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10 Amazing Jobs You Could Land With the Right STEM Education | Mashable

10 Amazing Jobs You Could Land With the Right STEM Education | Mashable | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When you think of someone who codes, you might picture a person hunched over a laptop in a dark garage. But that was the stereotype of yesteryear. Today, STEM careers have taken on a wildly different perception, and some of the coolest jobs around require a background in science, technology, engineering and math. After all, someone had to build and program all of the apps and gadgets you can't live without, right?

 

Below, we highlight 10 cool STEM jobs you should be jealous of. (And soon you could be an asteroid hunter!) Know someone else with a sweet science or tech gig? Let us know in the comments.

 

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#SHIFTNorCal: Through the Eyes of the Interns | Jackie Casey & Gabriel Alcaraz | ZeroDivide.org

#SHIFTNorCal: Through the Eyes of the Interns | Jackie Casey & Gabriel Alcaraz | ZeroDivide.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

ZeroDivide recently hosted #SHIFTNorCal: “On the Road to Healthy Communication & Collaboration,” a technology capacity building convening in Sacramento. As a technical assistance provider for the The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities Program (BHC), ZeroDivide brought together community based organizations, nonprofit entrepreneurs, tech experts, community organizers, app developers, academics and thought leaders to share wisdom and strategies for affecting social change through technology integration.


It’s no secret that many nonprofits have extremely tight resources. They are doing direct, important work in the community, but they don’t have time, money, or mental energy to spend on things that won’t benefit them or their communities directly and instantaneously. That’s where ZeroDivide comes in; swooping in with strategy and recommendations based on 15 years of experience of helping community based organizations transform through technology. ZeroDivide sifts through all the “tech noise,” the vast world of apps and devices vying for everyone’s attention, and filters it for use by those on the ground, in the community.


Participants attended a variety of session styles including:  “Experience Talks,” TED Talks meets General Assemblies exchanges; “Skill Building Teamwork” sessions where participants practiced strategies and used tools like Pulse Pin, a community mapping application developed at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism; and “Triage Circles,” where subject matter experts helped attendees address critical “tech pains”.


We, as ZeroDivide’s favorite Program Interns, witnessed what happens when attendees get themselves into an open mindset, entrusting ZeroDivide with their precious mental energy.


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Morlan Gallery at Transylvania opens exhibit featuring Lexington street artists | Rich Copley | Kentucky.com

Morlan Gallery at Transylvania opens exhibit featuring Lexington street artists | Rich Copley | Kentucky.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The irony of the Morlan Gallery's new exhibit, Street Tested: Kentucky Graffiti Artists, is not lost on director Andrea Fisher.


"Street art ran right out the doors of the institutions and into the street and started putting art in places that were unexpected," Fisher says. "The whole idea of street art is de-anesthetizing and de-institutionalizing art.


"They're not using the typical venue or the typical hierarchy of materials — oil, sculpture, bronze, marble. They're using spray paint — the lowest of materials — in often decaying, hidden locations."


But the Morlan's exhibit, which opened last week and will be through Oct. 17, including Gallery Hop on Friday, is bringing that work right back into an institution that has seen its fair share of oils, bronze, marble, watercolors and the like.


Fisher thinks that's only appropriate, pointing to the statement by the exhibit's curator and one of its artists, well-known and widely seen Lexington street artist Dronex.


"There is something pure and uncut about working on the street — for no money, with the risk of arrest and subsequent consequences," Myke Dronez, CEO of Dronex, Inc., wrote. "Artwork on the street is not meant to be auctioned off to the highest bidder, nor is it meant to be a status symbol amongst a 'collection.' Art in the street lives and dies as we do — the whitewashed walls, peeling paper, and fading lines are all artifacts of a fleeting existence that echoes our inability to withstand the persistence of time."


