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Information literacy – long list of resources

Information literacy – long list of resources | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I’ve been looking at information literacy resources over the last few weeks, and have emailed a number of stakeholders drawn from my research and identified nominations and recommendations from networks. I hope this has helped me to build a ‘long list’ that may be useful. Those responsible for these long list resources have been sent a form (see previous post) in order to gather evaluation criteria for this research, and to help narrow down the long list into a short one.

 

Here’s the long list, with links to information about the resources in question. If you spot any major omissions or wish to query any inclusions, please drop me an email: inskiprilads@gmail.com. I am keen to make this as comprehensive, relevant and useful as possible and I am happy to add to the list, which is not set in stone.

 

In alphabetical order by name of institution:

 

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The numbers behind the broadband ‘homework gap’ | John Horrigan | Pew Research

The numbers behind the broadband ‘homework gap’ | John Horrigan | Pew Research | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since the dawn of the internet, there’s been much talk about the digital divide – the gap between those with access to the internet and those without. But what about the “homework gap”?

In recent years, policymakers and advocates have pushed to make it easier for low-income households with school-age children to have broadband, arguing that low-income students are at a disadvantage without online access in order to do school work these days. Later this year, the Federal Communications Commission is expected to begin a rule-making process to overhaul the Lifeline Program, an initiative that subsidizes telephone subscriptions for low-income households, so that it would also cover broadband.

In 2013, the Lifeline program provided $1.8 billion worth of telephone subsidies for qualified low-income people. The FCC has not yet provided estimates of how much it would cost to add broadband subsidies to the program, but the debate will undoubtedly focus on overall program costs and how many households would be covered.


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NASA's Orion capsule swaps glass windows for plastic | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's Orion capsule swaps glass windows for plastic | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When the first Orion astronauts stare back at Earth, they'll be looking through windows made mostly of plastic. Because Orion is designed to carry out manned deep-space missions and even a possible Mars voyage, NASA decided it was time to replace the conventional glass windows with panes of acrylic that are lighter, less expensive, and more structurally sound than previous designs, and is more suited to long-duration missions.


Until now, all US manned spacecraft have used tempered and annealed glass windows to let astronauts see out while protecting them from the vacuum, extreme temperatures, and UV radiation of space, as well as from the heat of reentry. Anyone who has ever bumped a window pane too hard or dropped a water tumbler might think that glass was a poor choice, but it's actually quite a remarkable material.


Technically, glass isn't a solid. It's a supercooled liquid, which means it doesn't have a crystalline structure, but it is isotropic and elastic. It's also surprisingly strong, with the ability to withstand stress up to 3 million psi. In everyday terms, that means that you can make (and people have made) a spring out of glass that can support a doubledecker bus. The problem is that without a crystalline structure, glass needs to be flawless for maximum strength.


The reason why the bulk glass found in building windows and other items is so weak is because it's full of micro flaws due to manufacturing and handling. When under stress, a tiny scratch in a piece of glass can suddenly turn into a crack that spreads at the speed of sound. Tempering, where the glass surface is compressed, and annealing, where the glass is heated and allowed to cool slowly, can make it stronger, but annealed glass suffers from static fatigue and degrades under stress over time. Of course, a pressurized deep-space capsule puts the window glass under a lot of stress for a lot of time.

Orion has six windows in all – four windows in the crew module and two more in the docking and side hatches – so what to make them out of is a major engineering decision. There are many ways of solving the window problem in spacecraft. In fact, back in the Mercury days of the 1960s, the engineers wanted to leave them out entirely as an unnecessary structural weakness, but the astronauts weren't having it. One solution is to use a different transparent material, such as a polycarbonate, instead of glass, but because of the need for astronauts to take high-resolution images, the material has to have the optical qualities of glass.


