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How Generation Y really feels about online privacy | CNET Blog

How Generation Y really feels about online privacy | CNET Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A group of consumer panelists shared their candid thoughts on online privacy during a tell-all panel discussion on Generation Y and digital media at CES.

 

Six extremely articulate young adults ages 18 to 28 fielded questions from moderator Xavier Kochhar and the audience about their social media preferences and attitudes. On the topic of privacy, Darius, a 22-year-old fashion designer who uses Twitter "for therapy" summed up the group's attitude with this statement: "We live in public."

 

Darius was keenly aware that everything he shares on Twitter or other social media platforms is "out there," which has made him extremely conscious about what he posts. "I would expect people to be more conscious," he said.

 

The other panelists shared Darius' view and discussed the ways in which they went about keeping their content private. Jordan, a 20-year-old student and environmentalist, said she changed her Facebook settings specifically because of how the social network handles tagging. "I have to filter myself," she said, explaining that she was concerned that some photos or check-ins she was tagged in on Facebook would send the wrong message to employers and colleagues.

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:46 PM

An interesting insight into how some young people feel about the ways that the web has made their lives so public.

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Opposite Behaviors? Arctic Sea Ice Shrinks, Antarctic Grows | Maria-Jose Vinas | NASA.gov

Opposite Behaviors? Arctic Sea Ice Shrinks, Antarctic Grows | Maria-Jose Vinas | NASA.gov | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The steady and dramatic decline in the sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean over the last three decades has become a focus of media and public attention. At the opposite end of the Earth, however, something more complex is happening.

A new NASA study shows that from 1978 to 2010 the total extent of sea ice surrounding Antarctica in the Southern Ocean grew by roughly 6,600 square miles every year, an area larger than the state of Connecticut. And previous research by the same authors indicates that this rate of increase has recently accelerated, up from an average rate of almost 4,300 square miles per year from 1978 to 2006.

"There's been an overall increase in the sea ice cover in the Antarctic, which is the opposite of what is happening in the Arctic,” said lead author Claire Parkinson, a climate scientist with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. "However, this growth rate is not nearly as large as the decrease in the Arctic.”

The Earth’s poles have very different geographies. The Arctic Ocean is surrounded by North America, Greenland and Eurasia. These large landmasses trap most of the sea ice, which builds up and retreats with each yearly freeze-and-melt cycle. But a large fraction of the older, thicker Arctic sea ice has disappeared over the last three decades. The shrinking summer ice cover has exposed dark ocean water that absorbs sunlight and warms up, leading to more ice loss.

On the opposite side of the planet, Antarctica is a continent circled by open waters that let sea ice expand during the winter but also offer less shelter during the melt season. Most of the Southern Ocean’s frozen cover grows and retreats every year, leading to little perennial sea ice in Antarctica.


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Reaching Online Learners through Gamification Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

Reaching Online Learners through Gamification Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A key issue within eLearning (and training in general) is generating enough motivation so that students will want to invest the time and effort required to learn.


In the field of online education, gamification is used to promote the commitment of employees and students to the learning process.


The Reaching Online Learners through Gamification Infographic provides tips on how you can gamify your eLearning courses and motivate your online learners.


How You Can Gamify Your eLearning Courses


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Boston, MA: Tommy Chang shares vision for K-12 | Richard Weir | Boston Herald

Boston, MA: Tommy Chang shares vision for K-12 | Richard Weir | Boston Herald | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Heralded as an innovator unafraid to shake things up, the Hub’s next school Superintendent Tommy Chang said he envisions making Boston students more tech-savvy in their classrooms.

Chang, 39, an instructional superintendent in Los Angeles who oversees 135 low-performing and pilot schools with 95,000 students, said he is a proponent of a “three-screen day” — an integrated digital-learning concept that aims to have students, like their parents at work, use their smartphones, laptops and tablets to gather, generate and disseminate information.

“Just imagine the power of a three-screen day in the classrooms of Boston Public Schools,” he told the Herald. “Technology is just the tool. ... The power is how the classroom teacher brings this alive and facilitates the learning in the classroom.”

After an 18-month search, the Boston School Committee selected Chang Tuesday night by a 5-2 vote. His contract has yet to be finalized but Chang, who now earns about $175,000, said he would “be humble about his request for compensation.” The salary of former BPS Superintendent Carol Johnson was $267,000.

