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7 ways to keep up with social media changes | ragan.com

7 ways to keep up with social media changes | ragan.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Trying to keep up with social media is overwhelming.

 

And it's little wonder why. We're living in the middle of an unprecedented frenzy of change.

 

When was the last time there was an innovation in television that impacted the way we marketed? It was 1975—cable TV, and now, arguably, the move toward asynchronous viewing on mobile devices. If you do a lot of print advertising, the fundamentals have been the same since the advent of the printing press in 1450.

 

But social media? Not only do the platforms shift every day, the rules of engagement change constantly, too. Can anybody keep up with the real (and rumored) changes just to Facebook's EdgeRank formula?

 

What we considered best practices six months ago are passé today. Social media is overwhelming, especially when there is pressure to master every new platform that comes along.

 

So how can you keep up? Here are seven ideas to help you stay calm and carry on:

 

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A Doctor Who Game Will Teach Kids How to Code | Vikki Blake | IGN.com

A Doctor Who Game Will Teach Kids How to Code | Vikki Blake | IGN.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A Doctor Who game that teaches children basic computer programming is releasing on October 22.

The BBC has developed the free-to-play game, The Doctor and the Dalek, to build children's confidence and coding know-how. Syncing with the UK's computing curriculum, it will teach skills suitable for children aged six to twelve.


The game features voice work from Peter Capaldi - The Doctor to you and I - in an all-new story which sees The Doctor linking up with an unlikely ally.


"Children will be learning these increasingly important new skills while being actively entertained," said Jo Pearce, from BBC Wales' Interactive. "The idea behind it is simply to use one of our biggest, most popular brands to inspire children to find out more about programming."


The Doctor and the Dalek - the latest in a long line of some good and not-quite-so-good games based upon the fan-favourite franchise - will be available from Wednesday on the CBBC Website.


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NASA Posts a Huge Library of Space Sounds, And You're Free To Use Them | Create Digital Music

NASA Posts a Huge Library of Space Sounds, And You're Free To Use Them | Create Digital Music | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Space is the place. Again.

And SoundCloud is now a place you can find sounds from the US government space agency, NASA. In addition to the requisite vocal clips (“Houston, we’ve had a problem” and “The Eagle has landed”), you get a lot more. There are rocket sounds, the chirps of satellites and equipment, lightning on Jupiter, interstellar plasma and radio emissions. And in one nod to humanity, and not just American humanity, there’s the Soviet satellite Sputnik (among many projects that are international in nature).

Many of these sounds were available before; I’ve actually used a number of them in my own music. But putting them on SoundCloud makes them much easier to browse and find, and there are download links. Have a listen below.

Another thing: you’re free to use all of these sounds as you wish, because NASA’s own audio isn’t copyrighted. It’s meant to be a public service to the American people of their taxpayer-funded government program, but that extends to everyone. There are some restrictions – not everything NASA publishes is covered by the same license, though it appears to be on SoundCloud. And you aren’t free to use NASA’s name or logo or imply commercial endorsement. (The Eagle didn’t land on a bag of Doritos.) But that means just about any imaginable musical application is fair game. They do ask you to list NASA as source, but that’s only reasonable. Read their content guidelines for full details.

Let the space remixing begin.

European Space Agency, your move.


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Gamergate is loud, dangerous and a last grasp at cultural dominance by angry white men | Jessica Valenti | The Guardian

Gamergate is loud, dangerous and a last grasp at cultural dominance by angry white men | Jessica Valenti | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the cultural relevance of angry white men on the internet withers away and ends, their last words – muttered angrily at an empty room – will surely be “Gamer ... gate”.

The recent uproar – said to be over ethics in journalism but focused mostly on targeting outspoken women who aren’t journalists at all – is just the last, desperate gasp of misogynists facing an unwelcoming future. But this particular bitter end, while long overdue, is loud, angry and extremely dangerous.

Female game developers Brianna Wu and Zoe Quinn have fled their homes in fear after a terrifying barrage of rape and death threats. Feminist media critic Anita Sarkeesian was forced to cancel a talk last week at Utah State University after the school received an email promising a “Montreal Massacre-style” mass shooting if the “craven little whore” was allowed to speak. And despite assurances from Gamergate supporters that they have no problem with women, their de facto leaders are being outed as violent misogynists. (Sample tweets: “Fat/ugly women seek out dominant men to abuse them” and “Date rape doesn’t exist”.)

