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Giving Teachers Tools to Stop Bullying: Free Training Toolkit Now Available | ED.gov Blog

Giving Teachers Tools to Stop Bullying: Free Training Toolkit Now Available | ED.gov Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Over the past three years, at our annual Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Summits, we have heard the same call by educators-– teachers want to help stop bullying, but they don’t know how. Most try to help, but few receive training on how to do so. There are bullying prevention trainings available for teachers, but many are very expensive or not based on the best available research.

 

That is why the Department of Education and its Safe and Supportive Technical Assistance Center, set out to create a free, state-of-the-art training for classroom teachers on bullying. The two-part training aims to help teachers know the best practices to stop bullying on the spot and how to stop it before it starts. The training toolkit consists of PowerPoints, trainer guides, handouts, and feedback forms that school districts, schools, and teachers can use free of charge. Both the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers gave feedback on the modules and made suggestions on what teachers would find most useful.

 

The research-based training gives teachers practical steps to take to respond to bullying. These skills include how to deescalate a situation, find out what happened, and support all of the students involved. The training also shows the importance of building strong relationships in the classroom, as well as creating an environment respectful of diversity, in order to prevent bullying.

 

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Analisa Vickers's curator insight, October 14, 2013 6:18 PM

Its good to see processes and support being put in place

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What You Can Do to Support Public Schools | Blog, Take Action | BillMoyers.com

What You Can Do to Support Public Schools | Blog, Take Action | BillMoyers.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

We asked education historian Diane Ravitch what she hopes people will do after watching this week's show.


Here's what she had to say.


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Italian explorer plans to live on an iceberg for up to a year | GizMag.com

Italian explorer plans to live on an iceberg for up to a year | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Italian explorer Alex Bellini has conceived an extraordinary plan to live alone on a drifting iceberg in northwest Greenland for up to a year, or until it melts away – whichever happens first. He aims to stay alive during this time in a tiny survival pod, and hopes his experience will encourage further discourse on climate change and the environment in general.


At this stage of the project, which is dubbed Adrift 2015, Bellini offers relatively few fine details on how he plans to achieve his aim. The explorer does seem to have a taste for dangerous challenges though, and has previously rowed a small boat solo across the Mediterranean Ocean and Atlantic Ocean. An attempt to row across the Pacific Ocean solo fell just short and ended in rescue.


Bellini aims to live atop the iceberg within his survival capsule from Spring (Northern Hemisphere) 2015 in northwest Greenland, and remain in place even as the iceberg melts and becomes steadily smaller.


He will live off 300 kg (661 lb) of dried food provisions until he is forced to abandon the iceberg, then float within the survival pod until it's washed ashore to safety. Presumably there's a plan in place to rescue Bellini should the survival pod not float ashore in due time.


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Evidence Grows That Online Social Networks Have Insidious Negative Effects | MIT Technology Review

Evidence Grows That Online Social Networks Have Insidious Negative Effects | MIT Technology Review | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Online social networks have permeated our lives with far-reaching consequences. Many people have used them to connect with friends and family in distant parts of the world, to make connections that have advanced their careers in leaps and bounds and to explore and visualize not only their own network of friends but the networks of their friends, family, and colleagues.


But there is growing evidence that the impact of online social networks is not all good or even benign. A number of studies have begun found evidence that online networks can have significant detrimental effects. This question is hotly debated, often with conflicting results and usually using limited varieties of subjects, such as undergraduate students.


Today, Fabio Sabatini at Sapienza University of Rome in Italy and Francesco Sarracino at STATEC in Luxembourg attempt to tease apart the factors involved in this thorny issue by number crunching the data from a survey of around 50,000 people in Italy gathered during 2010 and 2011. The survey specifically measures subjective well-being and also gathers detailed information about the way each person uses the Internet.


The question Sabatini and Sarracino set out to answer is whether the use of online networks reduces subjective well-being and if so, how.


Sabatini and Sarracino’s database is called the “Multipurpose Survey on Households,” a survey of around 24,000 Italian households corresponding to 50,000 individuals carried out by the Italian National Institute of Statistics every year. These guys use the data drawn from 2010 and 2011. What’s important about the survey as that it is large and nationally representative (as opposed to a self-selecting group of undergraduates).


The survey specifically asks the question “How satisfied are you with your life as a whole nowadays?” requiring an answer from extremely dissatisfied (0) to extremely satisfied (10). This provides a well-established measure of subjective well-being.


