struggling to provide students and communities with the technology that others might take for granted. At the locations Apple has picked, at least 96 percent of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches. The company also notes that 92 percent of students at partner schools are of Hispanic, Black, Native American, Alaskan Native, or Asian heritage. "Despite their economic challenges, these schools share a vision of what their students’ lives would be like with Apple technology," Apple says. Here's how Apple's grants map out across the country; a full list of schools is also available.


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Augmenting the Future: From Reality to Space & Sound | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Augmenting the Future: From Reality to Space & Sound | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Derived from a popular Chinese folktale Butterfly Lovers, the painted figures in this augmented reality (AR) project wear traditional costumes in Times Square (New York). The site-specific AR work addresses issues of Chinese diaspora and cultural identity, and visualizes the restless, roaming cultural spirit of the East hidden in western metropolis.


Since co-creating an Augmented Reality mural in Albuquerque, NM in 2012, I’ve thought a lot about augmented reality and augmented space. Augmented Reality (AR) is a live direct or indirect view of a physical environment whose elements are augmented (layers or supplemented) by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, or GPS data.. Augmented space, according to Lev Manovich, is the physical space overlaid with dynamically changing information, multimedia in form and localized for each user.


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Teacher’s resignation letter: ‘My profession … no longer exists’ | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

Teacher’s resignation letter: ‘My profession … no longer exists’ | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Increasingly teachers are speaking out against school reforms that they believe are demeaning their profession, and some are simply quitting because they have had enough.

Here is one resignation letter from a veteran teacher, Gerald J. Conti, a social studies teacher at Westhill High School in Syracuse, N.Y.:


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Zombie-Based Learning -- "Braaaaaaains!" | Andrew Miller Blog | Edutopia.org

Zombie-Based Learning -- "Braaaaaaains!" | Andrew Miller Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You read that correctly: Zombie-Based Learning. When I started learning about it, my inner geek squealed with joy. I've always loved zombies. I've watched all the movies and even read the original Walking Dead Comics before it became a hit series in the classroom.

Geography has always been a learning target for social studies teachers, and David Hunter, who teaches at Bellevue, Washington's Big Picture School, decided to create a curriculum using Kickstarter as its funding source.


He sought to make geography relevant through engaging scenarios and stories with a zombie theme tying it all together. The whole curriculum is standards-based and includes over 70 lessons where students must "consider how to duck the undead invasion, secure their supplies and, eventually, rebuild society" through a variety of activities, worksheets and discussions.

Mr. Hunter's story was featured on an NPR affiliate if you would like to read more. In addition, he has made available one of the comics he created which serve as the textbook for the curriculum. Mr. Hunter created this work in order to engage students, and I believe we can use the topic of zombies to explore further curriculum areas.


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What Science Lost in the Antares Rocket Explosion | Marcus Woo | WIRED.com

What Science Lost in the Antares Rocket Explosion | Marcus Woo | WIRED.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last night, an unmanned Antares rocket carrying more than 5,000 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station exploded in a huge fireball seconds after liftoff. No one was hurt, but in addition to damage to the launch pad, NASA lost tons of supplies, including equipment and food for astronauts.

Science also took a big hit in the explosion.

Almost a third of the payload (by weight) consisted of science experiments that ranged from a student project studying how pea shoots would grow in zero gravity to a high-tech camera that would have been the first to monitor meteors from space.

All of the cargo was packed into the Cygnus spacecraft, which was set to launch from NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Both Cygnus and Antares were developed and operated by the Orbital Sciences Corporation; the resupply mission would’ve been the company’s third to reach the ISS.

“We do want to express our disappointment that we weren’t able to fulfill our obligation to the International Space Station program and deliver this load of cargo,” said Frank Culbertson, the general manager of Orbital Sciences’ Advanced Programs Group. “Especially to the researchers who had science onboard and the people that were counting on the various hardware and components that were going to the station.”

“There was no cargo that’s absolutely critical to us that was lost on this flight,” added NASA administrator Bill Gerstenmaier.


