Digital Media Lit...
Follow
49.9K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

High-tech desks help kids do better at math | gizmag.com

High-tech desks help kids do better at math | gizmag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Mathematics has always been one of those subjects that poses a lot of difficulties for some young students. In the 3-year SynergyNet project conducted by Britain’s Durham University, however, it was found that something might help – multi-user multi-touch networked desks.

 

The study involved over 400 children at 12 schools, most of whom were between eight and ten years old. The NumberNet desks used by some are capable of responding to touch-based commands from several users at once, via vision systems that detect infrared light. These desks allow groups of pupils to work together to solve arithmetic problems.

 

The teacher views live feeds from all the desks, and can intervene if they see that a group of students is going about solving their equation the wrong way. They can also send new problems out to specific groups, send one group’s work to another for review, or bring it up onto the main smartboard at the front of the classroom for discussion.

 

Click headline to read more, view pix and access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How to Use Scratch for Digital Storytelling | Donna Markey | Graphite.org

How to Use Scratch for Digital Storytelling | Donna Markey | Graphite.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Digital storytelling involves combining digital media (images, voice narration, music, text, or motion) to tell a story. Over the past few years, digital storytelling has become an increasingly popular and effective way for students to meet a range of learning goals in the classroom. Scratch, a programming project from the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, might be an unexpected tool for digital storytelling. But using Scratch to tell a story is a “twofer”: Students practice important ELA skills and, at the same time, use computational thinking.

As students build their stories in Scratch, their work aligns with ISTE's definition of computational thinking. With Scratch, students.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness | Katrina Schwartz | KQED.org

Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness | Katrina Schwartz | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On his first day teaching at Coronado Elementary School in Richmond, Calif., students threw rocks at Jean-Gabrielle Larochette, pretending he was a police officer. He spent fifteen minutes of every class calming down a handful of kids in this low-income-neighborhood public school who wouldn’t follow directions or behave.

Larochette began practicing meditation and mindfulness to cope with his own stresses of teaching and supporting traumatized kids. He believed the breathing techniques that helped calm his fears might work for his students too, so he founded the Mindful Life Project.

“Before we can teach a kid how to academically excel in school, we need to teach him how to have stillness, pay attention, stay on task, regulate, make good choices,” said Larochette. “We tell kids be quiet, calm yourself down, be still. We tell them all these things they need in the classroom, but we’re not teaching them how to do that.”

The project has since grown and is now being incorporated in a group of elementary schools in Richmond, in an attempt to improve academic performance and create a more positive school culture by teaching students mindfulness. Mindfulness is the ability to exist in the present moment and practicing it often looks like meditation. Schools across the country are beginning to use mindfulness as part of an effort to address the social and emotional needs of children, improving student achievement in the process.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Khan Academy & Pixar Unveil "Pixar In A Box" | Larry Ferlazzo | EduBlogs.org

Khan Academy & Pixar Unveil "Pixar In A Box" | Larry Ferlazzo | EduBlogs.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Thanks to John Fensterwald, I initially heard about Pixar In A Box, a new project unveiled by Khan Academy yesterday:

its new online curriculum Pixar in a Box analyzes how the studio fuses art, tech, science, engineering, and math to develop top-shelf animated cinema. Created with middle and high school students in mind but available to everyone, Pixar in a Box’s interactive exercises, in-depth video lessons, and hands-on activities are an informative addition to Khan Academy’s extensive educational resources.

I’m not a math teacher, so can’t say much about the quality of the program. However, I can say that the videos seem much, much better than the usual Khan fare.

Here’s a an introduction to the Pixar In A Box:


Click headline to access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Career Readiness: Starting Early With Young Learners | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org

Career Readiness: Starting Early With Young Learners | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We hear a lot of talk about career readiness these days, and for secondary educators, you can't spit without finding advice on how to make our units, our school structure, or our content more aligned with prepping our students for the jobs of today and the future. So how about kindergarten kids?

Don't laugh. I'm not writing today to advocate that we get our early learners to decide now on a career in dentistry or accounting. I'm here today to write about the skills that successful people have in any career -- skills that should be encouraged early on.