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Active Learning In Virtual Business Landscape – The Road To Success | Alexandru Capatina | eLearning Industry

Active Learning In Virtual Business Landscape – The Road To Success | Alexandru Capatina | eLearning Industry | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Virtual markets are the perfect venue for the students from business schools who are seeking to improve their entrepreneurial skills in a free risk environment.


Active learning, applied in scenarios involving virtual enterprises, has multiple advantages: it requires the students to take responsibility and initiative in their own decision making process; the students are able to carry out virtual business transactions with other practice enterprises, through eLearning platforms.


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Facebook change will give you control over data sharing with apps | Zach Miners | ComputerWorld.com

Facebook change will give you control over data sharing with apps | Zach Miners | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Users are getting greater choice over what information is shared with websites and apps when they log in using their Facebook ID.

A new version of Facebook Login, which begins its rollout this week, will present users with a prompt to "Edit the info you provide." Clicking that will let users grant or deny access to different types of information. The login now also highlights who will see content posted by the app in Facebook, for apps that request the ability to do so.

Facebook first announced this system during its F8 developers conference in April 2014. Many of the most popular apps, like Pinterest and Netflix, are already using it and over the next few weeks, Facebook will turn on the system for every app that uses the Facebook Login.

Facebook is also making a change to its software development kit so that third-party developers can ask permission to access a list of the person's friends who also use the app, but not information related to the friends such as their birthday, photos and likes.

Additionally, the company has a new team to review apps that ask for more than people's public Facebook profile, email address and friend list. Apps that Facebook determines are asking for unnecessary information from users could have their data access revoked.

The moves are part of Facebook's broader efforts to give better privacy controls to users in the hope more people will log in via Facebook. If that happens, it would help to grow Facebook's developer community. Facebook offers analytics and other tools to developers, including advertising.


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Keeping vital in the age of tech disruption: Learn from the libraries | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

Today’s post is just a little different but it’s a Sunday and I just thought this might be valuable to some readers and a handy thing to pass on to others in your community because it addresses the life and death prospect of the broadband economy.

Some people hang back from technology because they are a afraid of change. Think of Kodak, (many) local book shops or Encyclopedia Britannica. Libraries ran the risk of joining the list except librarians said – we’re not books, we’re information. There was a fundamental shift in what became the core competency based on how technology changed the need and role of libraries.

Forbes Magazine recently ran an article (Do we need libraries?) that outlines the shift that libraries made. I think the questions they pose would be helpful to anyone looking down the barrel of technology. Because technology can be a liability or an asset it all depends on how you use it.

The article poses three questions that don’t make sense…


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ESA to collaborate with Japan in daring asteroid mission | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

ESA to collaborate with Japan in daring asteroid mission | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

ESA has announced its intent to aid the Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA) with its ambitious Hayabusa-2 mission to retrieve material samples from an asteroid, and return said samples to Earth by the year 2020. Following a successful launch last December atop a H-IIA rocket, the probe will now benefit from 400 hours of tracking and telemetry from ESA's 35 m (115 ft) diameter dish at Malargüe, Argentina.

Traveling under the power of its ion engine, Hayabusa-2 is expected to make contact with its target, a carbon-rich asteroid known as 1999 JU3, in June 2018. Upon arrival, the probe will set about the work of attempting to shed light on the origins and evolution of our solar system.

Exploration is scheduled to last for 18 months, during which time Hayabusa-2 will deploy three small rovers and a lander containing a suite of four observation instruments. The probe will also attempt to penetrate the surface of 1999 JU3 by smashing a copper "bomb" into the surface of the asteroid in order to create a crater. Finally, a number of samples will be collected from the surface of the asteroid by the spacecraft's Sampler Mechanism. Upon return to Earth, these samples will be transported safely through the atmosphere via the probe's re-entry capsule.


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New Horizons detects possible polar ice caps on Pluto | David Szondy | GizMag.com

New Horizons detects possible polar ice caps on Pluto | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After over nine years of travel, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is starting to provide hints of what its July flyby of Pluto will reveal. Earlier this month, the unmanned probe sent back the clearest images yet of the most distant planet of the classic Solar System, which have revealed light areas on the surface that show it may have polar caps.

