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How college students find and use information | Social Media in Higher Education

How college students find and use information | Social Media in Higher Education | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

My friends over at Project Information Literacy have just released this infographic to summarize their recent research on how college students find and use information.

 

Data in this infographic come from PIL’s publications Balancing Act: How College Students Manage Technology While in the Library during Crunch Time and Truth Be Told: How College Students Evaluate and Use Information in the Digital Age.

 

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Map of Pangea With Current International Borders | MentalFloss.com

Map of Pangea With Current International Borders | MentalFloss.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The good people at Open Culture recently shared this map of Pangea with the present day country names.


If the band ever gets back together, here's who your nation's neighbors would be.


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Colombian Student Facing A Minimum Of Four Years In Prison For Uploading An Academic Article To Scribd | Techdirt.com

Colombian Student Facing A Minimum Of Four Years In Prison For Uploading An Academic Article To Scribd | Techdirt.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Upload a document to Scribd, go to prison for at least four years. Ridiculous and more than a bit frightening, but in a case that has some obvious parallels with Aaron Swartz's prosecution, that's the reality Colombian student Diego Gomez is facing. In the course of his research, he came across a paper integral to his research. In order to ensure others could follow his line of thinking, Gomez uploaded this document for others to view.

According to Gomez, this was a common citation practice among Colombian students.


The important thing is to make a correct citation, attributing researchers’ work by indicating their name and year of publication and, of course, not claiming the work of another researcher, but to recognize it and value it. Therefore, what we usually do is to reference the findings and make them available to those who need them.


The paper's author obviously disagreed and sued Gomez. But unlike civil lawsuits in the US, copyright-related lawsuits in Columbia carry with them the threat of imprisonment.


Under the allegations of this lawsuit, Gomez could be sent to prison for up to eight years and face crippling monetary fines.


To be clear, Gomez did not try to profit from the paper. He also wasn't acting as some sort of indiscriminate distributor of infringing works. But under Colombian law, none of that matters. But to really see who's to blame here for this ridiculous level of rights enforcement, you have to look past the local laws, past the paper's author and directly at the US government.


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18 Graphs That Show What The New York Times Talks About | BuzzFeed.com

18 Graphs That Show What The New York Times Talks About | BuzzFeed.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The New York Times just launched a cool data tool called Chronicle that graphs mentions of words and phrases over time.


It’s a fascinating look at what the paper and the country cared about since 1851.


Try it out! It’s awesome.


Here’s a few we checked out:


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ESA mission operators prepare for post launch control of twin Galileo satellites | GizMag.com

ESA mission operators prepare for post launch control of twin Galileo satellites | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The European Space Administration's (ESA)  post launch team are ready to guide and take control of a twin set of Galileo satellites, undertaking a number of procedures and adjustments in order to ready the pair for orbital duties. The satellites are due to be hefted into orbit together atop a Russian made Soyuz rocket on August 21 from the ESA's launch site situated in French Guiana.


The post launch team is in essence responsible for the safety of the multi-million dollar satellites from the moment of the final separation. Any number of things can go wrong as the satellites are readied for hand over to the Galileo Control Center, demarcating the beginning of the operational period of the twins life in space.


Potential mistakes during this phase could render the satellites effectively useless. For example, a failure in the deployment of the solar arrays used to power one of the satellites could leave it dead in space, no more than another piece of space junk to be monitored as a further threat to the ever increasing constellations of operational satellites.


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NASA seeks commercial satellites to talk to Mars | GizMag.com

NASA seeks commercial satellites to talk to Mars | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You can land the most advanced spacecraft in history on Mars, but if you can’t keep in touch with it, it might as well be so much scrap. To prevent that from happening, NASA has issued a Request for Information (RFI) to investigate the feasibility of using private satellites to provide communications into the 2020s between Earth and the fleet of exploration probes operating on and around Mars.


Though the US and European orbiters and rovers are state-of-the-art hardware, they still rely on radio-link communications systems from the 1960s. The rovers are able to communicate directly with Earth, but they only have limited power and during the Martian night they’re often out of the necessary line of sight, so they use the orbiters with their more powerful transmitters as relays.


This arrangement works, but it has a couple of problems. For one, using radio, even the orbiter links have very limited bandwidth, so only so much information can be transmitted at any time.


