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Big Internet Museum catalogs internet from ARPAnet to Gangnam Style | Gizmag.com

Big Internet Museum catalogs internet from ARPAnet to Gangnam Style | Gizmag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The internet only became commercialized in 1995, but its genesis goes back to the late 1960s, more precisely October 29, 1969. That was the date when Robert William Tayor, a former NASA researcher working for the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), launched the ARPAnet operational network, which is recognized as the precursor to what became the internet. ARPAnet provides the starting point for visitors to the recently launched The Big Internet Museum, a virtual venue for all things great and downright silly about the internet.

 

The museum is presented as a slideshow and moves over a timeline that covers 1969 to 2012. At the time of writing this article the tour ended with South Korean superstar Psy’s Gangnam Style, which has notched over one billion views on YouTube. Between ARPAnet and K-pop madness are AOL, MSN, LOLCats and many other internet icons, some of which already look positively vintage now. Some pieces are likely to give visitors a warm feeling of nostalgia, such as the page about Geocities, which colorfully ruled the Web-hosting arena in the late 90s.

 

The online museum project was devised by Dutch advertising professionals Dani Polak, Joep Drummen and Joeri Bakker. MediaMonks, a leading digital production agency in The Netherlands, chipped in with the technology and a mobile version of the museum is currently in development.

 

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lebeauparleur's comment, January 10, 2013 1:50 PM
I don't get why memes should be there. But cool stuff anyway !
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Considerations for Wi-Fi deployments for K-12 education customers | Zeus Kerravala | NetworkWorld.com

Considerations for Wi-Fi deployments for K-12 education customers | Zeus Kerravala | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you follow either the K-12 vertical or the Wi-Fi industry, you probably saw the news that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) revamped its E-Rate program and plans to boost the amount of money allocated to in-school Wi-Fi.


At the time, I wrote a post discussing how the announcement would impact the vendors, and now I would like to discuss what school systems should be thinking about as they prepare to expand or deploy Wi-Fi.


I had some thoughts about this, but also discussed the topic with Kezia Gollapudi, product marketing manager for K-12 at Aruba Networks. Aruba has a large install base in K-12, so I thought she would be a good person to discuss the topic with.


First, it’s important to understand why the E-Rate changes are so important. E-Rate helps schools in small or rural school districts build technology infrastructure that’s on par with what can be found in affluent or larger areas of the country.


Recently, many states have adopted the Common Core State Standards. Common Core establishes a consistent set of standards for students and prepares them for life after high school. To date, 45 out of 50 states have adopted the Common Core Standards, with Alaska, Texas, Virginia, Nebraska, and Minnesota being the lone remaining hold outs.


One of the keys to Common Core is that every student has a similar education experience. This will drive the use of tablets, online classes and laptops as the curriculum evolves. Every student will need a robust, high-quality wireless experience, thus the boost in funding for Wi-Fi.


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Kinesthetic Learning: Moving Toward a New Model for Education | Kirin Sinha Blog | Edutopia.org

Kinesthetic Learning: Moving Toward a New Model for Education | Kirin Sinha Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

How do people learn? Research has found that it is our learning process, not our intelligence, that is the most important factor in determining our abilities -- making it vitally important to examine how we teach our students.


So we must ask: how are we most effective at learning and retaining information? Is it when we are hearing, seeing, doing, creating, or some combination of the above?


Recently, multi-disciplinary learning has become the trend in education, allowing students to make connections between seemingly disparate subjects. Kinesthetic learning takes this model to the next level by connecting the different ways in which we learn, and this process enables a more effective understanding and retention of information.


In kinesthetic learning, movement and action replace more passive forms of learning, such as listening to a lecture. Everybody has probably experienced the effectiveness of this style of learning.


No matter how many years it has been since you learned, most people can still ride a bike and swim across a pool. I am able to play piano pieces that I once knew, and I remember the moves to dances I performed when I hear the music.


Yet I can no longer recite the capitols of all the states or the elements in the periodic table -- all information that I had memorized. No matter how much we memorize, recite, and study, our muscle memory seems to trump our brains alone. We learn best when we combine mind and body.


So let's use our bodies to their fullest advantage and bring kinesthetic learning into our classrooms.


