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New skills for changing times | chat2lrn

The environment in which Learning Professionals work has changed considerably in recent years. During a tough economic climate, there is continued pressure on budgets. Business agility and improved performance have become increasingly important. There is also recognition that an organisation’s learning strategy should to be aligned to business objectives with the focus moving from the L&D process to business outcomes.

 

Clive Shepherd, a leading learning consultant, believes that corporate learning and development is at a crossroads and whilst there are many challenges there are also lots of opportunities. Shepherd has identified that six areas of change for L&D are around whether or not learning is:

 

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Educational Uses of Second Life: Geometry Applications for Students | Kristi Kosina | YouTube

This is the multimedia video presentation of a collaborative project for the course, Educational Communications, at the University of Texas at Brownsville.

Please visit our website to learn more about our project:

http://edtc6325team1spring15.pbworks....


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New report adds fuel to argument for tougher charter standards to protect students, taxpayers | Brian Washington | NEA.org

New report adds fuel to argument for tougher charter standards to protect students, taxpayers | Brian Washington | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Another report is shining new light on alleged instances of fraud and abuse connected to charter schools.

The report, titled “The Tip of the Iceberg: Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste, Fraud, and Abuse,” was released earlier this week and charges the financial total connected to waste and mismanagement in the charter school sector is as high as $203 million.

The study was released by the Center for Popular Democracy and the Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools and has managed to get the attention of the Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss, who wrote a column about it. Here’s some of what she had to say:


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Will the Kansas Board of Ed vote to de-professionalize teaching? | Katie Kanner | NEA.org

Will the Kansas Board of Ed vote to de-professionalize teaching? | Katie Kanner | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Kansas educators and parents are speaking out against a dangerous proposal being considered by the state board of education that would remove restrictions on hiring untrained, unlicensed individuals as teachers.

The proposal would allow administrators to hire unlicensed individuals for schools that are part of the Coalition of Innovative School Districts. While superintendents insist the required waivers would be used sparingly, there are virtually no limitations on how the waivers could be employed in the proposal currently on the table.

Here are some top concerns the Kansas National Education Association has about the proposal, according to KNEA legislative director Mark Desetti. In the current proposal:


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Young people in the digital sonosphere: media digital, media devices and audio consumption habits | School of communication | University of Navarra

Given the lingering predominance of image over sound in the general media landscape, this article examines the implications of technological convergence related to the listening habit and the basis of 'own sound personality'.


This research, in which 521 Spanish university students participated, has rediscovered gratification by individual access to the sound and reveals the main role that laptop and mobile phones play in an environment of, that in here is called the digital sonosphere, in which radio music prevails over any other audio content.


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Massive stars lit up the early universe | Eric Mack | GizMag.com

Massive stars lit up the early universe | Eric Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After the Big Bang, it took several hundred million years for all the hydrogen and helium and some other gases floating around to start to coalesce into the first stars to light up the universe. New research shows these ancient suns would have clustered together to form extraordinarily bright groupings of stars.

A pair of researchers at the University of Western Ontario calculated that these star groupings may have been as luminous as 100 million suns at certain times, the cosmic equivalent of a truly fantastic searchlight.

These bright periods likely would have occurred during the stars' formation when, as "protostars," they were still pulling in gas and clumps of material, causing intermittent bursts of brightness. According to a simulation setup by the researchers, a cluster of just 16 protostars could generate temporary levels of brightness between 1,000 and 100 million times brighter than our sun.

These early stars burned remarkably bright, but also died young, leaving behind the first heavy elements, including those that have become the building blocks of life as we know it here on Earth, namely carbon and oxygen.


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NuSTAR captures mysterious high-energy X-ray glow from the center of the Milky Way | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

NuSTAR captures mysterious high-energy X-ray glow from the center of the Milky Way | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA astronomers have used the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to spot a glow of high-energy X-rays emanating from the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. The origin of the mysterious glow is unknown, with scientists speculating that it may be caused by dead stars as they draw material from their stellar partners.

The new observations would not have been possible without the NuSTAR array, which is the first orbiting telescope designed to collect light in the high energy X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The glow in question was emitted from a region some 40 light-years across, located around the supermassive black hole at the core of our home galaxy.

The origin of the unexpected haze of high-energy X-rays observed in the region is puzzling astronomers, with numerous explanations being put forward.


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NASA'S MESSENGER mission finishes with a bang | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

NASA'S MESSENGER mission finishes with a bang | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA'S MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has ended its phenomenally successful mission in the most fitting manner imaginable. The probe, which had maintained a lonely vigil over the desolate planet for more than four years, smashed into the surface of Mercury, the planet that had surrendered countless secrets to the robotic explorer this Thursday at 3:26:02 pm EDT.

