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SC: eMagazines arrive at Richland Library | Columbia Star

Richland Library customers can now access nearly 300 magazines from anywhere in the world—be it their local library, the comfort of their own home, or the other side of the globe.

 

Part of the library’s recent service enhancements, the new eMagazine collection is free and available to customers in downloadable, digital magazine formats for iPad, iPhone, Android, Mac, and PC platforms as well as the Kindle Fire.

 

The collection includes a mix of popular and niche titles including Good Housekeeping, US Weekly, Martha Stewart Living, Consumer Reports, The Economist and more. As the service grows, more than 200 additional titles— including a number of foreign language publications— will be added for check out and download.

 

“Our new eMagazine collection allows customers the ability to access their favorite magazines freely,” said Richland Library Director of Literacy and Learning Tony Tallent. “Not only can they browse magazines on almost every computer in the library but they will also have access to iPads for use at each location. If a customer checks out and downloads a magazine to their personal device, it’s theirs to keep for as long as they like.”

 

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Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
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Libraries Dust Off Quiet Image With Innovations | Stav Ziv | Newsweek.com

Libraries Dust Off Quiet Image With Innovations | Stav Ziv | Newsweek.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

These aren’t your grandmother’s libraries. Well, they are, but they’re tackling projects that would have been inconceivable two or three decades ago.

On Friday, the Knight Foundation announced the winners of its latest Knight News Challenge, which asked: “How might we leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities?”

The foundation's fundamental goal is to ask, "How can we make sure Americans have access to the news and information so they can be active participants in our democracy,” says John Bracken, vice president for media innovation. “Libraries are really key in improving Americans’ ability to know what’s going on around them.”

Over the past several years, Knight has posed a dozen such questions as calls for proposals, focusing on open government, health data or other areas. “One of the ways we use this contest is to better understand trends,” explains Bracken. The previous round in 2014 had asked, “How can we strengthen the Internet for free expression and innovation?” When three of those winners were libraries, it helped inform the next challenge.

The foundation announced eight winners Friday at the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. They’ll receive grant amounts of between $130,000 and $600,000 each. Another set of 14 winners will get smaller grants from Knight’s Prototype Fund to test earlier-stage ideas.

“It looks more like a design firm than what the stereotypical approach in libraries is,” Bracken said on Thursday, peering at a room where the winners were participating in a design thinking workshop.


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No-Tech Board Games That Teach Coding Skills to Young Children | Matthew Farber | MindShift | KQED.org

No-Tech Board Games That Teach Coding Skills to Young Children | Matthew Farber | MindShift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Thanks in part to STEM education initiatives and the tech boom, coding in the classroom has become more ubiquitous. Computer programming tasks students to persistently work to solve problems by thinking logically. What’s more, learning how to code is a desired 21st century career skill.

There are several digital games designed for kids as young as 5 that turn coding into a fun activity, such as Kodable and Scratch Jr. But some game designers are going further back to programming’s fundamentals by creating physical games that can’t be found in any app store.


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NYC Street art: Scribbles behind the wardrobe | Alex Rayner | The Guardian

NYC Street art: Scribbles behind the wardrobe | Alex Rayner | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

New York City was once the home of graffiti culture, so it's fitting that the latest development in street art is also taking place in the Big Apple: graffiti restoration.

Within the past year, two highly-prized, old school graffiti works have been retouched on the walls of lower Manhattan, while, this summer, a third work has been repainted in its entirety onto the brickwork of the Lower East Side. Proof, perhaps, that the city that in the 1990s rid many of its buildings of sprayed tags and burners has fallen back in love with its bygone public artists.

In May 2007, the developers at 151 Wooster Street in Manhattan's SoHo district pulled back the gypsum boards to uncover an unprecedented collection of long-lost aerosol trails. Michael Namer, a partner in Alfa Development, had been told by the building's previous landlord that a Jean-Michel Basquiat work lay hidden in the building somewhere.