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Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/13/3427186/morlan-gallery-at-transylvania.html?sp=%2F99%2F684%2F703%2F#storylink=cpy
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Common Core in Action: Using Digital Storytelling Tools in the ELA Classroom | Monica Burns | Edutopia.org

Common Core in Action: Using Digital Storytelling Tools in the ELA Classroom | Monica Burns | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When students come to school each morning, they have tons of stories -- stories to share with their friends as they unpack or move through the hallways, stories to share with the class during morning meetings, or stories to share with a teacher about something that made them happy or sad. In the classroom, writing can happen in many different ways, whether it's free writing in a notebook to gather ideas or publishing stories to share with the whole school.


The Common Core State Standards expect that children across the grades can write for three specific purposes:


  1. Opinion pieces that persuade a reader and make an argument
  2. Informative writing that explains an idea and relays information
  3. Narrative stories of real or imagined events.


As students move from one grade level to another, the complexity of these tasks will change greatly. The persuasive writing that takes place in a second grade classroom will look very different than the work that a seventh grader produces. From kindergarten through 12th grade, students are expected to share their writing through technology.


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Senate Judiciary Committee chairman urges PACER to restore access to removed case archives | Andrea Peterson | WashPost.com

Senate Judiciary Committee chairman urges PACER to restore access to removed case archives | Andrea Peterson | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you want digital access to U.S. court documents, PACER will likely be your first stop. It's a sort of digital warehouse for public court records maintained by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, or the AO.


The service charges 10 cents per page of search results within its databases and 10 cents per actual page of public court records. Public domain and freedom of information advocates have long criticized the charges, along with the system's difficult-to-navigate interface, and have tried to create free alternative archives.


But on Aug. 10, PACER unceremoniously announced that archives for five courts -- four of them federal courts of appeals -- would no longer be available through the system.


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Seven Ways to Increase Student Engagement in the Classroom | Stacy Hurst | Reading Horizons

Seven Ways to Increase Student Engagement in the Classroom | Stacy Hurst | Reading Horizons | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You have probably heard that teachers are the hardest people to teach. I submit teaching teachers is a lot like teaching younger learners (except that they have more autonomy). More often than not as I am setting up for a trainingat least one teacher will saunter in with a pile of lamination to cut out or a knitting project (for the grandbaby on the way, of course) to keep them occupied during the training.


First of all, let me say, “I get it.” I get that teachers by necessity become excellent multi-taskers. I also understand that if you are doing more than one thing at a time you are not fully engaged in either activity. So how do I react? I take it as a challenge. If the lamination or the knitting needles come out during the training, I feel that I haven’t done enough to keep that particular teacher engaged.


It should not surprise anyone to know that one of the most consistent findings in educational research demonstrates that the more times students spend engaged during instruction, the more they learn (Gettinger & Ball, 2007). Some researchers even identify differing levels of engagement.  Schlechty (2002) defines five levels of student engagement:


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No need to teach girls differently online | Annie Murphy Paul | The Hechinger Report

No need to teach girls differently online | Annie Murphy Paul | The Hechinger Report | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

To hear some ed tech enthusiasts tell it, online learning is sweeping aside the barriers that have in the past prevented access to education. But such pronouncements are premature. As it turns out, students often carry these barriers right along with them, from the real world into the virtual one.


Female students, for example, are poorly represented in science, technology, engineering, and math courses offered online, just as they are scarce in STEM classes conducted in physical classrooms. Demographic analyses of the students enrolled in much-hyped “massive open online courses” show the depth of the gender gap. “Circuits and Electronics,” the first MOOC developed by the online consortium of universities known as edX, had a student body that was 12 percent female, according to a study published in 2013. Another analysis, posted on the Coursera blog earlier this year, found that female enrollment in the company’s courses was lowest — around 20 percent — in subjects like computer science, engineering, and mathematics.


These dismally low numbers provide a reminder that “access” to education is more complicated than simply throwing open the digital doors to whoever wants to sign up. So how can we turn the mere availability of online instruction in STEM into true access for female students?


