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Giving Teachers Tools to Stop Bullying: Free Training Toolkit Now Available | ED.gov Blog

Giving Teachers Tools to Stop Bullying: Free Training Toolkit Now Available | ED.gov Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Over the past three years, at our annual Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Summits, we have heard the same call by educators-– teachers want to help stop bullying, but they don’t know how. Most try to help, but few receive training on how to do so. There are bullying prevention trainings available for teachers, but many are very expensive or not based on the best available research.

 

That is why the Department of Education and its Safe and Supportive Technical Assistance Center, set out to create a free, state-of-the-art training for classroom teachers on bullying. The two-part training aims to help teachers know the best practices to stop bullying on the spot and how to stop it before it starts. The training toolkit consists of PowerPoints, trainer guides, handouts, and feedback forms that school districts, schools, and teachers can use free of charge. Both the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers gave feedback on the modules and made suggestions on what teachers would find most useful.

 

The research-based training gives teachers practical steps to take to respond to bullying. These skills include how to deescalate a situation, find out what happened, and support all of the students involved. The training also shows the importance of building strong relationships in the classroom, as well as creating an environment respectful of diversity, in order to prevent bullying.

 

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Analisa Vickers's curator insight, October 14, 2013 6:18 PM

Its good to see processes and support being put in place

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Massive Bronze-Age City Discovered Underwater in Greece | Sarah Pruitt | History.com

Massive Bronze-Age City Discovered Underwater in Greece | Sarah Pruitt | History.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Located south of Athens, on the Peloponnese Peninsula, the area around Kiladha Bay is home to many ancient Greek artifacts and settlements. The Greek government strictly regulates diving to prevent the looting of underwater archaeological sites, and the University of Geneva team was training at Lambayanna Beach in 2014 while waiting for authorization to conduct underwater searches nearby.


At that time, they spotted the first pottery fragments now linked to a massive settlement submerged beneath the Aegean Sea. In July 2015, the archaeologists returned to the site to conduct a full investigation.


Overseen by the Swiss School of Archaeology in Greece in collaboration with the Greek Ministry of Culture, the researchers employed the world’s largest solar-powered boat, the PlanetSolar, to aid in their search.

According to their findings, several buildings can be seen amid the expansive ruins, which stretch over some 12 acres, or the equivalent of around 10 football fields. The buildings appear to be oval or circular in shape, and built in the same style as those known to have been constructed by other Bronze Age civilizations in Greece.


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I Was Intimidated by Coding Until I Learned This Secret Strategy: Googling | Victoria Fine | Slate.com

I Was Intimidated by Coding Until I Learned This Secret Strategy: Googling | Victoria Fine | Slate.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

"You don’t need to go to grad school. Save your money. I’ll teach you how to code.” Seven years ago, in a bar near downtown Los Angeles, I was sharing a drink with a new friend. We had met on a travel website and he had just finished giving me some excellent advice about Southeast Asia, where I was heading for a month. He’d asked me what I was planning on doing when I got back. I told him I was moving to Chicago for my master’s degree. He told me I was crazy.


“That’s nice of you. But I’m going,” I told the almost stranger flatly. That was enough advice for one night.


“Seriously, you can teach yourself anything you want to know. Sign up for Lynda.com. That’s how I taught myself.”


I was annoyed. It wasn’t the first time I’d heard this dismissive advice, and it was not what I wanted to hear. I wanted to learn how to build websites, shoot video, record podcasts, do all those things that made up a perfect “backpack journalist,” which was shorthand back then for “one-woman-band-that-failing-newspapers-could-afford-to-hire.” It was 2008, the recession was looming, and I was afraid my journalism career would be obsolete before it would even qualify financially as a career and not a hobby.


There was another reason I’d signed up to go back to school—I was intimidated by trying to learn about any kind of math-like technology, coding in particular, that didn’t fall into a strict curriculum.


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Planetoid a billion miles beyond Pluto selected as New Horizons' next destination | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Planetoid a billion miles beyond Pluto selected as New Horizons' next destination | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

New Horizons isn't going to get much of a rest. Following on from its historic flyby of Pluto on July 14, NASA has selected the next potential destination for the unmanned spacecraft – a planetoid called 2014 MU69 that lies a billion miles beyond Pluto's orbit.


The space probe will take over three years to reach this frozen remnant of the Solar System's earliest years.


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Geography just keeps getting more popular – so what's the subject's secret? | Rita Gardner | TES.com

Geography just keeps getting more popular – so what's the subject's secret? | Rita Gardner | TES.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As geography teachers return to school they will see their subject continuing to expand at all stages of education. For the fifth year running, GCSE entries have risen.


