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Arts town in Hamburg, Ngqushwa Local Municipality / EC | The South African LED Network

Arts town in Hamburg, Ngqushwa Local Municipality / EC | The South African LED Network | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Emthonjeni Arts is aimed at regenerating the area and turning it into a niche tourism destination with a central focus on art and the development of local artists. The artist retreat is now nearing final completion. The site for the residency was chosen as part of the development of a spatial development framework for the whole town.

 

It is on a north-facing brow of a hill overlooking the Keiskamma River and estuary and slightly shielded from the prevailing winds from the sea. Its location has been strategically chosen to promote further development around it and around developing Hamburg as an Arts town.

 

The vision of the retreat is to provide a creative space for local and international artists to develop and perfect their craft in a special environment. The retreat periods will be linked to other major art events such as the Grahamstown National Arts Festival.

 

Sustainability of the retreat will be ensured through strategic partnerships with stakeholders by, among other things establishing an endowment fund, scholarship or bursary sponsors to ensure residencies for artists, and the establishment of an Artists' Ambassadorial Network.

 

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How The Natural History Museum Is Changing The Ratio Of Women And Minorities in STEM | Lydia Dishman | Fast Company

How The Natural History Museum Is Changing The Ratio Of Women And Minorities in STEM | Lydia Dishman | Fast Company | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We know the problem: there aren’t enough women pursuing STEM careers and there are about to be a lot fewer. There are fewer women earning engineering and computer science degrees than there were 10 years ago.

We understand the impact: homogenous workplaces aren’t good for business as they report lower profits, less engagement, productivity, and innovation.

We also know that one of the best ways to ensure the future of STEM is a more equitable one is to engage girls while they are very young (think: GoldieBlox), keep them interested in learning necessary skills through middle and high school (hello, Girls Who Code), and throw in a strong female lead to watch on television to further the message that women can be scientists and engineers.

But science itself—specifically the scientific method of asking a question and testing through experiments—may hold the key to what will eventually right the lopsidedness of gender in STEM.

"It is going to take a lot of different approaches in combination," says Ellen Futter, "and testing and experiments to see what works best." As president of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), Futter is leading the charge to do just that.


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Chicago, IL: DuSable Museum of African American History Names Perri L. Irmer President and CEO | PR Newswire

Chicago, IL: DuSable Museum of African American History Names Perri L. Irmer President and CEO | PR Newswire | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The DuSable Museum of African American History has a new President and CEO. The board of trustees has selected Perri L. Irmer, an attorney, architect, public policy advocate and facilities management professional with a broad range of experience in executive management, construction and fundraising.

Irmer, 56, a Chicago native and lifelong resident of the Hyde Park-Kenwood community, brings to the position a wealth of qualifications including business, technical, legal and administrative experience, along with a commitment to public service and the advancement of the African American community. She starts September 14.

The DuSable was founded by Dr. Margaret Burroughs to preserve African American history and be a center for thought leadership. Irmer says she will focus on fulfilling Dr. Burroughs' vision, raising the museum's visibility globally, expanding its donor base, increasing community engagement and outreach, and collaborating with other diverse educational and cultural institutions.

Irmer also sees the museum playing an important role in community and economic development initiatives. She says she would like to pursue cross-pollination with leading institutions including universities, arts and theater organizations, and to connect with corporate boards, technology companies and other business leaders who seek to better support their minority client and customer base and broaden their civic engagement dialogue. Irmer expects to lead collaborative partnerships with other cultural-identity and social justice groups as well.


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You Don't Have to Be Good at Math to Learn to Code | Olga Khazan | The Atlantic

You Don't Have to Be Good at Math to Learn to Code | Olga Khazan | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I’m not in favor of anyone learning to code unless she really wants to. I believe you should follow your bliss, career-wise, because most of the things you’d buy with all the money you’d make as a programmer won’t make you happy. Also, if your only reason for learning to code is because you want to be a journalist and you think that’s the only way to break into the field, that’s false.

I’m all for people not becoming coders, in other words—as long they make that decision for the right reasons. “I’m bad at math” is not the right reason.

Math has very little to do with coding, especially at the early stages. In fact, I’m not even sure why people conflate the two. (Maybe it has to do with the fact that both fields are male-dominated.)

Victoria Fine, Slate’s strategy director, has a good piece up this week about how she taught herself how to code despite hating math. Her secret? Lots and lots of Googling.


