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Critical Media Consumption: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict | NAMLE

Critical Media Consumption: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict | NAMLE | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This instructor’s manual was developed as training program aimed at imparting critical media literacy education in teachers and educators.

 

The program was part of the Peace Education Through Media (PET-Med) project in 2010-2011, which was funded by the EU Partnership for Peace Program of the European Commission delegations in Israel, and the West Bank , and conducted jointly by the Veneto Region of Italy, the Netanya Academic College in Israel, and the Palestine-Israel Journal.

 

Its goal is to aid aspiring teachers understand the role of the media in covering war, particularly the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and to adopt a critical thinking approach toward the media, so that they can become an active and critical citizens of the democracy.

 

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Broadband and Minnesota Schools and Libraries: Talking points for policymakers | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I want to thank Minnesota Educational Technology Networks (METN) for sharing their talking points for policymakers (2015) with me. It’s an instructive sheet on what’s going on with technology in the schools today. But also it’s a great example of how to provide information to legislators.


It’s brief with easy statistics and it tells the stories of how the issue impacts constituents. Policymakers are expected to have a huge breadth of knowledge and generally are pretty quick studies.


Technology is difficult for many people who aren’t steeped in it daily so the details can bog someone down but I think it’s very easy to understand and appreciate the services they have described – the services that require continued funding.


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10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans Is ‘Gentrification’s Ground Zero’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com

10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans Is ‘Gentrification’s Ground Zero’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has transformed into “gentrification’s ground zero,” according to historian Megan French-Marcelin. Writing in Jacobin magazine, she dissects the city’s redevelopment and rebranding into a “neoliberal playground for young entrepreneurs.”

“One need only look at the harrowing weeks and months after the storm,” French-Marcelin writes, “to see that reconstruction would be used to implement a series of revanchist reforms that further deregulated labor, undermined unions, diminished educational and employment opportunities for working-class people, and excised public and affordable housing from the speculative urban landscape.”

The evidence to thwart any progressive redevelopment agenda is startling. For example, “In just over a decade—from 1996 to 2007—the city managed to close 85% of the city’s public housing, adopting a system of ‘mixed-income’ projects and vouchers instead.”

When it comes to public education, “within the first few months after the storm, nearly 7,500 predominantly black public school teachers were unilaterally fired, with no process or explanation, the first shot in a relentless battle to dismantle the city’s traditional public schools. In the next few years,” French-Marcelin explains, “education profiteers, led by Teach for America (TFA) and school privatization guru Paul Vallas, turned New Orleans schools into the first all-charter school system in the nation.”


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How The Ballpoint Pen Killed Cursive | Josh Giesbrecht | The Atlantic

How The Ballpoint Pen Killed Cursive | Josh Giesbrecht | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Recently, Bic launched a campaign to “save handwriting.” Named “Fight for Your Write,” it includes a pledge to “encourage the act of handwriting” in the pledge-taker’s home and community, and emphasizes putting more of the company’s ballpoints into classrooms.

As a teacher, I couldn’t help but wonder how anyone could think there’s a shortage. I find ballpoint pens all over the place: on classroom floors, behind desks. Dozens of castaways collect in cups on every teacher’s desk. They’re so ubiquitous that the word “ballpoint” is rarely used; they’re just “pens.” But despite its popularity, the ballpoint pen is relatively new in the history of handwriting, and its influence on popular handwriting is more complicated than the Bic campaign would imply.

The creation story of the ballpoint pen tends to highlight a few key individuals, most notably the Hungarian journalist László Bíró, who is credited with inventing it. But as with most stories of individual genius, this take obscures a much longer history of iterative engineering and marketing successes. In fact, Bíró wasn’t the first to develop the idea: The ballpoint pen was originally patented in 1888 by an American leather tanner named John Loud, but his idea never went any further. Over the next few decades, dozens of other patents were issued for pens that used a ballpoint tip of some kind, but none of them made it to market.

These early pens failed not in their mechanical design, but in their choice of ink.


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CA charter educators move to gain a stronger voice for students | Brian Washington | NEA.org

CA charter educators move to gain a stronger voice for students | Brian Washington | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Education activists all across the nation are working with parents, community leaders, and elected officials to ensure that public dollars invested in charter schools are used to make sure that students get a quality education.

Activists are pushing elected leaders at the local and state levels to adopt the charter school norms put out by the Annenberg Institute at Brown University. The Annenberg standards are designed to promote more transparency and accountability for charter schools and make them more accountable to students, parents, and taxpayers.