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Who Teaches Parents Tech? | Digital Literacy Blog

Who Teaches Parents Tech? | Digital Literacy Blog | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For decades society has been dominated by media such as books, comics, cinema, radio, and television — all are technologies, whether or not the users recognise it, all of which now have a digital equivalent, so that even if parents weren't familiar with the particular content their children engaged with, at least they could access and understand the medium, so that, if they wished to understand what their children were doing or share the activity with them, they could.

However, with the advent of digital media, things have changed. The demands of the computer interface are significant, rendering many parents to believe that they are 'dinosaurs' in an information age inhabited by their children.

Only in rare instances in history have children gained greater expertise than parents in skills highly valued by society. More usually, youthful expertise—in music, games, or imaginative play—is accorded little, serious value by adults, even if it is envied rather nostalgically.


Thus, although young people’s newfound online skills are justifiably trumpeted by both generations, this doesn't help their parents much.


For everyone of these mouse wielding, track pad savant, 'tech-savvy' students there is quite likely at least two not quite so tech-savvy parents - parents who often find themselves on the less competent end of the conversation - a conversation often sprinkled with a fair amount of eye ball rolling, groaning and huffing and puffing.


Thankfully, the people at Google thought there had to be a better way...

The result of their brainstorm is TeachParentsTech.org, a site that allows you to select any number of simple tech support videos to help ameliorate this situation, you might even want to send them to your own mum, dad or uncle Vinnie. The site is not perfect and hardly covers all the tech support questions you may be asked, but hopefully it’s a start.

Better than a click in the teeth, anyway.


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Study Finds Internet Surfing, Digital Literacy Can Boost Memory | Smitha Nambiar | IBTimes.com

Study Finds Internet Surfing, Digital Literacy Can Boost Memory |  Smitha Nambiar | IBTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Digital literacy, which includes activities such as internet or web browsing, and emailing, can improve memory, revealed a study conducted by researchers at the Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina in Brazil.


Digital literacy, or the ability to find, evaluate, utilize, share, and carry out digital action such as sending emails and browsing the Internet, can help lower brain aging and dementia or memory loss in later years. Brazilian researchers, led by Andre Junqueira Xavier at the Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina in Brazil found that digital literacy is associated with reduction in cognitive decline. 


The findings, drawn from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, studied 6,400 British adults between the age group of 50 and 89 for eight years and found that "digital literacy increases brain and cognitive reserve or leads to the employment of more efficient cognitive networks to delay cognitive decline."


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Private and religious school vouchers ruled unconstitutional in North Carolina | Education Votes | NEA.org

Private and religious school vouchers ruled unconstitutional in North Carolina | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Last Thursday, a Superior Court judge ruled that North Carolina’s Opportunity Scholarship program is unconstitutional as, “The General Assembly fails the children of North Carolina when they are sent with public taxpayer money to private schools that have no legal obligation to teach them anything.”


In December of last year, a group of active and retired educators, a former state school superintendent and several parents joined together to file a lawsuitcharging that the law violates the state constitution’s requirement that state funds be used “exclusively for establishing and maintaining a uniform system of free public schools.” Instead, the Opportunity Scholarship program was set up with every intention of funneling taxpayer dollars to unaccountable private and religious schools. The voucher program alone would have drained $11 million dollars from public schools this year.


It appears that Justice Hobgood was listening to the concerns of parents and educators. In his ruling he stated,


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Working as a System for the Citizens of the State of Georgia | Timothy Chester & Curtis Carver | EDUCAUSE.edu

Working as a System for the Citizens of the State of Georgia | Timothy Chester & Curtis Carver | EDUCAUSE.edu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The phrase "new normal" may be a bit overused, but we IT practitioners who work in higher education currently find ourselves in business and economic environments that differ dramatically from what we have previously encountered. These new conditions require that we stop doing things the way we did in the past, because those approaches are likely to be less effective moving forward. When it comes to the delivery of IT services, the 31 institutions of the University System of Georgia (USG) are doing just that, by working together as a system to ensure the delivery of more effective technology solutions at costs that we can better afford.


The large public systems of higher education combine different types of institutions in a complex mix of different missions, student bodies, and approaches to delivering teaching, research, and instruction. Different types of institutions and programs require different types of IT services, and these differences, together with a variety of technical infrastructures and legacy technologies, have hampered many systems in coming together around common platforms and shared technology solutions. The "we're different, we have to go our own way" approach to doing business is culturally ingrained within public systems, particularly at large research-intensive flagship institutions.