A University of Pennsylvania graduate, Chang began his career as a biology teacher at Compton High School in California. As instructional superintendent for the Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation’s second largest, he led the establishment three years ago of its Intensive Support and Innovation Center, which saw graduation rates improve by 15 percent from 2013 to 2014 while transforming 135 underperforming schools. He also oversaw its $984 million budget.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh, in a speech to the Boston Municipal Research Bureau yesterday, called Chang a “rising star” who has “a record of taking on the toughest challenges and succeeding. As an immigrant (from Taiwan) who learned English in school, his own life is a testament to the transforming power of education.”


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Teaching the Geography of Food | Seth Dixon | National Geographic

Teaching the Geography of Food | Seth Dixon | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment.


The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.


For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.


I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems.


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Why BuzzFeed is the Most Important News Organization in the World | Ben Thompson | StraTechery.com

Like a great many such things, some of journalism’s most precious ideals were the happy result of geography and economics. That is, in any given geography, the dominant newspaper tended towards a natural monopoly for two reasons:

  • When it came to costs, the ownership of expensive printing presses and distribution channels made entrance difficult for potential competitors
  • As for revenue, broad-based advertising, at least in the pre-targeting era, naturally flowed to the channel with the greatest reach


The interaction of these two economic realities made newspapers fabulously profitable and veritable cash machines; the editorial side, meanwhile, freed from the responsibility to directly make money, could instead focus on things like far-flung bureaus, investigative journalism that in many cases took months to develop, and a clear separation between the business and editorial sides of a newspaper. The latter was important not just for the avoidance of blatant corruption, but also because it imbued the editorial side with a certain responsibility to focus on stories that deserved to be written because they mattered, not because they were sensationalistic.

This last point was best exemplified by The New York Times’ famous slogan, “All the news that’s fit to print” and by the paper’s legendary Page One meetings where editors would pitch stories for inclusion on the most valuable real estate in journalism. It’s important to appreciate that this was more than just a slogan and meeting; there are important assumptions underlying this conceit:

  • The first assumption is that there is a limited amount of space, which in the case of a physical product is quite obviously true. Sure, newspapers could and did change the length of their daily editions, but the line had to be drawn somewhere
  • The second assumption is that journalists, by choosing what to write about, are the arbiters of what is “news”
  • The third assumption is that the front page is an essential signal as to what news is important; more broadly, it’s an assumption that editors matter


With the New York Times in particular, it’s striking how deeply embedded these assumptions are. For example, as part of its response to its internal innovation report, New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet announced last month that the paper would retire the traditional Page One pitch meeting. Baquet wrote:


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African Technology: Dance, Fractals & Visual Programming | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

African Technology: Dance, Fractals & Visual Programming | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Reggie Wilson of the Fist & Heel Performance Group spoke at the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston (ICA) about “how we lead and why we follow.” He engaged the audience in call and response participation and talked about Moses(es), a dance that draws from influences including Zora Neale Hurston’s Moses, Man of the Mountain; his studies of Monotheism, African cultures, and fractal geometry; and trips to Israel, Egypt, Turkey, and Mali.


Wilson highlighted the ring shout, an ecstatic, transcendent religious ritual, first practiced by enslaved African people in the West Indies and the United States, in which worshipers move in a circle while shuffling and stomping their feet and clapping their hands. This reminded me of artist Houston Conwill, who I met when I was 15 years old when he judged my work for NAACP ACT-SO, who created The New Ring Shout, a floor installation that is in the tradition of world ceremonial ground markings, and draws heavily upon BaKongo cosmology and the Yowa cross (cosmogram).


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Two Different Views Of The Classroom Of The Future? | Using Technology Better

Two Different Views Of The Classroom Of The Future? | Using Technology Better | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Sweden is often seen as the thought leader when it comes to education. Last week I came across an article about Vittra school. Vittra School has a philosophy of real life learning in creative learning spaces. The above photo is one of their library bookshelves.

Some of the other learning spaces include the conversation wall.


There other learning spaces such as the campfire, watering hole and so on.


I have a friend who sends his daughter to one of these schools and he says that their focus is on collaboration, real life problem solving and autonomy.  The philosophy of education isn’t necessarily driven by technology but they certainly embrace new technology within their school.