One would struggle to define the MESSENGER mission as anything less than a resounding success. Over the course of its time in orbit around Mercury, the probe has granted us innumerable insights into the characteristics of the barren planet, including its composition, structure, and the nature of its magnetosphere.

All of this was achieved under the protection of what was at the time of launch a cutting-edge Sunshade, which, for 4,104 orbits, fended away solar radiation that would have otherwise made short work of the delicate equipment stored within the spacecraft.


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Stricken Progress 59 spaceship to burn up in Earth's atmosphere | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

Stricken Progress 59 spaceship to burn up in Earth's atmosphere | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Repeated attempts by Russian mission controllers have failed to rescue the stricken Progress 59 cargo spacecraft. It is now expected that the unmanned resupply ship will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere at some point over the next few weeks, resulting in the complete destruction of both the spacecraft and its cargo.

Things have gone from bad to worse for the Russian-made cargo ship since launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 3:09 a.m. EDT on Tuesday morning, laden with over 6,000 lb (2,722 kg) of fuel, food and supplies for the crew of the International Space Station. Soon after insertion into a preliminary orbit, Russian operators failed to ascertain the health of the vehicle in a routine post-launch procedure.

Furthermore, ground control was unable to ascertain whether or not the antennas ordinarily required to dock with the station had even been deployed. At this point, Progress 59 was taken off of the expedited rendezvous schedule, and given a more leisurely two-day, 34-orbit docking target, which would see it rendezvous with the ISS at 5:03 a.m. EDT Thursday. The hope was that by this time, mission control would have been able to regain control of the spacecraft and troubleshoot the docking antennas.


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Russell Roberts's curator insight, May 2, 11:11 PM

Few things are certain these days, including scheduled resupply missions to the International Space Station.  Russian ground controllers have lost command of the Progress 59 resupply capsule. The spacecraft is expected to break up in the Earth's upper atmosphere, "resulting in the complete destruction of both the spacecraft and its cargo."  ISS crew members have sufficient supplies to last until the next resupply launch in June--this time supplies will be carried aloft by a SpaceX Dragon rocket.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Chattanooga, TN: EPB Offers High Speed Internet to Low Income Families | WDEF.com

Chattanooga, TN: EPB Offers High Speed Internet to Low Income Families | WDEF.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

EPB is working with the city of Chattanooga, TN to finalize its "Netbridge Student Program".

Its for low income families who could receive 100 megabits-per-second high speed internet for a reduced price of $26.99.


The plan was first announced Monday night by Mayor Andy Berke in his state of the city report.


Qualifying families would have to meet certain qualifications.

JOHN PLESS, EPB SPOKESMAN "In order to qualify a family would be..would have to show that they have children in Hamilton county schools within the city of Chattanooga that are currently enrolled in the free or reduced-price meals program."

Pless says discussions are underway with county mayor Jim Coppinger and superintendent Rick Smith to expand that internet offer to students living outside the Chattanooga city limits.


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Try a free curriculum on finances | Michelle Singletary | The Columbian

Try a free curriculum on finances | Michelle Singletary | The Columbian | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I believe that children live what they learn.

If you want your children to be better money managers, model that in your home. They need to see you saving, spending wisely and sparingly using credit. They need to watch as you make good financial decisions.

A recent Bank of America and USA Today survey of millennials confirmed this, with 58 percent saying their parents' advice or their example had an impact on their financial decisions.

When people say we need more financial literacy in schools and colleges, I counter with the need for more parents to be financially literate. Having said that, I also recognize that many children and young adults don't have parents or guardians who set the right example, for whatever reason.

So where should children who aren't taught at home get the information they need to become good money managers?

Sure, there are a number of financial literacy resources available. But much of the material comes from or is sponsored by financial institutions. It doesn't mean the information is wrong, but beware that it might come with an agenda.

Often lender-developed financial literacy programs for children and young adults don't go far enough for me in sounding the alarm about how dangerous a credit card can be. Instead the focus is on "managing" debt.

You manage money. You pay debt.

There isn't enough caution in the curriculum of financial literacy materials. But that's not the case with courses developed by the FoolProof Foundation, an organization created with help from the late CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite, who, I learned, had a passion for financial literacy.

"We have to take financial literacy back from people who make money when we make financial mistakes," said Remar Sutton, volunteer chairperson of the FoolProof Foundation Walter Cronkite Project.

At foolproofme.com, the foundation offers free online financial literacy lessons for students and individuals of all ages. You'll also find useful guides with short videos on various consumer-finance topics such as buying a car or avoiding the latest scams.