The new normal requires a new approach when it comes to increasing the scalability of IT services across public systems of higher education. Where the old culture said "we're out when it comes to shared IT services with other institutions, until it's proven that we should be in," the new normal requires that we take a different approach —"we're in until it's proven that we should be out." This subtle change in vocabulary when it comes to planning for IT services requires a dramatic change in mindset. The gains of greater scalability, whether in the form of better services for students or lower costs (or both), make this change worth the effort.


The USG has experienced success with greater reliance on IT shared services. These initiatives include:


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Turkey: A Man Renovating His Home Discovered A Tunnel... To A Massive Underground City | SunnySkyz.com

Turkey: A Man Renovating His Home Discovered A Tunnel... To A Massive Underground City | SunnySkyz.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In 1963, a man in the Nevşehir Province of Turkey knocked down a wall of his home. Behind it, he discovered a mysterious room and soon discovered an intricate tunnel system with additional cave-like rooms.


What he had discovered was the ancient Derinkuyu underground city in Turkey.


The elaborate subterranean network included discrete entrances, ventilation shafts, wells, and connecting passageways. It was one of dozens of underground cities carved from the rock in Cappadocia thousands of years ago. It remained hidden for centuries.

The underground city at Derinkuyu is neither the largest nor oldest, but its 18 stories make it the deepest.


The city was most likely used as a giant bunker to protect its inhabitants from either war or natural disaster.


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A Map of Every Device in the World That's Connected to the Internet | Gizmodo.com

A Map of Every Device in the World That's Connected to the Internet | Gizmodo.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Where is the internet? This map might explain it better than any statistics could ever hope to: The red hot spots show where the most devices that can access the internet are located.


This map was made on August 2 by John Matherly, the founder of Shodan, a search engine for internet-connected devices. Matherly, who calls himself an internet cartographer, collected the data to put it together by sending ping requests to every IP address on the internet, and storing the positive responses. A ping is a network utility that sends an echo-request message (known as a packet) to an IP address—the internet's version of "hey, are you there?"


That part was relatively easy compared to the visualization process, says Matherly. "It took less than five hours to gather the data, and another 12 hours or so to generate the map image." For that, he used the matplotlib plotting library in the programing language Python.


With its rainbow of connectedness, the map is similar to one produced last year by folks at Caida—however, that one was illegal. Although Shodan is well-known for its potentially shady practices that prey upon insecure networks, ping requests—the same thing your internet provider uses to test speed and data loss—are completely benign, Matherly says. "We've just advanced enough in technology where we can do it on internet-scale."


Basically, Shodan is now able to send and receive the requests fast enough that the world can be queried in just a few hours. Armed with the new process, Matherly plans to track the changes in the globe's internet connectivity over time. With the proliferation of the Internet of Things, we're bound to see some of those black holes slowly colorize over the next few years. [Shodan]


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Millions of historic images posted to Flickr | BBC News

Millions of historic images posted to Flickr | BBC News | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An American academic is creating a searchable database of 12 million historic copyright-free images.


Kalev Leetaru has already uploaded 2.6 million pictures to Flickr, which are searchable thanks to tags that have been automatically added.


The photos and drawings are sourced from more than 600 million library book pages scanned in by the Internet Archive organisation.

The images have been difficult to access until now.


Mr Leetaru said digitisation projects had so far focused on words and ignored pictures.


"For all these years all the libraries have been digitising their books, but they have been putting them up as PDFs or text searchable works," he told the BBC.


"They have been focusing on the books as a collection of words. This inverts that.


"Stretching half a millennia, it's amazing to see the total range of images and how the portrayals of things have changed over time.


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iKeepSafe Releases K-6 Copyright Curriculum | EdSurge.com

iKeepSafe Releases K-6 Copyright Curriculum | EdSurge.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“Everything we post leaves a digital footprint,” says Marsali Hancock, CEO of iKeepSafe, a nonprofit focused on children and digital literacy. “So young people need to know the questions they should be asking before posting digital content.”