His suspicions were piqued further when he learned that the eighth floor had served as an apartment for art critic and magazine editor, Edit deAk, during the late 70s and early 80s. Yet it was Namer's son, Matthew, who made the discovery. Though the pair didn't find one neatly-formed work behind the walls, the art they did uncover was perhaps of greater significance: a floor-to-ceiling hash of tags, throw-ups and burners belonging to such old school graffiti writers as Fab 5 Freddy, Futura 2000, Nesto, Ramellzee, as well as Basquiat.

The works were a little haphazard and adolescent, yet, save for a few missing patches where later tenants had installed plumbing, the images were remarkably well kept. Keen to preserve it further, the Namers called on renowned New York art conservationist, Harriet Irgang. Though more used to working with damaged oils and canvas, Irgang managed to remove and remount the graffiti to a lightweight panel, using a tissue paper, cheesecloth, adhesive, chisels and stiff fabric. Having gone on display at 151 Wooster towards the end of last year, the mural is due to join the collection of a major museum.

Architects overseeing a similar redevelopment at nearby 260 West Broadway weren't quite so fortunate. Todd Ernst and Frank Servidio had suspected that the space they were redeveloping into a three-storey apartment contained a Keith Haring mural, as it had once served as a gallery for the School of Visual Arts, Haring's alma mater. They discovered one of Haring's primal graff works behind a cupboard, yet the piece was too fragile to be removed.


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Going to a public college isn’t as affordable as it used to be | Danielle Douglas-Gabriel | WashPost.com

Going to a public college isn’t as affordable as it used to be | Danielle Douglas-Gabriel | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Michael Bayne has done everything you’re supposed to do to avoid taking on too much debt for college. He lives off-campus to save money on housing. He’s always working at least one job — sometimes two. And he enrolled at an in-state public school, Arizona State University.

But it’s not nearly enough. The $2,500 in grants Bayne received this semester covered less than half of his tuition at ASU. A decade ago, the same amount of aid would have been enough to pay his entire bill.

“My parents don’t have money to help me, so to help pay for tuition, pay for books, pay for everything, I work a full-time job,” he said. “And I still have $17,000 in student loans.”

It used to be that students such as Bayne could attend a public university and graduate with little to no debt. Then came the recession, when state governments slashed funding of higher education and families began paying higher tuition bills.

Now, even as the economy recovers and taxpayer revenue is pouring back in, states have not restored their funding, and tuition keeps rising, leaving parents and students scrambling to cover costs.


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FL: How one woman launched the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, 50 years ago | Lennie Bennett | Tampa Bay Times

FL: How one woman launched the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, 50 years ago | Lennie Bennett | Tampa Bay Times | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“Why not have an art museum in St. Petersburg?"


So mused a wealthy woman to herself sometime in the late 1950s.

And so began the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, which opened its doors Feb. 7, 1965. It transformed the cultural landscape of the city, becoming an institution that was so much more than it had to be, committed from the beginning to the high standards of major museums. It rallied a broad demographic to embrace it as a source of pride and pleasure.

The museum is marking its 50th anniversary with "Monet to Matisse — On the French Coast," an exhibition loaded with marquee names that opens with free admission on Saturday, the same date as that first opening. Wine Weekend: Cheers to 50 Years, with more marquee names but from the wine world (both vintners and wine labels), will contribute collective toasts to the occasion at a tasting, auction and dinner on Saturday and brunch on Sunday.

Margaret Acheson Stuart would be delighted.

Her story, intertwined with the museum's founding, has become something of a legend with attendant truths often exaggerated for drama.

Mrs. Stuart (1896-1980) was no parvenue when she decided to pursue this idea. St. Petersburg had been her primary residence for about 10 years as it had for other family members. They began visiting the area when she was a child. Her father, Edward Goodrich Acheson, had become wealthy as an inventor and was a colleague and friend of Thomas Edison, who had invited him to visit Edison's winter home in Fort Myers.

Mrs. Stuart was a shy, cultivated woman. Her greatest love was art and she was familiar with all the major museums in New York and Europe.

She didn't need a museum in St. Petersburg; she had the means to travel anywhere, anytime to visit one. But her love of St. Petersburg was such that she wanted to add a cultural resource that would provide the joy that art had always given her.