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How Political Donors Are Changing Statehouse News Reporting | Daniel Vock | Governing.com

How Political Donors Are Changing Statehouse News Reporting | Daniel Vock | Governing.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The talk radio segment started with the opening guitar riffs of Guns N’ Roses’ “Paradise City.” Then, over the first drumbeats of the 1987 rock anthem, came the deep, resonant voice of a male announcer, “Holding government accountable for how they spend our money, it’s Illinois Watchdog Radio: Watching the statehouse and cities across the state.”

Finally, host Benjamin Yount took the microphone. He playfully mimicked the driving sounds of the Guns N’ Roses guitar for a few seconds before launching in with his name, a Twitter handle and a number to text. Then, with a cadence common on conservative talk shows -- rapid succession of escalating questions, dramatic pauses and a tone of incredulity -- he got down to business.

The business for this particular mid-September segment, which was broadcast by several downstate Illinois stations, was a discussion of who deserved to be treated as legitimate media. The conversation celebrated a legal victory for a conservative Illinois blog, but Yount quickly turned to questioning long-held assumptions about journalism itself.

Yount, who has been an Illinois statehouse reporter for eight years, mentioned the many press passes hanging on his studio wall, 35 miles from the state Capitol in Springfield. He wondered why citizen journalists, including those who are advocates of one cause or another, should be treated differently than traditional journalists who see themselves as objective. “What is it going to take to legally erase that line? Should there be a line?” he asked, his indignation rising. “Should legally we recognize the difference between someone who is media and someone who is just an angry mom, an angry grandparent, the average taxpayer?”

For seasoned reporters, the idea that anyone off the street can do what they do is tough to take. But Yount is far from alone in pushing the idea that we need to re-examine who is qualified to cover state government. In fact, blurring the lines around what is considered legitimate media is a major emphasis of his employer and institutions like it.

The group he works for, the Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity, is deploying reporters to cover state and local governments around the country. Its ultimate ambition is to have bureaus in every state. But they aren’t news bureaus in the way many traditional journalists understand them. They are being paid to cover government from an unabashedly ideological perspective.

The Franklin Center has been one of the top recipients of money from groups tied to the conservative billionaire Koch brothers. It grew from zero outlets to 30 in its first year in 2009. By its second year, it claimed outposts in 41 states.


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The Charge of the Troll Brigade: What to know about #GamerGate | Matt Weinberger | NetworkWorld.com

The Charge of the Troll Brigade: What to know about #GamerGate | Matt Weinberger | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There are two ways to think about #GamerGate.

The short version is that it's a loosely-organized mob of so-called "gamers" rallied around a Twitter hashtag focused on the harassment of women -- primarily, but not only, female game developers -- under the pretense of pushing for higher standards in video game journalism.

The longer story is that the #GamerGate hashtag has all but taken over a large and growing corner of the web, starting back in August, when a jilted ex-boyfriend wrote a long (seriously, it's basically a novel) blog entry accusing his former girlfriend, independent game developer Zoe Quinn, of cheating on him with a video game journalist (in the spirit of disclosure, that journalist is a friend of mine) in return for positive reviews of her games. Never mind that the journalist in question had never actually reviewed one of her games -- the witchhunt was on.

From there, things started happening fast. Quinn was at the receiving end of a cavalcade of Internet hatred from "gamers" who claimed to be worried about the sanctity of their hobby, but in practice seemed to be more worried about a woman who dared to invade their hobby. The movement got a name when extremely conservative actor Adam Baldwin, best known for playing Jayne on the short-lived cult sci-fi TV show Firefly, got involved on Twitter in support of the burgeoning movement with the hashtag #GamerGate. The hashtag stuck, if for no other reason than that people love a "-gate" suffix for anything remotely resembling a scandal.

Death and rape threats became the norm on Twitter and via email for Quinn, ultimately forcing her to move out of her home for her safety after self-described "gators" leaked her address and phone numbers, a tactic commonly referred to as "doxxing."

And it hasn't been just limited to Quinn: Critic Anita Sarkeesian, host and producer of a series of popular YouTube series called Feminist Frequency that called out antifeminist tropes in video games, was also chased out of her home by death threats. More recently, a lecture Sarkeesian was supposed to give on a college campus in Utah was cancelled when threats of a mass shooting from persons identified with the #GamerGate cause spurred her towards cancellation. Developer Brianna Wu was -- guess what -- also scared into leaving her home after expressing support for the victims of this hate movement.