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The Happy Eating Place: How Elementary Students Can Run Their Own Business | Whitney Walker Blog | Edutopia.org

The Happy Eating Place: How Elementary Students Can Run Their Own Business | Whitney Walker Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The menu changes every time they open, and specialties range from turkey pozole to hearty fish chowder, quinoa salad to broccoli pasta, and blueberry scones to cheesy pigs-in-blankets. They use only organic, low-sugar ingredients and sustainably-raised meats or vegetarian alternatives. But this is not a fancy, five-star restaurant. It's an elementary school, and all the chefs are fourth and fifth graders.


Anne Malamud’s 4/5 class at Mills College Children's School, the laboratory school for the School of Education at Mills College in Oakland, California, is learning how to run a successful business and to make a difference in their own community. Calling their entrepreneurial venture the Happy Eating Place (HEP), the students originally set out just to prepare healthy snacks on campus and raise money for a yet-to-be determined nonprofit organization, but Malamud saw the opportunity for a service learning initiative with broader goals that would include social justice issues within our society. Now in its second year of operation, the HEP's mission has grown to include educating others about nutrition, the importance of sustainable farming, and the roots of hunger in America. This has included writing pamphlets, giving talks, and creating a presentation.


Service learning projects can be developed at any grade level. It may require extra work when teachers alter their plans to integrate student-driven, hands-on lessons in their math, writing, social studies, and science curricula, but that work pays dividends in student engagement. Here are five easy steps to start a service learning business model in your classroom.


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Long-lived Opportunity rover breaks extraterrestrial mileage record | Ars Technica

Long-lived Opportunity rover breaks extraterrestrial mileage record | Ars Technica | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Before the big publicity splash made by the Mars Science Laboratory and Curiosity, the big stars on Mars were the two Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. The pair of 400 lb (185 kg) semi-autonomous machines were dropped onto Mars in January 2004 and were initially designed with an operational lifespan of 90 sols (a sol is a Martian day, equivalent to about 24 hours and 39.5 minutes), but they managed to drastically exceed that lifespan through careful piloting and resource management. In fact, although Spirit fell silent in March 2010, Opportunity continues to be responsive—and as of yesterday, it has traveled 25.01 miles (40.25 km) across the Martian surface, setting a new record for off-world travel.


The previous record dates back to 1974 when the Soviet Lunokhod 2 rover zipped across about 24.2 miles (39 km) of dusty lunar terrain in about four months. Opportunity’s progress has been much slower, due to a combination of a low travel speed (usually about 10 mm per second, with a top speed of 50 mm per second, about 600 feet per hour) and regular stops to perform observations.


In the ten years that Opportunity has cruised the Martian craters and valleys, the faithful robot has contributed tremendously to our understanding of the composition and history of Mars, including transmitting back data that provides significant support to the idea that Mars once had oceans of liquid water.


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Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights | Will Pemble Blog | Edutopia.org

Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights | Will Pemble Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When my sixth grader Lyle asked if we could build a roller coaster in the backyard, I said yes -- for two reasons.


First, as a dad, it's my job to help my kids do what they want to do. I believe that what kids want and what kids need are usually the same thing. So I've trained myself to listen to their ideas. I look for reasons to say yes, and I look for ways to engage and play with them. Like every dad, I know that my kids are my best chance at changing the world for the better.


Second, I knew that a project this crazy-fun would surely keep the kids' attention, and that there would be fantastic learning opportunities in subjects like math, physics, construction, safety, research, collaboration, and (as it turned out) even media.


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South African Illustrators Redefining the Afro-Aesthetic | AFROPUNK.com

South African Illustrators Redefining the Afro-Aesthetic | AFROPUNK.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Afrocentric aesthetic has become a cliché within itself. It’s been muffled with defunct and ill-informed iconography and filled to brim with afros, fists and animal prints referenced from overly exhausted templates that expired lifetimes ago.


For countless centuries the creative products of Africans have been ornamental to the lives of middle classed Europeans with postcard knowledge of their origins. With our cultural symbols being diluted and simplified to match the drapes of the disinterested tourists who consume them.


A captivating movement of young black illustrators, alternative designers and urban artists has recently emerged South Africa; and it aims to remedy the semiotic misconceptions of Africa by redefining Afrocentrism one pixel at a time. No more shall Africa be enlisted as an influence in the footnotes of visual history.