St. Petersburg was beginning to grow into more than a winter haven for elderly snowbirds. The city continued to chafe at comparisons to Tampa across the bay, with its bigger banks and corporate headquarters downtown. A cultural focus, which Tampa lacked, could raise St. Petersburg's profile. The city would soon revive a long-studied proposal to build an arena and performing arts theater, which became the Bayfront Center on the downtown waterfront at First Street and Fourth Avenue S. It also opened in 1965.

In 1961, Mrs. Stuart, then in her 60s, approached city officials with her proposal, pledging $150,000 toward construction costs, a $1 million endowment and at least $10,000 as an annual contribution for operating costs. It would be named the Museum of Fine Arts. Her name would not be attached to it because she wanted the community to feel a sense of ownership. And it would be free.

She asked the city to convey a 4-acre parcel of land at Beach Drive and Second Avenue NE, overlooking the waterfront. An old building on the site would be demolished.


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12 Nuggets of 21st-Century Learning | Ken Kay Blog | Edutopia.org

12 Nuggets of 21st-Century Learning | Ken Kay Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this year as I was preparing for a series of presentations at annual school leaders and administrators events, several of my fellow EdLeader21 members suggested that I compile a list of my favorite 21st century resources -- tools and practices that introduce and encourage the 4Cs (critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity) in our schools. It was great fun pulling this list together, and I'd like to share it with you.


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Kideville Aimed at Bringing 3D Printing and Urban Planning Skills to Students | TE Edwards | 3DPrint.com

Kideville Aimed at Bringing 3D Printing and Urban Planning Skills to Students | TE Edwards | 3DPrint.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It’s all about the children at Kidesign, an ed-tech startup aimed at building educational kits and bringing 3D printing into school curricula.

Alberto Rizzoli and Dejan Mitrovic say they decided to turn the workshops they ran for 4 years into scalable projects that would allow teachers to build a kit composed of a term-long series of lessons.


Mitrovic, a London-based design entrepreneur from Belgrade, Serbia, graduated from the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London with an MA+MSc in Innovation Design Engineering before founding Kidesign. He also works as a tutor in design enterprise at the Royal College of Art, Ravensbourne College, and Imperial College London.


“We needed something that allowed children to learn all the skills to 3D print something from scratch, so we mixed everything into a city-planning project called Kideville,” Rizzoli says.


Made up of 12 to 14 lessons, Kideville begins with 8-to-12-year-old students. The students all receive individual tool kits which serve as the jumping off point of their personal projects.


Each tool kit contains a brief card which is categorized around something each student might be passionate about like science, sports, or food, and the briefs contain simple requirements on how the students can build an architecture and position objects.


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What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning? | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org

What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning? | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You know the hardest thing about teaching with project-based learning? Explaining it to someone. It seems to me that whenever I asked someone the definition of PBL, the description was always so complicated that my eyes would begin to glaze over immediately. So to help you in your own musings, I've devised an elevator speech to help you clearly see what's it all about.


An elevator speech is a brief, one- or two-sentence response you could give someone in the amount of time it takes to go from the first floor to the second floor in an apartment building. I like this visual, and I use it with my students because getting to the point and encapsulating the gist of something is vital in today's speaking- and writing-heavy world.

So the elevator opens up, a guy walks in and out of the blue asks you, "What the heck is project-based learning anyway?" I don't know why he would ask that, but for the purposes of this fantasy, it seems that any Joe-off-the-street is fascinated by your response.

You respond accordingly: "PBL is the act of learning through identifying a real-world problem and developing its solution. Kids show what they learn as they journey through the unit, not just at the end."

"That's it?" the guy asks.

"Well, no," you reply. "There's more to it than that, but this is your floor, and we're out of time." He gives you a brief nod of thanks and departs, leaving you to think of all the richness that this definition does not, in fact, impart.

After all, if we just look at that definition, it doesn't state certain trends in PBL.


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"It's Not What's Wrong with the Children, It's What's Happened to Them" | Jennifer Ng'andu Blog | Edutopia.org

"It's Not What's Wrong with the Children, It's What's Happened to Them" | Jennifer Ng'andu Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It has been said to me many times that it's the child who is acting out that needs you the most. And yet, all too often, the systems that are most likely to deal with young people in crisis do more damage than good.

