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The youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow, support open source today | opensource.com

The youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow, support open source today | opensource.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

At my public library job, all day long I help people use the library's public access computers. At the end of a long day's work, I enjoy kicking back and listening to some YouTube music videos. One way I do this is to search YouTube for new Bob Dylan cover songs. I search YouTube for: Bob Dylan cover, this week.

 

Imagine my happy surprise to come across this fabulous multitrack video of Knockin on Heaven's Door. But wait a second, is that a Tux penguin poster hanging on the wall behind this musician? Indeed it is. Hmmm, was that poster placed there intentionally, or was it just an accident?

 

I just had to find out, so I asked by sending a message to the musician, Emily Fox. Emily replied that she is a devoted fan of open source software and used the OpenShot video editor to create this music video. Warms my heart to see some of the most talented of the younger generation choosing open source creative tools. This story doesn't end there, though.

 

Last week Emily Fox uploaded her latest music video, an original called, Please, Mr. Snowman, with its own simple, but delightful, animated graphics created in GIMP. If you had any doubts about the depth of her musical and creative talents before, those doubts are completely erased in this video. The vocals are rich and deep. The layered instruments, clean and well-balanced. I cannot wait to see what Emily Fox makes next.

Meanwhile, this started me wondering about the youth I encounter in my public library work. Some of the most talented of these youth are closely attached to using open source software. One middle school youth I rely on for help tells me he won't touch any electronics device that uses DRM (digital rights management). I, myself, am more of a moderate on this issue, but I can appreciate his point of view.

 

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Can You Really Be A Copyright Expert If You Think Copyright Should Last Forever? | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Can You Really Be A Copyright Expert If You Think Copyright Should Last Forever? | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A couple months ago, a so-called "expert" in copyright law in Australia, Dr. George Baker, the director for the Centre of Law and Economics at the Australian National University, argued that rather than pushing back on over aggressive copyright law, New Zealand ought to be making copyright law a lot more strict, to the point that he actually argued copyright should last forever:

"Why not have copyright law like property law - ie it lasts forever?"

And then he claimed -- really -- that if copyright law were infinite it "would in turn increase the investment in industries like music." Does he have any support for this at all? If you look through the actual academic evidence on these things, no one has ever found any proof that longer and longer copyrights leads to greater investment. It's not as though Universal Music is going to think "gee, if only copyright lasted another century we'd invest more in it now." No one makes decisions like that. A key study from 1998 (the last time the US extended copyrights) in fact found that increasing copyright terms would "not be a useful" as an incentive to create more content. Even more ridiculous is Baker's focus on music, as that same study pointed out that, of all the major types of content, the revenue generated by copyright extension would have the smallest impact on music.

But Baker isn't done with his ignorance. He's also against any kind of fair use/fair dealing, even for research. Yes, this is an academic arguing against research exceptions to copyright.


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GA: GPTC to launch film and TV production program | Sandra Brands | The Rockdale News

GA: GPTC to launch film and TV production program | Sandra Brands | The Rockdale News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Dr. Jabari Simama, President of Georgia Piedmont College, told the Rockdale County Board of Commissioners Tuesday night the school will be introducing a three-track film and television production program this fall.

"We have been generally aware of film and television production's impact on your economy and tourism," he said, adding that the college had wanted to introduce the production program for some time. "We have decided to move up the date for the film and television production program [to begin]."

The first tract will begin this September, and is aimed at continuing education and workforce development residents who "want to be part of the industry and want to get training quickly," he said.


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Teachers Online Resources, Loans of Materials and On-Site Progams | National Gallery of Art

Teachers Online Resources, Loans of Materials and On-Site Progams | National Gallery of Art | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Borrow free-loan teaching packets and DVDs or access online lessons, activities, and interactives to bring art to your classroom, home, non-profit tv station, or other learning setting. All materials are free.


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The elephant in the classroom: the World Bank and private education providers | Bretton Woods Project

The elephant in the classroom: the World Bank and private education providers | Bretton Woods Project | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Following May’s Korea World Education Forum, co-convened by the World Bank, with targets to widen access and promote states’ domestic spending on education, questions have arisen about the Bank’s agenda for global education. The focus now moves to the July UN Financing for Development conference (see At Issue July 2015).