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Technology is changing School Buses – Ideas worth replicating | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I ran into two stories of how bus riding is better now thanks to technology. Both ideas are elegant in their simplicity and the quality of life benefits make them worth exploring.

First – Mille Lacs County-Wi-Fi on School Buses

Mille Lacs County is a Blandin Broadband Community. One of their successful projects, was putting Wi-Fi on the school buses. Here’s the story, cogged from one of their final reports…

In 2012, Milaca Public Schools was looking into the viability of adding wireless access routers to a small number of District school buses. The year prior, the school rolled out a one-to-one iPad initiative and were actively looking for creative ways to utilize this new technology and expand the boundaries of learning.

The goal was to increase a student’s ability to access the Internet outside of the boundaries of the brick and mortar buildings and traditional school hours. To that end, the pilot program was a success. Students were grateful to have access on their long bus rides to and from home. We heard from student athletes who were able to access digital curriculum and resources to and from activities. We heard from teachers who were able to engage students while on field trips. And we heard from bus drivers who noticed a remarkably positive change in the bus atmosphere.

Second – Where’s my bus (or kids’ bus)? There’s an app for that.


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Using Minecraft in Education : Cross Curricular Ideas | The Whiteboard Blog

Using Minecraft in Education : Cross Curricular Ideas | The Whiteboard Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Minecraft is an open sandbox game that allows players to construct their own world. They can build structures, farm animals, mine for resources and much more. There are different modes to the game; Survival Mode is a challenging mode where the player needs to fight for survival against other creatures in the world, and Creative Mode provides unlimited resources to build and create without limitations.

I’ve been investigating Creative Mode as it’s easier to build large structures quickly.

Minecraft can be played individually, or as a multiplayer environment allowing children to cooperate to build and explore together. In Multiplayer mode they connect to a Minecraft Server on the internet or locally (running on a game hosted by one of the computers).

Minecraft is available in many flavours, including a Raspberry Pi version, a pocket edition for the iPad and a Educational version.

Here are a few ways that Minecraft can be used to support different curriculum subjects.


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Marie Vans's curator insight, March 3, 10:10 AM

I worked with the Tech Librarian at my neighborhood elementary school to start up an after school Minecraft.edu Club. It's amazing how quickly the kids have embraced learning using this platform.

 

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21 Smart Games For Game-Based Learning | Te@chThought.com

21 Smart Games For Game-Based Learning | Te@chThought.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Game-Based Learning is a slippery beast.

For one, it promotes students playing video games, which is somewhat radical in many learning environments for anything other than recreation.

And two, there is seemingly a disconnect between what students learn while playing games (e.g., problem-solving, visual-spatial thinking, collaboration, resource management), and the pure academic standards most teachers are interested promoting mastery of.

In the middle, there is a simple truth that few things are as engaging–for adults and students alike–as a well-designed video game, which might just make the following list of smart, “learning games” curated by Sam Gliksman useful to you.

If you’re looking for somewhere to start, might we suggest Scribblenauts, Civilization Revolution, and Monster Physics?


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FL: Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age | Greg Allen | NPR.org

FL: Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age | Greg Allen | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport.

But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains.

Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago.

"Quite literally, where we're standing, they found what they, at the time, dubbed 'skeleton two' and 'skeleton three.' It turns out it's actually one individual, now known as Vero Man," Hemmings says.

The human remains were in a layer of soil that also contained bones from animals that lived in Florida during the Ice Age: mastodons, giant sloths and saber-toothed cats.

Sellards said this was proof that people lived in Florida during the Ice Age, at least 14,000 years ago. At the time, most scientists believed humans had been in the New World no longer than 6,000 years.

An anthropologist from the Smithsonian, Ales Hrdlicka, led the charge attacking Sellards' findings. Hrdlicka believed the human remains were of someone who lived much later and had been buried in the lower strata. Vero Man was discredited and became largely an archaeological footnote.

But in Vero Beach, Fla., a quiet community known mostly for its citrus groves, Sandra Rawls says the site of Sellards' investigation, and its potential, was never forgotten. Several years ago, Rawls and others in the community formed a nonprofit group, the Old Vero Ice Age Sites Committee, or OVIASC.

