Digital Media Lit...
Follow
35.4K views | +10 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

A 12-eyed music creator: the Dodecaudion music controller | gizmag.com

A 12-eyed music creator: the Dodecaudion music controller | gizmag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Moving around the stage while performing is a whole lot easier with instruments such as the Vortex or Kitara than with something like the mighty JUPITER-80. Innovations like Onyx Ashanti's Beatjazz hands or the Air Piano from Omer Yosha go even further, by making movement a vital part of the music creation process. Such is the case with the Dodecaudion from Polish art and design group panGenerator. When a performer places a hand, foot, head or other part of the body in front of any of its 12 IR-sensor-packing faces, wirelessly-linked processing hardware generates pre-programmed audio or visuals.

 

The Dodecaudion is described as a simple gestural, spatial musical interface which is suspended from the ceiling and produces sounds as a performer approaches any of the IR distance sensors pointing out from each of its 12 faces. The sensors are connected to a custom-made Arduino shield, which collects the incoming data and sends it as float variables via the unit's built-in Bluetooth modem to an external device for processing. The electronics are housed in a 3D-printed skeleton featuring laser-cut aluminum elements.

 

Click headline to read more, view pix and watch the video--

more...
No comment yet.
Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Never trust a corporation to do a library’s job | Andy Baio | The Message | Medium.com

Never trust a corporation to do a library's job - The Message - Medium

As Google abandons its past, Internet archivists step in to save our collective memory

Google wrote its mission statement in 1999, a year after launch, setting the course for the company’s next decade:

“Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

For years, Google’s mission included the preservation of the past.

In 2001, Google made their first acquisition, the Deja archives. The largest collection of Usenet archives, Google relaunched it as Google Groups, supplemented with archived messages going back to 1981.

In 2004, Google Books signaled the company’s intention to scan every known book, partnering with libraries and developing its own book scanner capable of digitizing 1,000 pages per hour.

In 2006, Google News Archive launched, with historical news articles dating back 200 years. In 2008, they expanded it to include their own digitization efforts, scanning newspapers that were never online.

In the last five years, starting around 2010, the shifting priorities of Google’s management left these archival projects in limbo, or abandoned entirely.

After a series of redesigns, Google Groups is effectively dead for research purposes. The archives, while still online, have no means of searching by date.

Google News Archives are dead, killed off in 2011, now directing searchers to just use Google.

Google Books is still online, but curtailed their scanning efforts in recent years, likely discouraged by a decade of legal wrangling still in appeal. The official blog stopped updating in 2012 and the Twitter account’s been dormant since February 2013.

Even Google Search, their flagship product, stopped focusing on the history of the web. In 2011, Google removed the Timeline view letting users filter search results by date, while a series of major changes to their search ranking algorithm increasingly favored freshness over older pages from established sources. (To the detriment of some.)

Two months ago, Larry Page said the company’s outgrown its 14-year-old mission statement. Its ambitions have grown, and its priorities have shifted.


The Internet Archive is mostly known for archiving the web, a task the San Francisco-based nonprofit has tirelessly done since 1996, two years before Google was founded.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Roscosmos video replaces our Sun and Moon with well known stars and planets | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Roscosmos video replaces our Sun and Moon with well known stars and planets | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

At some point in their lives, who hasn't looked up at the sky and gazed in wonder at Earth's closest companion? Hanging a dizzying 384,400 km (238, 606 miles) above us, the Moon has stood like a silent sentinel throughout our species' short existence. It has enticed some to visit and inspired others to look to the universe beyond. The Russian space agency Roscosmos recently released series of videos shot from the perspective of Earth, showing us what it would look like if other planets and stars took the place of our Moon and Sun.

In many ways the Moon has encouraged the most noble part of the human spirit, that which drives us to exploration and inspires us to push back the boundaries of human understanding. On the other hand, Roscosmos has taken a less philosophical view, recognizing that the moon is a massive rock in the sky that we've all just got a bit used to, and asks, what would it look like if it was something else?