With iKeepSafe’s free curriculum for grades K-6, Copyright & Creativity for Ethical Digital Citizens, Hancock hopes to empower youth to ask questions about how and when to cite material from others. The series of short video lessons were designed in consultation with experts in media literacy and copyright law, as well as educators, and aim to help students develop safe use practices. “When it comes to a digital incident, there often isn’t a plan in place for how to handle it,” Hancock tells EdSurge. “Copyright law is very case-specific, so we wanted to set up a framework for responsible use.”


“It’s critical that students learn at an early age to respect intellectual property and creators’ rights,” explains Dana Greenspan, technology specialist at Ventura County Office of Education in California. Along with educators at several other schools in California and Virginia, Greenspan piloted the curriculum before its official release on August 27.


Copyright & Creativity for Ethical Digital Citizens is the first of several free releases as part of iKeepSafe’s BEaPRO initiative, which aims to provide background information on digital literacy and safety for all involved parties. IKeepSafe plans to release more curriculum for students K-12, as well as educators and parents.

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News Challenge to explore role of libraries in the digital age | Knight Foundation

News Challenge to explore role of libraries in the digital age | Knight Foundation | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

On Sept. 10, we’re opening the next News Challenge, on libraries. Our 12th News Challenge, it will build upon the 19 projects we funded with $3.47 million in June through the News Challenge that sought ideas to strengthen the Internet. That work, conversations such as the ones we recently had at the Aspen Institute this month and longstanding initiatives such as the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy have affirmed for us the centrality of libraries for building and maintaining an informed citizenry.


We’re hoping to hear ideas for leveraging the assets that libraries have built: physical spaces open to anyone; professional staff trained in how to seek, retrieve and share information; and a legacy of aiding new readers, new entrepreneurs and new Americans. In recent years we’ve seen libraries leverage the Internet and digital approaches for education, entrepreneurship, the arts and “making.” In a digital age we see libraries--public, university, archival, virtual--as key for improving Americans’ ability to know about and to be involved with what takes place around them.


We’re finalizing details of the challenge over the next two weeks. For now, a couple of points to highlight:


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Rachel Cheeseman's curator insight, August 29, 6:36 PM

I love the challenge model of dispensing funding for social ventures, and I can't wait to see what results come from this challenge offered by the Knight Foundation!

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Photorealsitic oil paintings of women by artist Robin Eley | Netdost.com

Photorealsitic oil paintings of women by artist Robin Eley | Netdost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Robin Eley is a master when it comes to painting realistic pictures. He sometimes makes his work much more harder by covering his models in plastic sheet. Robin was born in England and grew up in Australia where he worked as a commercial artist before plunging into Fine Art. Most of his paintings are created with oil paints on Belgian linen.


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Surgeons replace a 12-year-old's cancerous vertebra with a 3D-printed implant | GizMag.com

Surgeons replace a 12-year-old's cancerous vertebra with a 3D-printed implant | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

According to market-based research firm IDTechEx, the medical and dental market for 3D-printers is set to grow from US$141 million to $868 million by the year 2025. And when you consider the recent spate of groundbreaking medical procedures, it is pretty easy to see why. The latest surgery brought to you by the seemingly endless possibilities of 3D-printing comes at the hands of doctors at China's Peking University Third Hospital, who produced a custom implant to replace a cancerous vertebra in the neck of a 12-year-old boy.


Minghao (a pseudonym) didn't feel much pain when he headed a soccer ball during a match with his friends. But waking up the next morning with a stiff, aching neck offered an early sign that something was not quite right. One month after the incident, Minghao's entire body went numb, leading spinal experts to perform a biopsy and ultimately diagnose him with a malignant tumor on the second vertebra in his neck.


Following two months of lying in the orthopedics ward at Peking University Third Hospital, only able to stand for a few minutes at a time, doctors commenced what would be the world's first 3D-printed vertebra surgery.


Over five hours, the doctors removed the cancerous vertebra and implanted the 3D-printed piece between his first and third vertebrae. This involved clearing the nerves, carotid arteries and spinal chord of cancerous tissue and fixing the artificial vertebra in place with titanium screws, The doctors say the 3D-printed implant was an improvement on current methods and enabled a much quicker recovery time.


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Northrop Grumman gives early look at its XS-1 Experimental Spaceplane design | GizMag.com

Northrop Grumman gives early look at its XS-1 Experimental Spaceplane design | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Northrop Grumman, in partnership with Scaled Composites and Virgin Galactic, has unveiled the preliminary design it is developing as part of DARPA’s XS-1 Spaceplane project. Looking like a windowless update of a 1960s Dyna Soar orbiter, it’s the next step in producing launch systems that will dramatically reduce the costs of getting into orbit.