However, in the absence of legislation implementing higher standards for charters and more protections for students, many charter school educators are banding together to form a stronger, more collective voice in the workplace—one they can use to make sure students get the best educational experience possible.


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Report: School takeovers deprive African-American and Latino communities of rights

Report: School takeovers deprive African-American and Latino communities of rights | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

According to a new report from The Alliance to Reclaim our Schools, school takeovers and privatization are leading to the disenfranchisement of large numbers of students and their families, mostly in African-American and Latino communities.

School takeovers, sometimes marketed as the “New Orleans Model,” strip districts of local control, placing them under the jurisdiction of politically appointed and unaccountable school boards that community members don’t even have the right to vote for. In many cases, these takeovers are simply a way to put a school district into private hands by removing voters from the equation and shuffling low-income students into charter schools that have been proven to, at best, perform no better than public schools.

According to the report:


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5 unavoidable truths about school funding | Amanda Litvinov | NEA.org

5 unavoidable truths about school funding | Amanda Litvinov | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We know the strategies that help close achievement gaps: Lower class sizes. A broad curriculum. Attraction and retention of highly qualified teachers.

But these strategies are unobtainable without stable, adequate, and equitable funding. And that’s an approach to closing achievement gaps that we’ve never really tried says Bruce D. Baker, a professor in the Department of Educational Theory, Policy, and Administration in the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University.


Baker is routinely frustrated by the pundits and policymakers who claim that America “pours money into failing schools.” We don’t, and we haven’t.


That’s the first thing you should know about school funding.


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Virtual theater opens new doors for performance artists | Kate Abrosimova | Hypergrid Business

Virtual theater opens new doors for performance artists | Kate Abrosimova | Hypergrid Business | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Storytelling is a valuable form of human expression that has been around since the very ancient times. Story itself is essential to so many art forms, and theater is one of them.

We have written before about how virtual reality could be applied to journalism and immersive storytelling. Theatrical “storytellers” are yet another creative group who can benefit from holding performances in virtual settings.

In fact, virtual theater isn’t even new. There are several organizations that already use virtual worlds to produce theatrical live performances for people who have appreciation for acting and playwriting.


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48,000+ students refused the testocracy in Washington State by opting out. This isn't an "anomaly", it's an uprising | Carolyn Leith | Seattle Education

48,000+ students refused the testocracy in Washington State by opting out.  This isn't an "anomaly", it's an uprising | Carolyn Leith | Seattle Education | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

How many students opted out of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) in Washington State? Short answer: More than you probably imagined.

Now that the final numbers are out, let’s dig in and see what happened.

11th Grade

We knew the opt out numbers were going to be huge. Last week’s OSPI report confirmed that. Across the state, the opt out rate for 11th grade was 49.3% for ELA and 52.9% for Math. This translates into:

37,112 students opted out of the English Language Arts (ELA)

39,444 students opted out of Math


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How Too Much Electronic Screen Time Is Making Kids ‘Moody, Crazy and Lazy’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com

How Too Much Electronic Screen Time Is Making Kids ‘Moody, Crazy and Lazy’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Excessive use of electronic devices by children can have alarming effects that may lead them to become “moody, crazy and lazy,” according to a child psychiatrist.

Writing in Psychology Today, Dr. Victoria L. Dunckley argues for an “electronic fast” and offers a look at six physiological mechanisms to explain electronics’ tendency to produce mood disturbance:


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NASA versus Katrina: August 29, 2005 | Nathan Mattise | Ars Technica

NASA versus Katrina: August 29, 2005 | Nathan Mattise | Ars Technica | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina came, the federal levees failed, and chaos ensued in the New Orleans metro area.

By now the damage is well documented. So many people were displaced that New Orleans still only sits at approximately 80 percent of its pre-storm population a decade later. More than 1,200 people died—the most for a US storm since 1928. And 80 percent of the city flooded, causing property damage since estimated at $108 billion by the National Hurricane Center. Almost regardless of metric, Katrina stands as the most devastating Atlantic storm to ever hit the US.

Yet one day before Katrina, Malcolm Wood had to go into work.