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery, access hot links and watch video clips--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Smithsonian Institution may be headed to London | Adam Williams | GizMag.com

Smithsonian Institution may be headed to London | Adam Williams | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For the first time in its 168 year history, the Smithsonian Institution may be "coming home," in a manner of speaking. Originally founded with funds from British scientist James Smithson, it has never established a longterm exhibition outside the United States. But recently unveiled plans for a new culture and arts center to be built at London’s Olympic Park site in the UK.

The plans make up part of a larger £141 million (roughly US$210 million) scheme to turn the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which was site of the 2012 London Olympics, in to a 4.5 acre (1.8 hectare) cultural hub with the unfortunate title of Olympicopolis. Olympicopolis will also contain universities, a museum, and dance theater, and is expected to host over 1.5 million visitors per year.

Details are scant at this stage, but Smithsonian plans for a 3,700 sq m (40,000 sq ft) gallery that will feature permanent and rotating exhibits, and a series of programs and activities. Entry will be free of charge, and costs will be covered by private philanthropy, temporary-exhibit admission fees, and retail income.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Prynt case turns your phone into a Polaroid-like instant camera | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com

Prynt case turns your phone into a Polaroid-like instant camera | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A new prototype instant camera case promises to let you print photographs directly from your Android or Apple smartphone, and in just 30 seconds. Dubbed Prynt, the modular unit acts as both a phone case and printer, and boasts an all-in-one ink and paper refill pack that claims to make reloading on the go a breeze.

Inspired by the original Polaroid instant camera, the Prynt team wanted to recreate the experience of sharing physical photos like people did in previous generations – only this time using the smartphones as the brain. Given that these handsets are becoming our ubiquitous and constant companions, the Prynt creators thought it made the most sense to make a gizmo that attaches to the device that's already living in your pocket.

In this vein, the Prynt is designed to wrap around and encase your phone, so you don’t have to fiddle with connections or plugs: just point, shoot and print. The Prynt case also holds 10 sheets of photo paper, with drop-in refills priced at just US$5 per pack and available through the Prynt app.

Though still under development, the Prynt team hopes to have a companion app up by mid-year, along with a greater range of smartphone compatibility.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

IA: 665 W.D.M. students to be part of Gates Foundation-backed program model | Christopher Pratt | Des Moines Register

IA: 665 W.D.M. students to be part of Gates Foundation-backed program model | Christopher Pratt | Des Moines Register | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

West Des Moines will be the first school district in the state to launch a new non-traditional classroom model backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The New Tech Network program will enlist 665 students in project-based learning that combines multiple subject areas and stresses collaboration amongst students and teachers.

The program began in California in 1996 and is active in more than 150 schools, most of them public schools, in 25 states. But it has not found a home in Iowa until now.

This week the West Des Moines school board approved a $1.3 million plan to implement the program at four schools starting in the fall.

The first students enrolled will include all fourth- through sixth-grade students at Clive and Crestview elementary schools, and about 220 of the district's approximately 660 seventh-graders at both Indian Hills and Stilwell junior high schools.

The goal of the program is to get young students more actively involved in day-to-day learning through collaborative projects, and build the knowledge and skills needed to succeed after their school years.

It also includes a focus on technology. All students enrolled in the program will be assigned either and laptop or a tablet.

"We really wanted to start thinking about other possibilities of how we could start helping kids feel engaged — and really prepare them — whether they are going into college, a career, military, whatever path they are planning to take," West Des Moines Superintendent Lisa Remy said.

She led five group visits to New Tech Network sites across the country. Those trips included teachers and school board members, but also West Des Moines city officials and business leaders.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

How To Choose A Learning Game | Jordan Shapiro | Mind/Shift | KQED.org

How To Choose A Learning Game | Jordan Shapiro | Mind/Shift | KQED.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Many teachers are excited about trying games in the classroom but don’t know where to begin. The landscape of learning games is vast and confusing — and it’s growing and changing rapidly. Moving at the pace of the software industry, games are often updated and iterated so that new versions replace familiar ones before you’ve even had a chance to implement them in your classroom routine.