It’s tempting to believe that this online row – a toxic combination of misinformation, anger and anxious masculinity – is just about one specific technology industry’s subculture, or that it will blow over. But by labeling Gamergate a “gaming problem” and attaching a hashtag to it, we’re putting unnecessary boundaries around a broader but nebulous issue: threats and harassment are increasingly how straight white men deal with a world that no longer revolves exclusively around them.

When I spoke to her by phone in San Francisco on Sunday night, Sarkeesian said Gamergate is “absolutely” an issue that goes beyond gaming:

The harassment is becoming more intense towards women and other marginalized communities, and it seems to be happening more to women in male-dominated fields, and to women who speak out or make critiques.

Sarkeesian told me that the backlash in gaming – hardly a new problem – has gotten more vicious as the conversations about women’s representations in games and their role in the industry have gained steam. “This reaction, mostly from male gamers, is to protect the status quo,” she said. The same is true more broadly, and always has been when it comes to women’s progress: the more ground we gain, the worse men react.


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The Trollslayers: 3 Women Who Took on the Internet’s Misogynistic Underbelly—And Came Out Swinging | Lindsey Weedston | Yes! Magazine

The Trollslayers: 3 Women Who Took on the Internet’s Misogynistic Underbelly—And Came Out Swinging | Lindsey Weedston | Yes! Magazine | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

At the height of the age of chat rooms and online message boards—around the dawn of the new millennium—trolls looked a bit different than they do now. Rather than being people who use anonymous Twitter accounts to send death threats, trolls were people who would pose deliberately outrageous or derailing arguments just to make people mad.

Like when someone would come to liberal forums discussing the best way to implement marriage equality, trolls would show up to say that gay people should be rounded up and put on an island somewhere off the coast of Japan, so that no one else would “catch the gay.”

A successful troll could put on a convincing show of really believing this was reasonable and, with one or two posts, completely derail an entire conversation because everyone involved now had to stop and tell the bigot how much of a bigot he was. Then he would slink away to pop up again under a different name and different type of bigotry.

There was also another breed of trolls called "flamers"—people who would verbally abuse and harass others. They would single out one user at a time and throw slurs and various insults until their fingers got tired—without actually posing any kind of counter-argument, the way a standard troll would.

In those days, ignoring the trolls often worked. If no one “fed” them by getting angry at their posts, they would get bored and leave—except for the flamers. Flamers couldn’t be starved out because the venting of anger and hatred was its own reward, even if the flamers were universally reviled.

Fast forward to 2014, and the dawn of #GamerGate—the Twitter-borne movement of video game fans out to fight corruption in gaming journalism and the attacks on the gamer persona.

Or so they say. It’s hard to believe this when the hashtag appears to be associated with so much modern-day trolling.


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Why You Need to Know About a Gross Thing Called #GamerGate—And the Women Who Fight It Christopher Zumski Finke | Yes! Magazine

Why You Need to Know About a Gross Thing Called #GamerGate—And the Women Who Fight It Christopher Zumski Finke | Yes! Magazine | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The terrorist organization Islamic State recently released a glossy recruiting video targeted at young men, a fairly common practice for the tech-savvy ISIS. This time, though, was different. The video replicates Grand Theft Auto 5, the massively successful—it made over $800 million its first day in release—and quite violent video game, and offers gamers the chance to “do the things you do in games, in real life on the battlefield.”

That ISIS would attempt to use the Internet to connect virtual combat with the literal kind may seem an unlikely move to some. But those familiar with gamer culture online may be less surprised. Compared with other “online neighborhoods,” the Internet gaming community is the “least welcome online space for women,” with 44 percent of participants telling the Pew Research Center that gaming is more welcoming towards men than women. We don’t need ISIS to demonstrate how gaming and culture wars overlap.


In the past few months, the hashtag #GamerGate has become a banner flying over America’s current confrontation over feminism, male privilege, and cultural expression. Waged on the Internet, this fight began in the niche forums and blogs reporting on the video game industry. But since August, the hashtag #GamerGate has appeared in over 2 million tweets, and the fight at last has bled into the mainstream media, with recent segments on MSNBC and CNN, and a feature in The New York TimesThere’s only so long that a cultural divide this disturbing can live in online anonymity.