So I reached out to a friend of mine that has some authority in career readiness to talk about ways to scaffold the skills our students need to know.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Why parents should challenge autoplay video | Lyz Lenz | Mashable.com

Why parents should challenge autoplay video | Lyz Lenz | Mashable.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In nineteenth century America, parents prepared children with macabre children’s books and fairy tales. It was impossible to hide death from them.

Today, low infant mortality rates and rising life expectancy mean death is not something many children face on a daily basis. Further, parents protect children from remaining experiences of death and violence. They set TV filters, check movie and video game ratings, and set web passwords to control children’s access to graphic media.

But Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat and a bevy of sites are investing in a growing media tool: autoplay video. These videos automatically start rolling as users scroll through their timelines or open articles. Autoplay videos are increasingly popular across the Internet — they generate automatic video views, which can increase ad revenue.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

A new casualty of high-stakes testing: student teachers | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

A new casualty of high-stakes testing: student teachers | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

And now, a new casualty of high-stakes standardized testing has been identified: student teachers.


This post, by Jennifer Wallace Jacoby, explains why and how some college and university teacher training programs are trying to find solutions so that student teachers get the vital classroom training they need.


Jacoby is an assistant professor of psychology and education at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts.


Click headline to read Jennifer Wallace Jacoby's blog post--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

I really don’t know if I can face another school year | The Secret Teacher | The Guardian

I really don’t know if I can face another school year | The Secret Teacher | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As summer arrived I was overcome with a feeling of relief. I’d made it. I’d actually made it through my NQT year, despite the many times when reaching that point didn’t seem possible.

Settling into a relaxed holiday mode hasn’t been an option for me, though. With the start of my second year drawing ever closer, I can already feel the pressure building and the thought of going back fills me with dread.

I know that the first year in any profession is challenging, but the first year in teaching was more than that. It was exhausting, gruelling and, at times, the demands were beyond belief.

A lack of training and support made things hard. I have a PGCE and many people seemed to think that signalled the end of teacher training. But it is really just the halfway point; I still needed a lot of help as I stepped into my own classroom for the first time. It was often just the basic things: my training didn’t teach me how to write reports adequately, manage difficult parents or navigate the complexities of the exam system.

But instead of getting help, I was forced to spend the year relying on intuition. When I sat down to mark my first batch of GCSE controlled assessments, I was dumbfounded. In that panic-stricken moment I realised I had never received so much as a crude how-to guide on marking the work, let alone any formal training.

I opened up my emails, frantically looking for someone to help me, but there was no one.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NY: Colleges at core of Rochester’s economy | James Goodman | Democrat & Chronicle

NY: Colleges at core of Rochester’s economy | James Goodman | Democrat & Chronicle | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Ryan Cummings understands — from personal experience — how colleges can connect to the local economy.

No sooner had he graduated from Monroe Community College this past June than he was hired as an electro-mechanical technician at Sydor Instruments. This Chili-based company makes measuring instruments with high-speed cameras to collect data that are sold to major research facilities, including the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

Cummings, 22, who graduated from Gates-Chili High School, picked up valuable experience during his last year at MCC when he worked part time at Sydor Optics, a sister company to his current employer. His concentration in physics at MCC gave him needed skills.

“Our systems have a lot of mechanical and electrical parts. Physics allows me to do all aspects of my job — putting together and testing cameras,” said Cummings.

The kind of high-tech training that Cummings received is becoming more of the norm as Rochester-area colleges have become key players in a local economy that has shifted from one in which Eastman Kodak Co. was king.

Instead, a multitude of smaller companies depend on computer chips to store massive amounts of information and fiber optics to transmit data at rapid speed. More than 110 optics, photonics and imaging science companies populate the region, according to the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How the state of the economy affects teacher quality and student outcomes | Journalist's Resource

How the state of the economy affects teacher quality and student outcomes | Journalist's Resource | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the school year has approached in fall 2015, the issue of serious teacher shortages across the country has come into focus, with certain districts dramatically lacking in sufficient numbers of quality candidates.