Key to DARPA’s brief is to develop a space-delivery system for the US military that will reduce costs by a factor of 10. DARPA also wants the XS-1 Spaceplane to be able to launch 10 times over a 10-day period, fly in a suborbital trajectory at speeds in excess of Mach 10, release a satellite launch vehicle while in flight, and reduce the cost of putting a 3,000 to 5,000 lb (1,360 to 2,267 kg) payload into orbit to US$5 million. Under DARPA contracts, Boeing, Masten Space Systems, and Northrop Grumman are working on their own versions of the spaceplane


The Northrop plan is to employ a reusable spaceplane booster that lifts off from a combination transporter/erector/launcher that needs only a minimal ground crew. In flight, the Northrop version of the XS-1 will take advantage of the company's experience in unmanned aircraft to use a highly autonomous flight system and will release an expendable upper stage, which takes the final payload into orbit while the XS-1 returns to base and lands on a standard runway like a conventional aircraft.


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Teens, Technology and Social Media: Free Webinar Sept 10 | Blandin on Broadband

A little off the beaten path – but I thought folks might be interested whether they have kids, work with kids or teach kids…


Teens, Technology and Social Media: Impacts on Healthy Relationship Development


Significant numbers of teens and young adults use social media as their main source of communicating with friends both those they have met in person and online. Today’s technology allows adolescents instant but distant access to each other yet at what price?


We wonder – “How will social media affect young people’s ability to build healthy, ongoing relationships? How will the new technologies affect their social skills? What can we do to help teens and young adults navigate this new terrain safely while building essential interpersonal skills?”


Join Jennifer Myers and Aaron Larson as they:


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How Social Media Can Support Science and Digital Literacy — NOVA Next | Brooke Havlik | PBS.org

How Social Media Can Support Science and Digital Literacy — NOVA Next | Brooke Havlik | PBS.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Paul Darvasi’s high school English classroom in Toronto, Ontario is anything but ordinary – it is blurring the lines between formal and informal education.


A lifelong gamer and PhD candidate in York University’s Language, Culture and Teaching program, Paul designed a multimedia, alternative reality experience called The Ward Game to teach One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest to his senior English class.


Darvasi uses social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to provide game instructions from the fictional totalitarian character “The Big Nurse,” played by Darvasi himself.  He did not use social media the first year he implemented the 30-day game, but it vastly improved the student experience in the second. “It allowed for the game to spill outside of the classroom and immerse them in play day and night, weekday and weekend,” says Darvasi who saw levels of engagement from his students he had rarely seen before.


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Benkirane Nabil's comment, August 30, 3:20 PM
thank you
Don Sturgill's curator insight, Today, 2:00 AM

Yep. What a time to be in school.

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Back to school under WI Gov. Scott Walker | Colleen Flaherty | Education Votes | NEA.org

Back to school under WI Gov. Scott Walker | Colleen Flaherty | Education Votes | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After 20 years of teaching in Wisconsin public schools, John Havlicek is still happy teaching Spanish at a La Crosse high school. “I love it. Teaching is not what I do, teacher is what I am,” said Havlicek.


Unfortunately, the past few years Gov. Scott Walker has implemented policies that have had a direct impact on the students in his classroom.


“The real significant change is that the kids that are most in need of additional support are the least served because with the budget crunch, schools have to make a lot of really tough choices,” said Havlicek. “The kids who have been underserved historically are the real victims of budget cuts.”


Under Gov. Scott Walker, $300 million in funding flowed to an unaccountable, private school voucher scheme by cutting $1.6 billion from public education, the largest cuts to education spending in Wisconsin history. In Havlicek’s school, where around 50 percent of students receive free or reduced lunch, students living in poverty are especially hurting.


“I see more kids every year that didn’t have breakfast, or I can see that they’ve got probably two pairs of pants and three sweatshirts they wear day after day, or kids or who can’t partake in extra curriculars. When we offered other things like field trips, we try to find the money ourselves. They can’t afford five or ten dollars.”


Several of other policies—such as Walker’s lack of support for raising the minimum wage, refusing federal funds for the expansion of Medicaid and devaluing public education and educators—have all hurt Wisconsin’s neediest citizens.