A recent report from the Juvenile Law Center on how to improve outcomes for young people in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems underscores this point. The report, which was sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), points out that the juvenile justice system relies heavily on a strategy of harsh punishment when its real goal should be helping and healing young people who are struggling.

When young people have behavioral challenges, the system usually asks, "What is wrong with this child, and how do we stop it?" Instead, they ought to be asking, "What happened to this child, and how do we help them?"

We see the same problems in our education system as well. For example, children who are exposed to traumatic events in early childhood are more likely to act out in school. Preschools all too often respond to that behavior by suspending or expelling children. Children of color are especially vulnerable to harsh discipline. Consider recent data (PDF, 2.1MB) from the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, which shows that children of color are far more likely to be suspended or permanently expelled from preschool. For example, black children account for 18 percent of the preschool population, but represent 48 percent of suspensions.

These preschool suspensions are particularly troubling because of how they might shape a child's future pathway. A suspension may or may not change a child's behavior, but what is certain is that it provides the first touch of punishment that may latch on and follow that child throughout his or her education and life experiences.


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A holistic approach to behavioral issues--I think this ties into the mind and body connection. Health bodies equal healthy minds!

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Sculptor Transforms Maine Fishermen's Trash Into Treasure | Tom Porter | MPBN.net

Sculptor Transforms Maine Fishermen's Trash Into Treasure | Tom Porter | MPBN.net | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A New York-based artist has become an unlikely source of revenue for a lot of Maine lobstermen. Internationally-renowned sculptor Orly Genger makes massive works of art using rope - particularly discarded lobster line.


Genger's latest project is a monumental sculpture to be installed in South Korea next year, utilizing more than 3 million feet of rope. And to craft the piece, she's prepared to pay fishermen good money for outdated trap lines they don't have much use for.


There's a saying back in England - "Money for old rope" - meaning to get payment for something which is seemingly worthless. Easy money, in other words. Well, that phrase is now a reality for many Maine lobstermen, thanks to the world of modern art.


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'The Queen of Code' Gives The Lowdown On Grace Hopper | Jackie Dove | The Next Web

'The Queen of Code' Gives The Lowdown On Grace Hopper | Jackie Dove | The Next Web | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Considering the scandalous lack of women entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley, and the debased treatment some receive in the industry, it can be hard to remember that women helped form the backbone of computing when it mattered most.

‘The Queen of Code,’ a brand new 16-minute film from actress Gillian Jacobs, serves up a humorous and inspiring reminder that there is indeed a Mother of Computing. Her name was Grace Hopper: mathematics professor, US Navy Admiral, instrumental in creating the first compiler and the COBOL programming language, popularizing the terms “bug” and “debugging” and much more in her long career.

Starting in World War II, the US government famously recruited women into both the workforce and the war effort as the men were sent off to the front. Many of those women became “human computers,” working in teams to hand-calculate ballistics trajectories.


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Creating Characters with Music | Gaetan Pappalardo Blog | Edutopia.org

Creating Characters with Music | Gaetan Pappalardo Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“You want to write a great story? Create a character. Make everyone fall in love in him. Then get him in trouble.” -- Bruce Coville

While a great story will keep an adult “with the writer,” a great character is what children crave. And usually it begins with a graphic of some sort, a character sketch. That’s why the illustrations are so integral to a great picture book. I’ve heard many authors admit that a cover can make or break the book, and most of the time the cover of the book showcases one or more of the main characters. And why not? That character, proudly displayed on the cover, was probably the reason the book was written in the first place. So, heck, why not teach kids to begin with a character when they’re frantically searching for a storyline?

When I was a wee-little music fan, you could find me huddled around a record player singing about rock-n-rollin’ all night and partying every day. KISS just fascinated me. And for good reason–– they are all characters. They have nicknames like Starchild and Spaceman, breathe fire, and launch rockets off the ends of their guitars (At 60+ years old, they are still doing this stuff). I would sit for hours staring at the album covers imagining painted faces singing the songs. Then the radio became my primary method of listening to music. The images disappeared and so did my visual connection with the artist. I didn’t get to see them as much. Late night TV was, well… too late for me and I was too young to attend concerts. Then, BOOM!