This forum will, among other things, set the financial goalposts for the post 2015 framework: the sustainable development goals (SDGs), including an education goal, which will be agreed at the UN’s September SDG summit.


However, one of the biggest questions remains: not what the education goal will be, or even the size of the financing envelope, but who will deliver the goals. The ‘elephant in the room’ that is being ignored remains the role of the private sector, given the World Bank and UN’s increasingly different visions of how the education goal should be met.

Meanwhile, the Global Partnership for Education (GPE), a multilateral partnership of governments, donors, civil society and including the World Bank, has been heavily courting the private sector.


At a June event, at UK development think tank the Overseas Development Institute, GPE’s board chair and former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard regretted that the education community hadn’t “engaged with the private sector in a meaningful way”, and spoke of the lessons that could be learnt from the health sector’s engagement, including “how they involve the business community in the global supply chains”. She outlined areas that she believed were ripe for private sector support: “deploying books … technology which is integrated with the education model … teacher professional support, learning materials”.


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FTC Staff Conducts Follow Up Survey of Kids’ Apps | Federal Trade Commission

The FTC’s Office of Technology Research and Investigation conducted a follow-up survey examining what information kids’ app developers are collecting from users, whom they are sharing it with, and what disclosures they are providing to parents about their practices. The findings will be announced in a series of blog posts, with the first one being released today.

The survey follows up on two FTC 2012 kids’ app surveys, Mobile Apps for Kids: Current Privacy Disclosures are Disappointing and Mobile Apps for Kids: Disclosures Still Not Making the Grade. These earlier surveys found that many apps shared kids’ information with third parties without telling parents, and that parents had little or no access to information about the apps’ privacy practices.

The new survey looked at 364 kids’ apps in Google Play and the Apple App Store, and in today’s post the FTC examined what privacy disclosures are available to parents.


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DailyDirt: Ready Or Not... Back To School | Michael Ho | Techdirt

DailyDirt: Ready Or Not... Back To School | Michael Ho | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Schools in the US vary quite a bit by location. A school in one neighborhood could be vastly better than another school just on the other side of town.


There are obvious factors that play into this situation, and unsurprisingly, some political campaigns can cloud the progress towards solutions that might improve lagging schools.


Clearly, not all schools can be created equal, but there could be some ways to close the "achievement gap" without simply knocking down the higher-performing schools.


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How The Natural History Museum Is Changing The Ratio Of Women And Minorities in STEM | Lydia Dishman | Fast Company

How The Natural History Museum Is Changing The Ratio Of Women And Minorities in STEM | Lydia Dishman | Fast Company | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We know the problem: there aren’t enough women pursuing STEM careers and there are about to be a lot fewer. There are fewer women earning engineering and computer science degrees than there were 10 years ago.

We understand the impact: homogenous workplaces aren’t good for business as they report lower profits, less engagement, productivity, and innovation.

We also know that one of the best ways to ensure the future of STEM is a more equitable one is to engage girls while they are very young (think: GoldieBlox), keep them interested in learning necessary skills through middle and high school (hello, Girls Who Code), and throw in a strong female lead to watch on television to further the message that women can be scientists and engineers.

But science itself—specifically the scientific method of asking a question and testing through experiments—may hold the key to what will eventually right the lopsidedness of gender in STEM.

"It is going to take a lot of different approaches in combination," says Ellen Futter, "and testing and experiments to see what works best." As president of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), Futter is leading the charge to do just that.


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Chicago, IL: DuSable Museum of African American History Names Perri L. Irmer President and CEO | PR Newswire

Chicago, IL: DuSable Museum of African American History Names Perri L. Irmer President and CEO | PR Newswire | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The DuSable Museum of African American History has a new President and CEO. The board of trustees has selected Perri L. Irmer, an attorney, architect, public policy advocate and facilities management professional with a broad range of experience in executive management, construction and fundraising.