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Good Teaching Is Not About Playing It Safe | Greg Toppo | Slate.com

Good Teaching Is Not About Playing It Safe | Greg Toppo | Slate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Steve Jobs once called the personal computer “a bicycle for our minds,” a tool that helps us go farther with the same amount of energy. But for many teachers, it has been a bumpy ride. Educators have long held new technology at arm’s length, and probably for good reason: For more than a century, they have looked on as reformers pushed a series of mostly ill-fated technical innovations, each touted as the Next Big Thing. The latest movement to add more technology into classrooms is repeating the same mistakes, focusing on how tech can help teachers by churning out more data about students, saving time, and raising test scores.

Here’s a crazy idea: What if we focused less on selling technology to teachers by convincing them it makes learning more efficient and more on how computers, like a bicycle, might make learning a little more dangerous?

I’ve been working for the past few years on a book about games and learning, and I’ve begun to see that part of their appeal for teachers is how games persuade kids to take risks.

First a bit of history: 100 years ago, Thomas Edison himself tried to persuade teachers that silent movies would soon make books obsolete. “Our school system will be completely changed in ten years,” he told a New York newspaper in 1913. Edison envisioned armed guards at schoolhouse doors, “a big army with swords and guns” to keep eager kids out. “You’ll have to lick ’em to keep ’em away.”

Teachers weren’t as eager—whatever virtues movies possessed, showing one required turning the lights out. As Harvard scholar David Dockterman said of the educational film, “Darkness proved to be one of its major weaknesses.”

In the 1930s and 1940s, thousands of classrooms tuned in each day to instructional radio programming, broadcast by state-sponsored “schools of the air” that were probably the most useful educational innovations of any recent period. Historian Randall Davidson told the story of one Wisconsin teacher, warming up her classroom radio one morning to prepare for the singalong program Journeys in Music Land, who found that the unit wasn’t working. She ordered her students to put on their hats and coats and join her outside, where she flagged down a passing motorist. The willing driver pulled over and flung open his doors so the students could sing along to the program. Davidson recalled that “the driver joined in.”

In the 1950s and 1960s, the federal government and private foundations poured millions of dollars into instructional television, much of it produced locally on closed-circuit systems. “Studio teachers” taught classes of a hundred students or more. In the 1980s, schools began buying what were then called “microcomputers,” a shopping spree that continues today with laptop and one-to-one tablet programs. Stanford scholar Larry Cuban, perhaps our foremost expert on how teachers actually work, has said teachers are skeptical of technology because, at heart, they’re deeply practical people who want tools that solve problems they see as important. Reformers who want to make teaching more “planned, systematic, and engineered” will always be disappointed, he said.

But what if technology took teaching in another direction, with risk-taking—and a touch of subversion—at its center? Good teaching is not about playing it safe. It’s about getting kids to ask questions, argue a point, confront failure and try again. More teachers might be willing to embrace technology if they saw it as a way to inject more of the dangers of learning into their classrooms.


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Galactic Wheel of Life Shines in Infrared | NASA.gov

Galactic Wheel of Life Shines in Infrared | NASA.gov | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It might look like a spoked wheel or even a "Chakram" weapon wielded by warriors like "Xena," from the fictional TV show, but this ringed galaxy is actually a vast place of stellar life. A newly released image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the galaxy NGC 1291. Though the galaxy is quite old, roughly 12 billion years, it is marked by an unusual ring where newborn stars are igniting.

"The rest of the galaxy is done maturing," said Kartik Sheth of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory of Charlottesville, Virginia. "But the outer ring is just now starting to light up with stars."

NGC 1291 is located about 33 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. It is what's known as a barred galaxy, because its central region is dominated by a long bar of stars (in the new image, the bar is within the blue circle and looks like the letter "S").

The bar formed early in the history of the galaxy. It churns material around, forcing stars and gas from their original circular orbits into large, non-circular, radial orbits. This creates resonances -- areas where gas is compressed and triggered to form new stars. Our own Milky Way galaxy has a bar, though not as prominent as the one in NGC 1291.

Sheth and his colleagues are busy trying to better understand how bars of stars like these shape the destinies of galaxies. In a program called Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, or S4G, Sheth and his team of scientists are analyzing the structures of more than 3,000 galaxies in our local neighborhood. The farthest galaxy of the bunch lies about 120 million light-years away -- practically a stone’s throw in comparison to the vastness of space.


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Cleveland Institute of Music brings world class music instruction to students via video | Elaine Shuck | PSV

Cleveland Institute of Music brings world class music instruction to students via video | Elaine Shuck | PSV | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Budget constraints have forced many schools to dial back the classes they offer in the arts, foreign languages and liberal arts subjects. Schools focus instead on core subjects that are pertinent to standardized testing – such as English alongside Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses.