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8 Ways to Save on Back to School Technology in the Classroom | Corey Anderson | SecureEdgeNetworks.com

8 Ways to Save on Back to School Technology in the Classroom | Corey Anderson | SecureEdgeNetworks.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It is that time of year again and parents are probably a little concerned about all the items on the back to school shopping list this time of year. Our kids need new outfits, new pens and those good ‘ole No. 2 pencils, books, notebooks and now...netbooks (or Chromebooks, if you prefer)


Preference and price are two of the many factors driving choices made by schools, parents, students and manufacturers alike. In a recent Wall Street Journal report, Taiwanese personal computer maker Acer, Inc. announced they’ll be moving away from Microsoft products and towards Android and Chromebook devices.


Companies, like individuals, understand the need to save money, that’s why the Google-based devices starts our 8 Ways to Save on Back to School Technology.


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This Fall, Minorities Will Outnumber White Students in U.S. Schools | Jeanne Kim | The Atlantic

This Fall, Minorities Will Outnumber White Students in U.S. Schools | Jeanne Kim | The Atlantic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

While 62 percent of the total U.S. population was classified as non-Hispanic white in 2013, when public schools start this fall their racial landscape will reflect a different America.


According to a new report by the National Center for Education (NCES), minorities—Hispanics, Asians, African American, Native Americans, and multiracial individuals—will account for 50.3 percent of public school students. To break this down by grade levels, minorities will make up 51 percent of pre-kindergarteners to 8th graders and 48 percent of 9th to 12th graders.


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Local Newsrooms As Participatory Journalism Labs | Josh Stearns | LocalNewsLab.org

Local Newsrooms As Participatory Journalism Labs | Josh Stearns | LocalNewsLab.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In both local and national coverage of Ferguson I’ve seen a shift in how journalists approach participatory media in conflict areas. Citizen journalism was central to the Occupy protests a few years ago, but it largely remained separate and distinct from the mainstream media coverage. The exceptions were notable – like a Chicago NBC station broadcasting the livestream from Tim Pool during NATO protests or the collaborative May Day coverage coordinated by the Media Consortium.


In Ferguson however, it feels like there has been a shift in the rhetoric around citizens’ role in covering the protests. In the New York Times, David Carr described how Ferguson became #Ferguson, arguing that “in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.” Writing a day after a three journalists were arrested the sociologist Zeynep Tufekci wrote, “last night’s Ferguson ‘coverage’ began when people started retweeting pictures of armored vehicles with heavily armored ‘robocops’ on top of them, aiming their muzzle at the protesters.”


There is a huge opportunity local journalism to help build more digital and media literacy as more and more people participate the news. Media scholar Dan Gillmor has written that today “none of us is fully literate unless we are creating, not just consuming.” My experience has been that, whether they are live streaming at a protest or just sharing news on Facebook, many people are curious about how to leverage the tools at their fingertips and hungry for guidance on how to be more trustworthy, safe, and ethical media participants.


While there is an array of online tools and trainings for citizen journalists – from online MOOC’s like Cardif University’s Community Journalism course to the great guides produced by groups like Global Voices and WITNESS (and even the terrific journalism merit badge at DIY) – I see an important role for local newsrooms to more deeply engage their communities as partners in co-creating the news.


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Does Spelling Count? | Shira Loewenstein Blog | Edutopia.org

Does Spelling Count? | Shira Loewenstein Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

"Does spelling count?"


This is one of my favorite and least favorite questions all rolled into one.


As a science teacher, I gave an assignment to my students to create a children's book. "In your book, I want you to explain everything your readers have learned about the different types of clouds and how they relate to weather patterns."


Before I even have the chance to hand out a rubric, no less than five children call out, "Does spelling count?!?" I am sure they're hoping for a simple "yes" or "no" (and more specifically a "no"), but this seems to be a teachable moment if I have ever met one. I'm going to seize it . . .


What is the purpose of learning spelling? Grammar? Math? Why do we break these subjects down? Why do these subjects seem so parsed from our students' lives that they need to know if something "counts?"


I ask my students these very questions. Why do I care if you learn spelling?


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Libraries add your voice to FCC public comment on network neutrality | DistrictDispatch.org

Libraries add your voice to FCC public comment on network neutrality | DistrictDispatch.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has heard from more than 1 million commenters on proposed rulemaking to Protect and Promote the Open Internet, including from the American Library Association (ALA), Association for College & Research Libraries (ACRL), the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). But it’s not too late to add your voice in support of network neutrality.