Irmer, 56, a Chicago native and lifelong resident of the Hyde Park-Kenwood community, brings to the position a wealth of qualifications including business, technical, legal and administrative experience, along with a commitment to public service and the advancement of the African American community. She starts September 14.

The DuSable was founded by Dr. Margaret Burroughs to preserve African American history and be a center for thought leadership. Irmer says she will focus on fulfilling Dr. Burroughs' vision, raising the museum's visibility globally, expanding its donor base, increasing community engagement and outreach, and collaborating with other diverse educational and cultural institutions.

Irmer also sees the museum playing an important role in community and economic development initiatives. She says she would like to pursue cross-pollination with leading institutions including universities, arts and theater organizations, and to connect with corporate boards, technology companies and other business leaders who seek to better support their minority client and customer base and broaden their civic engagement dialogue. Irmer expects to lead collaborative partnerships with other cultural-identity and social justice groups as well.


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You Don't Have to Be Good at Math to Learn to Code | Olga Khazan | The Atlantic

You Don't Have to Be Good at Math to Learn to Code | Olga Khazan | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I’m not in favor of anyone learning to code unless she really wants to. I believe you should follow your bliss, career-wise, because most of the things you’d buy with all the money you’d make as a programmer won’t make you happy. Also, if your only reason for learning to code is because you want to be a journalist and you think that’s the only way to break into the field, that’s false.

I’m all for people not becoming coders, in other words—as long they make that decision for the right reasons. “I’m bad at math” is not the right reason.

Math has very little to do with coding, especially at the early stages. In fact, I’m not even sure why people conflate the two. (Maybe it has to do with the fact that both fields are male-dominated.)

Victoria Fine, Slate’s strategy director, has a good piece up this week about how she taught herself how to code despite hating math. Her secret? Lots and lots of Googling.


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Rochester Institute of Tech To House 3D Printing R&D Center | Dian Schaffhauser | Campus Technology

Rochester Institute of Tech To House 3D Printing R&D Center | Dian Schaffhauser | Campus Technology | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

3D printing and additive manufacturing will be the prime topic of research and development at a new center opening at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).


The Additive Manufacturing and Multifunctional Printing (AMPrint) Center will draw participation from multiple university and corporate partners. Funding is coming from Empire State Development, New York's state economic development agency.

The state's Centers for Advanced Technology program, which selected the institute from a number of applicants to lead the new center, is designed to spur technology-based applied research and economic development in New York.

The new center will be eligible to receive $921,000 each year for up to 10 years if it passes annual performance evaluations. Participants in the venture include Clarkson University and State University of New York at New Paltz as well as Xerox, GE Research, Corning, Eastman Kodak and Stratasys-owned MakerBot.


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Renowned Stanford professor launches new education think tank | Emma Brown | WashPost.com

Renowned Stanford professor launches new education think tank | Emma Brown | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Renowned Stanford education professor Linda Darling-Hammond is launching a new think tank aimed at shaping education policies nationwide.

With offices in Palo Alto, Calif., and Washington, the new Learning Policy Institute will seek to link research and policy, two worlds that are too often disconnected, Darling-Hammond said.

“It is time to get serious about how to support and enable our education system to respond to the massive changes in learning that some other nation’s systems have been addressing more systemically, with much better results, over the last two decades,” Darling-Hammond wrote in the Huffington Post on Thursday.


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Microsoft and iUrban Teen spark interest in STEM jobs for kids of all backgrounds | Microsoft News Center

Microsoft and iUrban Teen spark interest in STEM jobs for kids of all backgrounds | Microsoft News Center | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Alexia Franklin, 16, wants to fight cybercrime. Samuel Goode, 13, wants to use technology to reduce child poverty. Ceon Duncan-Graves wants to make life easier with 3D-printed things. What kind of things?

“Maybe teleportation,” said Ceon, a 13-year-old eighth-grader from Illahee Middle School in Federal Way, south of Seattle. “That would be cool.”

The students were among roughly 80 teens at a day-long STEM exploration event at Microsoft’s Redmond campus Wednesday, where there was no shortage of big ideas and passion for STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).