The root causes are thought to be at least partly economic: The Great Recession of 2007-09 resulted in mass layoffs and budget belt-tightening — prompting some educators to leave the profession — while a recent period of economic growth has presented more career options for would-be teachers.


These realities have likely contributed to other notable teaching market-related shifts, such as fewer top graduates applying for the elite program Teach for America. It is also worth pointing out that, as the Washington Post‘s Valerie Strauss documents at some length, a growing dissatisfaction among teachers with the profession and the way it is administered is also likely at the heart of the shortage.

These trends are unfolding despite a heightened focus on the teaching profession over the past decade or so and a growing body of research that suggests teachers can have a vital impact on students’ later-life chances.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

WI: Back to ALEC, Back to (Private) School | Chris Taylor Opinion | Tomah Journal

WI: Back to ALEC, Back to (Private) School | Chris Taylor Opinion | Tomah Journal | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On the heels of a newly passed state budget that again leaves our K-12 public schools behind without ample and consistent funding, I recently headed back to where the school privatization push all began — the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC.

ALEC and its members, including the American Federation for Children, have become more powerful than our citizens’ voices at the state Capitol. Despite massive public urging from Wisconsin school superintendents, principals, teachers, parents and students for consistent and adequate K-12 public education funding, Republicans legislators chose to dump more money into an unaccountable private voucher school system.

Since Republicans took over our state Capitol in 2011, they have cut $1.2 billion from public K-12 education. Under this latest budget, 55 percent of school districts will get less general student aid than they did last budget cycle, and Wisconsin is spending $1,014 less per public school student than it did in 2008.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

For Inca Road Builders, Extreme Terrain Was No Obstacle | Jasmine Garsd | Parallels | NPR.org

For Inca Road Builders, Extreme Terrain Was No Obstacle | Jasmine Garsd | Parallels | NPR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

One of history's greatest engineering feats is one you rarely hear of. It's the Inca Road, parts of which still exist today across much of South America.

Back in the day — more than 500 years ago — commoners like me wouldn't have been able to walk on the Inca Road, known as Qhapaq Ñan in the Quechua language spoken by the Inca, without official permission.

Fortunately, I have Peruvian archaeologist Ramiro Matos by my side. He is the lead curator of an exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian called "The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire."

That's "Inka" with a K, as it's spelled in Quechua. And today, we're taking a virtual journey down what was once more than 20,000 miles of road traversing some of the world's most challenging terrain — mountains, forests and deserts.

The Inca road began at the center of the Inca universe: Cusco, a city in the Peruvian Andes, said to be built in the shape of a crouching puma. It actually was not a single road but a network of royal roads, an instrument of power designed for military transport, religious pilgrimages and to move supplies.

"As far as the road stretches, the empire stretches," says Ramos.


Click headline to read more, access hot links, view pix and listen to this NPR radio segment--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

1980’s Analogy to Coding Today | Eleven Fifty Academy

1980’s Analogy to Coding Today | Eleven Fifty Academy | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Wondering why you should learn to code? Or trying to think of the best way to sell your parents on paying your tuition for the next coding course offered here at the Academy?

I sat down with John Qualls, President of Eleven Fifty Academy, who shared why he believes its important to learn to code, through an analogy that has inspired him throughout his successful career path – a route which has never involved a job interview or an internship and has included successfully founding companies.

Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Tech companies are hiring more liberal-arts majors than you think | Brian Fung | WashPost.com

Tech companies are hiring more liberal-arts majors than you think | Brian Fung | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Silicon Valley has a reputation for being filled with egghead coders who popped out of college as brilliant engineers (or who never finished college in the first place). Films like "The Social Network" have played a big role in popularizing this impression. Google, too, is notorious for putting job candidates through grueling programming tests. Against these geniuses, what hope would a humanities or social science major have of getting a job at one of these companies?

Quite a lot, actually. In fact, liberal arts graduates joined the ranks of tech companies at a faster clip in the past few years than their engineering and computer-science counterparts, according an analysis by LinkedIn of its own users. And of the recent liberal arts grads the company examined, as many as 2 in 5 now work at an Internet or software company. That's a staggering number.


