Digital Media Lit...
Follow
28.7K views | +2 today
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Learning Analytics: The Next Generation Initiative in Student Assessment | Connected Learning

Learning Analytics: The Next Generation Initiative in Student Assessment  | Connected Learning | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There is probably no segment of activity in the education world attracting as much attention at present as that of knowledge management in terms of learning analytics. Learning analytics as defined by elearnspaces is the use of intelligent data, learner-produced data, and analysis models to discover information and social connections, and to predict and advise on learning.

 

EDUCAUSE’s Next Generation learning initiative defines the learning analytics as “the use of data and models to predict student progress and performance, and the ability to act on that information”.

 

The traditional approach to learning analytics was to measure a student's mastery of a skill sets as compared to rote learning strategies and state standards. These types of traditional assessments were renamed in the early 90's as summative assessment based after new trends were developed in data driven decision making.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Transparent touchscreen display can be used on both sides | GizMag.com

Transparent touchscreen display can be used on both sides | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You've probably seen TV shows in which groups of characters – usually forensic investigators – view data on large transparent touchscreen displays. Well, researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have taken that concept a step further. Their TransWall is not only transparent, but it can also receive input and display content on either side of its screen, plus it's capable of haptic feedback.


The system is housed within a T-shaped frame that also incorporates two overhead-mounted projectors, which project visuals onto either side of the screen. That screen is made up of two sheets of plexiglass, with a clear holographic film sandwiched between them. Bordering those sheets are two rectangular infra-red touch sensor frames, one on either side. A surface transducer is also mounted in the plexiglass above the frames, plus microphones are integrated into each of them.


When users on either side touch the plexiglass, the location and movements of their fingertip are detected by the frame on that side. That information is sent to a computer, which accordingly alters the images being projected onto that face of the holographic film. This means that users can draw lines, flip pages, select objects, and perform all the usual touchscreen functions.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

21st Century Literacy: New Initiative Makes the Case that Learning to Code is for Everyone | Berkman Center

Many people view computer programming as a narrow, technical activity appropriate for only a small segment of the population. But, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from MIT’s Media Lab, the University of California’s Digital Media and Learning (DML) Research Hub, and Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society is seeking to change that.


With a recently awarded $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the researchers aim to engage a broader range of young people in computer programming by building on their interests in areas such as music, dance and sports.


“Coding is the new literacy,” said Mitchel Resnick, professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab and director of the Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten research group. “To thrive in tomorrow’s society, young people must learn to design, create and express themselves with digital technologies.”


The new initiative extends the Lifelong Kindergarten group’s Scratch programming language, which enables young people to code their own interactive stories, games and animations. To ease the transition into coding, the MIT team is developing a series of interest-based “microworlds” — specialized coding environments designed to connect with young people’s interests. For example, those interested in dancing could use a microworld to program musical beats and the movement of dancing characters on the screen.


“The most powerful and effective learning happens when young people pursue personal interests and passions,” said Mimi Ito, research director of the DML Hub, which is based at UC Irvine. As part of the three-year NSF grant project, Ito and her team will conduct ethnographic research studies examining what types of technical and social support enable youth from diverse backgrounds to become engaged in learning to code.


The initiative will offer a variety of online activities and events that will help youth see coding as relevant to their interests and useful in a wide range of fields, from animation to zoology. In addition, the team at Harvard’s Berkman Center will investigate policies and practices designed to protect young people’s privacy and safety online, while opening new opportunities for learning.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

FCC's Pai: E-Rate Proposal Would Slash Connectivity Funding | Multichannel.com

FCC's Pai: E-Rate Proposal Would Slash Connectivity Funding | Multichannel.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

FCC commissioner Ajit Pai says the way he adds it up, Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposed revamp of E-rate funding to boost wireless access come out of current connectivity funds, depriving schools of the "flexibility to meet local needs."

 

That came in a statement on the eve of the FCC's planned vote on the proposal, which Pai has already given a failing grade.

 

"By slashing funds available for Internet connectivity," he said, "the program will likely provide many American students with “Wi-Fi to nowhere.”