But the other big problem is that this relay system depends on NASA’s Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and ESA’s Mars Express orbiter.


These will soon be joined by NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) and ESA’s ExoMars/Trace Gas Orbiter, but after that, no more Mars orbital missions are currently planned.


According to NASA, this means that by the next decade gaps could appear in the relay network as older orbiters fall out of service.


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Chandra X-ray Observatory celebrates 15th anniversary with new supernova images | GizMag.com

Chandra X-ray Observatory celebrates 15th anniversary with new supernova images | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today is the 15th anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is one of NASA's "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope. Since its launch, its x-ray vision and high sensitivity have helped us to better understand the universe.

Chandra orbits at 139,000 km (86,500 miles) above the Earth, which is more than a third of the way to the moon. This helps it to avoid being affected by the Earth's shadow when making observations. It is used to detect x-rays from very hot areas of the universe, such as supernova stars and clusters of galaxies. In order to do so, it uses a nested group of four highly sensitive mirrors. When x-rays strike the mirrors, they are focused onto electronic detectors. In this way, Chandra is able to produce extremely detailed images.


NASA likens Chandra's resolving power (the ability to read two points that are close together) to being able to read a stop sign from 12 miles (19 km) away. It can observe x-rays from particles up until to the last second before they fall into a black hole. Despite these capabilities, the power required to run Chandra is just 2 kW, which is about the same as a hair dryer.


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How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy | ATC | NPR.org

How Our Story About A Child's Science Experiment Sparked Controversy | ATC | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A story that ran last Sunday on All Things Considered about a sixth-grader's science fair project has elicited not just criticism but controversy.


Since the student's project built on the work of scientists, she's been accused this week of being a who earlier work.


We think those charges are not just overblown but inaccurate.

A bit of background. As our notes, Lauren Arrington, who is now 13, conducted an experiment that explored the levels of salinity of water in which lionfish could live.


That's an important question in Florida, where Lauren lives, because the ocean-dwelling fish is now invading inland waterways. The state has imposed a on imports of live lionfish that takes effect Aug. 1.


Lauren's project also received coverage from and , among other outlets. After our story aired, a researcher named Zack Jud that his own discoveries about lionfish had been misattributed to Lauren in media coverage.


"My name has been intentionally left out of the stories, replaced by the name of the 12-year-old daughter of my former supervisor's best friend," he wrote. "The little girl did a science fair project based on my PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED DISCOVERY of lionfish living in low-salinity estuarine habitats."


His post was widely shared and picked up considerable media coverage on its own. We looked into the matter and decided that while our story and headline may have overplayed the impact of Lauren's project — as by our standards editor — she had in fact done original work. (We have updated the Web version of the All Things Considered story in ways that are noted on the page.)


There appears to be no question that Jud has not just conducted pathfinding research on lionfish in Florida but been a public advocate about the issue, giving numerous talks in public forums and speaking with media outlets about it.


So what did Lauren add to the discussion?


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8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid | Tech News | HuffPost.com

8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid | Tech News | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

People assume that iPhones, laptops and Netflix are evidence of progress. In some ways, that's true. A moderate amount of Googling, for instance, can be good for your brain, and there are apps that can boost brain function and activity.


Yet tech advancements also come with some unintended consequences. Our brains being "massively rewired" by tech, says neuroscientist Michael Merzenich in The Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains, a Pulitzer-nominated 2011 book by Nicholas Carr. Merzenich warns that the effect of technology on human intelligence could be “deadly.”


That got us thinking. How exactly is technology messing up our brains?


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UT: Teenage Girl Creates Engineering Curriculum Now Being Used In Her High School | HuffPost.com

UT: Teenage Girl Creates Engineering Curriculum Now Being Used In Her High School | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Utah teen created an engineering curriculum that is now being used in her high school and is being distributed to schools throughout the country.


Amber Barron, who recently graduated high school and will be attending the University of Utah in the fall, developed the curriculum to help students participate in engineering fairs, according to local outlet KUTV.


"Engineering fair is similar to science fair, except you create a new innovation. I also authored an engineering fair curriculum to help guide that process and help students understand how to do that better," she told the outlet.


Now, her former Jordan School District physics teacher, Mrs. Craig, will be using the curriculum in her classroom. Craig favors it because it's “short and designed for students to read, not for teachers to read,” per KUTV.