In this environment, classes that allow students to explore concert music, appreciate and learn about art and study foreign languages are often unavailable. And, for students in rural areas, or students from underserved communities, the ability to access this type of educational content individually, outside of the classroom, may simply be impossible due to a lack of availability or resources.

However, the benefits of art focused electives to a student’s education and overall success are well documented, and many schools are looking toward technology to help provide these educational opportunities for their students. One way they’re accomplishing this is by bringing the arts into the classroom via interactive video conference.

One such program is currently being offered by the Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM) in an effort to deliver the arts to K12 classrooms. It is one of the many quality educational programs that teachers can find in theTwo Way Interactive Connections in Education (TWICE) database.

CIM’s distance learning program provides students with an opportunity to study with world class musicians and participate in interdisciplinary classes that combine music with other academic subjects like Math, Science, ELA, Social Studies and a foreign language. Both core music and interdisciplinary classes are aligned to national and state standards, including common core for Math and ELA.

Recently, Public Sector View (PSV) had the opportunity to sit down with Heather Young Mandujano, the Education Coordinator of the CIM’s distance learning program, to discuss the courses they offer and the benefits to the students. Here is what Mrs. Mandujano had to say:


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elizabeth herrera's curator insight, October 22, 8:45 PM

This program supliments music lessons that are not bring covered at school.

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STEAM Co to power art-meets-science events in UK schools | Emiko Jozuka | Wired UK

STEAM Co to power art-meets-science events in UK schools | Emiko Jozuka | Wired UK | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Nick Corston is a man on a mission. He gave up his regular job just three weeks ago, and now, he's ready to blaze a trail with an innovative project called STEAM Co for -- hopefully -- all school kids in the UK.

It's set to be a science-meets-the-arts head on type of affair, and Corston's been heading it up for St Saviour's Primary School in London, which his own two sons have attended for the last four years.

Inspired by Sir Ken Robinson's TED talk on how schools can actually kill creativity in education, Corston, as a parent and STEM ambassador for the UK, decided to turn this theory on its head, and organised his own response to the creativity crisis in schools.

According to Corston, he's set on righting the imbalance he sees as caused by a damaging polarisation between the arts and the sciences. Stressing that STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) weren't enough on their own, Corston -- an engineer himself -- is set on unleashing the creative potential of the arts and sciences together.

"STEM isn't enough, the world needs STEAM to solve its challenges," he told WIRED.co.uk. "STEM is quite dull and boring on its own, but when you bring the arts in it develops the skills needed for future economies where left and right sides of the brain are working together."

Quoting scientist Professor Robert Winston's words -- "you've got to get them at primary school" --Corston explained that given the unpredictability of the future, it's necessary that kids be inspired to think both creatively and collectively. And that's certainly what he's been doing for the last four years at his STEAM Co one-day, festival-like events for kids at St Saviour's Primary.


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Every child should learn to program, but not necessarily how to code | Christian Hernandez | The Guardian

Every child should learn to program, but not necessarily how to code | Christian Hernandez | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I am a proud geek and father of three young children. I taught myself to code Basic at the age of 12 on my father’s Commodore 64, and I actively encourage my children to be enthused by the notion of building with digital tools. But I don’t necessarily agree with the notion that every child must learn how to code.

Yes, technology is the fastest growing sector of the UK economy with over a quarter of all new jobs in London coming from the technology sector. And yes, what parent would not want their child to be the next Mark Zuckerberg or Jack Ma.

To thrive in what some have called the second machine age, we, as parents, should ensure that our children develop the right skills. Just as we want them to express themselves clearly through writing, or contextualise the world through geography and develop numeracy through mathematics, we need to give the understanding of tools to grasp the accelerating nature of technology.

Last year, the UK government took a bold step by adding coding into the core school curriculum. From this school year onwards your children will be exposed to Boolean logic and bring home words like Ruby and Objective C. The challenge is that few parents (and not all teachers) really understand what coding is all about.

First, let’s stop calling it coding.

Coding refers to the use of a specific computing language to string together instructions for a computing device to execute. Instead, let’s talk about programming: the process and concepts of logic which – when implemented via code – bring digital services to life.


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3D printing mathematics: Turning ideas into artwork | Nicole Hyman | Inside3DP.com

3D printing mathematics: Turning ideas into artwork | Nicole Hyman | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When your day job involves using mathematics to solve everyday problems, you’re bound to create the impossible once you get your hands on a 3D printer. Or at least try. Professor Craig Kaplan doesn’t disappoint. He turned his fascination with Islamic geometric patterns and background in computer science into a collection of 3D printed artwork that’s as mathematically fascinating as it is functional.