I want my Mtv!

Videos flooded the television! I prayed for my favorite song to morph into a music video, and then waited up all night to see it through droopy eyelids. Then, “What? I had no idea that person looked like that!” I see you nodding your head. How many times have you listened to your favorite song over and over again, then one day you finally see the artist perform on TV (nowadays it’s YouTube) and you say, “Huh?” The singing voice rarely matches physical characteristics, I know. I can vividly remember listening to Nirvana, then finally catching a glimpse of Curt Kobain. I had no idea that big, scratchy-screamy voice would come from a mousy-blonde-wearing-a-cardigan type of guy. Right?


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4 Easy Steps to Transmedia Screenwriting | Dr. Chester Elijah Branch | Media Shift | PBS.org

4 Easy Steps to Transmedia Screenwriting | Dr. Chester Elijah Branch | Media Shift | PBS.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

So you are a film student or filmmaker and you’re interested in telling a story that will stay with your audience beyond the “fade out.”


Let’s say you want a webisode to go viral. Or, a couple of years ago, you heard Disney and Fox talking about transmedia.


Now you’re wondering how to stay on trend with these big distribution companies. How would you even begin to write, shoot and produce a story that is “transmedia” ready?

There are four key elements you can pay attention to when creating your work that makes it easier to transition into something interactive and cross-platform.

The first tip is to be sure the story you’re telling has what it needs to be transmedia.


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NASA, Boeing and SpaceX outline future of commercial manned spaceflight | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA, Boeing and SpaceX outline future of commercial manned spaceflight | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For several years, NASA and its private enterprise partners have been working on the space agency's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) to provide an astronaut ferry service from US soil to the International Space Station (ISS). Now a panel from NASA, Boeing, and SpaceX has outlined the latest timetable leading up to the first commercial flights.

The two companies were selected last year by NASA to develop privately owned and operated US spacecraft to ferry crews to the ISS.. When certified, the Boeing CST-100 and SpaceXDragon V.2 (AKA Crew Dragon) will be able to travel to and from the ISS carrying up to seven passengers or a mixture of passengers and cargo. Being capable of remaining on station for 210 days, they will double as lifeboats; allowing ISS crews to expand to seven people. According to NASA, the extra crew will allow the time available for scientific experiments to grow from 40 to 80 hours per week.

When fully deployed, Boeing and SpaceX will provide NASA with two independent systems for sending astronauts back and forth from the ISS.


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Using Old Tech (Not Edtech) to Teach Thinking Skills | Raleigh Werberger Blog | Edutopia.org

Using Old Tech (Not Edtech) to Teach Thinking Skills | Raleigh Werberger Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I've been trying to use Google Docs to good effect in my ninth grade history classroom. It's a critical tool in that it lets me see the students puzzle out answers to their questions (especially with a heavy reliance of the "see revisions" function).

I've viewed classroom technology as the means to sharing knowledge, in addition to acquiring or manipulating it. Yet I find that not only has the computer itself become something of a distraction, but the students aren't making enough use of the tech’s "share-ability" -- that is, they struggle to work effectively together on it, and to have their ideas cohere in an intelligible way. It occurred to me that co-editing in a Google Doc is a skill that itself needs to be taught and practiced before it can become effective in the classroom.

I also started thinking that perhaps one fault of technology is that it brings the world to the student, rather than spurring the student to get up out the chair and go find it. I have noticed personalities in the class that like to work standing up, or who find reasons to walk around while thinking. Could there be a way to restore a kinesthetic element that had begun to disappear from the room with my reliance on web tools?


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How Improv Can Open Up the Mind to Learning in the Classroom and Beyond | Linda Flanagan | Mind Shift | KQED.org

How Improv Can Open Up the Mind to Learning in the Classroom and Beyond | Linda Flanagan | Mind Shift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Long before Amy Poehler became famous for her comic roles as Hillary Clinton on “Saturday Night Live,” and as indefatigable bureaucrat Leslie Knope on “Parks and Recreation,” she was a college freshman looking for something to do outside class.