Click headline to read more and access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist | Richard Feloni | BizInsider

10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist | Richard Feloni | BizInsider | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Elementary-school students learning how to write simultaneously learn the rules of grammar, and the two approaches can be difficult to balance.

It's why many teachers ingrain in their students a combination of white lies and formal habits that are meant to keep their writing focused but aren't actually based on rules of the English language.

As the students grow into adults, these habits result in plenty of incorrectly worded but well-intentioned sentences.

Harvard cognitive scientist and linguist Steven Pinker explores some of the most common myths and the mistakes they produce in his book "The Sense of Style," which is like a modern version of Strunk and White's classic "The Elements of Style," based on linguistics and updated for the 21st century.

Pinker strips popular grammar guides of the 20th century of their sanctity and instead delves into the evolution of English and how it was constructed and used for centuries to determine what is correct.

Here are some of the grammar myths that may be muddling your writing.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Schools: Study shows fruit and veggie plate waste increase | Tom Karst | The Packer

Schools: Study shows fruit and veggie plate waste increase | Tom Karst | The Packer | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack urges Congress not to roll back school nutrition rules that mandate produce in school menus, a University of Vermont study suggests that students are throwing the produce away.

The study, titled “Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Fruit and Vegetable Selection in Northeastern Elementary Schoolchildren, 2012–2013,” was published in the online journal Public Health Reports. According to the study, although students selected more fruits and vegetables under the new mandate requiring them to take either a fruit or vegetable, digital imaging of the food they throw away suggests they ate slightly less of each.

“The basic question we wanted to explore was if under these 2012 USDA guidelines, does requiring a child to select a fruit or vegetable correspond with consumption?” Sarah Amin, a researcher in Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont and lead author of the study, said in a news release. “It was heartbreaking to see so many students toss fruits like apples into the trash right after exiting the lunch line.”

Vilsack, in an opinion column said the standards are working.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Turkey: The Treasures Under Istanbul | Elif Batuman | The New Yorker

Turkey: The Treasures Under Istanbul | Elif Batuman | The New Yorker | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When it came to choosing the exact location of the first tunnel spanning the Bosporus—the narrow strait that divides the European and Asian sides of Istanbul and links the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara—one of the principal considerations was how to avoid encountering any archeological marvels.


The tunnel was for a new high-speed train called Marmaray (a combination of “Marmara” and ray, the Turkish word for “rail”), connecting to Istanbul’s metro system.


Of particular concern was the placement of the main station on the European shore, on the site of ancient Byzantium and Constantinople: everything within the ancient city walls has been designated both by UNESCO and by the Turkish government as a historical site, and all digging must be supervised by the Istanbul Archaeological Museum.


The location that was eventually chosen, in the working-class district of Yenikapı, had conveniently spent much of antiquity underwater. In Byzantine times, it was a harbor.

“What’s going to turn up in a harbor?” one official explained, when I asked about the decision. “Seabed and sand fill. Architectural structures aren’t going to turn up.”

In fact, a tiny Byzantine church did turn up in Yenikapı, under the foundations of some razed apartment buildings. But the real problem was the large number of Byzantine shipwrecks that began to surface soon after the excavation began, in 2004. Dating from the fifth to the eleventh century, the shipwrecks illustrated a previously murky chapter in the history of shipbuilding and were exceptionally well preserved, having apparently been buried in sand during a series of natural disasters.

In accordance with Turkish law, control of the site shifted to the museum, and use of mechanical tools was suspended. From 2005 to 2013, workers with shovels and wheelbarrows extracted a total of thirty-seven shipwrecks.


When the excavation reached what had been the bottom of the sea, the archeologists announced that they could finally cede part of the site to the engineers, after one last survey of the seabed—just a formality, really, to make sure they hadn’t missed anything. That’s when they found the remains of a Neolithic dwelling, dating from around 6000 B.C.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How Kids Are Learning to Code While Playing Minecraft | Mind/Shift | KQED.org

How Kids Are Learning to Code While Playing Minecraft | Mind/Shift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Teachers are already capitalizing on their students’ fascination with the computer game Minecraft to teach everything from math to history. Now, a new add-on teaches kids to code their own modifications to the game.