Microsoft partnered with Seattle nonprofit iUrban Teen for the day of technology immersion, which included a diverse group of speakers from Microsoft, the White House, Yale University and “Grey’s Anatomy.” Students also toured the Microsoft Envisioning Center and The Microsoft Garage.

“One of the great things about technology is there’s lots of opportunities. There’s opportunities at big companies. There’s opportunities at small companies,” Tony Prophet, Microsoft corporate vice president of Education Marketing, told the students.

“The opportunities available to you, just from getting an education, particularly a STEM education, are limitless.”


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Axe throwing, sword forging – but no sacrificing – at Norway's Viking school | Helen Russell | The Guardian

Axe throwing, sword forging – but no sacrificing – at Norway's Viking school | Helen Russell | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We’ve had the TV shows, we’re getting the theme park and now the Viking invasion is extending to higher education in Norway.

Students at Seljord Folkehøgskule, a college 90 miles west of Oslo, are embarking on a new programme to learn traditional Viking skills such as sword forging, jewellery making and roof thatching, as well as the essential art of axe-throwing.

The year-long Viking course is the first of its kind and came about after the headteacher, Arve Husby, decided to introduce more traditional courses into his curriculum. “Our school used to be really well known for handicrafts, but these started to die off,” said Husby.

“So I had a brainstorming session with other teachers and someone suggested Viking skills to get more students working with their hands.”


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TX: Laptops making their way across the District | El Paso Independent School District

Students at Bowie High School swarmed the hallways to transition from first period to second carrying with them the latest instructional material/fashion statement: a black messenger bag with a brand-new HP Stream laptop in it.

The laptops are part of EPISD PowerUp, an initiative to establish active learning strategies in the District. The District continued to distribute thousands of laptops to high-school students across the El Paso Independent School District.

Two EPISD technology services teams are making the rounds today at Bowie and Burges high schools, carrying with them nearly 3,000 laptops. By next week, more than 16,000 students will have laptops in hand once the teams finish visiting all EPISD high schools.


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World's first magnetic "wormhole" produces magnetic monopole | Darren Quick | GizMag.com

World's first magnetic "wormhole" produces magnetic monopole | Darren Quick | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It may not instantly whisk you to far-flung reaches of the universe like the gravitational wormholes of Stargate, Star Trek and Interstellar, but researchers at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) claim to have created the first experimental wormhole that links two regions of space magnetically.

Using metamaterials and metasurfaces, the scientists for UAB's Department of Physics created a sphere that from the outside is magnetically undetectable. The sphere consisted of an external layer with a ferromagnetic surface and an inner layer made of a superconducting material, while crossing it from one side to the other and forming a tunnel was a cylinder made of a rolled ferromagnetic sheet.


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What is a Fab Lab? | FabFoundation.org

Fab Lab is the educational outreach component of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA), an extension of its research into digital fabrication and computation.


A Fab Lab is a technical prototyping platform for innovation and invention, providing stimulus for local entrepreneurship. A Fab Lab is also a platform for learning and innovation: a place to play, to create, to learn, to mentor, to invent.


To be a Fab Lab means connecting to a global community of learners, educators, technologists, researchers, makers and innovators- -a knowledge sharing network that spans 30 countries and 24 time zones.


Because all Fab Labs share common tools and processes, the program is building a global network, a distributed laboratory for research and invention.

A Fab Lab is comprised of off-the-shelf, industrial-grade fabrication and electronics tools, wrapped in open source software and programs written by researchers at MIT’s Center for Bits & Atoms. Currently Fab


Labs include a laser cutter that makes 2D and 3D structures, a sign cutter that plots in copper to make antennas and flex circuits, a high-resolution NC milling machine that makes circuit boards and precision parts, a large wood router for building furniture and housing, and a suite of electronic components and programming tools for low-cost, high-speed microcontrollers for on-site rapid circuit prototyping.


Originally designed for communities as prototyping platforms for local entrepreneurship, Fab Labs are increasingly being adopted by schools as platforms for project-based, hands-on STEM education.