And teachers have busy schedules. We have barely enough time to complete our prep or even to provide students with as much written feedback as they deserve. Exploring such unfamiliar territory as games for learning takes a considerable investment of time and energy. For over-scheduled and underpaid teachers, available time and energy is already scarce and face-to-face classroom time is our top priority.

On the other hand, not exploring, updating and reinventing our teaching strategies can cause us to miss valuable opportunities to reach students. We all chose teaching because we love it, and a good teacher is constantly motivated to improve the classroom experience. Games are a great tool that can add a spark of new vitality. But how do you go about choosing the right game? What criteria should you use to pick a game for your classroom?

Selecting the right game can be like walking the teachers’ tightrope. Both engagement and academic rigor need to be priorities, but there is often tension between them.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

High School Teacher And His Students Re-Create 'Uptown Funk' Video In One Take

High School Teacher And His Students Re-Create 'Uptown Funk' Video In One Take | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is a great example of how a bunch of technology students let go of their fears, trusted their teacher, and got down to some "Uptown Funk!"

This could become the next "Happy" viral video idea where everyone starts creating their own version.


Click headline to watch the video--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Game-Based Learning | National Geographic

Game-Based Learning | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Using interactive games to facilitate learning in educational settings has a number of recognized benefits. For most students, games are highly engaging and motivating. Games provide real-time feedback and built-in goals that can motivate students to improve. In addition, students must make decisions as they play games, and they can see the results of those decisions right away and use that information to inform their next decisions.

Meaningful games embed educational content and require students to engage in a variety of 21st century skills in order to be successful. These games compel students to apply a variety of knowledge, skills, and strategies to solve problems. Such games provide a rich environment that promotes collaboration, problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication.

Some of the games in this collection include companion educator guides for using game-play to explore specific subjects and topics with students.


Click headline to access hot links to game-based learning organized by thematic category--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

ESA plans Integral satellite reentry 15 years in advance | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

ESA plans Integral satellite reentry 15 years in advance | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After 12 years in orbit, the European Space Agency (ESA) is in the process of enacting its retirement plan for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (Integral). However, while the agency is adjusting the orbit of the satellite now, the spacecraft will continue to make observations for some years, and won’t re-enter Earth’s atmosphere until the late 2020s.

The Integral satellite is one of ESA’s longest-running missions, having been placed in orbit in 2002. It’s achieved a great deal over its 12 years in space, making important observations of violent events including gamma ray bursts and black holes. Most recently, in August 2014, it made gamma-ray observations of a supernova, confirming that white dwarfs can indeed reignite and explode.

Looking towards its eventual demise, the team is in the process of adjusting the orbit of the satellite via four thruster burns, using around half of the estimated 96 kg (211 lb) of remaining fuel, and setting it up for safe re-entry in 2029 – a full 15 years down the line.

It might seem strange to plan the re-entry so far in advance, but making the adjustments now will ensure that Integral’s eventual entry into the Earth’s atmosphere will meet with the Agency’s guidelines concerning orbital debris, while allowing it to continue making observations for the next seven to eight years.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Lensless space telescope could be 1,000 times stronger than Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com

Lensless space telescope could be 1,000 times stronger than Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Hubble space telescope has given us decades of incredible images, but it's reaching the end of its service life and the question is, what will come after? One possibility is the Aragoscope from the University of Colorado Boulder, which uses a gigantic orbital disk instead of a mirror to produce images 1,000 times sharper than the Hubble's best efforts.

The Aragoscope is named after French scientist Francois Arago who first noticed how a disk diffracted light waves. The principle is based on using a large disk as a diffraction lens, which bends light from distant objects around the edge of the disk and focuses it like a conventional refraction lens. The phenomenon isn't very pronounced on the small scale, but if the telescope is extremely large, it not only becomes practical, but also extremely powerful.