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Pedagogy in Game-Based Learning – Tips to align ID strategies in Learning Games | G-Cube Blog

Pedagogy in Game-Based Learning – Tips to align ID strategies in Learning Games | G-Cube Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The popularity of games in learning is contributing to the immense growth of the gaming industry. Learning games are fast gaining popularity – in educational as well as corporate circles. Many popular video games are being re-furbished for educational purpose and many original games are also being designed to facilitate training. But there is often a disconnect between the advances in video game technology and the research on its design and effectiveness. While technology is advancing at an extremely fast pace, not many developers fully understand the ways to apply instructional design while designing games and thereby optimize the immense capabilities of game-based learning.

There are 3 main components of interactive entertainment: Story, Game and Play.

The Story is built with Characters, Setting and Events. It puts the player’s point of view within the game – making a connection between the player and the game. The story is the reason WHY the player plays the game.

The Game is created with a clear Goal and a set of Rules. When explained well, these make sure that the learner is charged up and determined to perform well during the course of the game. The game also has a set of tools that enable the learner to perform during the game. These tools include devices like instruments, special effects and so on.

Play is the immersive component where the player experiences the game, exploring the cause, effect and consequences that it presents.

While most game developers are experts in creating the above components, instructional strategies also have to be applied while creating the different levels and components of a learning game. Here is how we adapted the 5E instructional model to create a learning game for the sales function of a leading FMCG company:


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Internet2 slices network | Jim Duffy | NetworkWorld.com

Internet2 slices network | Jim Duffy | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Internet2 this week said it can now demonstrate a nationwide virtualized multitenant network that operates as multiple discrete, private networks.

Virtualization allows Internet2 to be partitioned into isolated “slices” that can accomodate multiple users and their applications, as if they had their own private network. This advancement is enabled by Internet2’s use of 100G speeds and software-defined networking, the organization says.

New software, called “FlowSpace Firewall,” has been installed in the Internet2 production network allowing slices of OpenFlow capabilities to be partitioned across nearly forty 100G-attached access nodes throughout the country. This software protects each network slice from overconsumption of resources by other slices, Internet2 says.

FlowSpace Firewall is now available to support the work of the research and education community’s data-intensive science and academic operations, the organization says. Several research collaborations have announced their intentions to build large-scale production cloud computing, next-generation IP and peering fabrics in virtual slices of the Internet2 network, Internet2 says.


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Mobile Games Need Their Artists | Tadhg Kelly | TechCrunch.com

Mobile Games Need Their Artists | Tadhg Kelly | TechCrunch.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Across 2013 and into 2014 the stories around games went in many directions, to Steam and Steam Machines, to consoles, to VR and microconsoles. It could be said that a considerable degree of the anima behind those stories was driven by hunts for the next big break in video game platforms. Where, people asked, would another Facebook or iPhone style explosion come from? Where would lean product and plentiful players be found anew?

Steam got full quickly, microconsoles struggled to find an audience and console feels like a repeat performance of its previous generations to the same crowd as always. My posited ultra-handheld device category is still in the mysterious future and tablet sales have slowed. There are certainly interesting developments – smart watches, virtual and augmented realities and whatnot – but none seems to have the scope to really hit like mobile did. We may be seeing the audience just settling in with what they have.


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Media arts should be at the core of the Australian curriculum | Ben Goldsmith | The Conversation

Media arts should be at the core of the Australian curriculum | Ben Goldsmith | The Conversation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Final Report of the Review of the Australian Curriculum is seriously flawed. Many aspects of the report have attracted comment – but the recommendation that schools do away with a major, world-leading innovation has not.

For the first time, media arts, one of the five strands of the Arts curriculum, was to become a compulsory subject for primary school students. This will no longer be the case if the Review’s recommendations are adopted by the government.

The Review recommends removing media arts from the mandatory arts strands, and “substantially reducing” its content. Rather than being an integrated part of the arts curriculum, media arts would become a “stand alone” subject.

Further implicit in the Review is the assumption that some media arts content will be, or already is being, covered in other learning areas “such as English, health and physical education, history and technologies”.