 

Here is how Commissioner Pai crunched the numbers:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Another Study Suggests Acting Immorally In Video Games Actually Makes Players More Moral | Techdirt.com

Another Study Suggests Acting Immorally In Video Games Actually Makes Players More Moral | Techdirt.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the evolution of video games as a major entertainment medium marches on, you would expect to see more and more studies done as to their effects. And, since the chief topic among those having this conversation seems to center around the effect of violence in games, that's where much of the focus of these studies is going to go.


Now, we've already discussed one study that linked violent video games and the so-called Macbeth Effect, in which the gamer feels the need to cleanse themselves of the wrong-doing with a conversely benevolent action. That study was important because it demonstrated that the effect of violent games might have the opposite effect of the all-to-prevalent theory that virtual violence begets real-life violence.

A recent study appears to boil this down even further, indicating that instead of feeling any kind of desensitizing effect, immoral actions taken in video games produce a more sensitive, compassionate person.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

What 4 teachers told Obama over lunch | Justin Minkel Blog | WashPost.com

What 4 teachers told Obama over lunch | Justin Minkel Blog | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

President Obama sat down this week for lunch at the White House with Education Secretary Arne Duncan and four teachers to talk about education, teaching and school reform.


What the teachers said to Obama is explained in the following post by Justin Minkel, the 2007 Arkansas Teacher of the Year, a board member of the National Network of State Teachers of the Year, and a member of the Center for Teaching Quality’s Collaboratory. He writes two blogs, Teaching for Triumph and Career Teacher. Follow him on Twitter:  @JustinMinkel


Click headline to read Justin Minkel article--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Myth-Busting Differentiated Instruction: 3 Myths and 3 Truths | John McCarthy | Edutopia.org

Myth-Busting Differentiated Instruction: 3 Myths and 3 Truths | John McCarthy | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In third grade, my daughter struggled with problems like 36 x 12, and she knew her multiplication facts. Fortunately, her math tutor recognized what was needed, and introduced the Lattice Method. My daughter rediscovered her confidence.


As educators, we know that learning is not one size fits all. Yet differentiated instruction (DI) remains elusive as a major part of formal planning. Myths about DI persist despite work by respected advocates such as Carol Tomlinson, Susan Allan, Rick Wormeli, and Gayle Gregory. What follows are prominent misperceptions expressed about DI, presented here so that we can separate myth from truth.


Click headline to watch video clip about the Lattice Method and read more about the Myths and Truths--


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tuna Knobs turns tablets into mobile DJ stations | GizMag.com

Tuna Knobs turns tablets into mobile DJ stations | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With just about every aspect of music production going digital, one budding DJ is looking to march to the beat of his own drum. Samuel Verburg joined forces with Dutch design firm Tweetonig aiming to mix not just perfectly matched beats, but a bit of old with a little bit of new. The result is Tuna Knobs, physical controls that work on any capacitive touchscreen to bring tactile feedback to music making applications.

The idea for Tuna Knobs arose when Verburg discovered the music production capabilities of the iPad at the behest of a colleague. After some time experimenting with apps such as virtual midi controller TouchOSC, Verburg concluded that the experience just wasn't quite the same. This led him to team up with Tweetonig to explore how these these apps might be improved by integrating the touch and feel of conventional DJ hardware.


"It is basically a stylus," John Tillema, product developer at Tweetonig, tells Gizmag. "The biggest problem was actually getting the footprint large enough so that every device recognize it as being a finger print. That, combined with getting the right feeling, made it a nice engineering challenge."


The team has now arrived at a prototype it hopes will offer a new kind of experience for musicians. A clear acrylic base is fixed to the touchscreen with a suction cap. Placed correctly to align with the virtual knobs on-screen, a conductive rubber grip combines with a conductive surface on the underside to transform a real-life turning movement into an in-app touch command.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Gauging Public Support for Education Spending | Conor Williams | EdCentral.org

Gauging Public Support for Education Spending | Conor Williams | EdCentral.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I attended First Focus’ annual Children’s Budget Summit this week to hear about the latest federal budget trendlines affecting programs that serve children. The accompanying report is full of interesting information on the United States’ budget priorities.


Across all programs, inflation-adjusted federal spending on children declined by 13.6 percent from 2010 to 2014. Education is down 15.1 percent, and early childhood spending 6.2 percent over the same time period.


These are sobering statistics, especially since, as we noted earlier this year in Subprime Learning, public awareness of the importance of the early years is higher now than ever before. Even though we know that investing in kids markedly improves their long-term life outcomes and saves public money, our representatives in Washington have been steadily cutting back on programs that support children.