"There were a lot of people who still remembered and knew a lot, are interested in the site. Many citizens had dug here, almost like a public park. Tons of fossils are in private collections that came out of here," Rawls says.

The group helped stop a water treatment plant from being built on the site and began raising money to fund a new archaeological investigation. That's when Mercyhurst University got involved. Archaeologists from the school are in their second year of work at the site.


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Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair | Sam Butterworth | Emerging EdTech

Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair | Sam Butterworth | Emerging EdTech | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Recent advances in science have been able to provide a better insight into how our brains develop from birth, allowing researchers to identify the most influential factors of early brain development. We now understand that a number of factors (including nutritional, emotional and intellectual factors) can all shape the very profile of a child’s future.

Now a new study has revealed that neurogenesis, which is the vital growth of new neurons, can actually be activated by video games. It’s no mystery that educational gaming can help a child’s mind develop but the recent study formed by neuroscientists at Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, now unveils exactly how this works.


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March 2015: Literacies for the digital age: Information and digital literacy | Kathy Schrock | DEN Blog Network

March 2015: Literacies for the digital age: Information and digital literacy | Kathy Schrock | DEN Blog Network | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is the seventh in a series of blog posts highlighting the digital literacies our students will need to succeed.


The first posts covered financial literacy, visual literacy, media literacy, historical literacy, numeracy, and data literacy.


This post will provide you with some ideas on how to infuse information literacy and digital literacy skills into the curriculum.

The thirteen literacies I feel need to be explored, practiced and mastered by students can be found in the graphic below.


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IBM Internet of Things boss takes new job at Internet2 | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com

IBM Internet of Things boss takes new job at Internet2 | Bob Brown | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Florence Hudson, most recently IBM's director of Internet of Things Business, has been named Senior VP and Chief Innovation Officer for computer network consortium Internet2.

Internet2 had been on the hunt for a CINO since October.

Hudson has more than 33 years in leadership positions at IBM, including as vice president in the Systems and Technology Group, and vice president and acting chief technology officer of the IBM Global Industrial Sector. "She brings a unique integration of business and technical experience," according to the non-profit Internet2 organization.

Hudson's new responsibilities include stimulating tech initiatives among the research and educational institutions that make up Internet2. Areas of focus include advanced networking, federal identity management and cloud services.


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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | Jenee Desmond-Harris | Vox.com

"There's a set of biracial twins in the UK who are turning heads because one is black and the other is white." That's how the New York Post introduced a profile of Lucy and Maria Aylmer, 18-year-olds whose father identifies as white and whose mother is "half-Jamaican" (and, we're to assume, thinks of herself as black).

It's just the most recent story of fraternal twins born with such dramatic variations in complexion they're seen by many — and even see themselves — as members of two different racial groups.

Each of these situations and their accompanying striking images, is a reminder of how fluid and subjective the racial categories we're all familiar with are.

Lucy and Maria's story, and all the other sensational tales in the "Black and White Twins: born a minute apart" vein are actually just overblown reports on siblings who, because of normal genetic variations that show up in more striking ways in their cases, have different complexions.

But they're fascinating because they highlight just how flimsy and open to interpretation the racial categories we use in the US and around the world are.


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The 20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 20 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The original list that was created in 2011 comprised 33 skills , after reviewing it we decided to do some merging and finally ended up with the 20 skills below.

The 21st century teacher should be able to :

1- Create and edit digital audio


Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill :


Free Audio Tools for Teachers

2- Use Social bookmarking to share resources with and between learners


Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill :


A List of Best Bookmarking Websites for Teachers

3- Use blogs and wikis to create online platforms for students


Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill


Great Tools to Create Protected Blogs and Webpages for your Class


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The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking | Carol E. Holstead | Chronicle of Higher Education

The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking | Carol E. Holstead | Chronicle of Higher Education | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The moment of truth for me came in the spring 2013 semester. I looked out at my visual-communication class and saw a group of six students transfixed by the blue glow of a video on one of their computers, and decided I was done allowing laptops in my large lecture class. "Done" might be putting it mildly. Although I am an engaging lecturer, I could not compete with Facebook and YouTube, and I was tired of trying.

The next semester I told students they would have to take notes on paper. Period.