The new images were captured in mid-April at a distance of 70 million miles (113 million km) from the dwarf planet by New Horizons' Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera. The images were sharpened using image deconvolution, which is a technique that reverses image jiggling and optical distortions by means of a digital algorithm that makes statistical comparisons of multiple images.

The result is low-definition images and animations of Pluto showing light and dark areas, with the bright spots indicating what may be polar caps. Whether these exist or are made of ice or frozen gases has still to be determined. In addition, LORRI took images of Pluto's moon Charon, but NASA says that the exposure times were too short to see the planet's four other moons.


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Most comprehensive map of the universe yet could pinpoint dark matter | Dario Borghino | GizMag.com

Most comprehensive map of the universe yet could pinpoint dark matter | Dario Borghino | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Astrophysicists from the University of Waterloo have compiled the most comprehensive 3D map of our cosmic surroundings to date. The map describes how ordinary matter is distributed in space up to a distance of about a billion light-years away from us. This survey will help scientists better understand the distribution of dark matter and explain why, to some extent, galaxies are moving erratically with respect to us.

The cosmological principle states that the matter is distributed homogeneously across the universe when seen on a large enough scale. This, however, doesn’t mean that the density of the universe is the same at each and every point in space: if that were the case, there would be no galaxies, stars, or planet Earth to speak of.

Rather, what we see are variations that occur with no set pattern, influenced by the gravitational pull of both ordinary and dark matter and forming clusters of galaxies in random directions relative to us. On the whole the fluctuations tend to average out, but in our cosmic neighborhood we still see significant variations.

Professor Mike Hudson and team have created the most comprehensive map of the universe yet, describing the distribution of galaxies in all directions, up to a billion light years out. This is a staggering distance: for reference, our own Milky Way is approximately 100,000 light years across.


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TN: Tech Goes Home Chattanooga Graduates First 72 Students | Chattanoogan.com

The Enterprise Center and Mayor Andy Berke awarded the first 72 Tech Goes Home Chattanooga participants with graduation certificates on Friday after eight weeks of course work targeted at teaching under-served communities digital literacy skills. The Tech Goes Home Chattanooga (TGH CHA) pilot program launched last February at six locations across the county as part of an increased focus on digital inclusion. The program was featured recently in Mayor Andy Berke’s State of the City address.

“We are a community that comes together to break down barriers to opportunity – and one of those barriers is the digital divide,” said Mayor Berke.


“Tech Goes Home accomplishes this by teaching our senior citizens and parents of young kids how to use a computer safely and practically, from paying your bills to sending an email to filling out a job application.”
 

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For mobile operators, sharing is caring | De Wet Bisschoff & Hennie de Villiers | TechCentral

For mobile operators, sharing is caring | De Wet Bisschoff & Hennie de Villiers | TechCentral | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Co-location allows for a more sustainable financial model that can bolster operator revenues, take pressure off consumers and increase network penetration in underserviced areas.

The telecommunications landscape has changed significantly in the past decade due to pricing pressure, rising network costs and evolving consumer demands.

According to Ovum, average revenue per user (Arpu) is forecast to decline at 16% globally (and at a faster 19% in South Africa) between 2012 and 2019. Related to this, data demand will drive 4G/LTE traffic, to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 110% from 2014 to 2019. Data is also driving future revenue, with LTE revenues in the Middle East and Africa predicted to grow from 23% of total radio access network revenues in 2015 to 67% in 2019.

To add to this, over-the-top services and increasing adoption of the Internet of things are presenting new challenges for operators.

Essentially, operators find themselves in a “perfect storm”, with margin pressures weighing heavily on current business models. The net effect will be that consumers are increasingly bearing the costs of connectivity, as witnessed in the recent pricing adjustments by South African operators.