Public opinion on early education is as clear as the research. At the event, First Focus announced polling that shows 84 percent of Americans want us to act now to improve conditions for kids. And that sort of overwhelming support isn’t an anomaly—it tracks previous polling.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

School Is Over for the Summer. So Is the Era of Majority White U.S. Public Schools | NationalJournal.com

School Is Over for the Summer. So Is the Era of Majority White U.S. Public Schools | NationalJournal.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The 2013-14 school year has drawn to a close in most U.S. school districts, and with it the final period in which white students composed a majority of the nation's K-12 public school population. When schools reopen in August and September, black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students will together make up a narrow majority of the nation's public school students.


The change marks far more than a statistical blip.

 

Broader demographic trends indicate that the new student majority, a collection of what have long been thought of as minority groups, will grow. In just three years, Latino students alone will make up nearly 28 percent of the nation's student population, predict data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Latino student population growth combined with a slow but steady decline in the number of white children attending public schools will transform the country's schools.


Click headline to read more and view graphic--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Teachers to Education Secretary Arne Duncan: Please Quit | The Nation

Teachers to Education Secretary Arne Duncan: Please Quit | The Nation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Given the choice between Republicans who are explicitly committed to doing away with collective bargaining rights and Democrats, public-sector labor unions tend to back Democrats at election time.


But that does not mean that unions are always satisfied with Democratic Party policies—or with Democratic policymakers.


This is especially true with regard to education debates. There are certainly Democrats who have been strong advocates for public schools. But there are also Democratic mayors, governors, members of Congress and cabinet members such as Secretary of Education Arne Duncan who have embraced and advanced “reforms” that supporters of public schools identify as destructive.


Duncan’s policies were so appealing to 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney—who explicitly praised the “good things” the education secretary was doing—that education writer Dave Murray wrote a 2012 article headlined, “Could a Romney Administration include Arne Duncan, President Obama’s education secretary?”


Former US Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch, who has emerged as a leading champion of public education, refers to Duncan as “one of the worst Secretaries of Education”— arguing that “Duncan’s policies demean the teaching profession by treating student test scores as a proxy for teacher quality.


Teachers are pushing back against Duncan and those policies.


When 9,000 National Education Association members from across the country gathered in Denver last week, they endorsed a resolution that declares:


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

5 Epiphanies on Learning in a 1:1 iPad Classroom | Alyssa Tormala Blog | Edutopia.org

5 Epiphanies on Learning in a 1:1 iPad Classroom | Alyssa Tormala Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last fall, my high school handed iPads to each student in the building, and I began my journey as the school's Instructional Technology Coach. Since our faculty had spent the previous year preparing for the rollout, I knew our classroom environment and teaching methods would evolve. I welcomed it. But I could never have imagined how vast -- and rewarding -- that evolution would be.


To provide some structure for my journey, I joined a cross-curricular group of my colleagues who were focusing on action research in their classrooms. Questions permeate good action research -- mine was: "What does learning look like in a fully-committed 1:1 iPad high school classroom?" I gathered data from my three freshman English classes throughout the year while we engaged in a rich, ongoing cycle of experimentation, feedback, and discussion.


As an English teacher, I use the word "epiphany" all the time. But this year I came to understand that term on a more personal level -- not just once, but again and again. The following are a few of the most meaningful epiphanies that I experienced.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

For Those in the Digital Dark, Enlightenment Is Borrowed From the Library | NYTimes.com

For Those in the Digital Dark, Enlightenment Is Borrowed From the Library | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Joey Cabrera stands for part of most evenings on the doorstep of the Clason’s Point Library, near 172nd Street and Morrison Avenue in the Bronx.


There, he taps into the Wi-Fi that seeps out of the library after it closes. He checks in on Tumblr, Snapchat, Facebook — “the usual stuff,” he said — and plays Lost Saga, a video game developed in Korea. “Formerly, I played Minecraft, but this is less mainstream, an inside thing with my friends,” Joey said.


Then there is a basic maneuver in skateboarding that he is mastering, the Pop Shove It. He studies the technique at the library doorstep.


“I’ve gone to YouTube multiple times to see how to do it,” he said.