In his Wired article, Klint Finley explains how the creators of the add-on called LearnToMod hope their tool could be a gateway for students to discover a love of computer programming.


Click headline to access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How libraries became the front line of America’s homelessness crisis | Richard Gunderman & David Stevens | WashPost

How libraries became the front line of America’s homelessness crisis | Richard Gunderman & David Stevens | WashPost | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On any given night in 2014, over half a million people in the United States found themselves without a home. While the majority of these people (69 percent) secured shelter for the night, many do not provide daytime accommodations for their patrons. This leaves many in search of daytime activity and protection from the elements.

Unfortunately, many homeless are also living with debilitating mental illnesses. The intimate relationship between homelessness and mental illness is well-established. Almost all psychiatric conditions are over-represented in homeless populations.

The transition from inpatient to outpatient psychiatric treatment that began in the 1960s, including the closure of state-run psychiatric hospitals, may contribute to the prevalence of mental illness among the homeless. Today, adjusting for changes in population size, U.S. state mental hospitals house only about 10 percent the number of patients they once did.

So it is no surprise that libraries are coping with a large number of patrons who are homeless or have mental illnesses. Public libraries are, after all, designed to be welcoming spaces for all.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The Feds Want Schools to Practice Race-Based Discipline—and Teachers Aren't Happy | Adrienne Green | The Atlantic

The Feds Want Schools to Practice Race-Based Discipline—and Teachers Aren't Happy | Adrienne Green | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Obama administration might be disappointed to find out there’s not much support for one of its key school-discipline reform initiatives—at least not from teachers or members of the general public.


A growing body of evidence has long revealed discriminatory tendencies in the ways school districts dole out discipline. Black and Latino students are much more likely to be disciplined and suffer greater rates of in- and out-of-school suspensions. Of the 49 million students enrolled in public schools in the 2011-12 school year, close to 7 million were suspended, about half of them out of school. According to the U.S. Department of Education’s Civil Rights Data Collection, black students were suspended and expelled at a rate three times greater than were white students.


Taken as a whole, white students in the U.S. account for the largest share of one-time suspensions and expulsions. Still, discrepancies emerge when considering how the numbers compare to enrollment. While black students represented 16 percent of the U.S. student population, they accounted for 32 percent of the students suspended and 42 percent of those expelled. Black students also experience the highest rate of multiple suspensions, the DOE data shows.

The discrepancies are particularly egregious in certain parts of the country.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and view charts--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Antimatter Will Surf on Plasma Waves in the Particle Colliders of the Future | Kiona Smith-Strickland | Gizmodo.com

Antimatter Will Surf on Plasma Waves in the Particle Colliders of the Future | Kiona Smith-Strickland | Gizmodo.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The best way to study the subatomic particles that make up the most fundamental building blocks of our universe is, of course, to smash them into each other with as much energy as possible. And now physicists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory say they’ve found a better way to do that.

Researchers at SLAC’s Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) are especially interested in what happens when they crash high-energy beams of electrons into beams of positrons, their antimatter opposites. To answer the next generation of questions about these particles, however, physicists would need particle accelerators six miles long or more, with current accelerator technology.

That’s why FACET researchers developed a way to increase the energy of a particle beam in a shorter distance, so physicists could study electrons and positrons with smaller accelerators.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA starts year-long isolation to simulate life on Mars | BBC News

NASA starts year-long isolation to simulate life on Mars | BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A team of Nasa recruits has begun living in a dome near a barren volcano in Hawaii to simulate what life would be like on Mars.

The isolation experience, which will last a year starting on Friday, will be the longest of its type attempted.

Experts estimate that a human mission to the Red Planet could take between one and three years.

The six-strong team will live in close quarters under the dome, without fresh air, fresh food or privacy.

They closed themselves away at 15:00 local time on Friday (01:00 GMT Saturday).

A journey outside the dome - which measures only 36ft (11m) in diameter and is 20ft (6m) tall - will require a spacesuit.