Wood lived roughly an hour away in Picayune, Mississippi, and luckily the rest of his family had the means and access to get north to Hattiesburg for safety. But unlike most folks working in Greater New Orleans while living in the Mississippi Delta or Southern Louisiana, Wood’s company refused to shut down on the eve of the storm of the century—despite New Orleans' first-ever mandatory evacuation. It couldn’t. For starters, billions in prior and future work were on the line. The livelihood of Wood’s direct coworkers—more than 2,000 colleagues—was too. Heck, the entire national operation that Wood was a part of likely hung in the balance depending on whether his facility, just 15 miles east of the Lower 9th Ward, could survive.

So Wood, a large and capable man who’d already logged 20-plus years of employment at the same location, set out to do the job he was assigned. Facing direct impact from a 400-miles-across stormfront and 120+ mph winds, he was part of a 38-person team that had to ride out Hurricane Katrina on site to defend the company’s 832-acre water adjacent facility. The goal? Keep as much of it intact and online as possible.

This task was daunting—“We knew from the weather station it was going to be worse than previous storms,” Wood says. “It looked like the perfect storm”—but the stakes were literally out of this world. So Wood traveled the roughly 40 miles down to tiny Michoud, Louisiana, and prepared to spend the night at Building 320. The unassuming office space sits toward the back of NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility, where the organization's fuel tanks have been made since the 1960s.

It’d be the first night of roughly 30 straight that Wood and company would spend on the Michoud grounds.

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10 Ways Well-Meaning White Teachers Bring Racism Into Our Schools | Jamie Utt | Everyday Feminism

10 Ways Well-Meaning White Teachers Bring Racism Into Our Schools | Jamie Utt | Everyday Feminism | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Teachers are some of my favorite people in the world. I mean I really love teachers! They tend to be enthusiastic about changing society, and more often than not, they care so deeply about their work and their students. What’s not to like?

As a former teacher myself, I feel so very fortunate to meet teachers from all over the United States in my work. Despite all of the BS that teachers have to deal with in our political climate, they remain optimistic about the state of education, which honestly blows my mind.

It is from this place of love that I work with teachers to help them improve their practice. And with the realities of the “education debt” and considering that 80% of our teachers are White while nearly half (and growing) of our students are youth of Color, part of improving teaching practice means paying more critical attention to race in our schools.

Though I know there are actively racist teachers out there, most White teachers mean well and have no intention of being racist. Yet as people who are inscribed with Whiteness, it is possible for us to act in racist ways no matter our intentions. Uprooting racism from our daily actions takes a lifetime of work.

Thus, as we head into the first weeks of school all over the US, here are 10 ways that White teachers introduce racism into our schools paired with things we can do instead.


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Library Deputy Director Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner Talks About Kansas City's Digital Divide | Jen Chen | KCUR.org

Library Deputy Director Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner Talks About Kansas City's Digital Divide | Jen Chen | KCUR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

According to Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, the digital divide is the civil rights issue of the 21st century.

“Having internet access is essential. It’s not a luxury,” she says.

Kositany-Buckner, the deputy director of the Kansas City Public Library, has been working to bridge the digital divide in Kansas City. And the library is the place to do it, she says.

“We provide access to digital content — whether it’s e-books, audio books or research tools you can access online,” says Kositany-Buckner.

There’s more to the library than checking out books and using the computers to get online. It’s a gathering spot for the community -- offering meeting spaces, live concerts, film screenings, story time for infants and kids, video game nights and more.

It’s also a place for civic engagement that’s open to everybody — especially those with opposite views.

“I like to say that libraries are Switzerland,” she says. “We do not necessarily support one view. We support all views and we bring everybody to the table to have these discussions.”

But most importantly, says Kositany-Buckner, it’s a place that promotes reading.


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Wi-Fi Woo-Woo - Quack Science Convinces Boston Family to Sue School Over Wi-Fi/EHS Allergy | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap!

Wi-Fi Woo-Woo - Quack Science Convinces Boston Family to Sue School Over Wi-Fi/EHS Allergy | Phil Dampier | Stop the Cap! | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Boston area boarding school’s failure to accommodate a 12-year-old student’s allergy to Wi-Fi will force the Fay School to hire attorneys to defend itself in a lawsuit brought under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

All three plaintiffs have been kept anonymous, but their lawsuit clearly identifies what is responsible for their son’s headaches, itchy skin and rashes — the school’s Wi-Fi system.


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1980’s Analogy to Coding Today | Eleven Fifty Academy

1980’s Analogy to Coding Today | Eleven Fifty Academy | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Wondering why you should learn to code? Or trying to think of the best way to sell your parents on paying your tuition for the next coding course offered here at the Academy?