When deployed the Aragoscope will consist of an opaque disk a half mile in diameter parked in geostationary orbit behind which is an orbiting telescope keeping station some tens to hundreds of miles behind that collects the light at the focal point and rectifies it into a high-resolution image.

"The opaque disk of the Aragoscope works in a similar way to a basic lens," says CU-Boulder doctoral student and team member Anthony Harness. "The light diffracted around the edge of the circular disk travels the same path length to the center and comes into focus as an image." He added that, since image resolution increases with telescope diameter, being able to launch such a large, yet lightweight disk would allow astronomers to achieve higher-resolution images than with smaller, traditional space telescopes.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

No worries! Asteroid to safely pass Earth on Monday | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com

No worries! Asteroid to safely pass Earth on Monday | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An asteroid that will zoom past Earth on Monday poses no threat, but will be in a good position for scientists to study, NASA said.

The asteroid, dubbed 2004 BL86, will fly too far away to affect the Earth, the International Space Station or any orbiting satellites, according to the space agency.

At its nearest, the asteroid will be about 745,000 miles away from Earth, or about three times the distance from Earth to the moon.

"Monday, Jan. 26 will be the closest asteroid 2004 BL86 will get to Earth for at least the next 200 years," said Don Yeomans, manager of NASA's Near Earth Object Program Office. "And while it poses no threat to Earth for the foreseeable future, it's a relatively close approach by a relatively large asteroid, so it provides us a unique opportunity to observe and learn more." The asteroid, which is about a third of a mile in size, was discovered in 2004.

Amateur astronomers in the northern hemisphere may be able to get a look at the passing asteroid using small telescopes and strong binoculars. NASA plans to obtain scientific data and radar-generated images of the asteroid using the Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., and the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

"When we get our radar data back the day after the flyby, we will have the first detailed images," said radar astronomer Lance Benner of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "At present, we know almost nothing about the asteroid, so there are bound to be surprises."

Scientists are interested in asteroids because it is generally believed they brought water and other building blocks of life to Earth. Yeomans also noted that in the future, asteroids may be explored for mineral ores and other natural resources.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Otto Piene’s Artistic Legacy — x 2 | Mark Favermann | The Arts Fuse

Otto Piene’s Artistic Legacy — x 2 | Mark Favermann | The Arts Fuse | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In recent months, two exhibitions have celebrated the art and life work of the late Otto Piene (1928-2014), the former director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT. Piene ran CAVS for 20 years and touched the creative lives of scores of artist fellows and students there.

The stunning Guggenheim Museum exhibition ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s was thoughtfully curated: this was the first large-scale historical survey in the United States dedicated to the German artists’ group ZERO (1957–66), which was founded by Heinz Mack and Otto Piene. The pair were joined in 1961 by Günther Uecker. Like-minded artists and collaborators included Lucio Fontana, Yayoi Kusama, Yves Klein, and Piero Manzoni. Technically provocative and often visually beautiful, the show, perhaps better than any but a very few previous exhibits in its 50-year history, filled the entire space of the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright spiral.

Having no political or ideological orientation, ZERO was an international network of like-minded artists from Europe, Japan, and North and South America. They all shared the group’s aesthetic and philosophical aspirations to transform and redefine art in the aftermath of World War II. Technical collaboration was also a key ingredient. The Guggenheim exhibition explored the experimental practices developed by ZERO’s extensive network of artists. Their creative approach — Otto Piene’s artwork in particular — anticipated Environmental Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and even Performance Art.

ZERO encompassed a diverse range of media: painting, sculpture, inflatables, light sculptures, works on paper, installations, and archival materials, along with publications as well as photographic and film documentation. The Guggenheim exhibition was organized around points of intersection, exchange, and collaboration. Among the themes explored was the establishment of new definitions of painting, monochrome (including serial structures), and Piene’s fire and smoke pictures. The introduction of movement and light as both formal and idea-based aspects of art was one of ZERO’s many breakthroughs.