At A-level, geography had the largest percentage increase of all the major subjects in 2015, with candidate numbers rising sharply by 13 per cent, following on from the 19 per cent increase in GCSE in 2013.


Enrolment on undergraduate courses is running higher than national averages, and graduating geographers experience some of the lowest unemployment levels of any degree subject.


Such positive news is welcome and provides a firm foundation for the introduction of the new GCSE and A-levels from September 2016.

So, what has happened to boost geography over the past 10 years?


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Why Silicon Valley Falls Short When It Comes To Education | Daniel Pianko | TechCrunch

Why Silicon Valley Falls Short When It Comes To Education | Daniel Pianko | TechCrunch | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Despite Silicon Valley billionaires’ remarkable track record of innovation, it appears they have decided to throw in the towel on higher education. Each year, many donate millions to old-line American colleges and universities that, together, graduate the same number of engineers as we did 25 years ago.

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) jobs will grow by more than 17 percent in the next decade, but an aging STEM workforce and small number of students graduating today with STEM degrees means there are more than 2.5 million unfilled STEM jobs in the U.S. Today, only 18 percent of Computer Science graduates are women. The numbers for underrepresented minorities are even worse.

Failure to transform American higher education may undo the very building blocks of our nation’s innovation infrastructure. Instead, today’s current generation of entrepreneurs are spending their energy and resources lobbying for band-aid solutions like H-1B visas, when they could be reimagining the current pipeline to address the lack of female and minority engineers in their companies.


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It’s time to demystify computational thinking | ISTE.org

It’s time to demystify computational thinking | ISTE.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Selling a new idea — or one that is unfamiliar to a majority of folks — can be a daunting task, fraught with barriers of skepticism, doubt and resistance. In the universe of computer science, the definition and application of “computational thinking” (CT) is widely acknowledged as a pathway to problem solving, easily transferable to other academic subjects and even everyday life.

But have you tried tossing those words up for public consumption outside the boundaries of computer science and then waiting for a reaction? If not, prepare yourself for a blank stare and crossed arms. This will take some work.

Many of those who espouse teaching CT across disciplines — because it will be a skill increasingly applied in fields from economics to sports — say it’s incumbent upon those who either teach computer science or embrace technology in the classroom to help demystify the concept.

Once educators recognize that computational thinking is not confined to the specific study of computers but is a skill to enhance deeper thinking and discovery, it becomes a catalyst for exploration, the vehicle of curiosity.


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Conservatives Have Kidnapped Our Language | David Morris | ILSR.org

Conservatives Have Kidnapped Our Language | David Morris | ILSR.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“Sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never harm me.” A fine sentiment, but any child subjected to cyber bullying knows that words do indeed matter.

Language evolves. Sometimes a word that once was negative becomes positive, like “terrific” which originally meant terrifying. Sometimes a word that was once positive becomes negative, as when “awful” changes from awe inspiring to very bad.

In politics too words matter, and in politics too language evolves. In the last 50 years we have witnessed a politically motivated sea change in the meaning of old words and the introduction of new words, all intended to undermine our sense of compassion.

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How to Use Scratch for Digital Storytelling | Donna Markey | Graphite.org

How to Use Scratch for Digital Storytelling | Donna Markey | Graphite.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Digital storytelling involves combining digital media (images, voice narration, music, text, or motion) to tell a story. Over the past few years, digital storytelling has become an increasingly popular and effective way for students to meet a range of learning goals in the classroom. Scratch, a programming project from the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, might be an unexpected tool for digital storytelling. But using Scratch to tell a story is a “twofer”: Students practice important ELA skills and, at the same time, use computational thinking.

As students build their stories in Scratch, their work aligns with ISTE's definition of computational thinking. With Scratch, students.


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Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness | Katrina Schwartz | KQED.org

Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness | Katrina Schwartz | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On his first day teaching at Coronado Elementary School in Richmond, Calif., students threw rocks at Jean-Gabrielle Larochette, pretending he was a police officer. He spent fifteen minutes of every class calming down a handful of kids in this low-income-neighborhood public school who wouldn’t follow directions or behave.

Larochette began practicing meditation and mindfulness to cope with his own stresses of teaching and supporting traumatized kids. He believed the breathing techniques that helped calm his fears might work for his students too, so he founded the Mindful Life Project.