This is not only wrongheaded: it is ignorant of the essential role that media arts plays in digital media literacy education.


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Colorado: Student Scores Collapse on "Harder" Tests in Science, Social Studies | Diane Ravitch | DianeRavitch.net

Colorado released scores on its new tests in science and social studies, and the proportion of students labeled “college-reeady ” was disastrous. That is, if you expect most students to graduate from high school and perhaps go to college.

Either the curriculum has been narrowed so much that students aren’t learning much science or math, or the tests were so hard that few students could pass it.

Officials said, as they always did, that they expected low scores. Any teacher whose class got such low scores would be rated “ineffective.”

Colorado has been in the firm grip of the corporate reform movement for a decade. Look at the results. Sad for the kids.

Colorado students scored dismally in new science and social studies test results released Monday, a sobering development as the state enters a new era of standards and tests meant to be more demanding.

Just 17 percent of Colorado fourth- and seventh-graders scored “strong” or “distinguished” in the state’s first social studies tests. That means those students are on track to be ready for college and career.

In science, 34 percent of fifth-graders and 32 percent of eighth-graders hit those marks in assessments given last spring.

The results are a test run for advocates of tougher standards and tests. Those supporters will face a similar situation — and possible backlash — after a larger round of tests this spring based on the politically divisive Common Core standards in math and language arts.

In portraying the social studies and science results, state officials were careful to emphasize two points — that the standards and tests are unique to Colorado, and low scores were anticipated.

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NASA releases more information on Antares explosion | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA releases more information on Antares explosion | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

At a press conference arranged only a few hours after the event, NASA released details of the explosion of the Antares rocket carrying the unmanned Cygnus supply ship to the International Space Station (ISS). The space agency said that the launch pad at Wallops Island, Virginia, where the 240,000-kg (530,000-lb) rocket went up in flames seconds after lift off has been cordoned off by firefighters until daylight because of the on-going hazards from fires, and scattered solid and hypergolic fuel from the Antares.

NASA says that Orbital Sciences Corporation (the builders and operators of the Cygnus and Antares), the US FAA, and NASA are investigating what happened to the Antares rocket when it was destroyed at 6:22 pm EDT. It suffered a “catastrophic anomaly” 10 to 12 seconds after launch, after which the range safety officer activated the rocket’s autodestruct. No injuries were reported and all personnel have been accounted for, with damage confined to the south end of Wallops Island, though there was some debris was scattered over the water.

At the press conference, NASA and Orbital Science representatives said that the explosion resulted in the loss of the US$200 million spacecraft, plus damage to the ground facilities. Pad damage was sustained, but instrument readings indicate that some systems are still holding pressure, so are not seriously damaged. However, the exact extent of the accident is still unknown. In addition, the spacecraft processing facilities seem undamaged.


The destruction of the Cygnus freighter means the loss of 5,000 lb (2,200 lb) of cargo originally destined for the ISS. Because of this, the manifest for later missions will have to be swapped around to make up for the destruction of the cargo ship. However, NASA says that the station is in no danger because there was no critical cargo aboard and that the ISS can remain functioning without resupply for four to six months. In addition, a Progress supply ship launches on Wednesday and a SpaceX Dragon is scheduled to launch on December 9.


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Dr. Jonas Salk on Using Our Intelligence to Think Like Nature | Theresa Riley | BillMoyers.com

Dr. Jonas Salk on Using Our Intelligence to Think Like Nature | Theresa Riley | BillMoyers.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Had he lived, Dr. Jonas Salk would have turned 100 today. Salk was a young man when in the spring of 1955 he announced his discovery of a vaccine that could prevent polio. He was hailed as a modern miracle worker. He went on to lead scientists from from around the world in studies of cancer, heredity, the brain, the immune system and AIDS at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California.

In this age of Ebola, it’s enlightening and inspiring to hear Salk talk about the lessons he learned in developing the polio vaccine, and how they might be applicable to the AIDS crisis, which was raging at the time of this interview with Bill Moyers recorded in 1990.

Salk died five years after this interview was broadcast. His memorial at the Salk Institute reads: “Hope lies in dreams, in imagination and in the courage of those who dare to make dreams into reality.”


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