I knew that eliminating laptops in my classroom would reduce distractions. Research has shown that when students use their laptops to "multitask" during class, they don’t retain as much of the lecture. But I also had a theory, based on my college experience from the dark ages—the 70s, aka, before PowerPoint—that students would process lectures more effectively if they took notes on paper. When students took notes on laptops they barely looked up from their computers, so intent were they on transcribing every word I said. Back in my day, if a professor’s lectures were reasonably well organized, I could take notes in outline format. I had to listen for the key points and subpoints.

Some of the students I teach are journalism majors. For them, taking notes by hand is an enormously helpful skill since journalists often have no choice but to take notes on paper. You can tape an interview, but transcribing tapes is inefficient when you’re on deadline, and you’re not going to pull out a laptop in somebody’s office or in the middle of a protest and start typing. Now, if you’re interviewing people over the phone, you might type as they talk, but if you try typing every single word your interview subjects say, you end up not really listening to them.

In laying down my no-tech note-taking decree, I explained that it would help students engage in the lectures and also pay off later in their careers. I use PowerPoint in my visual-communication course but only to outline the lecture and show examples of designs. I told students they would need to listen to what I said about each slide and selectively write down the important points. I said I believed they would remember more of my lectures by taking notes on paper.

It turned out my theory was right and now is supported by research.


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12+ Historic Tall Ships Headed To Philly This Summer For The Biggest Sailing Event In The Country Kristina Jenkins | UWishUNu

12+ Historic Tall Ships Headed To Philly This Summer For The Biggest Sailing Event In The Country Kristina Jenkins | UWishUNu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Imagine a 179-foot long, 284-ton, three-masted ship gliding on the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Camden — yes, the Delaware River.

This summer, visitors to Philadelphia won’t have to dream up such a sight: the Tall Ships Challenge Philadelphia Camden 2015 lands on both shores of the Delaware River June 25-28.

Tall Ships Challenge is an annual event, which drifts in a three year cycle between the waters of the Great Lakes, the Pacific and the Atlantic coasts of North America. Billowing sails will waft in the breeze for four days when this traveling festival of sea craft pulls into port right here in Philadelphia and Camden.

Hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to navigate their way to the Delaware to catch a glimpse, step aboard and even set sail on the massive ships, which will all dock at Penn’s Landing and the Camden Waterfront.

Headlining the dozen-ship fleet of Tall Ships Challenge Philadelphia Camden 2015 will be L’Hermione, a replica of the 145-foot long Concorde class frigate that brought General Lafayette to the aid of the fledgling United States during the Revolutionary War.

In addition to L’Hermione, the river will be dotted with both domestic and international ships, including the 295-foot long US Coast Guard vessel Barque Eagle, a replica of a late-16th century Galeon warships and Gazela – Philadelphia’s official Tall Ship.


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Learning connected civics: Narratives, practices, infrastructures | Taylor and Francis Online

Learning connected civics: Narratives, practices, infrastructures | Taylor and Francis Online | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Bringing together popular culture studies and sociocultural learning theory, in this paper we formulate the concept of “connected civics,” grounded in the idea that young people today are engaging in new forms of politics that are profoundly participatory. Often working in collaboration with adult allies, they leverage digital media and emerging modes of connectivity to achieve voice and influence in public spheres. The rise of participatory politics provides new opportunities to support connected civics, which is socially engaged and embedded in young people's personal interests, affinities, and identities.


We posit three supports that build consequential connections between young people's cultural affinities, their agency in the social world, and their civic engagement: 1. By constructing hybrid narratives, young people mine the cultural contexts they are embedded in and identify with for civic and political themes relevant to issues of public concern. 2. Through shared civic practices, members of affinity networks lower barriers to entry and multiply opportunities for young people to engage in civic and political action. 3. By developing cross-cutting infrastructure, young people–often with adults–institutionalize their efforts in ways that make a loosely affiliated network into something that is socially organized and self-sustaining.


Drawing from a corpus of interviews and case studies of youth affinity networks at various sites across the US, this paper recasts the relationship between connected learning, cultural production, and participatory politics.


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During snow days, college professors turn to technology to interact with students | Matt Rocheleau | The Boston Globe

During snow days, college professors turn to technology to interact with students | Matt Rocheleau | The Boston Globe | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Local college administrators and professors are scrambling to make up for missed class time after the recent blast of snowstorms caused many campuses to shut down for five days.