One potential solution to this information-age problem comes from an old-fashioned source: single-sex education. The Online School for Girls, founded in 2009, provides an all-female e-learning experience. (A companion institution, the Online School for Boys, is opening this fall.) It appears to be doing an especially good job of educating girls in STEM: Last year, 21 of its approximately 1,000 students were recognized by the National Center for Women in Technology “for their aspirations and achievements in computing and technology.” And over the course of the 2013-2014 academic year, the Online School for Girls prepared 30 female students to take the Advanced Placement exam in computer science. To put that number in perspective: 25 American states each prepared fewer than 30 girls to take the AP computer science exam.


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International Literacy Day: the library’s role in promoting literacies | Guy Daines | CILIP.org.uk

International Literacy Day: the library’s role in promoting literacies |  Guy Daines | CILIP.org.uk | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today is International Literacy Day. It reminds us that promoting and sustaining literacy is one of the critical roles of libraries. Our strength lies in the fact that we are really about literacies, all those skills individuals need to participate effectively in an information society.


Reading ability may be at the centre of this but digital and information literacies are also essential life skills of today and underpin lifelong learning. Libraries provide a holistic approach embracing all these literacies (and often others such as health or financial literacy) and so help equip the citizen, consumer, employee and learner of today.


This relationship between basic literacy skills and more “advanced” literacy skills was a theme of last year’s International Literacy Day that focused on the “literacies for the 21st century”.


It helps to see the link between these literacies if more current definitions of reading literacy are understood. No longer is reading just about decoding symbols on a page and giving them meaning but it is described, for instance, in PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) Draft Literacy Programme 2015 (see paragraph 30) as: 


“Reading literacy is understanding, using, reflecting on and engaging with written texts, in order to achieve one’s goals, to develop one’s knowledge and potential, and to participate in society”.


This more dynamic definition has similarities to CILIP’s definition of information literacy. It combines aspects of reflection and evaluation with a strong sense of purpose. It can be seen as a fundamental building block for information literacy which we define as, “knowing when and why you need information, where to find it, and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner"


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Harvard's CompSci intro course boasts record-breaking enrollment | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com

Harvard's CompSci intro course boasts record-breaking enrollment | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Harvard College's CS50, the school's Introduction to Computer Science course for undergrads, has attracted about 1 in 8 students this fall -- a new record for the school and yet another sign of just how hot this field is becoming for the job-hungry.


The news, first reported by the Harvard Crimson, is based on stats released Wednesday by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Registrar’s Office.


Overall, 818 undergrads (or 12% of the student body) signed up for the challenging course this semester, and nearly 900 students are registered when factoring in graduate and cross-registered students. Topics included in the syllabus include Linux, cryptography, HTML and JavaScript. David Malan, a Harvard CompSci grad, teaches the course.


(If you'd like to join in the fun, virtually, CS50 is available via the free Edx online course systm.)


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AZ: Community college district tries full slate of innovations, all at once | Jon Marcus | The Hechinger Report

AZ: Community college district tries full slate of innovations, all at once | Jon Marcus | The Hechinger Report | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Hidden at the edge of an industrial park near the Phoenix airport, housed in a handful of utilitarian buildings with no grassy quadrangles or ivy crawling up red brick, Rio Salado Community College doesn’t look much like a typical higher-education institution.


It doesn’t act like one, either.


Rio Salado has just 23 full-time faculty, so few they fit into a ring of offices around a single common room, which helps keep its tuition comparatively low. Yet it serves more than 60,000 students, a disproportionate number of whom are low-income and attend part-time and online — characteristics other colleges have found make students tough to keep enrolled.


Thanks to a barrage of support, however, Rio Salado boasts a graduation rate four times that of comparable schools, U.S. Department of Education figures show.


There are 600 courses that start on almost any Monday of the year, for instance — not just according to a rigid academic calendar of two semesters. There’s an automated program that can predict, by the eighth day of a course, how well a student will do, triggering extra help if necessary — and a separate alert system that intervenes when faculty raise red flags, or a student fails to log into an online course, or makes an above-average number of calls to the technology help desk.


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Who is Alexander von Humboldt? | TED ED by George Mehler | YouTube.com

Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt's major accomplishments and why we should care about them today.