Like most homes in his part of the Bronx, Joey’s apartment has no Internet access. Even before the library opens for the day, people stand outside, polishing résumés, then dash in at the crack of 10 a.m. to use the printers. “Then they get right on the train for job interviews,” said Wanda Luzon, the manager of the Clason’s Point Branch of the New York Public Library.


Joey, 15, who is going to be a sophomore in high school, arrives at the end of the day, after he is finished at the year-round academic enrichment program he attends in Manhattan. He walks a block from the Westchester Avenue el, then settles in at the library until closing time, which is 7 p.m. on Mondays. Then he continues his online session through the library’s network.


“I’ve got an hour before sunset, when it gets dangerous,” Joey said.

As he spoke, a young woman nearby finished her online sidewalk session and moved on.


The branch library is the village well.


For most of the city, two companies, Time Warner and Verizon, provide broadband access, at an annual cost of close to $1,000 per home. For many houses, that means no access at all. About 2.9 million people in the city were in the digital dark, according to a 2010 study by the Center for Technology and Government at the University at Albany, part of the State University of New York. In the city’s libraries, 68 percent of the people who make under $25,000 and are using the computers do not have Internet access at home.


“Imagine that in the information capital of the world, kids are camped out on the stoops of libraries to do their online math homework,” said Anthony W. Marx, the president of the New York Public Library, the city’s leading provider of free Internet access.


Andrew Rasiej, the chairman of NY Tech Meetup and an advocate for broadband access at low cost, has lobbied Mr. Marx. “I asked him, ‘You let people check out books, why don’t you let them check out the Internet?’ ” Mr. Rasiej said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Iraq: Scientists Discover Long-Lost Temple in Kurdistan Region | HuffPost.com

Iraq: Scientists Discover Long-Lost Temple in Kurdistan Region | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Life-size human statues and column bases from a long-lost temple dedicated to a supreme god have been discovered in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq.


The discoveries date back over 2,500 years to the Iron Age, a time period when several groups — such as the Urartians, Assyrians and Scythians — vied for supremacy over what is now northern Iraq.


"I didn't do excavation, just archaeological soundings —the villagers uncovered these materials accidentally," said Dlshad Marf Zamua, a doctoral student at Leiden University in the Netherlands, who began the fieldwork in 2005. The column bases were found in a single village while the other finds, including a bronze statuette of a wild goat, were found in a broad area south of where the borders of Iraq, Iran and Turkey intersect. [See Photos of the Life-Size Statues & Other Discoveries in Iraq]


For part of the Iron Age, this area was under control of the city of Musasir, also called Ardini, Marf Zamua said. Ancient inscriptions have referred to Musasir as a "holy city founded in bedrock" and "the city of the raven."


"One of the best results of my fieldwork is the uncovered column bases of the long-lost temple of the city of Musasir, which was dedicated to the god Haldi," Marf Zamuatold Live Science in an email. Haldi was the supreme god of the kingdom of Urartu. His temple was so important that after the Assyrians looted it in 714 B.C., the Urartu king Rusa I was said to have ripped his crown off his head before killing himself.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
Leiah Cooper's curator insight, July 10, 3:32 PM

We lose so much history to war and destruction, it is wonderful when bits are found.

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Source: FCC Chair Has Votes to Pass E-Rate Reform | Multichannel.com

Source: FCC Chair Has Votes to Pass E-Rate Reform | Multichannel.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler has secured enough votes to pass his proposed E-rate reforms at today's meeting, according to an agency official speaking on background. that will almost certainly be on a straight party line vote.

 

E-rate is the Universal Service Fund subsidy that goes to provide advanced telecommunications to schools and libraries.

 

In the wake of concerns from the Hill and elsewhere about the migration of E-rate funding to wireless broadband and its impact on funding of traditional broadband connectivity, the order is now said to include a "safety valve" that makes sure that support for that basic service is not eroded by Wi-Fi demand.

 

The commission will seek comment on long-term funding for the program, and include an evaluation of the Wi-Fi migration as part of that long-term review.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Network Structure of Jewish Texts | Science Blogs | WIRED

The Network Structure of Jewish Texts | Science Blogs | WIRED | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Scholarship is a conversation between individuals and across the generations. And this conversation can often be mapped. We can look at who cites who in the scientific literature or we can look at who collaborates with each other. We can also look at annotations, because in this long conversation, scholars can have comments on each others’ work.