Barron is a champion for the importance of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. After winning a scholarship in March 2014, Barron told Utah outlet The Deseret News, "Through my participation in science, specifically engineering and physics, I have developed logical reasoning and thinking skills.”


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Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts | Slate.com

Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts | Slate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Bill Gates was still a teenager, he would sneak out of his family’s house before dawn and ride his bike to a building on the campus of the University of Washington. He had discovered that the university’s huge supercomputers were idle between the hours of 3 and 6 in the morning, allowing the budding computer enthusiast to teach himself how to program—night after night, until the sun came up.


At a young age, Gates was already an autodidact, someone compelled to learn for himself what he needed to know. Over the course of his life, Gates has maintained this habit: He dropped out of college after two years, but he has continued his education through incessant reading and conversing. Michael Specter, a New Yorker writer who profiled Gates for the magazine, has said that the Microsoft founder “is one of these autodidacts who reads, reads, reads. He reads hundreds of books about immunology and biochemistry and biology, and asks a lot of questions, and because he’s Bill Gates [he] can get to talk to whoever he wants.”


Gates is particularly interested in these topics because of his philanthropic work combating disease in developing countries. Another arm of his philanthropy, of course, involves the promotion of technology in education. Many of Gates’ fellow leaders in the ed tech world are also members of the autodidact club. Computer scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, academics—they are a self-selected group of individuals who have schooled themselves in a fast-changing field for which there is no settled syllabus, no well-established curriculum. In turn, their preferences and proclivities have shaped the educational technologies that the rest of us use, as well as the expectations we hold about what ed tech can and should do.


This is no surprise: We all rely on our own experiences in forming our ideas of how learning works. But the experiences of ed tech creators and promoters are notably influential—and notably unusual. Most people are not autodidacts. In order to learn effectively, they need guidance provided by teachers. They need support provided by peers. And they need structure provided by institutions. Amid all the effusions about how ed tech will “change the way we learn,” however, these needs rarely merit a mention. Instead we hear about the individual and his app, the person and her platform, as if teachers, classmates and schools were unnecessary and unwelcome encumbrances.


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Ohio educators testify against corrupt charter school | Education Votes | NEA.org

Ohio educators testify against corrupt charter school | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last week, four former teachers at the Horizon Science Academy gave testimony before the Ohio State Board of Education about serious misconduct at the charter school operated by the Concept charter management company, which has largely operated with limited accountability and oversight.


According to The Plain Dealer,”Testimony to the board from four former teachers at Horizon schools in Dayton accused officials at the school of possibly completing state tests for students, of unqualified teachers, of teachers showing videos day after day in class, of women being treated as second-class citizens and of teachers encouraging sexually harassing behavior toward female students.”


Ed Fitzgerald, who is running for governor against Gov. John Kasich, called on the governor to ask state Superintendent Richard Ross to resign for not investigating the charter schools earlier.


“The Governor should then appoint an independent counsel to investigate these incidents as well as others that may be happening in Ohio’s charter schools. This is what happens when you weaken accountability and oversight. This is a moment for the Governor to show leadership and shake up charter schools that are not only failing to educate Ohio’s children but are also dangerous. It is the absolute minimum the Governor can do for Ohio’s children and families.”


The Ohio Department of Education (ODE)—appointed largely by Kasich—called into question the motives of the educators testifying. An ODE spokesman accused the teachers of participating in an “orchestrated political stunt” and suggested they could face sanctions for not having filed an earlier report.


“It is appalling that ODE officials have chosen to retaliate against the teachers whose charges they previously ignored rather than take them seriously, as Senator Lehner and members of the state board did,” said Ohio Education Association President Becky Higgins. “In light of these outrageous actions, we have no confidence in ODE’s willingness or ability to conduct a fair and responsible probe of the serious charges made by OEA member Matt Blair and other former teachers at the Horizon Science Academy.”


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10 Self-Evaluation Tips for Technology Instructional Specialists | Dr. Stephanie Hatten | Edutopia.org

10 Self-Evaluation Tips for Technology Instructional Specialists | Dr. Stephanie Hatten | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

"Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"


"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to."


"I don't much care where."


"Then it doesn't matter which way you go."


-- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1865


I can usually relate most of my career in integrating technology to a quote or character from Wonderland, such as the role of the Technology Instructional Specialist (TIS) as the Cheshire Cat who asks Alice (the teacher) the questions about her instructional goals for the classroom. Then I use those goals and the teacher's personality to tailor the assistance we give and the devices and programs we integrate. To do all this, the TIS needs to be reflective in their own practice and ask themselves certain questions at the beginning of the year before the integration planning can even begin. We have to know where we are going, or it doesn't matter which way we go.


During a yearlong study of my actions as a campus TIS, I developed a list of ten reflective questions that I ask myself before I enter a new school year. These questions have helped me become more reflective with my actions, have allowed me to focus on the teacher I will be coaching, and assist in planning the differentiated, classroom-embedded, technology staff development of which I am an avid proponent.


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Facebook is no longer a social network. It’s the world's most powerful news reader | Pando Daily

Facebook is no longer a social network. It’s the world's most powerful news reader | Pando Daily | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It was barely two years ago that things were starting to look absolutely awful for Facebook.


Its stock was hitting one new low after another, at one point falling to half of its IPO value. General Motors announced that Facebook ads were basically useless. The same people who named Mark Zuckerberg the Person of the Year began the calls for him to resign. And the whole “teens hate Facebook” line began to emerge, along with accusations that the company overpaid for Instagram.


The perception was that Facebook was sick, and the list of symptoms could have filled a Pepto Bismol commercial. What’s more, the company’s app and gaming platform, which at one point had seemed so promising, was falling apart as Zynga collapsed.


But the disease itself could not have been more clear — Facebook’s mission statement and core value proposition were not working. Maybe people didn’t want to connect with their friends and family anymore. Perhaps all those years of baby pictures and FarmVille sheep had turned them off from The Stream. Or could it have been that youngsters were paranoid about Mom and Dad spying on their social life? Some argued that an “everybody in one place” social network was giving way to specialized niche networks — a clear sign that Facebook was the next AOL or Yahoo.


Everybody was right, insofar as every dissatisfied user probably had a different reason for losing interest.


But as Facebook was losing tens of billions of dollars in valuation, a company thousands of miles away was growing like a weed — BuzzFeed. In fact, during the worst of Zuckerberg’s trials, CEO Jonah Peretti was in the process of raising big dollars at valuations rarely seen in media companies.


We didn’t fully realize it at the time, but BuzzFeed was giving Facebook the ultimate lesson. Through a combination of data savvy, content experimentation, and an almost shameless desire to win, Jonah Peretti was proving that what Facebook users really wanted… was to read shit.


Nobody will give BuzzFeed credit for making us human beings feel better about our species. Even the executives in Palo Alto confess their frustration at how the typical user would prefer a funny cat listicle over a long-form Mother Jones investigation on lead poisoning… by a margin of about 100-to-1. But that isn’t relevant. What BuzzFeed proved was that all people — young, old, black, white, male, female, gay, straight — find great delight in a story that resonates with them. Enough to keep coming back to Facebook.


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Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights | Will Pemble Blog | Edutopia.org

Roller Coaster Middle School: How One Kid's Crazy Idea Took PBL to Thrilling New Heights | Will Pemble Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When my sixth grader Lyle asked if we could build a roller coaster in the backyard, I said yes -- for two reasons.


First, as a dad, it's my job to help my kids do what they want to do. I believe that what kids want and what kids need are usually the same thing. So I've trained myself to listen to their ideas. I look for reasons to say yes, and I look for ways to engage and play with them. Like every dad, I know that my kids are my best chance at changing the world for the better.


Second, I knew that a project this crazy-fun would surely keep the kids' attention, and that there would be fantastic learning opportunities in subjects like math, physics, construction, safety, research, collaboration, and (as it turned out) even media.


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South African Illustrators Redefining the Afro-Aesthetic | AFROPUNK.com

South African Illustrators Redefining the Afro-Aesthetic | AFROPUNK.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Afrocentric aesthetic has become a cliché within itself. It’s been muffled with defunct and ill-informed iconography and filled to brim with afros, fists and animal prints referenced from overly exhausted templates that expired lifetimes ago.


For countless centuries the creative products of Africans have been ornamental to the lives of middle classed Europeans with postcard knowledge of their origins. With our cultural symbols being diluted and simplified to match the drapes of the disinterested tourists who consume them.