Our story will be read in our own fonts and embellished in our own imagery. We refuse to let our environment be prescribed by diasporic and colonial pasquinades about our nature. Africa has a dynamic new face, and these are the young names behind it.


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Net Literacy Exceeds 30,000 Computers Repurposed! | Net Literacy.org

In collaboration with fellow nonprofit TeenWorks (www.teenworks.org), Net Literacy’s summer program repurposed 2700 computers during the summer teaching 14 high school students computer repurposing, software, and hardware skills.


These computers will be donated to the families of students without a computer at home.


Net Literacy has increased computer access to over 250,000 individuals through donations to families, public libraries, schools, community centers, afterschool programs, senior centers, literacy centers, and churches with remediation programs for students.


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NASA begins to plan successor to the Hubble and James Webb deep space telescopes | GizMag.com

NASA begins to plan successor to the Hubble and James Webb deep space telescopes | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has assembled a team of scientists and engineers to lay the first tentative plans for a successor platform to the Hubble and James Webb telescopes. The project, currently in the study phase, is being assessed for the technological and financial requirements needed to create so advanced a deep space observation platform.


Currently Hubble is without question NASA's flagship deep space telescope, with each image it captures not only contributing to our scientific knowledge, but also representing a piece of art and inspiration that has captured the minds of a generation. However, NASA cannot simply sit on the laurels of Hubble and stagnate. Instead, the agency is striving to continue to advance our knowledge, and peer deeper into the cosmos.


In this vein, NASA is well on the way to building Hubble's immediate scientific successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. This next step in space exploration comes with a 21 ft (6.5 m) primary mirror, designed in segmented pieces to allow for easy launch. Once the mirror is unfurled, James Webb will represent the largest and most advanced spacefaring telescope ever created, with the ability to image distant objects in long-wavelength visible to mid-infrared bands by utilizing a suite of advanced equipment.


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Astronomers discover exoplanet with longest known year | GizMag.com

Astronomers discover exoplanet with longest known year | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With the aid of NASA's Kepler spacecraft a team of astronomers, including members from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, has discovered an exoplanet with the longest yearly cycle ever recorded. The planet, imaginatively named Kepler-421b, takes an impressive 704 days to orbit its parent, a dim type K star.


The discovery was made by analyzing data from the Kepler spacecraft, which accrued the information over the course of a four year continuous vigil of the patch of sky containing Kepler-421b. The planet was detected using a technique which measures the dip in light as the exoplanet transits over the face of its parent star. Due to the impressive length of Kepler-421b's orbit, only two transits were detected over the entire four year period in which Kepler stood watch.


"Finding Kepler-421b was a stroke of luck," states David Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and lead author on the paper detailing the discovery. "The farther a planet is from its star, the less likely it is to transit the star from Earth's point of view. It has to line up just right."


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Lafayette, LA: Teachers should be treated as professionals | Jonathan Cole OpEd | TheAdvertiser.com

Lafayette, LA: Teachers should be treated as professionals | Jonathan Cole OpEd | TheAdvertiser.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, the Lafayette Parish School system declared a critical teacher shortage. This is a direct result of the inability of the district to retain qualified educators in the happiest city in America.


When I first began teaching 10 years ago, my mentors were the very teachers that taught me as a student. As they became my friends and colleagues over time, they expressed great concern for my future well-being as a young educator in Lafayette. They spoke of a day when teachers would leave en masse because of stressful working conditions. It wasn’t long before their words proved prophetic, as Lafayette lost over a third of its teachers over a five-year period.


They left for many reasons, including state and local reforms that have turned teachers into paper pushers and administrators into enforcers of a flawed accountability system, and a lack of discipline enforcement in classrooms. The situation, as it now stands, is pivotal, and solving the teacher crunch in our district is a complex task with many variables to consider.


Let’s start with some goals we know we can reach.


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8 Tips for Reaching Out to Parents | David Cutler Blog | Edutopia.org

8 Tips for Reaching Out to Parents | David Cutler Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After seven years in the classroom, I feel I'm in a position to offer some advice for how teachers can build and sustain positive relationships with parents -- as well as appropriately handle difficult circumstances.


Following are eight tips that I've learned from experience.