This is a particularly appropriate method when it comes to Jewish texts. Many of these texts not only cite each other, but comment upon them, a sort of citation on steroids. For example, there is the Mishnah, part of the Oral Law in Judaism. Each section of Mishnah is in turn commented upon by the Gemara, and together these two things make up the Talmud. And there are medieval rabbis who in turn comment on the Talmud, as well as each other. And so on and so forth. With each text of course referencing and annotating the Bible. Ultimately, classical Jewish literature is one that is steeped in annotation and reference. It is the quintessential network.


Sefaria, is an open source database of Jewish texts and recently, Liz Shayne of UC Santa Barbara attempted to extract the relationships between the texts found there—annotations, allusions, and such—and visualize them.


Unfortunately, Sefaria is very much a work-in-progress, so conclusions are likely to early to be drawn, but here is a quick visualization that Shayne performed of the complete network of more than 100,000 nodes and 87,000 links. (see above)


Here is the meaning of the colors, along with some interpretation:


Click headline to read more and view visualization full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hong Kong: Want your bilingual kids to get ahead? Teach them a third language: computer code | SCMP.com

Hong Kong: Want your bilingual kids to get ahead? Teach them a third language: computer code | SCMP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Whether or not they dazzle in final exams, students are expected to be numerate and literate, preferably at least in two languages (English and Chinese for most youngsters here). They may soon have to add a third language if they are to get ahead in the 21st century: code.


Computer programming, or machine language, code defines much of modern society. It drives all those apps which many rely on everyday to communicate, do business and navigate the world, and policy makers in developed countries have been working on ways to ensure that youngsters speak code.


In Hong Kong, some efforts have begun to instil code literacy. Ray Cheung Chak-chun, an assistant professor at the City University Apps Lab, has been running a series of workshops called "We Can Code", to teach secondary school students the ins and outs of creating mobile apps. At the same time, British entrepreneur David Greenwood started Code Club HK, a volunteer-run network to promote coding among children aged from nine to 11 at after-school activities.


That is far from adequate if Hong Kong is to realise its dreams of being a tech hub, let alone keep apace with global practices.


"I won't say Hong Kong is behind the rest of the world. But to become a leader, you need to do more than enough," says Yat Siu, founder and CEO of web-technology company Outblaze.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

DIY shop SparkFun now offers a cloud for your connected device data | GigaOM Tech News

DIY shop SparkFun now offers a cloud for your connected device data | GigaOM Tech News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

SparkFun, the Boulder, Colo. company that sells DIY projects and boards, and even helps with fulfilling the orders from crowdfunding campaigns, has built a cloud service and an open-source project designed to get data online. The company laid out the new service, called data.sparkfun.com in blog post Thursday, and it also released code it calls Phant (as in elephant, the pachyderm that never forgets) so people who don’t want to use the service can still upload their data to their own servers.


With this offering it is becoming crystal clear that if you’re going to offer hardware to people building connected devices, you’re also going to have to offer a service to get that data online, where developers can then play with it. I was reminded of the Dweet.io and Freeboard projects by Big Labs while reading SparkFun CEO’s Nate Seidle’s description of the data service:


"See the simplistic beauty here? All you have to do is string a bunch of sensor data together from whatever hardware you’re using and throw a link out into the world. Phant never forgets them. And almost any embedded device can stick a bunch of strings and variables together!<br />"


However, like many of the toolsets associated with the DIYers out there and even products like Electric Imp that offer both hardware and cloud, there’s still a level of expertise or comfort with physical tinkering and software required. The barrier is much lower, and clearly efforts like this are bringing more people and ideas into the connected device universe, but I’m curious how large this market is.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Hero hacks: 14 Raspberry Pi projects primed for IT | NetworkWorld.com

Hero hacks: 14 Raspberry Pi projects primed for IT | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

You have to hand it to Eben Upton and crew for the Raspberry Pi. This single-board design, aimed at making computers inexpensive enough to bring computer science to the poorest of schools, has kicked off a revolution not just in education, but in tapping computing power to interact with the environment around us. And along the way, this $35 computer has proved to have significant value in traditional IT and business contexts.