Almost all the items in his collection can be purchased through his Shapeways store and include rings, ceramic coffee mugs and other mathematical artwork. All 3D printed, of course. But it’s the things you’d never think to 3D print that really stood out to me. This includes a 3D printed Kippah, a skullcap worn by Orthodox Jewish men, and Little Dipper, a cup designed specifically for biscuit dipping.


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Terrestrial Return Vehicle to provide parcel post for the ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Terrestrial Return Vehicle to provide parcel post for the ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

So much attention is paid to how to get into space that we often forget that getting back can be just as difficult. For example, getting experiment samples back from the International Space Station (ISS) is a logistical nightmare. Intuitive Machines' Terrestrial Return Vehicle (TRV) system may change that by making sending small payloads back to Earth as easy as mailing a parcel.

Getting samples back from the ISS currently means hitching a ride on a returning cargo or crew ferry craft, but this happens only a few times a year with every ounce already spoken for. That may be okay for most items, but what about the ones that can't wait?

The Terrestrial Return Vehicle (TRV) is a commercial service being developed by Intuitive Machines and NASA as part of a project under the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), which is responsible for installing the TRV on the space station and non-flight systems. It's designed to return small samples on demand from the ISS on the same day, and is suitable for critical and perishable materials that can't wait for the next ship home.


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On HBCUs, White House Moves From Disregard to Dismantling | CL Carter Sr. | HBCUDigest.com

On HBCUs, White House Moves From Disregard to Dismantling | CL Carter Sr. | HBCUDigest.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, historically Black colleges and universities were just a thorn in the side of the Obama Administration. We will soon long for those days, because signs of the administrative shift from disregard to attempts at dismantling HBCUs, are growing in frequency and impact seemingly every year.

The Department of Education last week appropriated more than $171 million to colleges and universities nationwide to bolster college access and equity for low-income and minority students. Several dozens of colleges and universities received First in the World grants to increase S.T.E.M. professional development for minorities, or smaller grants aimed at supporting Alaskans, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, African-Americans and Hispanics.

Of those dozens, just three HBCUs – Fayetteville State University, Hampton University and Prairie View A&M University, collectively received just over $3 million in federal support. Hampton’s FITW grant accounted for $3.5 million, while FSU and PVAMU received less than $250,000 each.

It would be easy to make the case that HBCUs should have received the lion’s share of the $171 million, but that would be doing HBCUs a great disservice in addressing their generational funding disparities. Howard University alone receives more than $230 million annual in federal support – a regrettably low number for the nation’s flagship institution serving the underserved and underrepresented, who typically fall into these categories after being marginalized by their race and/or economic status.

The White House has not matched resources with rhetoric, and its getting worse. For every HBCU Student All-Star that is named by the White House Initiative on HBCUs, there are hundreds of students denied the opportunity to matriculate or complete a degree at an HBCU due to a lack of financial aid. For every line of support for HBCUs and their students uttered by Education Secretary Arne Duncan, policy and funding consistently makes him, and those who echo his sentiments, liars.


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Why Conservatives Opt for Propaganda Over Reality | Amanda Marcotte | AlterNet.org

Why Conservatives Opt for Propaganda Over Reality | Amanda Marcotte | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Pew Research set out to find what’s behind what it considers the increasing political polarization of the United States; why the country is moving away from political moderation and becoming more and more divided between liberals and conservatives. Its first report on the phenomenon, which examines where people are hearing news and opinion in both regular and social media, shows that this is happening for very different reasons among people moving to the right than for people moving to the left.

Or that’s the charitable way to put it. The less charitable way is to say Pew discovered that conservatives are consuming a right-wing media full of lies and misinformation, whereas liberals are more interested in media that puts facts before ideology. It’s very much not a “both sides do it” situation. Conservatives are becoming more conservative because of propaganda, whereas liberals are becoming more liberal while staying very much checked into reality.

That this polarization is going on isn’t a myth. Previous Pew research shows the percentage of Americans who are “mostly” or “consistently” conservative has grown from 18% in 2004 to 27% in 2014. During that same period, the percentage of Americans who are “mostly” or “consistently” liberal stayed a little more consistent, growing from 33% to 34% in 10 years. (These statistics don’t measure what you call yourself, but what you rate as on a scale of beliefs about various issues.) While liberals became more liberal, conservatives both became more numerous and more rigidly conservative over time. What gives?