I sat down with John Qualls, President of Eleven Fifty Academy, who shared why he believes its important to learn to code, through an analogy that has inspired him throughout his successful career path – a route which has never involved a job interview or an internship and has included successfully founding companies.

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Tech companies are hiring more liberal-arts majors than you think | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Tech companies are hiring more liberal-arts majors than you think | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley has a reputation for being filled with egghead coders who popped out of college as brilliant engineers (or who never finished college in the first place). Films like "The Social Network" have played a big role in popularizing this impression. Google, too, is notorious for putting job candidates through grueling programming tests. Against these geniuses, what hope would a humanities or social science major have of getting a job at one of these companies?

Quite a lot, actually. In fact, liberal arts graduates joined the ranks of tech companies at a faster clip in the past few years than their engineering and computer-science counterparts, according an analysis by LinkedIn of its own users. And of the recent liberal arts grads the company examined, as many as 2 in 5 now work at an Internet or software company. That's a staggering number.


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In a bankrupt Pa. school district, teachers plan to work for free | Lyndsey Layton | WashPost.com

In a bankrupt Pa. school district, teachers plan to work for free | Lyndsey Layton | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Employees of the Chester Upland School District in Pennsylvania will show up for work on the first day of school next Wednesday, but they don’t expect to get paid.

The district, which has been struggling with financial and academic problems for decades, is on the edge of insolvency and cannot make payroll, state and local officials have said.

So on Thursday, about 200 members of the local teachers union voted unanimously to work without pay as the new school year opens. They were joined by secretaries, school bus drivers, janitors and administrators.


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Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Neil Gaiman Opinion | The Guardian

Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Neil Gaiman Opinion | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It's important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members' interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I'm going to tell you that libraries are important. I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. I'm going to make an impassioned plea for people to understand what libraries and librarians are, and to preserve both of these things.

And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I'm an author, often an author of fiction. I write for children and for adults. For about 30 years I have been earning my living though my words, mostly by making things up and writing them down. It is obviously in my interest for people to read, for them to read fiction, for libraries and librarians to exist and help foster a love of reading and places in which reading can occur.

So I'm biased as a writer. But I am much, much more biased as a reader. And I am even more biased as a British citizen.

And I'm here giving this talk tonight, under the auspices of the Reading Agency: a charity whose mission is to give everyone an equal chance in life by helping people become confident and enthusiastic readers. Which supports literacy programs, and libraries and individuals and nakedly and wantonly encourages the act of reading. Because, they tell us, everything changes when we read.

And it's that change, and that act of reading that I'm here to talk about tonight. I want to talk about what reading does. What it's good for.


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Are You Ready for the New School Year? | Brandi Leggett Blog | Edutopia.org

As we get ready to begin a new school year, we think about what things need to get done. Is my classroom ready? What will my first day with the students look like? Is my teaching aligning with the district's vision for the upcoming school year? All of these things are important, but in all the back-to-school madness, we often times tend to forget the little things that will enable us to have a successful school year.

As you plan for the new school year, take time to think about these tips.


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Golden Rectangles: Fabricating Geometry, Reflection & Light | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Golden Rectangles: Fabricating Geometry, Reflection & Light | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I’m back into sacred geometry, culture and art, especially as it relates to “making” or fabrication. I learned that the icosahedron is a polyhedron with 20 equilateral triangle faces. The 12 edges of a regular octahedron can be partitioned in the golden ratio so that the resulting vertices define a regular icosahedron. I laser cut cardboard rectangles that are slightly longer, then used purple thread to make vectors (edges) so that each face is bounded by a loop. I added tiny green foam squares to mark the vertices. I will adjust the rectangle lengths for the final work.

The golden ratio, also known as the divine proportion, golden mean, or golden section, is a number often encountered when taking the ratios of distances in simple geometric figures such as the icosahedron. This principle became available to artists in theoretical works that were not overly mathematical. Artists such as John Biggers used geometric shapes and principles to create patterns and break up space in his compositions. Ascension (see below) represents an integration of knowledge from many academic disciplines: African mythology and folklore have been fused with mathematical concepts, scientific theories, literary extracts, American historical events, sociological patterns and religious beliefs.