“Before we can teach a kid how to academically excel in school, we need to teach him how to have stillness, pay attention, stay on task, regulate, make good choices,” said Larochette. “We tell kids be quiet, calm yourself down, be still. We tell them all these things they need in the classroom, but we’re not teaching them how to do that.”

The project has since grown and is now being incorporated in a group of elementary schools in Richmond, in an attempt to improve academic performance and create a more positive school culture by teaching students mindfulness. Mindfulness is the ability to exist in the present moment and practicing it often looks like meditation. Schools across the country are beginning to use mindfulness as part of an effort to address the social and emotional needs of children, improving student achievement in the process.


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Khan Academy & Pixar Unveil "Pixar In A Box" | Larry Ferlazzo | EduBlogs.org

Khan Academy & Pixar Unveil "Pixar In A Box" | Larry Ferlazzo | EduBlogs.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Thanks to John Fensterwald, I initially heard about Pixar In A Box, a new project unveiled by Khan Academy yesterday:

its new online curriculum Pixar in a Box analyzes how the studio fuses art, tech, science, engineering, and math to develop top-shelf animated cinema. Created with middle and high school students in mind but available to everyone, Pixar in a Box’s interactive exercises, in-depth video lessons, and hands-on activities are an informative addition to Khan Academy’s extensive educational resources.

I’m not a math teacher, so can’t say much about the quality of the program. However, I can say that the videos seem much, much better than the usual Khan fare.

Here’s a an introduction to the Pixar In A Box:


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Career Readiness: Starting Early With Young Learners | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org

Career Readiness: Starting Early With Young Learners | Heather Wolpert-Gawron Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We hear a lot of talk about career readiness these days, and for secondary educators, you can't spit without finding advice on how to make our units, our school structure, or our content more aligned with prepping our students for the jobs of today and the future. So how about kindergarten kids?

Don't laugh. I'm not writing today to advocate that we get our early learners to decide now on a career in dentistry or accounting. I'm here today to write about the skills that successful people have in any career -- skills that should be encouraged early on.

So I reached out to a friend of mine that has some authority in career readiness to talk about ways to scaffold the skills our students need to know.


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Why parents should challenge autoplay video | Lyz Lenz | Mashable.com

Why parents should challenge autoplay video | Lyz Lenz | Mashable.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In nineteenth century America, parents prepared children with macabre children’s books and fairy tales. It was impossible to hide death from them.

Today, low infant mortality rates and rising life expectancy mean death is not something many children face on a daily basis. Further, parents protect children from remaining experiences of death and violence. They set TV filters, check movie and video game ratings, and set web passwords to control children’s access to graphic media.

But Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat and a bevy of sites are investing in a growing media tool: autoplay video. These videos automatically start rolling as users scroll through their timelines or open articles. Autoplay videos are increasingly popular across the Internet — they generate automatic video views, which can increase ad revenue.


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A new casualty of high-stakes testing: student teachers | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

A new casualty of high-stakes testing: student teachers | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

And now, a new casualty of high-stakes standardized testing has been identified: student teachers.


This post, by Jennifer Wallace Jacoby, explains why and how some college and university teacher training programs are trying to find solutions so that student teachers get the vital classroom training they need.


Jacoby is an assistant professor of psychology and education at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts.


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Graduated From An Engineering Bootcamp? Now What? | Ben Shippers | TechCrunch

Graduated From An Engineering Bootcamp? Now What? | Ben Shippers | TechCrunch | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While hip hop may have ‘too many mc’s and not enough mics,’ in tech, there are too many startups and not enough seasoned technologists. Over the last seven years, hopeful entrepreneurs have flooded the market, looking to cut their teeth in the hopes of building the next billion-dollar business.

Many (probably most) of these recent business ideas should never be funded, nor affix themselves to the firmament of the web. But in reality they are… unceasingly.

If we agree that even the least fundable companies will continue to be funded for another few years, then we’d better come up with solutions for introducing new budding technologists into the field to support the ever-growing need for more social networks and photo sharing apps.

The current quandary is that our education system is inept at preparing students for jobs in the modern, web-related industry. The current liberal arts curriculum, while well-intended, focuses on softer skills. Though better, computer science-oriented degrees are still built on dated client-side syntax that leaves much to be desired when trying to transition to the web.

The solution: the rise of the 4-, 8- or 10-week pop-up product and engineering school.


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NASA's Space Launch System fires up | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA's Space Launch System fires up | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA is another step closer to manned deep-space missions with the completion of the latest round of RS-25 rocket engine tests. Based on the engines that sent the Space Shuttle into orbit, the new power plants will form the core of the Space Launch System (SLS).