The group also first organized the use of space as subject and material. This was done with specific reference to the relationships among art, nature, technology, and the viewer. In addition, participatory art was incorporated into the production of live action events, one of the major (and prescient) inspirations for ’60s “happenings.”


At once a period snapshot of a specific creative group and a portrait of energetic aesthetic experimentation, the show honored the pioneering nature of both the art and the transnational vision advanced by ZERO during two pivotal decades of the 20th Century.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Microsoft’s HoloLens may be the least stupid pair of smartglasses yet | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com

Microsoft’s HoloLens may be the least stupid pair of smartglasses yet | Hayley Tsukayama | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Microsoft showed off its HoloLens headset on Wednesday, a device that just may win the prize for the least stupid pair of smartglasses launched by a major tech company to date.

It's a dubious honor. But Microsoft ably handled its first reveal of the HoloLens with a mix of modesty, optimism and showmanship. And introducing a promising piece of future technology is pretty important for the company as it looks to make over its image as a stodgy firm that's unable to cope with changes in the industry.


What really worked for Microsoft was the fact that it showed admirable restraint by keeping its pitch for the HoloLens focused. It didn't claim it was a must-have product for everyone, at all times. Instead, Microsoft stuck to specific but relatable examples of when you would want to have holograms overlaid onto your vision, with just a few hints about how it could be useful to the everyday customer. It's the kind of pitch that Apple tends to be good at -- showing exactly how you'll use its products to fix particular problems that everyone has.


For example, when being instructed on how to fix something, or when collaborating on a project that requires everyone to look at -- and possibly edit -- the same thing:


Click headline to read more and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

4 Easy Steps to Transmedia Screenwriting | Dr. Chester Elijah Branch | Media Shift | PBS.org

4 Easy Steps to Transmedia Screenwriting | Dr. Chester Elijah Branch | Media Shift | PBS.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

So you are a film student or filmmaker and you’re interested in telling a story that will stay with your audience beyond the “fade out.”


Let’s say you want a webisode to go viral. Or, a couple of years ago, you heard Disney and Fox talking about transmedia.


Now you’re wondering how to stay on trend with these big distribution companies. How would you even begin to write, shoot and produce a story that is “transmedia” ready?

There are four key elements you can pay attention to when creating your work that makes it easier to transition into something interactive and cross-platform.

The first tip is to be sure the story you’re telling has what it needs to be transmedia.


Click headline to read more, view graphics and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New Dawn Ceres image outdoes Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com

New Dawn Ceres image outdoes Hubble | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The dwarf planet Ceres has come into sharper focus with NASA's Dawn spacecraft sending back the best images yet of the asteroid. Shot on January 25 from a distance of 147,000 mi (237,000 km) as the unmanned probe closes in for its March rendezvous, the resolution was 30 percent better than the best images obtained by the Hubble space telescope.

The 43-pixel-wide image may still be a bit blurry, but NASA says that it's already presenting scientists with new insights into the nature of Ceres. The new images provide a better look at the white spot discovered on January 13, as well as hints of craters and other features.

Dawn was launched on September 27, 2007 atop a Delta II rocket from Space Launch Complex 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. After making a flyby of Mars on February 4, 2009 in a slingshot maneuver, it went into orbit around the protoplanet Vesta on July 16, 2011, where it carried out a 14-month survey of its surface.


Click headline to read more, view pix and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Google Lunar XPrize Milestone Prize winners announced | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

Google Lunar XPrize Milestone Prize winners announced | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Back in December, we learned that the final deadline for the prestigious Lunar XPrize had been pushed back to 2016, giving the teams a little more time to perfect their creations. We also heard that up to US$6 million in funding would be awarded to the most promising teams. The results are now in and the front runners are beginning to emerge.

First, a quick recap. The Lunar XPrize is a competition being run in partnership with Google that promises a grand prize of $30 million for any team that can successfully land a custom built robot on the Moon, and have it travel at least 500 m (1,640 ft) before transmitting HD footage back home.