September is a perfect time to add more voices from the library and education community. Working with EDUCAUSE, ALA has developed a template letter of support for our comments that you can use to amplify our voice. Click here (doc) to open the document, customize with your information and follow guidelines for submission to FCC.


ALA is meeting with FCC officials, and there is definite interest in our perspective as advocates for intellectual freedom and equity of access to information for all. Please consider strengthening our presence as a community in the public record.


The formal “reply” comment period of the FCC proceeding will close September 15, but “ex parte” comments will be accepted until further notice. The FCC hoped to deliver a new Order on network neutrality by the end of the year, but this could be delayed as the commission considers the broad public input and a range of proposals and perspectives.


As always, more background and related news can be found online. Stay tuned!

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Jump Inside Virtual Paintings at the Barnes Foundation and Explore with a New App Created by Drexel University | Drexel.edu

Jump Inside Virtual Paintings at the Barnes Foundation and Explore with a New App Created by Drexel University | Drexel.edu | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Have you ever found a painting so enticing that you wished you could jump inside and explore? A new, interactive mobile application created by Drexel University’s School of Education for young visitors of the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, PA allows you to do just that.


Using 3-D immersive graphics, the touch-screen app, entitled “Keys to the Collection,” launches a game environment of the Barnes’ beloved, world-renowned art collection. The app turns a visit to the Barnes into a game or can be used to explore the Barnes virtually from anywhere. Using augmented reality, users who play the game from the Barnes’ galleries can even use their avatar to jump inside masterpieces to learn about elements of art like lines, colors, shapes and depth of space.


The game, which is targeted for ages 7-14, invites players to complete an assortment of art missions, guided by Dr. Barnes’ dog Fidéle. Players accumulate keys to enter different realms, solve a variety of mysteries and add works of art to a growing portfolio. Players rack up badges and points to chart the thrilling quest for the elusive gold key which allows them to unlock a special room, create their own art gallery and win the game.


The game is free from the iTunes store and can be played on any Apple device. It also is downloadable from the Barnes Foundation website at www.barnesfoundation.org/education/app.


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Vloasis's curator insight, August 29, 10:54 PM

Awesome if it can gets kids interested!

Sadim MR's curator insight, August 30, 5:34 AM

"Using 3-D immersive graphics, the touch-screen app, entitled “Keys to the Collection,” launches a game environment of the Barnes’ beloved, world-renowned art collection. The app turns a visit to the Barnes into a game or can be used to explore the Barnes virtually from anywhere. Using augmented reality, users who play the game from the Barnes’ galleries can even use their avatar to jump inside masterpieces to learn about elements of art like lines, colors, shapes and depth of space.

The game, which is targeted for ages 7-14, invites players to complete an assortment of art missions, guided by Dr. Barnes’ dog Fidéle.

- See more at: http://drexel.edu/now/news-media/releases/archive/2014/August/Barnes-app/#sthash.bKtafRQg.dpuf";

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The attack on bad teacher tenure laws is actually an attack on black professionals | Dr. Andre Perry Blog | WashPost.com

The attack on bad teacher tenure laws is actually an attack on black professionals | Dr. Andre Perry Blog | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After the Vergara v. California decision in California’s state Supreme Court, which held that key job protections for teachers are unconstitutional, anti-union advocates everywhere began spawning copycat lawsuits. But while reformers may genuinely want to fix education for everyone, their efforts will only worsen diversity in the teaching corps.


The truth is that an attack on bad teacher tenure laws (and ineffective teachers in general) is actually an attack on black professionals. If the Vergara clones succeed, black children will lose effective teachers and the black community will lose even more middle-class jobs.


Black workers are most likely to hold public sector union jobs. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, among the major ethnic groups, blacks (13.6 percent) represent the highest percentage of union members among the total number of workers (whites are 11 percent; Asians are 9.4 percent; and Hispanics are 9.4 percent), and the highest unionization rates among all professions were in the education services occupations (35.3 percent).


In 26 of the 48 jurisdictions (states plus the District of Columbia) where at least some black and some white teachers are covered by collective bargaining agreements, blacks are more likely to be covered by agreements than whites.


This is the case in California, where the Vergara decision originated. Blacks are more likely to teach in urban areas in many states, and so are more likely to be covered by collective bargaining. Therefore, black teachers have much at stake in the Vergara decision.


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