A captivating movement of young black illustrators, alternative designers and urban artists has recently emerged South Africa; and it aims to remedy the semiotic misconceptions of Africa by redefining Afrocentrism one pixel at a time. No more shall Africa be enlisted as an influence in the footnotes of visual history.


Our story will be read in our own fonts and embellished in our own imagery. We refuse to let our environment be prescribed by diasporic and colonial pasquinades about our nature. Africa has a dynamic new face, and these are the young names behind it.


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Net Literacy Exceeds 30,000 Computers Repurposed! | Net Literacy.org

In collaboration with fellow nonprofit TeenWorks (www.teenworks.org), Net Literacy’s summer program repurposed 2700 computers during the summer teaching 14 high school students computer repurposing, software, and hardware skills.


These computers will be donated to the families of students without a computer at home.


Net Literacy has increased computer access to over 250,000 individuals through donations to families, public libraries, schools, community centers, afterschool programs, senior centers, literacy centers, and churches with remediation programs for students.


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NASA begins to plan successor to the Hubble and James Webb deep space telescopes | GizMag.com

NASA begins to plan successor to the Hubble and James Webb deep space telescopes | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has assembled a team of scientists and engineers to lay the first tentative plans for a successor platform to the Hubble and James Webb telescopes. The project, currently in the study phase, is being assessed for the technological and financial requirements needed to create so advanced a deep space observation platform.


Currently Hubble is without question NASA's flagship deep space telescope, with each image it captures not only contributing to our scientific knowledge, but also representing a piece of art and inspiration that has captured the minds of a generation. However, NASA cannot simply sit on the laurels of Hubble and stagnate. Instead, the agency is striving to continue to advance our knowledge, and peer deeper into the cosmos.


In this vein, NASA is well on the way to building Hubble's immediate scientific successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. This next step in space exploration comes with a 21 ft (6.5 m) primary mirror, designed in segmented pieces to allow for easy launch. Once the mirror is unfurled, James Webb will represent the largest and most advanced spacefaring telescope ever created, with the ability to image distant objects in long-wavelength visible to mid-infrared bands by utilizing a suite of advanced equipment.


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Astronomers discover exoplanet with longest known year | GizMag.com

Astronomers discover exoplanet with longest known year | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With the aid of NASA's Kepler spacecraft a team of astronomers, including members from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, has discovered an exoplanet with the longest yearly cycle ever recorded. The planet, imaginatively named Kepler-421b, takes an impressive 704 days to orbit its parent, a dim type K star.


The discovery was made by analyzing data from the Kepler spacecraft, which accrued the information over the course of a four year continuous vigil of the patch of sky containing Kepler-421b. The planet was detected using a technique which measures the dip in light as the exoplanet transits over the face of its parent star. Due to the impressive length of Kepler-421b's orbit, only two transits were detected over the entire four year period in which Kepler stood watch.


"Finding Kepler-421b was a stroke of luck," states David Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and lead author on the paper detailing the discovery. "The farther a planet is from its star, the less likely it is to transit the star from Earth's point of view. It has to line up just right."


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Lafayette, LA: Teachers should be treated as professionals | Jonathan Cole OpEd | TheAdvertiser.com

Lafayette, LA: Teachers should be treated as professionals | Jonathan Cole OpEd | TheAdvertiser.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, the Lafayette Parish School system declared a critical teacher shortage. This is a direct result of the inability of the district to retain qualified educators in the happiest city in America.


When I first began teaching 10 years ago, my mentors were the very teachers that taught me as a student. As they became my friends and colleagues over time, they expressed great concern for my future well-being as a young educator in Lafayette. They spoke of a day when teachers would leave en masse because of stressful working conditions. It wasn’t long before their words proved prophetic, as Lafayette lost over a third of its teachers over a five-year period.


They left for many reasons, including state and local reforms that have turned teachers into paper pushers and administrators into enforcers of a flawed accountability system, and a lack of discipline enforcement in classrooms. The situation, as it now stands, is pivotal, and solving the teacher crunch in our district is a complex task with many variables to consider.


Let’s start with some goals we know we can reach.


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8 Tips for Reaching Out to Parents | David Cutler Blog | Edutopia.org

8 Tips for Reaching Out to Parents | David Cutler Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After seven years in the classroom, I feel I'm in a position to offer some advice for how teachers can build and sustain positive relationships with parents -- as well as appropriately handle difficult circumstances.


Following are eight tips that I've learned from experience.