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Putting the A in STEAM | NYTimes.com

Putting the A in STEAM | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An arrangement of test tubes containing color-coded genetic material; a wearable garden that purifies the air; an installation inspired by the periodic table — these artworks all incorporate components of STEM, an educational curriculum that is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. They are currently among more than 40 pieces on view in “Steam,” a new exhibition at ArtsWestchester’s Arts Exchange.


“Steam” takes its name from another educational movement, STEAM, which is STEM with the addition of the “A” for art. Championed by the Rhode Island School of Design and widely adopted by schools, businesses and policy makers, STEAM promotes the premise that innovation in the STEM subjects is enhanced through the arts. “Steam” fills the Arts Exchange with a diverse array of installations, videos and prints, all reflecting aspects of STEM, in their content, creation or both.


The exhibition was curated by Patricia Miranda, an artist and the founding director of Miranda Arts Project Space in Port Chester. In assembling “Steam,” she turned to 31 artists whose practices are influenced by fields including medicine, ecology and subatomic physics.


Nevertheless, Ms. Miranda said, “This is an art show, not a science show. I wanted to show the depth of involvement that artists have with scientific disciplines.” She noted that paint itself is produced through chemical processes. “Artists have always relied on technology,” Ms. Miranda said.


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How to Shoot, Edit & Publish Videos From Your Android Phone | TheNextWeb.com

How to Shoot, Edit & Publish Videos From Your Android Phone | TheNextWeb.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Without meaning to stray to far into truism territory, the core raison d’être of smartphones is that they are designed for many tasks. In a single, compact device you have a mobile phone, digital camera, PC, MP3 player, video player, travel guide, supermarket and any other service you can think of that works online.


Yes, your smartphone is a jack of all trades. But is it a master of any?


Dedicated point-and-shoot digital cameras and lower-end camcorders are surely facing a slow road to extinction, with many modern phones capable of shooting ridiculously high-quality photos and videos. But can your phone really do it all, from start to finish, without connecting up to your PC? Well of course it can.


Here, we take a look at some of the tools and techniques beginners can use to shoot, edit and upload videos from their Android smartphone.


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Animaker, Make Animated Explainers for free | Animaker.com

Animaker, Make Animated Explainers for free | Animaker.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Animaker.com is a cloud-based do-it-yourself (#DIY) video making app that is bringing studio quality professional animation tools within reach of everyone.


Break free from traditional drag and drop routines and create stunning videos with Animaker’s extensive pre-animate asset library.


Find, use, and tinker with thousands of pre-animated assets — each with inbuilt activities, awesome expressions, and super cool effects. Use and edit these assets to create and share stunning videos without any previous training or experience!


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Internet Researcher John Horrigan on How Digital Illiteracy is Eclipsing Digital Divide | BroadbandBreakfast.com

The internet equity facing the nation isn’t the digital divide, but is digital readiness, according to a panel last month by internet researcher John Horrigon at an event of the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation.


According to Horrigan, digital literacy is rapidly overshadowing non-adoption.A half-decade ago in 2009, 83 million adults didn’t have broadband in 2009, he said. Today, 43 million now lack access.


The real problem is instead the 29 percent of Americans classified as having “low levels of digital readiness.” A total of 42 percent of people have a moderate understanding of the digital world and the rest have a high level of readiness. Those with lower levels of readiness tend to be older people, or lower income earners with little educational attainment, said Scott Wallsten, vice president for research and senior fellow of the Technology Policy Institute.


In addition to having a skills problem, there is also a trust problem, Horrigan said. “Being digitally ready is about having the skills to use online applications, but also trust in new ways of carrying out tasks that require people to share a lot of information about themselves and about their households.”


To assess people’s digital readiness, Horrigan surveyed people about their knowledge of basic technological terms. These included terms like: cookies, spyware and malware, apps, refresh, reload, and QR code. This is a reliable method, Horrigan said, because previous studies have shown that people’s knowledge of these terms track closely with their ability to perform online tasks.


Does that mean people are digitally illiterate if they don’t know what a QR code is? Wallsten said no, not necessarily. Digital readiness doesn’t mean the same thing to everyone.


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Google sets up Community Site For Translate Service | TheNextWeb.com

Google sets up Community Site For Translate Service | TheNextWeb.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Google today launched a new community site to help improve Google Translate, its free online language translation service.