Enter right-wing media, which has a nifty trick of convincing audiences it’s the other guys who are the liars, all while actually being much less trustworthy in reality. From conservative screaming about the “media elite” to Fox News’s old slogan “Fair and Balanced,” conservative media is rife with the message that everyone is out to get you, conservative viewer, and only in the warm blanket of right-wing propaganda will you be safe.


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#GamerGate And A Culture Clash In The Making | On Point Radio on WBUR.org

#GamerGate And A Culture Clash In The Making | On Point Radio on WBUR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Hashtag “Gamergate” is all over the world of online fisticuffs lately. If you’re in it, you know all about it. Gamers – video gamers, online gamers – on an online tear, charging corruption in the incestuous world of video game journalism. Standing as the new citizen activist. Warriors at the Alamo.


Critics, charging that raging gamers are a bunch of culturally-privileged largely young white guys ready to unleash very real menace and misogyny to defend a passing era of supremacy. The threats are real and ugly and maybe the future of culture clash.


This hour On Point: Inside Gamergate.


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How Serious Games Fit With Blooms Taxonomy | DesigningDigitally.com

How Serious Games Fit With Blooms Taxonomy | DesigningDigitally.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Blooms Taxonomy was developed in 1956 and was used to help classify the difficulty associated with questions asked during assessments, ultimately being transformed into a “system” for classifying various learning outcomes. But how do serious games tie in with Blooms Taxonomy?

In simple terms, the Blooms Taxonomy model is based around the idea that learning can be divided into three main areas - learning that is generating a skill, learning that is developing attitudes, and finally, learning that is transferring knowledge. These are referred to as “domains”, and more complicated “languages” can be used to capture each of these areas. They include:

  • Cognitive Domain
  • Attitude Domain
  • Skills Domain


Okay, so what about the “Taxonomy” part? Well, this isn’t too complicated either. It basically means the classification of something. To explain further, the Bloom’s model suggests that each individual learning type has a series of learning levels that should be considered when providing a serious game platform for learners.


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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, Today, 12:49 AM

Blooms Taxonomy was developed in 1956 and was used to help classify the difficulty associated with questions asked during assessments.  The model was based around the idea that learning can be divided into three main areas:

  • Cognitive Domain
  • Attitude Domain
  • Skills Domain


Blooms and gaming together provide an individual learning type that has a series of learning levels to be considered when providing serious game platforms for learners.

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Copyright Law Stifling Free Speech And Artistic Criticism | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com

Copyright Law Stifling Free Speech And Artistic Criticism | Mike Masnick | Techdirt.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Pacific Standard Magazine has a really great article by Noah Berlatsky, looking at how copyright is stifling artistic criticism. Much of it focuses on a recent paper by John Tehranian, whom we've written about before.


The paper is called Dangerous Undertakings: Sacred Texts and Copyright's Myth of Aesthetic Neutrality -- and focuses on how aesthetic judgments about the value of works almost always applies in copyright cases, which is a bit dangerous when it comes to art, criticism and free speech.


Berlatsky's piece focuses on the famous case of The Wind Done Gone, the famous "unauthorized retelling" of Gone With The Wind from the perspective of another character. The lower court said it was infringing, and the appeals court overturned it -- but both were based, at least in part, on aesthetics, rather than underlying legal issues:


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Man’s Genome From 45,000 Years Ago Is Reconstructed | Carl Zimmer | NYTimes.com

Man’s Genome From 45,000 Years Ago Is Reconstructed | Carl Zimmer | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Scientists have reconstructed the genome of a man who lived 45,000 years ago, by far the oldest genetic record ever obtained from modern humans. The research, published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, provided new clues to the expansion of modern humans from Africa about 60,000 years ago, when they moved into Europe and Asia.

And the genome, extracted from a fossil thighbone found in Siberia, added strong support to a provocative hypothesis: Early humans interbred with Neanderthals.

“It’s irreplaceable evidence of what once existed that we can’t reconstruct from what people are now,” said John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Wisconsin who was not involved in the study. “It speaks to us with information about a time that’s lost to us.”

The discoveries were made by a team of scientists led by Svante Paabo, a geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Over the past three decades, Dr. Paabo and his colleagues have developed tools for plucking out fragments of DNA from fossils and reading their sequences.