To help the teams achieve those lofty goals, several prize purses were available to teams whose creations showed promise in certain areas. Actual testing and analysis was required for the awarding of the Milestone Prize funds, $5.25 million of which has now been awarded, spread over three categories.


Click headline to read more, view pix gallery and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

California dad asks grade school to ban unvaccinated kids to keep his son safe | Faith Gardner | DailyKos.com

California dad asks grade school to ban unvaccinated kids to keep his son safe | Faith Gardner | DailyKos.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since the measles outbreak that began at Disneyland, California and six other states (and Mexico) have seen patients infected with the disease. If you read the comments in a lot of these articles in the major news networks (which I don't really advise, unless you enjoy the feeling of beating your head against your keyboard) people ask, why does this matter? Aren't only unvaccinated people affected? As long as you yourself are vaccinated, this shouldn't be an issue, right?

Wrong. Take Rhett Krawitt in Marin County, for example. He's a six-year-old kid who has been battling leukemia for over four years. That's over three years of chemo treatments. Now that he's in remission, he can't receive vaccinations. And this new measles outbreak poses a serious threat to him and other similar cases.

Rhett cannot be vaccinated, because his immune system is still rebuilding. It may be months more before his body is healthy enough to get all his immunizations. Until then, he depends on everyone around him for protection — what's known as herd immunity.

But Rhett lives in Marin County, Calif., a county with the dubious honor of having the highest rate of "personal belief exemptions" in the Bay Area and among the highest in the state. This school year, 6.45 percent of children in Marin have a personal belief exemption, which allows parents to lawfully send their children to school unvaccinated against communicable diseases like measles, polio, whooping cough and more.

Although no measles cases are known at Rhett's school currently, 30 babies have been isolated in the Bay Area in the past few days to prevent the outbreak from spreading. Rhett's oncologist, Dr. Goldsby, says, "It's not just Rhett. There are hundreds of other kids in the Bay Area that are going through cancer therapy, and it's not fair to them. They can't get immunized; they have to rely on their friends and colleagues and community to help protect them."

Rhett's father Carl Krawitt is concerned for the safety of his child, and is trying to change the policies at Rhett's elementary school.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

The 2015 submarine cable map is here! | TeleGeography.com

TeleGeography is pleased to announce that our 2015 Submarine Cable Map, sponsored by PCCW Global, is now available!

This year’s map pays tribute to the pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were highly sought after works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers at sea. Such embellishments largely disappeared in the early 1600s, pushing modern map design in a purely functional direction. TeleGeography’s newest map brings back the lost design aesthetic that vanished along with these whimsical details, to provide a view of the global submarine cable network seen through the lens of a bygone era.

While the design is vintage, the data are fresh: the map depicts 278 in-service and 21 planned submarine cables. TeleGeography’s latest data on submarine cable latency and lit capacity by route appear alongside ornate illustrations depicting common causes of submarine cable faults, steps in the cable laying process, and mythical sea monsters.


Click headline to view the map and access hot link to download the map--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Fantastically Wrong: The Bizarre Mirages That Once Scared the Bejesus Out of Sailors | Matt Simon | WIRED

Fantastically Wrong: The Bizarre Mirages That Once Scared the Bejesus Out of Sailors | Matt Simon | WIRED | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Jesuit priests aren’t especially known for their heavy drug use, but it would seem that Father Domenico Giardina was tripping pretty hard on August 14, 1643. Looking out over the sea from Messina, Sicily, Giardina saw “a city all floating in the air, and so measureless and so splendid, so adorned with magnificent buildings, all of which was found on a base of a luminous crystal.” The metropolis suddenly transformed into a garden, and next a forest. And then in a flash it all descended into chaos. Huge armies sprang forth, as did the towns they had laid waste to, before the whole mess disappeared.


Father Giardina, you see, was high on life. The “great and marvelous theater” he had witnessed was the mysterious fata morgana, an incredibly complex mirage that has historically both fascinated and scared the hell out of sailors and landlubbers alike. Whether it be the work of necromancers or fairies or a god, few phenomena have captivated humankind quite so thoroughly as fata morgana.