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Rochester Institute of Tech To House 3D Printing R&D Center | Dian Schaffhauser | Campus Technology

Rochester Institute of Tech To House 3D Printing R&D Center | Dian Schaffhauser | Campus Technology | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

3D printing and additive manufacturing will be the prime topic of research and development at a new center opening at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).


The Additive Manufacturing and Multifunctional Printing (AMPrint) Center will draw participation from multiple university and corporate partners. Funding is coming from Empire State Development, New York's state economic development agency.

The state's Centers for Advanced Technology program, which selected the institute from a number of applicants to lead the new center, is designed to spur technology-based applied research and economic development in New York.

The new center will be eligible to receive $921,000 each year for up to 10 years if it passes annual performance evaluations. Participants in the venture include Clarkson University and State University of New York at New Paltz as well as Xerox, GE Research, Corning, Eastman Kodak and Stratasys-owned MakerBot.


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Renowned Stanford professor launches new education think tank | Emma Brown | WashPost.com

Renowned Stanford professor launches new education think tank | Emma Brown | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Renowned Stanford education professor Linda Darling-Hammond is launching a new think tank aimed at shaping education policies nationwide.

With offices in Palo Alto, Calif., and Washington, the new Learning Policy Institute will seek to link research and policy, two worlds that are too often disconnected, Darling-Hammond said.

“It is time to get serious about how to support and enable our education system to respond to the massive changes in learning that some other nation’s systems have been addressing more systemically, with much better results, over the last two decades,” Darling-Hammond wrote in the Huffington Post on Thursday.


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Microsoft and iUrban Teen spark interest in STEM jobs for kids of all backgrounds | Microsoft News Center

Microsoft and iUrban Teen spark interest in STEM jobs for kids of all backgrounds | Microsoft News Center | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Alexia Franklin, 16, wants to fight cybercrime. Samuel Goode, 13, wants to use technology to reduce child poverty. Ceon Duncan-Graves wants to make life easier with 3D-printed things. What kind of things?

“Maybe teleportation,” said Ceon, a 13-year-old eighth-grader from Illahee Middle School in Federal Way, south of Seattle. “That would be cool.”

The students were among roughly 80 teens at a day-long STEM exploration event at Microsoft’s Redmond campus Wednesday, where there was no shortage of big ideas and passion for STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).

Microsoft partnered with Seattle nonprofit iUrban Teen for the day of technology immersion, which included a diverse group of speakers from Microsoft, the White House, Yale University and “Grey’s Anatomy.” Students also toured the Microsoft Envisioning Center and The Microsoft Garage.

“One of the great things about technology is there’s lots of opportunities. There’s opportunities at big companies. There’s opportunities at small companies,” Tony Prophet, Microsoft corporate vice president of Education Marketing, told the students.

“The opportunities available to you, just from getting an education, particularly a STEM education, are limitless.”


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Axe throwing, sword forging – but no sacrificing – at Norway's Viking school | Helen Russell | The Guardian

Axe throwing, sword forging – but no sacrificing – at Norway's Viking school | Helen Russell | The Guardian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We’ve had the TV shows, we’re getting the theme park and now the Viking invasion is extending to higher education in Norway.

Students at Seljord Folkehøgskule, a college 90 miles west of Oslo, are embarking on a new programme to learn traditional Viking skills such as sword forging, jewellery making and roof thatching, as well as the essential art of axe-throwing.

The year-long Viking course is the first of its kind and came about after the headteacher, Arve Husby, decided to introduce more traditional courses into his curriculum. “Our school used to be really well known for handicrafts, but these started to die off,” said Husby.

“So I had a brainstorming session with other teachers and someone suggested Viking skills to get more students working with their hands.”


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In Alaska, massive achievement gaps separate Native and white students | Emma Brown | WashPost.com

In Alaska, massive achievement gaps separate Native and white students | Emma Brown | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

President Obama’s trip to Alaska this week has brought new attention to climate change and energy production and the name of the nation’s highest mountain. But some in Alaska are hoping that the president’s visit also helps shine a light on the needs of the state’s public education system.

Alaska, which educates about 130,000 children in preschool through 12th grade, faces achievement gaps that rival or exceed those of the most troubled urban school systems in the Lower 48.

Only 57 percent of Alaska Native students graduated on time in 2013, for example, compared to 78 percent of white students. Only 7 percent of Native Alaskan fourth-graders are proficient in reading, according to the 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress, compared to 41 percent of white Alaskans.

But as teachers and principals work to close those gaps, they face budget problems caused by a dramatic drop in the price of oil, on which the state’s coffers overwhelmingly depend. And they face perennially high teacher turnover, particularly in farflung rural villages, that makes it difficult to build and sustain meaningful school improvements.