View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/who-is-alexander-von-humboldt-george-mehler


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Digital Literacy vs. Learning to Code: A False Dichotomy | ComputingEd

Digital Literacy vs. Learning to Code: A False Dichotomy | ComputingEd | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The below linked article makes some strong assumptions about “learning to code” that lead to the author’s confusion about the difference between learning to code and digital literacy.  NOBODY is arguing that all students “need to learn how to build the next Dropbox.”  EVERYONE is in agreement about the importance of digital literacy — but what does that mean, and how do you get there?


As I’ve pointed out several times, a great many professionals code, even those who don’t work in traditional “computing” jobs — for every professional software developer, there are four to nine (depending on how you define “code”) end-user programmers.  They code not to build Dropbox, but to solve problems that are more unique and require more creative solutions than canned applications software provides.  We’re not talking thousands of lines of code.  We’re talking 10-20, at most 100 lines of code for a solution (as my computational engineer colleagues tell me).  For many people, coding WILL be part of the digital literacy that they need.


Learning some basic coding is an effective way of developing the valued understanding of how the cloud works and how other digital technology in their world works.  Applications purposefully hide the underlying technology. Coding is a way of reaching a level lower, the level at which we want students to understand. In biology, we use microscopes and do dissections to get (literally) below the surface level. That’s the point of coding. No student who dissects a fetal pig is then ready for heart surgery, and no student who learns how to download a CSV data file and do some computation over the numbers in it is then ready to build Dropbox. But both groups of hypothetical students would then have a better understanding of how their world works and how they can be effective within it.


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Laniakea: Our home supercluster | Science & Technology | YouTube.com

Superclusters – regions of space that are densely packed with galaxies – are the biggest structures in the Universe. But scientists have struggled to define exactly where one supercluster ends and another begins.


Now, a team based in Hawaii has come up with a new technique that maps the Universe according to the flow of galaxies across space.


Redrawing the boundaries of the cosmic map, they redefine our home supercluster and name it Laniakea, which means ‘immeasurable heaven’ in Hawaiian.


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Biggest hunting dinosaur was an aquatic shark-gobbler | Andy Coghlan | New Scientist

Biggest hunting dinosaur was an aquatic shark-gobbler | Andy Coghlan | New Scientist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It ate whole sharks, and came equipped with feet like paddles and sealable nostrils that allowed it to swim under water. Spinosaurus, the largest known predatory dinosaur, now turns out to be the only known dinosaur that spent most of its time swimming. While palaeontologists envisaged it as a sort of gigantic heron, it was actually an enormous version of a crocodile.


"This is the first and only dinosaur we know of that has clear and unmistakable adaptations for a semi-aquatic lifestyle," says Nizar Ibrahim of the University of Chicago. "It's possible that we'll find other dinosaurs with similar adaptations in the future, but right now, Spino is the only one."


Spinosaurus was around 15 metres long, 3 metres longer than the more famous Tyrannosaurus rex. Fossils of Spinosaurus were first discovered in north Africa a century ago by German palaeontologist Ernst Stromer. But they were displayed in a Munich museum, and were destroyed in an Allied air raid in 1944. Since then only fragmentary remains have turned up.


Over the past decade, Ibrahim and his colleagues found more Spinosaurus bones in the Kem Kem beds of Morocco, a rich trove of fossils. The new fossils include parts of Spinosaurus that have not been seen before. "Altogether, we have over half the skeleton," says Ibrahim.


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Primary school kids 'often download apps without parents' permission' | Luke Thompson | Cable.co.uk

Primary school kids 'often download apps without parents' permission' | Luke Thompson | Cable.co.uk | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Primary school children are often allowed to download mobile apps without first seeking permission from their parents, according to new research from Internet Matters.


The child safety organisation founded by BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media discovered that 29 per cent of mums and dads didn't make their child get their consent before downloading apps to their smartphones or tablets.


Dads (34 per cent) were more likely than mums (25 per cent) to allow kids to purchase or download free or paid-for applications.


The issue is particularly significant given that primary school pupils say they're eager to make more use of apps, with three-quarters of those surveyed welcoming the opportunity to learn from applications and games.