It was Jesuits like Father Giardina, argues Marina Warner in her brilliant book Phantasmagoria, who made the first “careful” observations of fata morgana, that is, not freaking out about them and instead beginning to apply a dash of science to the matter. The good Father claimed, writes Warner, that the minerals and salts in the region “rise up in hot weather in vapours from the sea to form clouds, which then condense in the cooler upper air to become a mobile specchio, a moving, polyhedrical mirror.” It was wrong, but it actually wasn’t that far off.


At work here is some basic physics. When the sun heats up the atmosphere above the ocean, it creates a gradient of temperatures: Near the surface, it’s still relatively cool because the water is chilling that air, but sitting above that is a layer of warmer air. Now, light doesn’t always travel in a straight line. When it hits a boundary between two layers of the atmosphere that are different temperatures (and therefore different densities), it bends and travels through the new layer at a different angle. This is known as refraction. The change in the light’s angle of travel depends on the difference in density between the two layers.


How does bending light create a mirage?


Click headline to read more and view pix--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Middle School Math | Justin Reich | EdWeek.org

Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Middle School Math | Justin Reich | EdWeek.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This is a guest post from Dr. Reshan Richards (@ReshanRichards), the director of education technology at Montclair Kimberley Academy and the co-creator of the Explain Everything screencasting app. This post previews his upcoming featured talk at the EdTechTeacher iPad Summit San Diego.

I have recently been writing about the qualitative formative assessment toolkit (QFAT for short) which is something that has come out of my research on and practice with mobile devices, multimedia, and formative assessment. It is comprised of four media authoring approaches available on most smartphones, tablets, and laptops: making photos, taking screenshots, filming videos, and screencasting.

Each of these approaches allow teachers and learners to capture and create moments of learning, excerpts of understanding, and reflections of experience.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

MIT study redefines the role of meteorites in the formation of the early solar system | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Until now, it has been generally accepted that a meteor constitutes a time capsule – a relic of the early creation of the solar system that has fallen to Earth, allowing us to delve into the distant past by looking at the composition of the essentially unchanged material that formed the basis of planetary formation. However, a new study carried out by researchers from MIT and Purdue University seeks to challenge the established belief, asserting that rather than representing the kernel of planetary creation, that they are instead a by-product of the violent and often cataclysmic process.

The new research revolves around the creation of tiny spherical grains known as chondrules, that are present in meteorites. Chondrules are formed where molten droplets cool, leaving behind a glassy residue. The established theory on planetary formation is that the chondrules (then molten droplets), came into contact with gas and dust particles, resulting in larger clumps of matter that would form the basis for the planetary bodies that we have today.

However, this established view of the formation of the early solar system has been thrown into doubt by a series of complex computer simulations run by researchers from MIT and Purdue University. The simulations suggest that planetary bodies the size of the moon existed prior to the creation of the earliest chondrules, and that it was the enormous pressures produced by a collision between two such bodies that were responsible for the formation of the glassy spheres.

According to the research, a cataclysmic clash between the protoplanets would produce enough force to melt a fraction of the material, sending a molten plume jetting out into space, whereupon it would cool, and adhere to the surface of what would eventually become meteorites.

Whilst the new simulations may disprove the current leading theory on the role of meteorites in planetary creation, it provides valuable insight into this formative period.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Mars Opportunity rover celebrates 11 years on the Red Planet with impressive panorama | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Mars Opportunity rover celebrates 11 years on the Red Planet with impressive panorama | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA's Mars Opportunity rover recently celebrated its 11th anniversary on the Martian surface, marking the milestone with a stunning panorama that doubles as a moving tribute to the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack in New York. Over the course of its tenure on the Red Planet, the tenacious explorer has broken the record for the longest distance traveled on another world, making countless groundbreaking discoveries along the way.