The tests, which ended on Thursday, was the seventh in a series of hot-firings of the liquid-fueled engine that will lift the Orion capsule into space on its first manned mission.


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Danish astronaut to control earthbound rover from ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Danish astronaut to control earthbound rover from ISS | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Working outside in space is a tall order. The environment is hostile, even the smallest job takes hours instead of minutes, and everything has to be done in either bulky suits or through robotic arms.


It's a challenge that will become even more difficult when future astronauts are controlling robotic rovers from orbit, so ESA is getting in a bit of practice.


Next month Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen will take control of a rover in the Netherlands while orbiting the Earth aboard the International Space Station (ISS).


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Exploring Geometry by Coding With @gosphero & @tickleapp | Brian Aspinall Blog

Exploring Geometry by Coding With @gosphero & @tickleapp | Brian Aspinall Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In this article I would like to dissect the Math curriculum here in Ontario and focus on the process of mathematics.

From the Ontario curriculum document:

Problem Solving

Problem solving is central to learning mathematics. By learning to solve problems and by learning through problem solving, students are given numerous opportunities to connect mathematical ideas and to develop conceptual understanding. Problem solving forms the basis of effective mathematics programs and should be the mainstay of mathematical instruction.


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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Derek Watkins | NYTimes.com

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Derek Watkins | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Looking from the window seat on a long plane flight, you might have noticed that large swaths of the United States are divided into a latticework of farms, towns and forests. The cells of that grid, each one mile to a side, are the visible result of a land planning system first proposed by Thomas Jefferson more than two centuries ago.

The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The account's curator, who prefers to remain anonymous, uses Google Earth to find interesting blocks across the country.

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A Tale of Two Perspectives: My Experience Starting with a Clean Slate | Ramy Mahmoud Blog | Edutopia.org

A Tale of Two Perspectives: My Experience Starting with a Clean Slate | Ramy Mahmoud Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In my 10 years of teaching the ninth grade, I, as have many of my colleagues, have struggled with a certain category of students - the low performers. These are the boys and girls who walk into our classes on the first day of school expecting to fail. They know nothing about us, but we represent every adult that has ever failed them in the past. These kids have a legacy of failure. One so deeply instilled into their own self-image that the prophecy is undeniably self-fulfilling.

For 9 years, I tried a multitude of strategies, all with negligible results. But last year, I tried a very specific strategy that went against everything I was told to do as a teacher. Yet, it completely changed the atmosphere of my classroom and the way these "low performers" saw my class. What's most amazing is that this entire strategy took place on one single day - the first day of school.


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Are Coddled College Students the New Book Censors? | Corey Robin | AlterNet.org

Are Coddled College Students the New Book Censors? | Corey Robin | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

No one knows the power of literature better than the censor. That’s why he burns books: to fight fire with fire, to stop them from setting the world aflame. Or becomes an editor: Stalin, we now know, excised words from texts with about as much energy and attention as he excised men and women from the world. As Bertolt Brecht archly noted of the East German regime’s efforts to control what he wrote: “Where else in the world can you find a government that shows such interest and pays such attention to artists?”


This week, as I head back to the classroom amid controversy — from Columbia to Berkeley to Duke — over what college students will or will not read, I’m mindful of Brecht’s observation. Could it be that the men and women who most appreciate what we, professors of the humanities and social sciences, have to offer are the students who’ve been vilified as coddled and cosseted, demanding trigger warnings on syllabi or simply refusing to read the books we’ve assigned them because those books make them uncomfortable? Could it be that they, like the censor, are the ones who truly understand the power of the books we teach?


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10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist | Richard Feloni | BizInsider

10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist | Richard Feloni | BizInsider | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Elementary-school students learning how to write simultaneously learn the rules of grammar, and the two approaches can be difficult to balance.

It's why many teachers ingrain in their students a combination of white lies and formal habits that are meant to keep their writing focused but aren't actually based on rules of the English language.

As the students grow into adults, these habits result in plenty of incorrectly worded but well-intentioned sentences.

Harvard cognitive scientist and linguist Steven Pinker explores some of the most common myths and the mistakes they produce in his book "The Sense of Style," which is like a modern version of Strunk and White's classic "The Elements of Style," based on linguistics and updated for the 21st century.

Pinker strips popular grammar guides of the 20th century of their sanctity and instead delves into the evolution of English and how it was constructed and used for centuries to determine what is correct.

Here are some of the grammar myths that may be muddling your writing.