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Putting the A in STEAM | NYTimes.com

Putting the A in STEAM | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An arrangement of test tubes containing color-coded genetic material; a wearable garden that purifies the air; an installation inspired by the periodic table — these artworks all incorporate components of STEM, an educational curriculum that is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. They are currently among more than 40 pieces on view in “Steam,” a new exhibition at ArtsWestchester’s Arts Exchange.


“Steam” takes its name from another educational movement, STEAM, which is STEM with the addition of the “A” for art. Championed by the Rhode Island School of Design and widely adopted by schools, businesses and policy makers, STEAM promotes the premise that innovation in the STEM subjects is enhanced through the arts. “Steam” fills the Arts Exchange with a diverse array of installations, videos and prints, all reflecting aspects of STEM, in their content, creation or both.


The exhibition was curated by Patricia Miranda, an artist and the founding director of Miranda Arts Project Space in Port Chester. In assembling “Steam,” she turned to 31 artists whose practices are influenced by fields including medicine, ecology and subatomic physics.


Nevertheless, Ms. Miranda said, “This is an art show, not a science show. I wanted to show the depth of involvement that artists have with scientific disciplines.” She noted that paint itself is produced through chemical processes. “Artists have always relied on technology,” Ms. Miranda said.


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How to Shoot, Edit & Publish Videos From Your Android Phone | TheNextWeb.com

How to Shoot, Edit & Publish Videos From Your Android Phone | TheNextWeb.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Without meaning to stray to far into truism territory, the core raison d’être of smartphones is that they are designed for many tasks. In a single, compact device you have a mobile phone, digital camera, PC, MP3 player, video player, travel guide, supermarket and any other service you can think of that works online.


Yes, your smartphone is a jack of all trades. But is it a master of any?


Dedicated point-and-shoot digital cameras and lower-end camcorders are surely facing a slow road to extinction, with many modern phones capable of shooting ridiculously high-quality photos and videos. But can your phone really do it all, from start to finish, without connecting up to your PC? Well of course it can.


Here, we take a look at some of the tools and techniques beginners can use to shoot, edit and upload videos from their Android smartphone.


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The DIY World of Maker Tools and Their Uses | Vicki Davis Blog | Edutopia.org

The DIY World of Maker Tools and Their Uses | Vicki Davis Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Maker movement is spreading through schools. You'll see many tools becoming part of unique maker ecosystems in schools based upon teacher expertise and student interests.


(For more about the Maker movement read How the Maker Movement is Moving into Classrooms.)


Let’s look at the most common tools being used in makerspaces.


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Congressmen discuss bipartisan effort to limit federal testing | Education Votes | NEA.org

Congressmen discuss bipartisan effort to limit federal testing | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In heavily tested grades, more than a month of instructional time can be lost to test preparation and administration in a single year. Parents and educators have spoken up—their schools deserve better assessment and more time to teach.


Luckily, there are congressmen on both sides of the aisle who are listening. Rep. Chris Gibson (R-NY) and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) introduced the “Student Testing Improvement and Accountability Act,” which aims to reduce the over-testing in schools put in place by the No Child Left Behind Act.


“This is the first piece of legislation ever introduced in the House of Representatives that would aim to reduce the number of federally mandated tests, which allows teachers to focus on teaching,” said Sinema in a recent telephone town hall with Gibson and over 2,000 educators.


“I was shocked when I learned that, but I’m proud to say that Chris, myself and the other cosponsors have stepped up to say that this is the right thing for our kids and our communities.”


This legislation would assess students in certain grade spans and reduce the number of federally-mandated standardized tests from 14 to six, the same level of testing required before No Child Left Behind was enacted.


“What we’re trying to get away from is this phenomenon of teaching to the test, and we really want to get back to what inspired [educators] in the first place to take on the calling of teaching—your opportunity to really make a difference, to inspire, to educate,” said Gibson. “We want to put the focus back on empowering our teachers.”


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Video Games That Are Actually Educational | Von Ryan de Lacy | TheBitBag.com

Video Games That Are Actually Educational | Von Ryan de Lacy | TheBitBag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We are now in the middle of summer, so any talk about education may seem quite unpatriotic.


But still, one of the secrets of many successful video games is the fact that they can teach you stuff without you even knowing it.


And these games are as enjoyable as they are instructional.


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