But some faculty said that they have been able to, for the most part, keep their students on schedule, by planning ahead and using new technology.

Stephanie Kellar, an assistant professor of music business/management at Berklee College of Music in Boston has continued to teach students during snow days by using an online video conferencing service called Zoom.

“It’s really kind of saved the day in this situation where the Mondays have been canceled left and right,” said Kellar. “I’ve been able to keep up with the curriculum and my students are not behind.”

At Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, Dean Diane Mello-Goldner said that during a recent snow day she asked students in her sports psychology class to take photos of themselves doing yoga poses they had learned in previous classes and then e-mail the “selfies” to her for extra credit.

“It was an easy way to keep them thinking about the class,” she said. “I got some interesting photos, and they seemed to like doing that.”

Mello-Goldner said other professors at the college have used online video communication services, such as Skype, to connect with students or have had students participate in discussion forums on the Web.


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7 things every kid should master | Susan Engel | The Boston Globe

7 things every kid should master | Susan Engel | The Boston Globe | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the past few years, parents, teachers, and policy makers have furiously debated whether standardized tests should be used to promote or hold back children, fire teachers, and withhold funds from schools. The debate has focused for the most part on whether the tests are being used in unfair ways. But almost no one has publicly questioned a fundamental assumption — that the tests measure something meaningful or predict something significant beyond themselves.

I have reviewed more than 300 studies of K–12 academic tests. What I have discovered is startling. Most tests used to evaluate students, teachers, and school districts predict almost nothing except the likelihood of achieving similar scores on subsequent tests. I have found virtually no research demonstrating a relationship between those tests and measures of thinking or life outcomes.

When you hear people debate the use of tests in schools, the talk usually assumes that the only alternative to the current approach is no testing at all. But nothing could be further from the truth. Ideally, everyone would benefit from objective measures of children’s learning in schools. The answer is not to abandon testing, but to measure the things we most value, and find good ways to do that. How silly to measure a child’s ability to parse a sentence or solve certain kinds of math problems if in fact those measures don’t predict anything important about the child or lead to better teaching practices.

Why not test the things we value, and test them in a way that provides us with an accurate picture of what children really do, not what they can do under the most constrained circumstances after the most constrained test preparation? Nor should this be very difficult. After all, in the past 50 years economists and psychologists have found ways to measure things as subtle and dynamic as the mechanisms that explain when and why we give in to impulse, the forces that govern our moral choices, and the thought processes that underlie unconscious stereotyping.

Here are seven abilities and dispositions that kids should acquire or improve upon — and therefore should be measured — while in school. One key feature of the system I am suggesting is that it depends, like good research, on representative samples rather than on testing every child every year. We’d use less data, to better effect, and free up the hours, days, and weeks now spent on standardized test prep and the tests themselves, time that could be spent on real teaching and learning.


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The Anatomy Of Good Gamified eLearning | Li Whybrow | eLearning Industry

The Anatomy Of Good Gamified eLearning | Li Whybrow | eLearning Industry | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We’ve long known that playing games can help people to learn a well as being fun, that’s why we play games with our kids, and it’s not a new concept to bring games into instructional design. Disney coined the phrase ‘edutainment’ back in the 1940’s and ‘gamification’ was probably first used by Nick Pelling, creator of games for the BBC Micro and Commodor in the 1980’s. Kevin Werbach of Wharton offers a definition for the term ‘gamification’:

We’ve seen an explosion in ‘gamification’ in the way firms seek to engage customers (think Nike) and the iOS and Android platforms have opened up a world of apps which naturally employ gaming elements into their feature lists. But in our sphere, that of learning and development, the notion of games design elements in what we do has been around for a fair while now. It’s a long time ago, relatively speaking in digital terms, that Marc Prensky penned his first book, Digital Game-based Learning.

We knew back then what the core principles were in games design that were beneficial for instructional design. I can boil them down to just four:


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Not So Fast, Jamestown, VA: St. Augustine, FL Was Here First | Peter Haden | NPR.org

Not So Fast, Jamestown, VA: St. Augustine, FL Was Here First | Peter Haden | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Clyde and Corrita Warner came to St. Augustine on vacation from Louisville, Ky. They know their history.

"Well, I knew that this started before the pilgrims landed and before Jamestown," says Corrita. "You know, this area was first."