Furthermore, the survey revealed a lack of comprehension from many parents about the suitability of downloads.


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India: Should inspire students to take up teaching: Smriti Irani | The Hindu

India: Should inspire students to take up teaching: Smriti Irani | The Hindu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Union Human Resource Development Minister Smriti Irani tells Smriti Kak Ramachandran about her plans for the education sector, including the proposal to review the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan and the Right to Education Act


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TN: Using Exhibits as Assessment | Normal Park Museum Magnet School Blog | Edutopia.org

Students at Normal Park Museum Magnet School in Chattanooga, TN, create various types of museum-style exhibits to demonstrate their understanding of academic topics.


Transcript--


Trey Joyner: At Normal Park, we focus largely on creating an atmosphere for the students to give them an outlet, give them an opportunity to exhibit the work that they've been doing, the learning.


Emily Pittman: Exhibits are the way that we allow students to take ownership over their learning.


Jamie Tipton: So, each year, the students will put on four different exhibits, and they work with all four of their teachers on that team to have a cohesive theme. In each one of the exhibits, there is a piece from the math class, the reading class, the language arts, social studies, and science. They all work together. In addition to that, we work with related arts teams to add visual arts, art pieces, Spanish pieces, German pieces, and the library will even write text and books with the kids.


Each quarter, we sit down as a team and we assess what needs to be learned, and from that, we create the big ideas or essential questions, and so, for the entire quarter, students are presented at the very beginning with the essential questions. They learn in art class ways to incorporate art pieces to showcase one of the essential questions. In writing, they will expand and write persuasive pieces or poems to express that, and at the end of the eight weeks, we put the exhibit on. The exhibit is a way to show every understanding that the kids have.


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New e-Book: Revolutionizing Education through Technology | ISTE.prg

New e-Book: Revolutionizing Education through Technology | ISTE.prg | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Project RED, a team that conducted a survey of a thousand schools to find out what makes technology integration work. Project RED has concluded that properly implemented educational technology, especially 1-to-1 programs where technology is continuously accessible, substantially improves student achievement and can be revenue positive at the local, state, and federal levels. The key is successful integration that brings about transformational change.


Transformational change—doubling student performance while reducing costs—is possible, and Revolutionizing Education through Technology is your blueprint for how it is done. Get the facts on what works, what makes a successful leader, what proper ed tech implementation looks like, and what cost savings to expect, as well as a vision of schools of the future, where student learning is self-directed and self-paced. See how you can be a part of the education revolution!


Features: A vision for revolutionizing schools through technology integration; an overview of what makes ed tech successful, how you can properly implement technology, and what results you can expect; nine technology and implementation factors; a Project RED checklist that, if followed, help schools achieve meaningful change; a chapter full of potential cost savings due to technology—up to $435 per student.


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Can research libraries adapt to live up to their potential? | Bernard Reilly | KnightFoundation.org

Can research libraries adapt to live up to their potential? | Bernard Reilly | KnightFoundation.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Knight News Challenge: Libraries offers applicants a chance to share in $2.5 million by focusing on the question, “How might we leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities?” Below, Bernard Reilly, president of the Center for Research Libraries, writes about the role research libraries could play in promoting transparency in the digital age, some thoughts prompted by the discussions at the center’s April 2014 Leviathan Forum.” Photo: King's Library, British Library, via Wikimedia Commons. 


The longstanding role of research libraries as “memory institutions” has been upended by the digital revolution.  Academic libraries and major independent research libraries have long collected and archived documents and information that, absent their efforts, would no doubt have been lost or destroyed. In 1944, when copies of his book “Born Free and Equal” were being burned publicly, the photographer Ansel Adams quietly turned over the 241 original negatives for his Manzanar portraits of interned Japanese-Americans to the Library of Congress for safekeeping. 


Today, the Web and the Cloud make information and documentation ubiquitous and abundant. Ironically, the same technologies that account for this abundance threaten the long-term integrity and accessibility of electronic evidence that is important to civil society. The impermanence and growing complexity of digital communications media, and the volume of digital documentation being produced, challenge our ability to collect and maintain that material for the long term. 