During her first week on campus, she auditioned for the school’s improvisational theater group, “My Mother’s Fleabag,” and discovered a passion. “Everyone was getting to act and be funny and write and direct and edit all at the same time,” she writes in her memoir, Yes, Please. “My college life sort of exploded in happiness,” she adds.


What Poehler found liberating as a performer — the free-wheeling, creative and judgment-free nature of improv — is what makes it an appealing way to learn.


Improvisation is well-known as comedy and entertainment, but during the past decade it has grown as a method of teaching and learning as well, says Robert Kulhan, adjunct professor of business administration at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, and CEO of Business Improvisations.


Today, improv is offered in the theater departments of many colleges and some high schools, according to Kulhan. As well, improv troupes around the country offer short workshops to school kids on specific subjects, and teach the basics of the art form in afterschool programs and summer camps. ImprovBoston, a 30-year old nonprofit comedy theater, sends staff into local schools to perform assemblies and share the fundamentals of improv to teachers and students.


The first rule of improvisation is “yes, and,” meaning that anyone’s contribution to the group discussion is accepted without judgment. “We always talk about the four ‘c’s of improv: creativity, critical thinking, collaboration and communication,” says Deana Criess, director of ImprovBoston’s National Touring Company, about how she teaches the form to seventh-graders.


To persuade students to abandon their fear of mistakes, she insists on unconditional support to all answers, then works to build trust among the group and invite risk-taking. “Once we have confidence in our ideas and in our teammates, we can free ourselves up to have fun,” she says. “So support, trust, risk, confidence and fun. That’s what improv is all about,” Criess says.


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Why poor kids don’t stay in college | Jeff Guo | WashPost.com

Why poor kids don’t stay in college | Jeff Guo | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It is a Tuesday in October and Terrell Kellam is running late. He usually wakes up at 5:30 a.m. to catch the first of two buses that will take him from southwest Baltimore to Morgan State University, just north of the city. With a good connection, making it to his college classes might take an hour and a half.

But his bus pass has been acting up recently. He spends the morning looking for spare change. He’s going to miss his first class. And, because he forgot to pack food from home, he doesn’t have anything to eat for the rest of the day. He goes hungry pretty often.

Today, more people than ever are going to college, yet the nation’s overall college graduation rate has remained low. Only 59 percent of students who began as freshmen at a four-year college in the fall of 2006 received their diplomas within six years. Meanwhile, the high school completion rate reached a historic high: In 2012, four out of five students graduated high school within four years.

College students who come from low-income backgrounds, such as Kellam, 19, see the least chance of college success. They are less likely to begin college, less likely to finish.

Even after controlling for ability, the gap in college graduation rates persists. Low-income students who scored between 1200 and 1600 on their SATs were half as likely to finish college than their counterparts in the top 25 percent of the income distribution, according to one analysis of data from 2000. Economic distress can dim a student’s chances by forcing her to take on part-time jobs or reduce her credit load to help out at home.

In short, the afflictions of poverty don’t just disappear after a student gets into college.


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Visualizing the Digital Divide in Chicago | Will Flanagan | ChicagoInno.streetwise.co

Visualizing the Digital Divide in Chicago | Will Flanagan | ChicagoInno.streetwise.co | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This year, a number of city initiatives - including the Smart Chicago Challenge (SCC) and the Chicago Public Library's WiFi lending program - will be launched in an effort to shrink the city's 'digital divide,' the gap between those with ready-access to the internet and computers and those without it.

In fact, when the SCC says that its mission is to make "Chicago the most dynamic digital city in the world," it means that it's out to fill in the holes where residents are either lacking connectivity, digital skills, or both.

One way that the city works to address this digital divide is through Connect Chicago, a loose network of more than 250 places in the city where internet and computer access, digital skills training, and online learning resources are available for free. These locations include public libraries, public housing locations, city colleges, senior centers and more.