The following DIY projects just scratch the surface of how you can hack the Raspberry Pi, and its Arduino cousin, into an effective workplace tool. A few I've yet to build myself, but they are modifications of previous projects I have built. Consider it a catalog of battle-tested possibilities.


Click headline to learn about the projects--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Cloud brings thunder and lightning inside your home | GizMag.com

Cloud brings thunder and lightning inside your home | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Cloud, by New Zealand-based designer Richard Clarkson, is an interactive lamp designed to mimic a thundercloud. It brings the outside inside, providing an audiovisual show that looks and sounds like thunder and lightning ... but thankfully rain isn't included in the package.


Powered by an Arduino microcontroller, Cloud is able to react to motion by automatically adjusting the color and brightness of lighting. There are also alternate modes for those who need a break from having a thundercloud in their home. For instance, Cloud can be turned into a nightlight or used to stream music via any Bluetooth-compatible device.


The Cloud itself is made hypoallergenic fiberfill that is felted to a sponge casing to form a frame. The frame holds within it the lighting system and speakers used to make Cloud look and sound like a real thundercloud ... just one that's hanging from your ceiling rather than growing ominously outside your window.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How college remediation rates are distorted — and why | WashPost.com

How college remediation rates are distorted — and why | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Are a large percentage of high school graduates so unprepared for college when they get there that they have to take remedial courses to catch up? School reformers like to say so, and throw out big percentages of students who are said to need remediation.


But where do these figures come from, and are they accurate? Award-winning Prinicipal Carol Burris of South Side High School in New York looks at this issue in the following post.


Burris has been exposing the problems with New York’s botched school reform effort for a long time on this blog. (You can read some of her work here, herehere,  here, and here.) She previously wrote about remediation rates here. She was named New York’s 2013 High School Principal of the Year by the School Administrators Association of New York and the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and in 2010,  tapped as the 2010 New York State Outstanding Educator by the School Administrators Association of New York State.


Click headline to read Carol Burris' post--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Study: Too Many Structured Activities May Hinder Children's Executive Functioning | EdWeek.org

Study: Too Many Structured Activities May Hinder Children's Executive Functioning | EdWeek.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When children spend more time in structured activities, they get worse at working toward goals, making decisions, and regulating their behavior, according to a new study.


Instead, kids might learn more when they have the responsibility to decide for themselves what they're going to do with their time. Psychologists at the University of Colorado and the University of Denver studied the schedules of 70 six-year olds, and they found that the kids who spent more time in less-structured activities had more highly-developed self-directed executive function.


Self-directed executive function develops mostly during childhood, the researchers write, and it includes any mental processes that help us work toward achieving goals—like planning, decision making, manipulating information, switching between tasks, and inhibiting unwanted thoughts and feelings. It is an early indicator of school readiness and academic performance, according to previous research cited in the study, and it even predicts success into adulthood. Children with higher executive function will be healthier, wealthier, and more socially stable throughout their lives.


The researchers asked parents to record the activities of their six-year-olds for a week, and then they measured how much time each child spent in structured and less-structured activities. The researchers define structured activities as anything organized and supervised by adults—like music lessons or community service. For an activity to be less-structured, the child must be in charge of deciding what to do and figuring out how to do it. All forms of free play counted as less-structured activities.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Democratic Party's Divide On Education Policy Gets Worse | Educational Opportunity Newtork

Political pundits who try to tamp down talk of divisions within the Democratic Party must not be paying any attention to education policy.


For quite some time, close observers of the nation’s education policy have been calling attention to the fault lines between education progressives in the Democratic Party and Third Way-style centrists, such as Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Democrats for Education Reform, who lean toward a market-based, econometric philosophy for public education governance.


As Furman University education professor Paul Thomas recently wrote for Alternet, “While the Obama administration has cultivated the appearance of hope and change, its education policies are essentially slightly revised or greatly intensified versions of accountability reform begun under Ronald Reagan.”


But the Democratic Party’s divergence from real progressive values for governing our schools mostly went unnoticed in major media outlets until recently when a few light bulbs went off among political observers. Writing for Slate, Matt Yglesias noticed, “Education reform, not ‘populism’ divides Democrats.” Then, Connor Williams of the New America Foundation saw the light and explained for The New Republic, “In 2016, Democrats have good reason to run against Obama’s education record.”