St. Augustine treasures being the first — and oldest — city in the United States. So when the area around Jamestown, Va., adopted the title "America's First Region" a while back, the gloves came off.

On Saturday, residents begin a year-long celebration to honor St. Augustine. Founded 450 years ago, it's the oldest city in the United States.

"You don't have to be much of a mathematician to know that St. Augustine was settled first," says Richard Goldman, executive director of the city's Visitors and Convention Bureau. "Jamestown was about 42, 43 years later, so for Jamestown to claim to be where the country began, just doesn't settle well with history."

There's plenty of history in St. Augustine. The original Spanish fort, the Castillo de San Marcos, was built in the 17th century. Now a national monument, the castillo was built of crushed coquina seashells that the Spanish found here. Light and porous, the coquina walls proved to be compressible, absorbing cannonballs like Styrofoam might absorb BBs. That construction helped it survive for so long.

Park Ranger Mike Evans says the Spanish were roping cattle and pruning their citrus groves in St. Augustine before the British even set sail for Jamestown.

"Bless their hearts," Evans says of Virginians. "I mean, the Virginians have Robert E. Lee and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, and that's fine, you know. But here — we introduced the oranges to the new world!"


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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World (And The Embarrassing U.S. Equivalent) | Adele Peter | FastCoExist.com

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World (And The Embarrassing U.S. Equivalent) | Adele Peter | FastCoExist.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For a fourth-grader in Italy, school lunch might include a caprese salad, local fish on a bed of arugula, pasta, and a baguette. A school cafeteria in France might serve steak, brie, and a plentiful helping of fruits and vegetables. In comparison, a typical school lunch in the U.S. looks fairly embarrassing: Some fried chicken, congealed fruit salad, and a giant cookie.

These images are all from a recent photo series, created by the salad chain Sweetgreen, showing what school lunches look like around the world. Each plate is meant to be representative of a typical lunch and was put together by intepreting local government standards and studying Tumblr photos taken by elementary students.


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Contentious teacher-related policies moving from legislatures to the courts | Emma Brown | WashPost.com

Contentious teacher-related policies moving from legislatures to the courts | Emma Brown | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Opponents of the nation’s teacher unions won a landmark victory last year in a California lawsuit that challenged tenure protections, a case that became the beginning of a national effort to roll back teacher tenure laws in state courts.

Now the largest unions in the country are using a similar tactic, as teachers turn to the courts to fight for one of their most pressing interests: An end to test-based evaluations they say are arbitrary and unfair.

The lawsuits show that two of the nation’s most contentious battles over the teaching profession are shifting from legislative arenas to the courts, giving judges the chance to make decisions that could shape the way teachers are hired, fired and paid. Union critics and wealthy advocates have hired lawyers to take on the teachers; the teachers, through their unions, have gone before the bench to go after state officials and their policies.

The latest foray into the courtroom began Feb. 13, when New Mexico teachers sued state officials over an evaluation system that relies heavily on student test scores. Tennessee teachers also sued their state officials this month, arguing that most teachers’ evaluations are based on the test scores of students they don’t actually teach. Florida teachers brought a similar lawsuit last year; it is now in federal appeals court, while other complaints are pending in Texas and New York.

Union officials say they expect to see more lawsuits in the future, especially over evaluations that use complex and controversial algorithms — called “value-added models” — to figure out how much of a student’s learning can be attributed to their teacher.

“There will be more challenges because things are not being seen as credible and fair,” said Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, which joined the New Mexico lawsuit. “What we’ve gotten to is this routinized, mechanized displacement of human judgment, and that’s what I think you’re seeing — that is the underlying issue that is the root of this agita about evaluations.”

“It’s ridiculous that we have to go to the courts,” Weingarten said. But she said that New Mexico education officials and other supporters of test-based evaluation are deaf to evidence that the evaluations aren’t working.

Critics say that the unions are exaggerating both the problems associated with value-added scores and the weight that they carry in evaluations. Value-added scores account for up to 50 percent of evaluations in some states, and a smaller portion in many others, with the remainder of teachers’ ratings comprised of classroom observations and other measures.

“Essentially teacher unions don’t want any evaluation,” said Eric Hanushek, an economist at Stanford University’s conservative Hoover Institute and a supporter of value-added measures. “That’s what they’re angling for.”


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