But, in order to truly attack the digital divide, you need to know what it looks like. Below is a map of every Connect Chicago location in the city. (The map was created using data from the city's Data Portal). The city and civic organizations use maps like this to identify the neighborhoods and areas where there is a significant gap between public buildings with internet access. Take a look:


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CA: Some doctors will no longer see patients who refuse vaccinations | Faith Gardner | DailyKos.com

CA: Some doctors will no longer see patients who refuse vaccinations | Faith Gardner | DailyKos.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since the measles outbreak that began at Disneyland in December (and news is now saying originated overseas), the virus has spread to several states and Mexico.


Recently, unvaccinated high school students in Huntington Beach were temporarily banned from school. This week, 70 unvaccinated students in Riverside were also temporarily banned from school to prevent the outbreak from spreading. In Marin County, a father asked an elementary school to ban unvaccinated students from attending to protect his son who is recovering from leukemia and can't be vaccinated.

Now it appears come doctors are beginning to refuse to see patients who will not vaccinate.

With California gripped by a measles outbreak, Dr. Charles Goodman posted a clear notice in his waiting room and on Facebook: His practice will no longer see children whose parents won't get them vaccinated.

"Parents who choose not to give measles shots, they're not just putting their kids at risk, but they're also putting other kids at risk — especially kids in my waiting room," the Los Angeles pediatrician said.

Recently 30 Bay Area babies were put under isolation after being exposed to measles. One Alameda County woman named Jennifer Simon, a mother of one of those isolated babies, voiced her anger to the press about this issue. Her baby was exposed in a waiting room due to an unvaccinated child who contracted the disease.


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Washington educator testifies on ESEA reauthorization | Colleen Flaherty | Edutopia.org

Washington educator testifies on ESEA reauthorization | Colleen Flaherty | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Rachelle Moore has been teaching first grade in Seattle for the past five years in a high-needs school and has seen what can make the difference in her classroom.

“I have a wide range of learners, kids from all different backgrounds, a number of which are minority students, live in poverty and lack early educational experiences, as well as students who have been afforded more opportunities that help them prepare to be successful students,” said Moore.

“Being at my school, I’ve learned how important it is to kids who maybe don’t have the same opportunities that I had growing up be given really high quality teaching and be seen as an individual, a whole child, and feel like they’re a valuable part of our classroom.”

To share her experiences and an educator voice with Congress, Moore traveled to Washington D.C. to testify before the Senate Committee on Health, Educator, Labor and Pensions (HELP) to discuss what should be included in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

“I’m here today to share a teacher’s vision of what’s happening in our schools, and hopefully help them shape education policy,” said Moore. “There is no ‘average’ student. Each student is shaped by individual experiences, and those experiences must be taken into consideration when shaping policies geared towards improving student success.”


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WI Gov. Scott Walker among 2016 GOP hopefuls plugging into Koch network | Amanda Litvinov | NEA.org

WI Gov. Scott Walker among 2016 GOP hopefuls plugging into Koch network | Amanda Litvinov | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For years EdVotes has covered how Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has made life tougher for public school students and educators, not to mention working families.

Just days after his re-election in November, Walker promised more of the same with his pledge to expand the private school voucher scheme used to funnel more than $300 million in taxpayer money to unaccountable private schools.

Now we’re forced to imagine the devastation to our nation’s public schools and workers’ rights if Walker held the highest office in the land: Gov. Walker was one of four GOP presidential hopefuls invited to speak at a closed-door meeting of the Koch network in Palm Springs this weekend.


Walker shared the spotlight with thee other high-profile invitees with presidential aspirations: Sens. Marco Rubio(R-FL), Tex Cruz (R-TX) and Rand Paul (R-KY).


Walker’s campaign manager confirmed late last week that the governor intended to speak at the meeting.


So what does such an invitation mean? The opportunity to court some of the richest donors and influencers in U.S. politics. It is estimated that in the 2014 midterm elections, four Koch groups ran more than 12,000 TV ads, at a cost exceeding $25 million.


It was Koch money that fueled Iowa State Senator Joni Ernst’s successful bid for a U.S. Senate seat.