Opportunity's original mission was only scheduled to last 90 days, during which time it would scour the terrain near its landing site in Eagle Crater for any clues that would point to the existence of liquid water on ancient Mars. Over a decade later, Opportunity is still going strong (albeit with some memory problems), with last year seeing the audacious adventurer overtake the Russian lunar rover Lunokhod 2 to take the crown for the most miles traveled on another planet, racking up an impressive 25.9 miles (41.7 km).

In order to capture the image, Opportunity has ascended 440 ft (135 m) since traversing a low-lying section of the Endeavour Crater known as Botany Bay in mid 2013. Cape Tribulation represents one of the highest altitudes that the rover has visited, allowing it to image a large portion of the interior of the Endeavour Crater, in addition to the rim of another crater positioned close to the horizon, in a single panorama.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Ancient Skull Adds New Insight to Story of Human Evolution | John Noble Wilford | NYTimes.com

Ancient Skull Adds New Insight to Story of Human Evolution | John Noble Wilford | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Anthropologists exploring Manot Cave in Israel have uncovered a rare 55,000-year-old fossil skull that they say has a story to tell of a reverberating transition in human evolution, in the time and place when some early humans were moving out of Africa and apparently interbreeding with Neanderthals.

The story is of when the Levant was a corridor for anatomically modern humans who were expanding out of Africa and then across Eurasia, replacing all other forms of early human-related species. Given the scarcity of human fossils from that time, scholars say, these ancestors of present-day non-African populations had remained largely enigmatic.

From the new fossil find, it appears that these people already had physical traits a bit different from other Africans they were leaving behind and many inhabitants along the corridor. In fact, they may have have already looked something like their descendants known later from fossils in Stone Age Europe.

Could this support recent genetic evidence that modern Homo sapiens and their Neanderthal cousins interbred, perhaps in the Middle East and most likely between 65,000 and 47,000 years ago? The discovery team urged caution on the interbreeding issue, but noted anatomical features of the cranium suggesting that some human-Neanderthal mixture had presumably occurred before any encounters with one another in Europe and elsewhere in Asia.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA tests robotic helicopter that would act as Mars scout | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com

NASA tests robotic helicopter that would act as Mars scout | Sharon Gaudin | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The robotic rovers driving across the surface of Mars are limited by what their onboard cameras can see.

If they could see further ahead, they might be able to travel three times as far in a single Martian day, enabling them to better find sites to explore and gather more information, faster, than they can today.

To speed up the rovers’ work, NASA is considering sending a robotic helicopter to Mars that could act as a scout for their explorations.

“So why would we want to put a helicopter on Mars?” asks Mike Meacham, a mechanical engineer with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in a video presentation. “If I'm the rover right now, I can't really see the terrain behind me. But if I had a helicopter with a camera on it, all of a sudden, I can see a whole lot more.”

Dubbed the Mars Helicopter, the robot could be an add-on to future Mars rovers. Weighing 2.2 pounds and measuring 3.6 feet from the tip of one blade to the other, the helicopter would be able to detach from the rover and fly on its own.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Apple education chief sees big data for education | Jonny Evans | ComputerWorld.com

Apple education chief sees big data for education | Jonny Evans | ComputerWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Apple's vice president for education, John Couch, spoke at BETT 2015 about his company's offerings for education last week. And he noted the potential for data analytics in the sector.

"Steve Jobs saw technology as an amplifier for our intellect,” he said, observing that the current generation of university students were three years old when Google began and 13 when the App Store opened for business.

“This is the generation that is now sitting in our classrooms. We need a new learning environment that is going to meet the needs of this generation,” said Couch.

Apple studies have shown learning is most effective when it is engaging, collaborative and challenging – and isn’t so effective when confined to the simple regurgitation of facts.

"It's not so important that we know that Christopher Columbus discovered America in 1492; what's important is what was happening around the time, what impact it had and how did that change society,” he said.

Personalized education is a response to different students having different learning styles and reactions.

That’s more than just making information available. Apple offers a range of content and collaboration tools within iTunes U:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.