In the circumstances, how can operators provide better services, supported by a financially sustainable business model?


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Congress introduces bill to repeal excise tax and protect workers’ health benefits | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org

Congress introduces bill to repeal excise tax and protect workers’ health benefits | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This week, Congressman Joe Courtney (D-Conn.) introduced legislation to protect health insurance for working families across the country. The Middle Class Health Benefits Tax Repeal Act would repeal an excise tax, originally known as the “Cadillac Tax,” for health care coverage that exceed a certain amounts.

“The excise tax is a poorly designed penalty that will put a dent in the pocketbooks of many families and businesses with health insurance plans that do not resemble the ‘Cadillac’ plans originally targeted when this policy was adopted—instead, the excise tax will punish people living in higher cost areas, with ‘Ford Focus’ level plans,” said Courtney.

The bill would repeal a 40 percent excise tax of employer-sponsored health coverage which will go into effect in 2018. The tax is thought to go after high-end and overly-generous health plans. In reality, the tax would have a disproportionate impact on older workers, women and workers in high-cost regions.

“The excise tax is not a smart reform—it is a flawed, one-size-fits-all penalty that will degrade workers’ benefits, lead employers to choose less comprehensive plans and force families to pay more out-of-pocket health care costs,” said Courtney. “Fortunately, we have the opportunity to eliminate this tax before it goes into effect, and I am proposing this legislation to ensure that America’s working families are protected from an uneven, unnecessary cut to their hard-earned health care benefits.”


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Funding needed for school nurses to keep students physically, mentally healthy | Katie Kanner | NEA.org

Funding needed for school nurses to keep students physically, mentally healthy | Katie Kanner | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“As cuts have deepened and essential personnel have been reduced, schools are quickly finding that nurses are a significant component in addressing not only the health needs of students, but also in creating an emotionally and physically safe learning environment,” says School Nurse Practitioner Maggie Beall, who serves in Pennsylvania.

Maggie has witnessed firsthand just how detrimental these cuts have been for students and their access to proper medical care. In some cases, multiple schools share one nurse by means of daily rotations. In other cases, schools are not even required to have nurses on staff.

School nurses serve as strong influences in promoting healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining positive health outcomes for all of our students. More importantly, nurses serve as vital assets in the daily routines for many of America’s students.

Some estimates claim that nearly 25 percent of the student population has a chronic health condition (CHC). These conditions can range from physical impairments to emotional and developmental disabilities. Children with CHCs may need insulin for diabetes, an inhaler for asthma, or other routine medications. School nurses are the only qualified experts who can care for and evaluate these conditions. So what happens when they’re not around?

“You hear these horror stories of preventable tragedies. Soon schools are going to be held liable; they need to make the investment not only for students’ well-being, but also for their own protection.”

By supporting school nurses, we can keep our students healthy, as well as encourage their overall academic achievement.

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Patti Hamilton's curator insight, May 3, 2:48 PM

In the late 1980s I worked with the Texas School Nurses' Association to gather data on health needs of Texas school children.  Still, we lack qualified school nurses in every school in Texas.

Patti

Darren Nutting's curator insight, Today, 3:36 PM

Always take care of yourself. That gives you the best chance to take care of others at your full potential!

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Skeleton Sound | Rajinder Sodhi | Projection Mapping Central

Skeleton Sound | Rajinder Sodhi | Projection Mapping Central | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you’re looking to surround yourself with projection mapping, look no further than Noisy Skeleton (Skeleton Sound), by David-Alexandre Chanel and Jonathan Richer’s studio Theoriz. They created a fun and immersive installation that gives users the chance to control a projected 360 cave and its accompanying sound. David Guerra was the musician and composer for the piece, putting together an experience that mixes projected light with sound in a way that also reacts to a user’s whole body gesture.