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Schools: Study shows fruit and veggie plate waste increase | Tom Karst | The Packer

Schools: Study shows fruit and veggie plate waste increase | Tom Karst | The Packer | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack urges Congress not to roll back school nutrition rules that mandate produce in school menus, a University of Vermont study suggests that students are throwing the produce away.

The study, titled “Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Fruit and Vegetable Selection in Northeastern Elementary Schoolchildren, 2012–2013,” was published in the online journal Public Health Reports. According to the study, although students selected more fruits and vegetables under the new mandate requiring them to take either a fruit or vegetable, digital imaging of the food they throw away suggests they ate slightly less of each.

“The basic question we wanted to explore was if under these 2012 USDA guidelines, does requiring a child to select a fruit or vegetable correspond with consumption?” Sarah Amin, a researcher in Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont and lead author of the study, said in a news release. “It was heartbreaking to see so many students toss fruits like apples into the trash right after exiting the lunch line.”

Vilsack, in an opinion column said the standards are working.


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Turkey: The Treasures Under Istanbul | Elif Batuman | The New Yorker

Turkey: The Treasures Under Istanbul | Elif Batuman | The New Yorker | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

When it came to choosing the exact location of the first tunnel spanning the Bosporus—the narrow strait that divides the European and Asian sides of Istanbul and links the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara—one of the principal considerations was how to avoid encountering any archeological marvels.


The tunnel was for a new high-speed train called Marmaray (a combination of “Marmara” and ray, the Turkish word for “rail”), connecting to Istanbul’s metro system.


Of particular concern was the placement of the main station on the European shore, on the site of ancient Byzantium and Constantinople: everything within the ancient city walls has been designated both by UNESCO and by the Turkish government as a historical site, and all digging must be supervised by the Istanbul Archaeological Museum.


The location that was eventually chosen, in the working-class district of Yenikapı, had conveniently spent much of antiquity underwater. In Byzantine times, it was a harbor.

“What’s going to turn up in a harbor?” one official explained, when I asked about the decision. “Seabed and sand fill. Architectural structures aren’t going to turn up.”

In fact, a tiny Byzantine church did turn up in Yenikapı, under the foundations of some razed apartment buildings. But the real problem was the large number of Byzantine shipwrecks that began to surface soon after the excavation began, in 2004. Dating from the fifth to the eleventh century, the shipwrecks illustrated a previously murky chapter in the history of shipbuilding and were exceptionally well preserved, having apparently been buried in sand during a series of natural disasters.

In accordance with Turkish law, control of the site shifted to the museum, and use of mechanical tools was suspended. From 2005 to 2013, workers with shovels and wheelbarrows extracted a total of thirty-seven shipwrecks.


When the excavation reached what had been the bottom of the sea, the archeologists announced that they could finally cede part of the site to the engineers, after one last survey of the seabed—just a formality, really, to make sure they hadn’t missed anything. That’s when they found the remains of a Neolithic dwelling, dating from around 6000 B.C.


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How Kids Are Learning to Code While Playing Minecraft | Mind/Shift | KQED.org

How Kids Are Learning to Code While Playing Minecraft | Mind/Shift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Teachers are already capitalizing on their students’ fascination with the computer game Minecraft to teach everything from math to history. Now, a new add-on teaches kids to code their own modifications to the game.


In his Wired article, Klint Finley explains how the creators of the add-on called LearnToMod hope their tool could be a gateway for students to discover a love of computer programming.


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How libraries became the front line of America’s homelessness crisis | Richard Gunderman & David Stevens | WashPost

How libraries became the front line of America’s homelessness crisis | Richard Gunderman & David Stevens | WashPost | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On any given night in 2014, over half a million people in the United States found themselves without a home. While the majority of these people (69 percent) secured shelter for the night, many do not provide daytime accommodations for their patrons. This leaves many in search of daytime activity and protection from the elements.

Unfortunately, many homeless are also living with debilitating mental illnesses. The intimate relationship between homelessness and mental illness is well-established. Almost all psychiatric conditions are over-represented in homeless populations.

The transition from inpatient to outpatient psychiatric treatment that began in the 1960s, including the closure of state-run psychiatric hospitals, may contribute to the prevalence of mental illness among the homeless. Today, adjusting for changes in population size, U.S. state mental hospitals house only about 10 percent the number of patients they once did.

So it is no surprise that libraries are coping with a large number of patrons who are homeless or have mental illnesses. Public libraries are, after all, designed to be welcoming spaces for all.


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