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Moral Panics And How 'The Kids These Days' Adapt: From Facebook 'Permanence' To Snapchat's 'Impermanence' | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Moral Panics And How 'The Kids These Days' Adapt: From Facebook 'Permanence' To Snapchat's 'Impermanence' | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It is funny to see how some people react to technology changes, almost always assuming that "new" is somehow bad, because it's different.


Looking back through historical examples, they often look pretty funny.


Last year, we wrote about an old moral panic in the NY Times from 1878 about two Thomas Edison inventions, the phonograph and the aerophone (basically a broadcasting system for the phonograph). It's somewhat hilarious to read these days:


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STEM students intern with Minnesota companies: students and companies invited to apply | Ann Treacy | Blandin on Broadband

This looks like a great experience for anyone lucky enough to participate. I learned about it through the MHTA…

SciTechsperience Internship Program kicks off new program year with 200 matching grants

MHTA — The SciTechsperience Internship Program is now accepting student and company applications for the 2015-2016 program year. SciTechsperience connects college students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines to internships in small Minnesota companies.

SciTechsperience is administered by the Minnesota High Tech Association (MHTA) through a grant from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

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3D Robotics Launches 3DU To Promote The Use Of Drones In Education | Fredric Lardinois | TechCrunch.com

3D Robotics Launches 3DU To Promote The Use Of Drones In Education | Fredric Lardinois | TechCrunch.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

3D Robotics (3DR), the largest North American consumer drone manufacturer, today announced the launch of its 3DU educational program.

3DU aims to bring drones to more schools — ranging from K-12 to postgraduate programs — by making both hardware discounts and sponsorships available to these schools, as well as giving them classroom and curriculum support. The idea is to empower students to not just use the drones but also to develop their own apps for them using 3DR’s DroneKit software development kit.


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The decline of play in preschoolers — and the rise in sensory issues | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

The decline of play in preschoolers — and the rise in sensory issues | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Here is a new post from pediatric occupational therapist Angela Hanscom, author of a number of popular posts on this blog, including “Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today,” as well as “The right — and surprisingly wrong — ways to get kids to sit still in class” and “How schools ruined recess.”


Hanscom is the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England.


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Fill Your Child's Digital Backpack | Family Online Safety Institute

Fill Your Child's Digital Backpack | Family Online Safety Institute | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Today's kids need digital skills to be successful in school and beyond. Help them to develop a healthy relationship with technology by teaching them to use it wisely and appropriately for both schoolwork and fun.

Whether you are introducing your toddler to an iPad or helping your teen apply for college, we've got advice for you to navigate the online world and set healthy standards for tech use in your home.

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IN: AT&T grant funds high-tech academy for youth | Louise Ronald | Pal-Item.com

IN: AT&T grant funds high-tech academy for youth | Louise Ronald | Pal-Item.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Thanks to a $15,000 grant from AT&T’s Aspire education initiative, Richmond, Indiana youth will have an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of computer programming.

Creation of The Greenhouse was announced Wednesday by AT&T Indiana President Bill Soards, State Sen. Jeff Raatz and Jason Whitney, executive director of the Innovation Center, to a gathering of about 20 community members.

The first Greenhouse project will be a free coding academy for ninth-graders.

Whitney described the academy as a six-week course with meetings once a week. Students will receive basic training in computer coding and learn about technology-based careers — including opportunities at local companies. Fifteen participants for the first session are being recruited through Richmond High School.


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Educator of the Week Gets S.T.E.A.M.'ed Up! | Jordan Lim | National Geographic

Educator of the Week Gets S.T.E.A.M.'ed Up! | Jordan Lim | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Connie Boltz incorporates visual arts and parent participation to inspire students’ personal and academic growth. She has been an educator for 20 years and currently teaches at Colvin Run Elementary in Vienna, Virginia.

Activity: S.T.E.A.M Kids
Subjects: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math
Grade: Kindergarten

Tell us about your activity.

The S.T.E.A.M. Kids project empowers students to explore their passions through art. Students create “S.T.E.A.M. Kid” glyph figures, symbolizing what they love about S.T.E.A.M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) and character traits they value.

Using the visual arts as the tool of understanding, the project aims to help students identify their goals and interests, make global connections, and find relationships between new and familiar information.

Each glyph is unique in design, but also in what character traits and academic interests are represented.