Early on, the scientists were able only to retrieve tiny snippets of ancient genes. But gradually, they have invented better methods for joining the overlapping fragments together, assembling larger pieces of ancient genomes that have helped shed light on the evolution of humans and their relatives.

In December, they published the entirety of a Neanderthal genome extracted from a single toe bone. Comparing Neanderthal to human genomes, Dr. Paabo and his colleagues found that we share a common ancestor, which they estimated lived about 600,000 years ago.

Recently, Dr. Paabo and his colleagues got an opportunity to test their new methods on an exceptional human bone.

In 2008, a fossil collector named Nikolai V. Peristov was traveling along the Irtysh River in Siberia, searching for mammoth tusks in the muddy banks. Near a settlement called Ust'-Ishim, he noticed a thighbone in the water. Mr. Peristov fished it out and brought it to scientists at the Russian Academy of Sciences.

The Russian researchers identified the bone as a modern human, not a Neanderthal. To determine its age, they sent samples to the University of Oxford. Scientists there measured the breakdown of radioactive carbon and determined the bone was about 45,000 years old — making it the oldest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa and the Near East.

In 2012, Dr. Paabo and his colleagues took samples from the bone to search for DNA. To their surprise, it held a number of genetic fragments.


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Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment | Troy Hicks Blog | Edutopia.org

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment | Troy Hicks Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Providing students with feedback on written work can, at times, feel like a burden. Dozens (perhaps even hundreds) of papers clutter your desk, and commenting on each is nearly impossible.

Still, we know, both from our experiences and from research, that feedback is essential. John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, believes that feedback must be timely, relevant, and action-oriented. The good news, according to Hattie, is that "students want feedback just for them, just in time, and just helping nudge forward." To that end, he encourages us to "worry more about how students are receiving your feedback . . . than increasing how much you give."

So how can we provide this kind of feedback -- the kind that students actually listen to, understand, and use -- in a timely manner? Before looking at specific technologies that can assist us in the process, let's first explore how other experts describe feedback as a key tool in the formative assessment process.


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Midnight Vistas: Afrofuturism Is for All of Us | Darryl Smith Blog | HuffPost.com

Midnight Vistas: Afrofuturism Is for All of Us | Darryl Smith Blog | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

"Armed with the knowledge of our past, we can with confidence charter a course for our future."
- Malcolm X

Afrofuturism, a cultural and political practice that's both new and old alike, peeks out from a quote by Malcolm X. Though he certainly never attended a conference himself on the social movement that Afrofuturism seems primed to become, Malcolm X's words still sketch an Afrofuturist outlook - even as the scope and possibility of this emerging and complex outlook transcends his words.


As its name implies, Afrofuturism can encompass science fiction written by or about black people, but it ranges much further. This is because of its typically dynamic, ever-changing artistic and social nature.


Afrofuturism - through its various guises, calls attention to the present-day challenges that people of color face by encouraging them to remember and remake past historical events through their writings, music, art and politics. Remakings of the past can offer us a new and fresh awareness of our present delights and dilemmas which can, in turn, inspire us to truly visionary approaches to present-day systemic injustices.


When speaking about the African diaspora, long has been the suggestion that people of color have no real future (that the end of chattel slavery succeeded only in creating an "obsolete" race) and, too, that they have no real history to speak of (that the experience of same successfully annihilated that self-awareness). Afrofuturism challenges such claims through critical remakings of the past to inspire us to imagine and create an audacious future.

In February 2015, the first-of-its-kind Afrofuturism conference, Midnight Vistas, will bring together artists, writers, scholars and activists from across the United States - and throughout the world - to convene on the campuses of Pomona and Scripps Colleges, part of the Claremont Colleges Consortium, the group hosting the event. They will gather for a series of unprecedented opportunities.


For several days, these dynamic individuals will share their insights through scholarship, the visual arts, poetry readings, film screenings and musical performances. This groundbreaking event will gather these renowned authors, hip hop artists, academics, griots, dramatists, and activists as they come together to engage, listen to and learn from one another as well as from the pioneering ancestors of Afrofuturism, remembering and remaking those such as jazz innovator Sun Ra, funk musician George Clinton and writer Octavia Butler, among others.


With the impressive body of scholarship that has emerged to date on Afrofuturism, the time is right for a large-scale gathering of visionaries who want to explore how Afrofuturism interconnects with grassroots social movements and how those bonds can be strengthened.