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NH Supreme Court decision says educators’ retirement benefits can be changed at will | Brian Washington | NEA.org

NH Supreme Court decision says educators’ retirement benefits can be changed at will | Brian Washington | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A significant blow has been dealt to the retirement security of educators, fire fighters, police officers and other state workers who serve their communities in New Hampshire.

The State Supreme Court has ruled that those public servants–including teachers and education support professionals–who pay into the state retirement system can have their benefits changed or diminished by the legislature at any time. The court ruled that retirement benefits are not a contract.

The court’s ruling, released earlier this month, follows so called pension reforms enacted by the state legislature last year.

The NEA-NH, which represents more than 17,000 active, retired, and future educators across the state, released a statement about the court’s ruling. Bottom line: the legislature can change the terms of retirement benefits at will.


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The 5 questions you need to ask about charter schools | Brian Washington | NEA.org

The 5 questions you need to ask about charter schools | Brian Washington | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Education activists across the country are being put on alert to help raise awareness about the need for higher standards and more accountability for charter schools to protect the public’s investment in these schools and ensure that students’ needs are being met.

Next week charter school industry insiders will kick off what they call “School Choice Week,” a campaign to promote unaccountable charter schools—which are at the center of several reports concerning waste, fraud, and abuse—as an alternative to traditional public schools.

However, the Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) is asking pro-public education activists to use this time to demand answers from politicians and charter school proponents about what it calls “essential gaps in accountability and fraud looming over the charter sector.”


5 Questions to Ask During School Choice Week

CPD’s “5 Questions to Ask During School Choice Week” will help public education advocates demand answers to the critical issues surrounding charter schools and their impact on students and public education. The questions include the following:


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Teacher: I see the difference in educational privilege every day. I live it. I am disgusted by it. | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

Teacher: I see the difference in educational privilege every day. I live it. I am disgusted by it. | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Here is a post by a Colorado teacher who vividly explains the difference in the lives of fortunate students and the less fortunate students whom she teaches.


Her last post on this blog was a nuanced look into the psyche of some students of color who live in poverty, which you can read here.


This public school teacher often blogs anonymously under the name Shakespeare’s Sister at Daily Kos. She teaches 11th grade AP Language and Composition in the Denver area.

Here is Shakespeare’s Sister newest post for this blog:


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Never trust a corporation to do a library’s job | Andy Baio | The Message | Medium.com

Never trust a corporation to do a library's job - The Message - Medium

As Google abandons its past, Internet archivists step in to save our collective memory

Google wrote its mission statement in 1999, a year after launch, setting the course for the company’s next decade:

“Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

For years, Google’s mission included the preservation of the past.

In 2001, Google made their first acquisition, the Deja archives. The largest collection of Usenet archives, Google relaunched it as Google Groups, supplemented with archived messages going back to 1981.

In 2004, Google Books signaled the company’s intention to scan every known book, partnering with libraries and developing its own book scanner capable of digitizing 1,000 pages per hour.

In 2006, Google News Archive launched, with historical news articles dating back 200 years. In 2008, they expanded it to include their own digitization efforts, scanning newspapers that were never online.

In the last five years, starting around 2010, the shifting priorities of Google’s management left these archival projects in limbo, or abandoned entirely.

After a series of redesigns, Google Groups is effectively dead for research purposes. The archives, while still online, have no means of searching by date.

Google News Archives are dead, killed off in 2011, now directing searchers to just use Google.

Google Books is still online, but curtailed their scanning efforts in recent years, likely discouraged by a decade of legal wrangling still in appeal. The official blog stopped updating in 2012 and the Twitter account’s been dormant since February 2013.

Even Google Search, their flagship product, stopped focusing on the history of the web. In 2011, Google removed the Timeline view letting users filter search results by date, while a series of major changes to their search ranking algorithm increasingly favored freshness over older pages from established sources. (To the detriment of some.)

Two months ago, Larry Page said the company’s outgrown its 14-year-old mission statement. Its ambitions have grown, and its priorities have shifted.


The Internet Archive is mostly known for archiving the web, a task the San Francisco-based nonprofit has tirelessly done since 1996, two years before Google was founded.


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