In their own words:

“Skeleton Sound uses the human body as a means of expression to explore the audiovisual landscape. We deliberately opted for a minimalist approach both from a visual standpoint. Our goal is to give the impression to viewers that the sound passes through their fingers. “

“It’s a real dialogue between man and machine, with minimalist aesthetic resonance and vibration that allows you to feel the tiniest disturbances of sound and space, plunging the interpreter in an experiment of both physical and virtual.”

The installation uses a 3D camera, tracking a user’s skeleton (position, joint data, etc.) and uses data like the distance between the user’s hands to change the video and audio. Awesome work!


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NASA application grants general public the opportunity to explore the surface of Vesta | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

NASA application grants general public the opportunity to explore the surface of Vesta | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA has released a browser-based application that allows citizen scientists to explore the surface of the asteroid Vesta. The 3D model was created from data harvested by the agency's Dawn spacecraft over the course of its year-long stay in orbit around the asteroid between July 2011 and September 2012. The application allows users a rare opportunity to make detailed observations of one of the lesser-known bodies in our solar system in an engaging, easy-to-use format.

The surprisingly in-depth option bar features a quick-start tutorial, allowing you to interact with and observe the surface of Vesta above and beyond the capabilities afforded by a standard interactive map. The app can be viewed either in 2D, with viewing options including global, north pole, or south pole, or via a 3D representation of the asteroid.

The "My Data" tab allows you to select a number of overlays such as mineral ratio, geology, and for the more scientifically minded, high-energy gamma-ray count rate, all of which come with an easy-to-understand color legend.


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NASA: The fine art of space “traffic” control around Mars | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com

NASA: The fine art of space “traffic” control around Mars | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Around Mars the space traffic really isn’t all that bad – five spacecraft vying for hundreds of miles or open cosmos around the planet – but serious space traffic control is still necessary to prevent a collision.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) which controls the airspace around the red planet this week said it implemented formal collision-avoidance technology that will keep the current and future orbiters a safe distance from each other and warn the scientists if two orbiters approach each other too closely.

In a paper written by JPL scientists that detailed the collision avoidance software and algorithms the researchers said that the possibility of a collision around Mars (or the moon which uses similar avoidance technology) is minuscule.


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White House Unveils New ConnectED Effort Focused on Library Access, Content | Audrey Armitage Blog | EdWeek

White House Unveils New ConnectED Effort Focused on Library Access, Content | Audrey Armitage Blog | EdWeek | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

President Obama today is announcing a pair of White House initiatives aimed at increasing students' access to public libraries, and boosting the ability of economically disadvantaged students to use the digital resources available in those facilities.

At an appearance at the Anacostia Library in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, the president is expected to put forward a plan, supported by commercial publishers, to provide more than $250 million worth of free e-book content to students from low-income families, along with a second effort meant to give all students in 30 different communities, and eventually nationwide, a library card.

The two efforts are part of the ConnectED program, a White House plan launched in 2013 that has drawn financial support from numerous ed-tech providers and private organizations with the goal of improving digital education and Web connectivity.

Several major publishers, including Macmillan, Simon & Schuster, Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, and Hachette, are supporting the e-book program, and will provide over 10,000 of the most well-known books to students as e-resources.

As part of the e-book effort, nonprofits and librarian networks will work with the New York Public Library to develop an app designed to give low-income families access the newly available digital materials.


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States Are Required to Educate Students Behind Bars, but Here's What Really Happens | Molly Knefel | Truth-Out.org

States Are Required to Educate Students Behind Bars, but Here's What Really Happens | Molly Knefel | Truth-Out.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When he was young, Cadeem Gibbs was really into school. Bright, curious, and naturally rebellious, he enjoyed arguing the opposing point of view in a classroom discussion just to see how well he could do it. “I was always academically inclined,” says the Harlem native, now 24. “I always wanted to learn.”

But there were plenty of stressors in his young life—a violent upbringing, a household in poverty—and the struggle to navigate them pulled him away from his education. He started getting into trouble and ended up in the juvenile justice system at the age of 12. That first contact with “the system” began a 10-year cycle of incarceration that ended only when Gibbs was released from an upstate New York prison two years ago, at the age of 22. He was just a sixth grader when first arrested, but he would never complete a school year as a free child again.