Aimed at language connoisseurs and professional translators, it can be used to rate and compare existing translations, as well as create new ones and match words to their correct counterparts. Over time, Google said it will give contributors more ways to pitch in and offer better “visibility” regarding how the submissions are being used to improve its translation tools.


“We will also localize Community pages to support your preferred display language,” Google added in a blog post.


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Map of Pangea With Current International Borders | MentalFloss.com

Map of Pangea With Current International Borders | MentalFloss.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The good people at Open Culture recently shared this map of Pangea with the present day country names.


If the band ever gets back together, here's who your nation's neighbors would be.


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Colombian Student Facing A Minimum Of Four Years In Prison For Uploading An Academic Article To Scribd | Techdirt.com

Colombian Student Facing A Minimum Of Four Years In Prison For Uploading An Academic Article To Scribd | Techdirt.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Upload a document to Scribd, go to prison for at least four years. Ridiculous and more than a bit frightening, but in a case that has some obvious parallels with Aaron Swartz's prosecution, that's the reality Colombian student Diego Gomez is facing. In the course of his research, he came across a paper integral to his research. In order to ensure others could follow his line of thinking, Gomez uploaded this document for others to view.

According to Gomez, this was a common citation practice among Colombian students.


The important thing is to make a correct citation, attributing researchers’ work by indicating their name and year of publication and, of course, not claiming the work of another researcher, but to recognize it and value it. Therefore, what we usually do is to reference the findings and make them available to those who need them.


The paper's author obviously disagreed and sued Gomez. But unlike civil lawsuits in the US, copyright-related lawsuits in Columbia carry with them the threat of imprisonment.


Under the allegations of this lawsuit, Gomez could be sent to prison for up to eight years and face crippling monetary fines.


To be clear, Gomez did not try to profit from the paper. He also wasn't acting as some sort of indiscriminate distributor of infringing works. But under Colombian law, none of that matters. But to really see who's to blame here for this ridiculous level of rights enforcement, you have to look past the local laws, past the paper's author and directly at the US government.


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18 Graphs That Show What The New York Times Talks About | BuzzFeed.com

18 Graphs That Show What The New York Times Talks About | BuzzFeed.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The New York Times just launched a cool data tool called Chronicle that graphs mentions of words and phrases over time.


It’s a fascinating look at what the paper and the country cared about since 1851.


Try it out! It’s awesome.


Here’s a few we checked out:


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ESA mission operators prepare for post launch control of twin Galileo satellites | GizMag.com

ESA mission operators prepare for post launch control of twin Galileo satellites | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Space Administration's (ESA)  post launch team are ready to guide and take control of a twin set of Galileo satellites, undertaking a number of procedures and adjustments in order to ready the pair for orbital duties. The satellites are due to be hefted into orbit together atop a Russian made Soyuz rocket on August 21 from the ESA's launch site situated in French Guiana.


The post launch team is in essence responsible for the safety of the multi-million dollar satellites from the moment of the final separation. Any number of things can go wrong as the satellites are readied for hand over to the Galileo Control Center, demarcating the beginning of the operational period of the twins life in space.


Potential mistakes during this phase could render the satellites effectively useless. For example, a failure in the deployment of the solar arrays used to power one of the satellites could leave it dead in space, no more than another piece of space junk to be monitored as a further threat to the ever increasing constellations of operational satellites.


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NASA seeks commercial satellites to talk to Mars | GizMag.com

NASA seeks commercial satellites to talk to Mars | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You can land the most advanced spacecraft in history on Mars, but if you can’t keep in touch with it, it might as well be so much scrap. To prevent that from happening, NASA has issued a Request for Information (RFI) to investigate the feasibility of using private satellites to provide communications into the 2020s between Earth and the fleet of exploration probes operating on and around Mars.


Though the US and European orbiters and rovers are state-of-the-art hardware, they still rely on radio-link communications systems from the 1960s. The rovers are able to communicate directly with Earth, but they only have limited power and during the Martian night they’re often out of the necessary line of sight, so they use the orbiters with their more powerful transmitters as relays.


This arrangement works, but it has a couple of problems. For one, using radio, even the orbiter links have very limited bandwidth, so only so much information can be transmitted at any time.


But the other big problem is that this relay system depends on NASA’s Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and ESA’s Mars Express orbiter.


These will soon be joined by NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) and ESA’s ExoMars/Trace Gas Orbiter, but after that, no more Mars orbital missions are currently planned.