Click headline to read more, view pix and watch video clips--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

As Common Core results trickle in, initial goals unfulfilled | Christine Armario | AP.org

As Common Core results trickle in, initial goals unfulfilled | Christine Armario | AP.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Results for some of the states that participated in Common Core-aligned testing for the first time this spring are out, with overall scores higher than expected though still below what many parents may be accustomed to seeing.

Full or preliminary scores have been released for Connecticut, Idaho, Missouri, Oregon, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia. They all participated in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of two groups of states awarded $330 million by the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 to develop exams to test students on the Common Core state standards in math and English language arts.

Scores in four other states that developed their own exams tied to the standards have been released. The second testing group, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, is still setting benchmarks for each performance level and has not released any results.

Even when all the results are available, it will not be possible to compare student performance across a majority of states, one of Common Core's fundamental goals.

What began as an effort to increase transparency and allow parents and school leaders to assess performance nationwide has largely unraveled, chiefly because states are dropping out of the two testing groups and creating their own exams.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New technology sees first braille tablet | RNIB | Supporting people with sight loss

New technology sees first braille tablet | RNIB | Supporting people with sight loss | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NB talks to Kristina Tsvetanova, a co-founder and CEO of Blitab about a possible ground breaking braille tablet.


What is Blitab®?


BLITAB® is the first ever braille tablet, which uses a new liquid-based technology to create tactile relief outputting braille, graphics and maps for the blind and partially sighted. We call it BLITAB® – the iPad for the blind. It is a next-generation affordable and multi-functional device for braille reading and writing that displays a whole page of braille text, without any mechanical elements.


Everything started three years ago during my studies, when a colleague of mine, sitting next to me, asked me to sign him in for an online course. I did it, but after that I realised Peter was blind. For the first time, I understood that something sighted people take for granted can be a challenge for others. This was the trigger, how we started developing a revolutionary tactile technology that will disrupt the status quo. In the past 10 months, we transferred the concept and project into a start-up company with social impact. Within this short space of time, our tablet has become an 11-time award-winning social and innovative project, with more than 20 sustainability recognitions. And more importantly, we already have more than 2,500 sign-up testers, among them 300 children in 34 countries, and this was the reason we were spotted and awarded as social change makers.


Click headline to read more of the interview--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Broadband and Minnesota Schools and Libraries: Talking points for policymakers | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

I want to thank Minnesota Educational Technology Networks (METN) for sharing their talking points for policymakers (2015) with me. It’s an instructive sheet on what’s going on with technology in the schools today. But also it’s a great example of how to provide information to legislators.


It’s brief with easy statistics and it tells the stories of how the issue impacts constituents. Policymakers are expected to have a huge breadth of knowledge and generally are pretty quick studies.


Technology is difficult for many people who aren’t steeped in it daily so the details can bog someone down but I think it’s very easy to understand and appreciate the services they have described – the services that require continued funding.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans Is ‘Gentrification’s Ground Zero’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com

10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans Is ‘Gentrification’s Ground Zero’ | Roisin Davis | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has transformed into “gentrification’s ground zero,” according to historian Megan French-Marcelin. Writing in Jacobin magazine, she dissects the city’s redevelopment and rebranding into a “neoliberal playground for young entrepreneurs.”

“One need only look at the harrowing weeks and months after the storm,” French-Marcelin writes, “to see that reconstruction would be used to implement a series of revanchist reforms that further deregulated labor, undermined unions, diminished educational and employment opportunities for working-class people, and excised public and affordable housing from the speculative urban landscape.”

The evidence to thwart any progressive redevelopment agenda is startling. For example, “In just over a decade—from 1996 to 2007—the city managed to close 85% of the city’s public housing, adopting a system of ‘mixed-income’ projects and vouchers instead.”

When it comes to public education, “within the first few months after the storm, nearly 7,500 predominantly black public school teachers were unilaterally fired, with no process or explanation, the first shot in a relentless battle to dismantle the city’s traditional public schools. In the next few years,” French-Marcelin explains, “education profiteers, led by Teach for America (TFA) and school privatization guru Paul Vallas, turned New Orleans schools into the first all-charter school system in the nation.”


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.