The recent confusion and controversy surrounding the disappearance of IRS Commissioner Lois Lerner’s emails, for example, highlighted some of the problems that confront civil society when government records are electronic. Holding governments, corporations and the other major actors in our society accountable is a new challenge when the proverbial “paper trail” no longer exists.  When records and communications are all digital, transparency requires new norms for establishing authenticity, provenance, chain of custody and persistence, norms that will hold up not only in the historical record but also in the hearing rooms of the legislatures and in the courts.

 

What can research libraries do?


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Australia: Ink paintings on vintage book pages by artist Loui Jover | NetDost.com

Australia: Ink paintings on vintage book pages by artist Loui Jover | NetDost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Australian artist Loui Jover creates Ink drawing on old book pages.


Loui used to draw passionately since his childhood and when he grew up he took this interest further by getting an advanced certificate in visual communication.


The ink paintings on these old pages add more meaning and character to his paintings than a normal paper would have.


Thou Loui primarily works with ink he also dabbles with oil and acrylic.


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US Senators and supporters rally behind student loan refinancing bill | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org

US Senators and supporters rally behind student loan refinancing bill | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

At a Capitol Hill event with supporters behind the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act, Sen. Al Franken told a story about meeting with Joelle Strangler, a student at the University of Minnesota.


Strangler’s mother was a lifelong teacher who desperately wanted her kids to go to college. To help with the rising costs of college tuition, she left teaching to get a higher paying job in hopes that she could help her children avoid the massive debt most graduates face.


“This is about our educational system. We lost a great teacher because she can make more money in the private sector,” said Franken. “Joelle is now a junior, student body president, and she will still graduate with a mountain of debt.”


Franken is a cosponsor of the Bank on Student Act, which help millions of Americans with existing federal student loans and private loans in good standing to refinance at a lower rate to make repayment more manageable.


“This is putting a damper on our entire economy. There’s over $1.2 trillion in debt, and this is simply saying, ‘Let’s let people refinance, just like you can refinance your car loan, just like you can refinance a home loan. Why not allow graduates to refinance their student loans?’”


Currently, there are forty million Americans that have student loan debt. More than 70 percent of America’s students borrow money to attend college, and the average student graduates from college owning nearly $30,000. The act would allow an estimated 25 million student loan borrowers to refinance at a lower rate.


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I just spent an hour playing with this 'interactive music video' and now I'm scared | Ross Miller | The Verge

I just spent an hour playing with this 'interactive music video' and now I'm scared | Ross Miller | The Verge | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Embedded in the article is a music video for Ty Segall's "Manipulator."


But that's not the way to experience this.


Instead, head over to Segall's page and, after a few minutes of loading, get ready to click anything and everything in this so-called "interactive music video."


There are three scenes in all, and more than a dozen things to alter in each scene. According to designer Simon Wiscombe, "all in all there are about 3.1 * 10^31 different combinations."


So let's give it a shot.


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Can Humans Get Used to Having a Two-Way Relationship with Earth's Climate? | Andrew Revkin Opinion | NYTimes.com

Can Humans Get Used to Having a Two-Way Relationship with Earth's Climate? | Andrew Revkin Opinion | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this summer, I was invited to write an essay on humanity’s troubled relationship with the changing atmosphere for a special issue of Audubon Magazine centered on the Audubon Society’s comprehensive new report on birds in a changing climate.


The issue is now published online and in print and has a range of excellent features, including “How Climate Change is Sinking Seabirds” by Carl Safina, “Why U.S. Forests Are Fueling Europe” by T. Edward NIckens, “Rethinking How We Think about Climate Change” by Elizabeth Kolbert, and a stunning photo essay on climate change.


In part, my article, “How We Ran Out of Airtime,” considers the current human-generated carbon dioxide buildup in relation to a tumultuous period of atmospheric disruption triggered by another life form some 2.4 billion years ago. Here’s the opening section:


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Is asteroid mining legal? Congress wants to make it so. | Joseph Stromberg | Vox.com

Is asteroid mining legal? Congress wants to make it so. | Joseph Stromberg | Vox.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A few different companies have recently announced grand plans to mine asteroids for precious metals and other materials.