According to NASA, this means that by the next decade gaps could appear in the relay network as older orbiters fall out of service.


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Chandra X-ray Observatory celebrates 15th anniversary with new supernova images | GizMag.com

Chandra X-ray Observatory celebrates 15th anniversary with new supernova images | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today is the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is one of NASA's "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope. Since its launch, its x-ray vision and high sensitivity have helped us to better understand the universe.

Chandra orbits at 139,000 km (86,500 miles) above the Earth, which is more than a third of the way to the moon. This helps it to avoid being affected by the Earth's shadow when making observations. It is used to detect x-rays from very hot areas of the universe, such as supernova stars and clusters of galaxies. In order to do so, it uses a nested group of four highly sensitive mirrors. When x-rays strike the mirrors, they are focused onto electronic detectors. In this way, Chandra is able to produce extremely detailed images.


NASA likens Chandra's resolving power (the ability to read two points that are close together) to being able to read a stop sign from 12 miles (19 km) away. It can observe x-rays from particles up until to the last second before they fall into a black hole. Despite these capabilities, the power required to run Chandra is just 2 kW, which is about the same as a hair dryer.


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How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy | ATC | NPR.org

How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy | ATC | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A story that ran last Sunday on All Things Considered about a sixth-grader's science fair project has elicited not just criticism but controversy.


Since the student's project built on the work of scientists, she's been accused this week of being a who earlier work.


We think those charges are not just overblown but inaccurate.

A bit of background. As our notes, Lauren Arrington, who is now 13, conducted an experiment that explored the levels of salinity of water in which lionfish could live.


That's an important question in Florida, where Lauren lives, because the ocean-dwelling fish is now invading inland waterways. The state has imposed a on imports of live lionfish that takes effect Aug. 1.


Lauren's project also received coverage from and , among other outlets. After our story aired, a researcher named Zack Jud that his own discoveries about lionfish had been misattributed to Lauren in media coverage.


"My name has been intentionally left out of the stories, replaced by the name of the 12-year-old daughter of my former supervisor's best friend," he wrote. "The little girl did a science fair project based on my PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED DISCOVERY of lionfish living in low-salinity estuarine habitats."


His post was widely shared and picked up considerable media coverage on its own. We looked into the matter and decided that while our story and headline may have overplayed the impact of Lauren's project — as by our standards editor — she had in fact done original work. (We have updated the Web version of the All Things Considered story in ways that are noted on the page.)


There appears to be no question that Jud has not just conducted pathfinding research on lionfish in Florida but been a public advocate about the issue, giving numerous talks in public forums and speaking with media outlets about it.


So what did Lauren add to the discussion?


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8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid | Tech News | HuffPost.com

8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid | Tech News | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

People assume that iPhones, laptops and Netflix are evidence of progress. In some ways, that's true. A moderate amount of Googling, for instance, can be good for your brain, and there are apps that can boost brain function and activity.


Yet tech advancements also come with some unintended consequences. Our brains being "massively rewired" by tech, says neuroscientist Michael Merzenich in The Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains, a Pulitzer-nominated 2011 book by Nicholas Carr. Merzenich warns that the effect of technology on human intelligence could be “deadly.”


That got us thinking. How exactly is technology messing up our brains?


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UT: Teenage Girl Creates Engineering Curriculum Now Being Used In Her High School | HuffPost.com

UT: Teenage Girl Creates Engineering Curriculum Now Being Used In Her High School | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Utah teen created an engineering curriculum that is now being used in her high school and is being distributed to schools throughout the country.


Amber Barron, who recently graduated high school and will be attending the University of Utah in the fall, developed the curriculum to help students participate in engineering fairs, according to local outlet KUTV.


"Engineering fair is similar to science fair, except you create a new innovation. I also authored an engineering fair curriculum to help guide that process and help students understand how to do that better," she told the outlet.


Now, her former Jordan School District physics teacher, Mrs. Craig, will be using the curriculum in her classroom. Craig favors it because it's “short and designed for students to read, not for teachers to read,” per KUTV.


Barron is a champion for the importance of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. After winning a scholarship in March 2014, Barron told Utah outlet The Deseret News, "Through my participation in science, specifically engineering and physics, I have developed logical reasoning and thinking skills.”


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