Different shapes and colors symbolize different characteristics: orange rhombus for Courage, green square for Responsibility, blue triangle for Respect, red circle for Compassion, and a yellow star for Honesty.

As these figures are displayed, students have a chance to learn about what characteristics their classmates identify with.


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DMCA aims to promote connectedness, digital creativity | Yale News | Yale.edu

DMCA aims to promote connectedness, digital creativity | Yale News | Yale.edu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This past April the alabaster exterior of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library transformed into an illuminated canvas for the “Lux: Ideas Through Light” projection festival. The project was one of the latest intersections between art and technology at Yale — other examples of which include a massive LED canvas at the engineering café Ground, showcasing student-made videos, and the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design, where a film composer used a 3D printer to build his own instrument.

One of the first Yale entities to support such cross-disciplinary collaborations is the Digital Media Center for the Arts (DMCA). Formed in 1998, the DMCA (located at 149 York St.) is a research hub for hands-on art production that equips Yale students — regardless of their majors — with essential skills needed to communicate in a 21st-century creative economy.


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Award-winning environmental education curriculum now available free online | Derek Markham | TreeHugger.com

Award-winning environmental education curriculum now available free online | Derek Markham | TreeHugger.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Think Earth's environmental curriculum, which is designed for preschool through middle school, is being updated, revised, and made freely available online.

In order to make our way toward a more sustainable world, it's important that we're not only taking direct action now, such as expanding initiatives that reduce pollution and increase renewable energy production, but it's also key that we're giving future generations a good understanding of our environmental issues and challenges, because ultimately, they will be the ones inheriting them.

And there's no better time to start educating kids about the environment than early on in their lives, when they are still getting a grasp on the basics, because so much of what we learn during our formative years ends up influencing the rest of our lives, for better or for worse.


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World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead | David Szondy | GizMag.com

World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A smartphone with a 16-megapixel camera may seem cutting edge, but it won't impress astronomers now that the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has given the green light to start construction of the world's largest digital camera. With a resolution of 3.2-gigapixels (enough to need 1,500 high-definition television screens to display one image), the new camera is at the heart of the 8.4-meter (27.5-ft) Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) now under construction atop Cerro Pachón in Chile.

Not surprisingly, the new camera is no lightweight. The three-mirrored device is the size of a small car, tipping the scales at over 3 tons (2.7 tonnes). It's the result of a wide partnership of institutions that include Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and SLAC, contains 189 sensors, has a resolution equivalent to 800,000 eight-megapixel cameras, and includes a filter-changing mechanism and shutter for viewing different wavelengths from the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared.


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In the US, computer science is a privilege, and that's a real shame | Alice Truong | Quartz.com

In the US, computer science is a privilege, and that's a real shame | Alice Truong | Quartz.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There’s a reason why Silicon Valley has a reputation for being the land of young, white, privileged brogrammers.

If you look at the makeup of students today, white children who grow up in higher-income households with educated parents are more likely to have a computer at home and access to computer science classes, according to a new survey from Gallup that was commissioned by Google. (The report surveyed 1,673 students in seventh to 12th grades, 1,685 parents, 1,013 teachers, 9,693 principals, and 1,865 school district superintendents.)

Students who are black, Hispanic, and/or from lower income backgrounds are less likely to have computers at home or any type of computer science instruction. Hispanic students in particular have the lowest rate of access to computers—both at home and at school. (The survey did not include any data for Asian students. A Gallup spokesman said there weren’t “enough respondents in that group to break out and report separately.”)


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When Big Data Becomes Bad Data | Lauren Kirchner | Truthdig.com

When Big Data Becomes Bad Data | Lauren Kirchner | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A recent ProPublica analysis of The Princeton Review’s prices for online SAT tutoring shows that customers in areas with a high density of Asian residents are often charged more. When presented with this finding, The Princeton Review called it an “incidental” result of its geographic pricing scheme. The case illustrates how even a seemingly neutral price model could potentially lead to inadvertent bias — bias that’s hard for consumers to detect and even harder to challenge or prove.

Over the past several decades, an important tool for assessing and addressing discrimination has been the “disparate impact” theory. Attorneys have used this idea to successfully challenge policies that have a discriminatory effect on certain groups of people, whether or not the entity that crafted the policy was motivated by an intent to discriminate. It’s been deployed in lawsuits involving employment decisions, housing and credit. Going forward, the question is whether the theory can be applied to bias that results from new technologies that use algorithms.

One unexpected effect of the company’s geographic approach to pricing is that Asians are almost twice as likely to be offered a higher price than non-Asians, an analysis by ProPublica shows. Read the story.