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Competency-Based Education (CBE) | Confessions of a Community College Dean | Matt Reed | @insidehighered

Competency-Based Education (CBE)  | Confessions of a Community College Dean | Matt Reed | @insidehighered | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When Michael Dukakis ran for President, his slogan of “competence, not ideology” didn’t exactly stir the blood. But I saw competency stir the blood of some smart people on Monday, and it gave me hope. NEBHE - the New England Board of Higher Education - hosted a conference in Boston on Competency-Based Education, and it was one of the best I’ve attended in years.

Competency-Based Education (CBE) doesn’t have a standard definition yet -- which several speakers noted over the course of the day -- but it generally refers to programs in which student learning is measured in accomplishments, rather than time. The idea is to invert the credit hour. Under a credit hour system, time on task is fixed, and learning is variable. Under a CBE system, learning is fixed and time is variable.

CBE has existed in various guises for decades, but has hit its stride only in the last few years. Many colleges allow students to “test out” of certain courses, whether through CLEP, AP, or departmental exams, for example. Clinicals, in Nursing, are largely competency-based, as are co-ops. Self-paced developmental classes are a variation on competency-based, as are practicum courses. Licensing exams, such as the bar exam or the NCLEX, function as a competency-based form of quality control. For that matter, outcomes assessment is a close cousin to CBE. So the basic idea isn’t new.


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Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You | ESRI.com

Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You | ESRI.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is for people who know something about data analysis and want to learn about the special capabilities of spatial data analysis.


Spatial analysis focuses on location to gain a deeper understanding of data. Spatial analysis skills are in high demand by organizations around the world.


You'll get free access to the full analytical capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri's cloud-based GIS platform. Previous experience with GIS software is helpful, but not necessary for tech-savvy problem solvers.


Could you and your career go places with spatial analysis?


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Carvey: The desktop 3D carving machine | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com

Carvey: The desktop 3D carving machine | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

3D printers are the appliance of choice for a new generation of makers keen to rapidly prototype straight from their computer. But many materials with which 3D printers can produce items have limitations, and there are others that they can’t work with at all. Enter Carvey – a working prototype of a desktop mounted, rapid-modelling, 3D carving device that can sculpt wood, plastic, and metal into almost any object that you care to design.

Inventables – the company behind the Carvey – claims that the benefits of being able to mill store-bought-quality items in minutes from a range of materials is the next, and obvious, step beyond 3D printing.

"In the past few years we’ve seen an explosion in 3D printing, and we believe that 3D carving is the next step," said Zach Kaplan, Inventables CEO. "We are looking for the support of the Kickstarter community to make Carvey a reality. Carvey is for the maker in all of us, and we hope we can bring everyone the opportunity to create something exciting."


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NASA looks to SpaceX for Mars landing tips | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA looks to SpaceX for Mars landing tips | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

SpaceX founder Elon Musk has made it no secret that he plans to go to Mars, and it looks like he’s giving NASA’s ambitions about the Red Planet a bit of a boost along the way.


During a Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in September, the space agency sent a pair of chase planes up to take high-resolution images of the booster as it made a powered test landing on the surface of the Atlantic Ocean as a way of gather critical engineering information for future Mars missions.

The Falcon 9 is SpaceX’s attempt at a paradigm shift in spaceflight as the company works on a space launch system where all the major components from booster stages to spacecraft are able to return to Earth for a quick refueling and relaunching at a fraction of what current systems cost. Though still in its early stages, the powered landing system is already paying dividends to NASA, who sees the Falcon 9 as a source of data for future Mars missions.

In September, NASA sent up a pair of chase planes; one from NASA's Scientifically Calibrated In-Flight Imagery (SCIFLI) project team, and one from the US Naval Air Systems Command Weapons Division's Air Test and Evaluation Squadron-30 at Point Mugu, California. The idea was that by studying the Falcon 9 as it re-fired its engines at supersonic velocities, it would be a low cost way for both NASA and SpaceX to gather the needed data for building future spacecraft for making powered landings on Mars.


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3D printing and ham radio: A match made in heaven? | Mike Grauer | Inside3DP.com

3D printing and ham radio: A match made in heaven? | Mike Grauer | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As a member of the ham radio community, I have always been fascinated by the maker mindset which has existed since the early days of radio. From making radio equipment from scratch, to kits and even modifying commercially available equipment, the maker movement and radio go hand in hand.

The 3D printing community shares many traits with the ham radio movement. At the heart of it all is making, creating and inventing. And just like ham radio operators, those involved with 3D printing are constantly learning new technical skills that can be used in other areas of our lives.

Here are just a few ways ham radio operators can use 3D printing:


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