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Katrina's 'Golden Opportunity': 10 Years of Corporate Media Celebrating Disaster | Adam Johnson | FAIR.org

Katrina's 'Golden Opportunity': 10 Years of Corporate Media Celebrating Disaster | Adam Johnson | FAIR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Americans love, above all, a narrative. Preferably a moral one, marked by a clear good and evil. For many so-called “school reformers,” the tragedy of Katrina, which marks its ten-year anniversary today, provided that narrative. Its stark before-and-after provided a clear A/B test as to the righteousness of their cause. Before was a “broken school system,” and after is a glossy, privatized education system.

We’ll set aside the fact that this is largely a fantasy. Torture the data enough, and the “New Orleans miracle” can be teased out if one wants it enough. Despite studies and reporting showing otherwise, for the sake of this piece it doesn’t actually matter if radical post-Katrina New Orleans school reform was a “success,” a failure or somewhere in between. What is important is that so many corporatists think this “miracle” was not just an incidental positive but was, all things considered, worth it. Worth the 1,800 people killed and the 100,000 African-Americans permanently ejected from the city.

The most popular examination of this pathology is, of course, from Naomi Klein, who coined the idea of the ”shock doctrine” in her 2007 book of the same name. In it, she explores how Katrina and other manmade and non-manmade disasters are exploited to rush through a radical right wing corporate agenda.


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IL: Three 16-Year-Olds Hatch Production Company in Englewood Incubator | Andrea Watson | DNAinfo.com

IL: Three 16-Year-Olds Hatch Production Company in Englewood Incubator | Andrea Watson | DNAinfo.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Three teens from the South Side of Chicago, IL have come together to form their own production company, and they say they hope to encourage other black youths.

“I’m glad that we’re doing this because this can show young black kids that you can actually do something, that playing sports isn’t the only way you can make it in life,” said 16-year-old Devin Buckley, whose squad consists of 16-year-olds Chris Berry and Regis Luckett.

The idea to launch the Chicago-based company, VIP Productions, came after exposure to the new Blue 1647 Englewood Business Accelerator, which is housed in the U.S. Bank building, 815 W. 63rd St. The 1,600-square-feet business incubator opened its doors to the community in April, aimed at helping emerging entrepreneurs. The office has meeting rooms and private office space. Workshops, courses and technical assistance are also provided.


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NASA tests Orion parachutes to breaking point | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

NASA tests Orion parachutes to breaking point | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has been pushing the safety features on its next-generation Orion spacecraft to the extreme, as it carried out a dramatic parachute test. During the test, engineers staged the failure of various components of the descent system in order to see if it would still function, and save the lives of a potential crew in a worst case scenario.

The capsule that was dropped during yesterday's test was not a size-accurate representation of the Orion spacecraft. Instead, it was a squashed-down dummy version with dimensions that would allow it to fit in the hold of the C-17 aircraft that would transport it to the drop altitude of 35,000 ft (10, 668 m).

Whilst the dummy may have been slightly out of proportion, its key characteristics, such as weight and base surface area, were similar enough to the actual spacecraft to make it a viable analogue for the purpose of the test.


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School Leaders: Tips for Coaching Your Super Teachers | Ben Johnson Blog | Edutopia.org

School Leaders: Tips for Coaching Your Super Teachers | Ben Johnson Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Anyone who is willing to be a teacher is a superhero in my book. I admire and honor any person that is willing to interact with students of any age and openly engage with students who are interested, oblivious, and even antagonistic. Super teachers come in all shapes and sizes, but I would like to discuss three specific types:

  1. The super in-need teacher: Spiderman
  2. The super stoic teacher: Silver Surfer
  3. The super imaginative teacher: The Green Lantern.


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Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel

Discovery Launches Virtual Reality Initiative | Jeff Baumgartner | Multichannel | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Discovery Communications is jumping into the virtual reality game with a new brand and a suite of cross-platform apps and services for iOS and Android devices, the Samsung Milk VR premium video service and on YouTube.

The new initiative, called Discovery VR, launched today with a slate of original content, show extensions and plans for additional short-form programming that will be offered across several platforms.


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U.S. Education Department bars states from offering alternative tests to most students with disabilities | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

U.S. Education Department bars states from offering alternative tests to most students with disabilities | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A new rule issued by the U.S. Education Department requires all states to stop offering alternative standards and aligned standardized tests to nearly all students with disabilities after the 2015-16 school year.

As published in the Federal Rule, the rule is called “Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged; Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities,” and it requires states to give the same assessments to students without disabilities as to the vast majority of those with disabilities under the premise that nearly all students can “make academic progress when provided with challenging instruction and appropriate supports.”

Effective Sept. 21, 2015, the official rule summary says:


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