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WV: Go to Green Bank to listen to the stars | Zielinski | Science News

WV: Go to Green Bank to listen to the stars | Zielinski | Science News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Long before we reached Green Bank, W.Va., the gleaming white dish of a massive radio telescope stood out against the lush green vegetation of a remote valley four hours southwest of Washington, D.C. By then, the car radio received only static, and our cellphones hadn’t gotten a signal in hours. To get even closer to the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope — the world’s largest movable land object — we were required to turn off those useless phones and our digital cameras.

“The big battle we have here is to prevent any interference from getting to our telescope,” says Steve White, leader of the telescope’s microwave engineering group.

Many objects in the universe, such as quasars and clouds of hydrogen gas, give off radio waves, but they are weak and easily overwhelmed by human-made radio signals. That is why the telescope is in such a remote spot with strict rules about electronic equipment that could interfere with signals. Several rooms in the facility, including the telescope’s control room, are encased in copper mesh, creating big Faraday cages that prevent stray signals from escaping toward the telescope’s detectors. Even the microwave in the public café has shielding (SN: 5/16/15, p. 5). “We don’t want to self-interfere,” White says.


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Do The Right Thing | Sarah Witham Bednarz | Association of American Geographers

Do The Right Thing | Sarah Witham Bednarz | Association of American Geographers | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It is that time of the year again. I hear the scurry of my colleagues sorting through old folders, re-organizing class notes. The copy machine is chugging along, spewing syllabi. The line outside the IT staff office is long with instructors seeking assistance in posting to their websites or the campus learning management system. The odd student is lurking, interested in changing his or her schedule or seeking advice on courses to take. Anticipation is in the air. A fresh start. The angst of the first class.

Alas, for too many of my fellow geographers the start of the teaching season is greeted with groans. It means less time for research. Earlier this year I read a particularly bitter yet entertaining commentary in the Chronicle of Higher Education by Jacques Berlinerblau entitled Teach or Perish. In his broad ranging rant about higher education, Berlinerblau makes a few points that resonate with me.


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NYC: Seniors can go back to school too | Mark Lord | Queens Chronicle

NYC: Seniors can go back to school too | Mark Lord | Queens Chronicle | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While many “back to school” advertisements are aimed at those who still thrill to finger paints and cartoon-decorated backpacks, the approach of fall also brings tremendous opportunities for older adults to continue their own education.

Best of all, many of the classes are available at little or no cost.

The Queens Library system, for example, offers a wide variety of free classes for seniors, among which computer training is particularly popular. Those classes, which introduce students to the modern computing technology, covering topics including the internet, email, Google and Facebook, are available at the Cyber Center at the Central Library (89-11 Merrick Blvd. in Jamaica) as well as at most of the library’s other branches.

The library’s Adult Learner Program offers adult classes in learning and practicing English, as well as adult basic education, with a focus on reading and mathematics skills and preparation for obtaining a high school diploma. The programs are available at seven ALP centers around the borough.


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IN: AT&T grant funds high-tech academy for youth | Louise Ronald | Pal-Item.com

IN: AT&T grant funds high-tech academy for youth | Louise Ronald | Pal-Item.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Thanks to a $15,000 grant from AT&T’s Aspire education initiative, Richmond, Indiana youth will have an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of computer programming.

Creation of The Greenhouse was announced Wednesday by AT&T Indiana President Bill Soards, State Sen. Jeff Raatz and Jason Whitney, executive director of the Innovation Center, to a gathering of about 20 community members.

The first Greenhouse project will be a free coding academy for ninth-graders.

Whitney described the academy as a six-week course with meetings once a week. Students will receive basic training in computer coding and learn about technology-based careers — including opportunities at local companies. Fifteen participants for the first session are being recruited through Richmond High School.


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Educator of the Week Gets S.T.E.A.M.'ed Up! | Jordan Lim | National Geographic

Educator of the Week Gets S.T.E.A.M.'ed Up! | Jordan Lim | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Connie Boltz incorporates visual arts and parent participation to inspire students’ personal and academic growth. She has been an educator for 20 years and currently teaches at Colvin Run Elementary in Vienna, Virginia.