Americans believe that education is the great equalizer, the key that opens the door to a better future and lifts young people out of poverty. And this is true, to an extent—those who finish high school or college have lower unemployment rates and higher incomes than those who don’t. But while people who don’t complete their education are more likely to stay in poverty, they’re also more likely to come from poverty. In the 21st century, so-called reformers have emerged to prescribe everything from charter schools to iPads in order to boost poor students’ educational achievements.

Ignored is a trifecta of policies that prevent young people in poverty from finishing their education: high-stakes testing and the high-stakes discipline that comes with it; weak to nonexistent federal policy concerning education for those young people already involved with the juvenile justice system; and a lifetime of background checks that keep the formerly incarcerated from gaining degrees and finding jobs.

These intersecting policies, which push kids out of school and into a punitive legal system, are collectively known as the “school-to-prison pipeline.” But the individuals who emerge at the end of that pipeline, though criminalized, are still young people—a population that has a reasonable expectation to receive an education. So what happens to a young person’s schooling when he or she is taken out of the classroom and put behind bars?


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"Sailing" spaceship could make return trips to Mars easier | Eric Mack | GizMag.com

"Sailing" spaceship could make return trips to Mars easier | Eric Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Getting to Mars is a difficult, long and costly journey. However, Finnish scientists may have a solution based on combining an electric solar sail invented in 2006 with fuel stations orbiting around Earth and the Red Planet.

One of the longstanding challenges of space exploration is the huge amount of thrust it takes to escape the Earth's atmosphere. That kind of power is also expensive to create, so the holy grail of the last decade or so has become more efficient and inexpensive ways to move around space. SpaceX is working on reusable rockets, but another nascent concept involves "sailing" on the solar wind.

We first detailed the electric solar sail developed by Dr. Pekka Janhunen of the Finnish Meteorological Institute in 2008, and now it's back in a paper recently published in the journal Acta Astronautica. The report outlines how combining the sail with the mining of asteroids for water to convert to fuel could be the best way to conduct manned missions to Mars in the future.

You can consult our original article for more details on the workings of the sail, but the central concept involves using dozens of very long thin conducting filaments and an on-board electron gun to create a field that the solar wind then "pushes" against to propel the craft.


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Earth-sized virtual telescope to study supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com

Earth-sized virtual telescope to study supermassive black hole at center of Milky Way | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In astronomy, much like many other other aspects of life, bigger is better. Taking this adage to heart, astronomers at the University of Arizona are helping to build a virtual radio telescope the size of the Earth itself. With a resolution factor more than a thousand times greater than that of the Hubble Space Telescope, the new Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) will be used to study in fine detail the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way.

A team led by Dan Marrone, assistant professor of Astronomy and Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona, has recently helped stitch in the latest in a range of radio telescopes across the world that form part of a set of instruments being used for Very Long Baseline Interferometry, or "VLBI" – a technique whereby a telescope with a size equal to the maximum separation between multiple linked radio telescopes can be emulated. This latest instrument is located in Antarctica and is known as the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The connection of the SPT completes the loop of a range of other high-end observation devices spanning the globe.

"Now that we’ve done VLBI with the SPT, the Event Horizon Telescope really does span the whole Earth, from the Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham in Arizona, to California, Hawaii, Chile, Mexico, Spain and the South Pole," said Dan Marrone. "The baselines to SPT give us two to three times more resolution than our past arrays, which is absolutely crucial to the goals of the EHT. To verify the existence of an event horizon, the 'edge' of a black hole, and more generally to test Einstein's theory of general relativity, we need a very detailed picture of a black hole. With the full EHT, we should be able to do this."