But in addition to all the technological hurdles that would need to be cleared to make this possible, there's an obstacle of a much different sort: the law.


The Outer Space Treaty of 1967 — a UN treaty signed by 102 countries, including the US — bans countries from appropriating any astronomical bodies. But there's a dispute over whether this would apply to private companies mining asteroids.


Congress seems to be arguing that it does not. On Wednesday, a House subcommittee discussed a new law that would explicitly give companies ownership over any materials they extract from an asteroid.


Still, experts disagree over whether this would be compatible with international law — and whether it'd actually legalize asteroid mining.


Here's a breakdown of the issue.


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Massachusetts finds probable cause to investigate firing of activist teacher | Laura Clawson | DailyKos.com

Massachusetts finds probable cause to investigate firing of activist teacher | Laura Clawson | DailyKos.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you've wondered why teacher tenure was being so hotly debated, here's a great example of its importance. The Massachusetts Department of Labor has found probable cause that a teacher and local union leader's job—a job that wasn't protected by tenure—was terminated after he spoke out against school district policies.


In February, Agustin Morales was part of a group of teachers and parents that went to a school committee meeting to protest the use of data walls in Holyoke, Massachusetts, schools. The data walls included students' standardized test scores and in some cases their names, publicly shaming them as part of the drive for higher scores. When schools superintendent Sergio Paez tried to claim that teachers had not been instructed to put students' names on data walls, they produced slides from a PowerPoint presentation in which the sample data walls were shown with names—with Paez listed on the slides as present to give welcoming remarks.


Morales went on to be elected president of his union local—but at the same time, he says he was targeted for eventual termination, despite having received good teaching evaluations up until he started speaking out. That speedy termination was possible because he hadn't been at his job for long enough to be covered by the Massachusetts equivalent of tenure protections. So far, he's produced evidence to back up his claims:


"Based on the evidence presented during this investigation, I have found probable cause to believe that a violation occurred," Brian K. Harrington, of the Department of Labor Relations, wrote.


In fact, while the Department of Labor Relations was investigating the complaint, Paez issued a no-trespass order barring Morales from entering school property even to fulfill his role as elected union president. That order was lifted after 24 hours, but doesn't exactly make it look less like Paez has a grudge against Morales. Morales has also received significant support from students and parents:


Parents told 22News they want Morales to get his job back. “If it wouldn’t have been for Gus, my daughter would’ve failed 8th grade. He’s a passionate teacher. He’s loving. He’s caring. He stayed after school tutoring her,” said Marisol Marcano.


Since the state found probable cause of a violation, there will be a hearing sometime in the coming months. But even if that hearing ends in Morales getting his job back, the clear message has been sent to Holyoke teachers: speak out against district policies, even the ones that harm your students, and you are likely to face retaliation. That's why it's so important for teachers to have due process protections, and it's exactly those due process protections that are currently under attack across the country.

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5 ways virtual reality will change education | Kate Abrosimova | Hypergrid Business

5 ways virtual reality will change education | Kate Abrosimova | Hypergrid Business | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Education and technology are interconnected. This synergy is able to transform the world we live in. The contradictory phenomenon is that while being an early adopter of technology, education is also one of the last sectors to be fully transformed by it, due to institutional inertia and a number of other reasons.


Education hasn’t changed for years in terms of teaching approaches and techniques applied. Although we are seeing some innovative variability in this area. Today millennials feel pretty comfortable with online education, doing research on the Internet, resorting to instructional videos on YouTube and distance learning powered by video technology. Obviously, virtual reality is next.


Some virtual reality projects used both in schools and higher educational institutions, are already under way.


We’ve covered before a story about the students in Ireland who recreated a historic place in OpenSim and explored it with an Oculus Rift headset. The project was made possible with the help of MissionV – a platform, that provides Irish schools’ students with tools to build virtual learning environments.


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