Activity: S.T.E.A.M Kids
Subjects: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math
Grade: Kindergarten

Tell us about your activity.

The S.T.E.A.M. Kids project empowers students to explore their passions through art. Students create “S.T.E.A.M. Kid” glyph figures, symbolizing what they love about S.T.E.A.M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) and character traits they value.

Using the visual arts as the tool of understanding, the project aims to help students identify their goals and interests, make global connections, and find relationships between new and familiar information.

Each glyph is unique in design, but also in what character traits and academic interests are represented.

Different shapes and colors symbolize different characteristics: orange rhombus for Courage, green square for Responsibility, blue triangle for Respect, red circle for Compassion, and a yellow star for Honesty.

As these figures are displayed, students have a chance to learn about what characteristics their classmates identify with.


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DMCA aims to promote connectedness, digital creativity | Yale News | Yale.edu

DMCA aims to promote connectedness, digital creativity | Yale News | Yale.edu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This past April the alabaster exterior of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library transformed into an illuminated canvas for the “Lux: Ideas Through Light” projection festival. The project was one of the latest intersections between art and technology at Yale — other examples of which include a massive LED canvas at the engineering café Ground, showcasing student-made videos, and the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design, where a film composer used a 3D printer to build his own instrument.

One of the first Yale entities to support such cross-disciplinary collaborations is the Digital Media Center for the Arts (DMCA). Formed in 1998, the DMCA (located at 149 York St.) is a research hub for hands-on art production that equips Yale students — regardless of their majors — with essential skills needed to communicate in a 21st-century creative economy.


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Award-winning environmental education curriculum now available free online | Derek Markham | TreeHugger.com

Award-winning environmental education curriculum now available free online | Derek Markham | TreeHugger.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Think Earth's environmental curriculum, which is designed for preschool through middle school, is being updated, revised, and made freely available online.

In order to make our way toward a more sustainable world, it's important that we're not only taking direct action now, such as expanding initiatives that reduce pollution and increase renewable energy production, but it's also key that we're giving future generations a good understanding of our environmental issues and challenges, because ultimately, they will be the ones inheriting them.

And there's no better time to start educating kids about the environment than early on in their lives, when they are still getting a grasp on the basics, because so much of what we learn during our formative years ends up influencing the rest of our lives, for better or for worse.


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World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead | David Szondy | GizMag.com

World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A smartphone with a 16-megapixel camera may seem cutting edge, but it won't impress astronomers now that the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has given the green light to start construction of the world's largest digital camera. With a resolution of 3.2-gigapixels (enough to need 1,500 high-definition television screens to display one image), the new camera is at the heart of the 8.4-meter (27.5-ft) Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) now under construction atop Cerro Pachón in Chile.

Not surprisingly, the new camera is no lightweight. The three-mirrored device is the size of a small car, tipping the scales at over 3 tons (2.7 tonnes). It's the result of a wide partnership of institutions that include Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and SLAC, contains 189 sensors, has a resolution equivalent to 800,000 eight-megapixel cameras, and includes a filter-changing mechanism and shutter for viewing different wavelengths from the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared.


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In the US, computer science is a privilege, and that's a real shame | Alice Truong | Quartz.com

In the US, computer science is a privilege, and that's a real shame | Alice Truong | Quartz.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There’s a reason why Silicon Valley has a reputation for being the land of young, white, privileged brogrammers.

If you look at the makeup of students today, white children who grow up in higher-income households with educated parents are more likely to have a computer at home and access to computer science classes, according to a new survey from Gallup that was commissioned by Google. (The report surveyed 1,673 students in seventh to 12th grades, 1,685 parents, 1,013 teachers, 9,693 principals, and 1,865 school district superintendents.)

Students who are black, Hispanic, and/or from lower income backgrounds are less likely to have computers at home or any type of computer science instruction. Hispanic students in particular have the lowest rate of access to computers—both at home and at school. (The survey did not include any data for Asian students. A Gallup spokesman said there weren’t “enough respondents in that group to break out and report separately.”)


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