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NASA to test atomic clock to keep space missions on time | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA to test atomic clock to keep space missions on time | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you thought the Apple watch was something to write home about, take a look at NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC). This miniaturized, ultra-precise mercury-ion atomic clock is described by the space agency as "orders of magnitude more stable than today's best navigational clocks," and is smaller and more accurate than any that's been previously sent into space. In 2016, it will fly on a test mission to demonstrate a technology that NASA sees as key to a number of high-priority Earth-orbit and deep space missions.

The Age of Exploration with its wooden sailing ships and picking weevils out of hardtack may not seem much like today's era of space exploration, but the two have much in common. For one thing, both depend heavily on clocks. In the old days, one of the key problems of navigation for centuries was how to calculate a ship's longitude. In essence, doing so required knowing the difference in time between the ship and Greenwich, England, which is the position of zero longitude. To do this required the navigator to have a chronometer of great accuracy, and one that could work as well on a tossing ship as another could on shore.

Spacecraft have a similar problem. Navigation, and other tasks, rely on very precisely timed radio signals and this requires ever more accurate atomic clocks. The latest of these is the DSAC.

Assembled at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the DSAC is designed to not drift more than 1 nanosecond in 10 days. In addition, it's smaller, lighter, more accurate and more stable than previous clocks flown in space.


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LA: A glimpse at Lafayette's future leaders | Amanda McElfresh | The Advitiser

LA: A glimpse at Lafayette's future leaders | Amanda McElfresh | The Advitiser | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Twenty-seven high school juniors from across Lafayette Parish will spend the next several months learning about their community and developing their skill sets as members of the 2015 Lafayette Junior Leadership class.

The program is under the Leadership Institute of Acadiana umbrella, along with Leadership Lafayette and the alumni division.

As part of Lafayette Junior Leadership, the students will learn about government, volunteerism, health care, technology, college preparation and more.

Here is a look at this year's Junior Leadership class.


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5 reasons why transmedia still matters | Sandra Lehner | MIP Blog

5 reasons why transmedia still matters | Sandra Lehner | MIP Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The term “transmedia” has had a difficult birth as a buzzword of academic-conference panelists and digital-era visionaries.


And even though it has arrived in film industry jargon and popular culture in the past few years, it is still a widely misunderstood and little appreciated expression.


The concept of transmedia is still powerful for producers though. Here are five reasons why transmedia still matters:


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Educational Uses of Second Life: Geometry Applications for Students | Kristi Kosina | YouTube

This is the multimedia video presentation of a collaborative project for the course, Educational Communications, at the University of Texas at Brownsville.

Please visit our website to learn more about our project:

http://edtc6325team1spring15.pbworks....


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New report adds fuel to argument for tougher charter standards to protect students, taxpayers | Brian Washington | NEA.org

New report adds fuel to argument for tougher charter standards to protect students, taxpayers | Brian Washington | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Another report is shining new light on alleged instances of fraud and abuse connected to charter schools.

The report, titled “The Tip of the Iceberg: Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste, Fraud, and Abuse,” was released earlier this week and charges the financial total connected to waste and mismanagement in the charter school sector is as high as $203 million.

The study was released by the Center for Popular Democracy and the Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools and has managed to get the attention of the Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss, who wrote a column about it. Here’s some of what she had to say:


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Will the Kansas Board of Ed vote to de-professionalize teaching? | Katie Kanner | NEA.org

Will the Kansas Board of Ed vote to de-professionalize teaching? | Katie Kanner | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Kansas educators and parents are speaking out against a dangerous proposal being considered by the state board of education that would remove restrictions on hiring untrained, unlicensed individuals as teachers.

The proposal would allow administrators to hire unlicensed individuals for schools that are part of the Coalition of Innovative School Districts. While superintendents insist the required waivers would be used sparingly, there are virtually no limitations on how the waivers could be employed in the proposal currently on the table.

Here are some top concerns the Kansas National Education Association has about the proposal, according to KNEA legislative director Mark Desetti. In the current proposal:


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