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The misuse of research to support deregulation and privatization of teacher education | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

The misuse of research to support deregulation and privatization of teacher education | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For years now we’ve been hearing from school reformers that traditional teacher preparation programs at colleges and universities are awful and that what we need is deregulation and market competition.


In the following post, two academics evaluate the argument that these programs have failed as well as the value of the programs that school reformers embrace to replace them. This was written by Kenneth Zeichner and Hilary G. Conklin. Zeichner is a professor of teacher education at the University of Washington, Seattle, and professor emeritus in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A member of the National Academy of Education, he has done extensive research and teaching and teacher education. Conklin is a program leader and associate professor of secondary social studies at DePaul University whose research interests include teacher learning and the pedagogy of teacher education.

This post is an introduction to a paper on the subject by Zeichner and Conklin that is being published by Teachers College Record, titled “Beyond Knowledge Ventriloquism and Echo Chambers: Raising the Quality of the Debate on Teacher Education.”


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Asians Are Nearly Twice as Likely to Be Charged More by Princeton Review for SAT Test Preparation | Julia Angwin, Surya Mattu & Jeff Larson | Techdig.com

Asians Are Nearly Twice as Likely to Be Charged More by Princeton Review for SAT Test Preparation | Julia Angwin, Surya Mattu & Jeff Larson | Techdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Every year, thousands of high school students get ready for the SAT by using The Princeton Review’s test preparation services.

But few, if any, realize that the prices for The Princeton Review’s online SAT tutoring packages vary substantially depending on where customers live. If they type some ZIP codes into the company’s website, they are offered The Princeton Review’s Premier course for as little as $6,600. For other ZIP codes, the same course costs as much as $8,400.

One unexpected effect of the company’s geographic approach to pricing is that Asians are almost twice as likely to be offered a higher price than non-Asians, an analysis by ProPublica shows.


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Discovery’s Resources Bringing Change, Hope to Schools Abroad | NCTA.com

Discovery’s Resources Bringing Change, Hope to Schools Abroad | NCTA.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Have you ever seen a cheetah before? Maybe not in person, but certainly on television or on the Internet. It might surprise you to know that children in Africa who live just a few hours from a national park full of cheetahs and wildlife have no idea what a cheetah looks like. For developing communities across the globe that lack televisions, computers, technological devices and sound education, this is not surprising, explains Aric Noboa, the president of the Discovery Learning Alliance (DLA).

To rectify the disconnect between communities and their surroundings, DLA—a non-profit established by Discovery Communications—sets out to expose children in developing countries to the kind of crucial media that they’re missing in their lives. This mission becomes possible through the organization’s link to Discovery’s programming and resources, which it uses to bring educational benefits to underprivileged groups in areas like Africa, Latin and South America, and parts of Eastern Europe.


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CYC 2.0 comments support FCC action on Lifeline broadband option | Connect Your Community 2.0

CYC 2.0 Director Bill Callahan yesterday submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission supporting the agency’s proposal to create a low-income broadband option as part of the Federal Lifeline telephone program.

The FCC has asked for public comments on the idea itself, as well as on a long list of related questions laid out in a “Notice of Proposed Rulemaking”. Yesterday was the deadline for initial comments. A second round of “reply comments” will be due at the end of September.

In a three-page letter addressed to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, Callahan wrote:


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Plastic: the wonder material filling our oceans and beaches | Ann Jones | Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Plastic: the wonder material filling our oceans and beaches | Ann Jones | Australian Broadcasting Corporation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

There is a young turtle in the ocean closest to you, learning to hunt. It is learning to judge the water's movement, the prey's agility and trying to capture itself enough sustenance to feed its growing body.

It spies a shadow lurking nearby, floating along, with wiggly bits around its edges. Is it a tender cuttlefish? A jellyfish? A tasty slab of wobbling seaweed?

It's actually a shopping bag, a bit of a balloon and a piece of your lunch wrap. It's plastic. And it floats in the ocean twisting and turning on the current just like an underwater creature that could be eaten.

The CSIRO has recently reported that globally about one third of marine turtles have ingested plastic debris.

It might be one of those plastic bags—just like the one that I used to bring home the plastic carton of milk last night. You know, the carton type that has the handle already formed into the jug, with the plastic lid and the plastic ring on it, all encased in a plastic bag to transport it home.

Somehow, instead of being reused, recycled or disposed into a landfill site, that bag makes its way onto a street.


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