Now, Jonathan Chait has penned a piece for New York Magazine, “Teachers Unions Turn Against Democrats,” in which he postulates that a “backlash” to President Obama’s education policies, energized by education historian Diane Ravitch, could lead to an alliance between teachers unions and, gulp, Republicans.


For sure, the divide on education policy within the Democratic Party has grown into a Rubicon, and now Democratic candidates and their operatives and supporters need to decide which side makes the most sense to ally with.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NTCA Finds Fast Rural School Broadband | Telecompetitor.com

NTCA Finds Fast Rural School Broadband |  Telecompetitor.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It appears that the rural-rural broadband gap applies to schools as well as the broader Internet marketplace.


That seems the best explanation for two substantially different measurements of average school bandwidthin surveys conducted by NTCA- The Rural Broadband Association and EducationSuperHighway, an advocacy organization focused on bringing better broadband to the nation’s schools.


The NTCA yesterday released the results from a survey of its rural telecom service provider members which found that schools served by those companies, on average, purchase broadband connections delivering 65 Mbps downstream and 13 Mbps upstream. But EducationSuperHighway, which surveyed schools nationwide, found a median bandwidth of 33 Mbps.


These results might seem surprising, considering that broadband is generally available more broadly and at higher speeds in metro areas than in rural areas because it is less costly to deploy broadband in metro areas. That phenomenon is known as the rural-urban gap.


But FCC researchers also have noted a rural-rural gap: Rural areas served by small independent telcos generally have better broadband availability and higher speeds than rural areas where the incumbent local carrier is one of the nation’s larger carriers such as AT&T or Verizon.


“The results of this survey are a clear indication that NTCA members and other small, rural providers understand the importance of these anchor institutions having high-quality broadband service,” said NTCA economist Rick Schadelbauer in a press release about the NTCA survey.


A variety of factors contribute to the rural-rural gap.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Aspen Institute: The Public Library Reimagined -- Are Libraries Fundamentally Shifting? | YouTube.com

The Public Library Reimagined  -- As the institution continues to evolve, are libraries moving away from being mere repositories for books and increasingly becoming essential community centers? Panelists discuss the role of libraries as anchor institutions and centers of learning, and how they continue to innovate in radical ways after so many years.

Tessie Guillermo relates the important themes of "People, Place, and Platform" in public libraries, and how libraries connect people in a central, important community location, creating both a physical and virtual network that provides the platform basis.

"The Public Library Reimagined" took place on June 29, 2014 in Aspen, Colorado, as part of the Aspen Ideas Festival's Metropolis track. Sommer Mathis (Editor, Atlantic CityLab) moderated a panel with Brian Bannon (Commissioner, Chicago Public Library), Tessie Guillermo (President & CEO, ZeroDivide), and John Palfrey (President, Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America and Head of School, Phillips Academy).


Click headline to watch Part 1 or an 8 Part video of this panel full screen--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Individualized Technology Goals (ITGs) for Teachers: A Fable of the Staff Development with No Clothes | Edutopia.org

Individualized Technology Goals (ITGs) for Teachers: A Fable of the Staff Development with No Clothes | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In a public school kingdom, the school year started typically for the instructional technology department, with a daylong meeting about school year requirements. This included a list of trainings the campus technology instructional specialists (TIS) were obligated to offer.


As one lowly TIS looked over the list, she saw that many of the trainings did not apply to her campus. Her teachers needed her help with integration, not the technology itself.


Basically, she felt that the list -- created by a district over-reliant on the group training model for a certain software or technology tool without including integration ideas -- did not reflect the needs of the teachers on her campus. After all, wasn't she an integration specialist? She also pondered what would happen if teachers were allowed to choose their own staff development goals and how they would be coached to reach these goals. She wanted to shout, "This Staff Development Plan has no clothes!"


That TIS did not shout. She proposed that instead of just documenting technology group trainings, she should be allowed to document other types of staff development, including modeling, co-teaching, conferencing, finding resources, and mentoring her teachers.


She focused her time on individual teachers and their needs using Vygotsky's theory of the Zone of Proximal Development and scaffolding. After a year, she proposed that the whole district try her Differentiated Technology Staff Development Plan.


Several changes have been made to keep the plan continuously improving, but now in its third year of implementation, the following basics are currently being implemented in this district.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.