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Build a Book Buffet | Julie Ramsay | International Literacy Association

Build a Book Buffet | Julie Ramsay | International Literacy Association | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the end of the school year approaches, there are many things I know I am going to miss. Each Friday, for example, my students and I enjoy free reading and informal book chats. This is a time when students share something they are reading and truly enjoying. It could be a blog post, a comic book, or a traditional book that has sparked their imaginations.


Although I plan for us to spend about half of a class period on this reading and chatting time, rarely do we limit ourselves to that time. Active discussions occur when students begin asking one another questions and making connections with other things they have been reading.

As I reflect back over the year, I notice a shift in my students’ reading patterns. At the beginning, they would usually choose a quick read. As the year progressed, their choices have become complex, more of an investment. An increased number of students are choosing books to share and discuss. They enjoy the ongoing dialogue.


Students search on OverDrive, iBook, or Kindle or go to the school library to find (or put their name on the waiting list for) a book that a peer recommended. I have read so many amazing books this year because of student recommendations. One student said she needed to create a list to get her through the summer with great books!

Although our school hosts a digital forum for book discussion through our learning management system, many of my students spend a large portion of their summer traveling and at camps, away from access to the book forum. That’s why each spring our class has a “book tasting”—an opportunity for students to collect suggestions from their classmates.

My students admitted they have varied tastes depending on what is going on in their lives at the time. That was the perfect portal for introducing the book tasting. Each student created a recipe for a book he or she wanted to share that was also one others may not have heard of.


They looked at recipes to determine what elements needed to be included in this style of writing in addition to what elements of the book should tempt the reader with their scrumptious literary dish. The day before the book tasting, each student brought their recipe and a copy of their book to share. Because I teach multiple classes, I included the books from the students in all of my classes to give them a wider selection.


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Earth's tectonic plates skitter about | Ilima Loomis | Science Magazine

Earth's tectonic plates skitter about | Ilima Loomis | Science Magazine | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Back when dinosaurs were just starting to skulk, Earth had just one giant land mass, a supercontinent that scientists call Pangea. It broke up about 200 million years ago, and since then its fragments—riding on chunks of crust called tectonic plates—have been gliding, merging, and splitting their way into their present—temporary—positions.


Now, geoscientists have unveiled a computer model that maps the details of that tectonic dance in 1-million-year increments—practically a frame-by-frame recap of geologic time. It shows that the plates speed up, slow down, and move around in unexpectedly short bursts of activity. It also suggests that researchers may have to rethink what drives much of that incessant motion.

“It’s a major achievement, and it’s very impressive that they can now do this analysis at this resolution,” says Thorsten Becker, a geodynamicist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who was not involved in the study.

The reconstruction is the work of scientists at the EarthByte program at the University of Sydney in Australia, one of the world’s foremost research groups for plate tectonics and geodynamics, who described it in a paper published online on 12 March in Earth and Planetary Science Letters.


Previous work had mapped out tectonic movement in 20-million-year increments, which were then used to analyze plate velocities. But a closer look using the latest plate reconstructions created by the EarthByte group revealed that a lot more can change in 20 million years than scientists had thought.

“It turns out that plates can change their motion (speed and direction) over geologically short periods of time, about 1 million years,” says the new study’s lead author, Sabin Zahirovic, a tectonics researcher and geodynamicist at the University of Sydney. “Which means that if you have a snapshot over 20 million years, you can easily miss an important regional or global plate reorganization.”


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WA state educator advocates for English Language Learners in ESEA reauthorization | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org

WA state educator advocates for English Language Learners in ESEA reauthorization | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Michael Tamayo is a Seattle elementary school teacher who will begin a round of standardized testing this week for his students.

“We were told that each day of testing will take 2 hours and that the entire assessment will take 20 hours over a two-week period. Our 3rd graders started the test last week and teachers were reporting that it was taking upwards of 3 hours to finish the first day’s tests,” said Tamayo at an event with Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash).

At Tamayo’s school, about 30 percent of the students are English Language Learners, or students whose primary language is not English. These students are not exempt from testing, and teachers were told that if the student couldn’t read at their appropriate grade level and couldn’t answer the questions, the students were just supposed to let the test time itself out and the students would receive a zero.

“Can you imagine a student who is new to this country, working hard in class to learn English and then sitting in front of a computer screen and not knowing what to do? Can you imagine what that does to a student for 2 hours a day over the course of 2 weeks?”

Over reliance on testing and a one-size-fits all approach to assessment introduced by No Child Left Behind—the most recent reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act—has had a major impact on classrooms like Tamayo’s.


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Congress introduces bill to repeal excise tax and protect workers’ health benefits | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org

Congress introduces bill to repeal excise tax and protect workers’ health benefits | Colleen Flaherty | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This week, Congressman Joe Courtney (D-Conn.) introduced legislation to protect health insurance for working families across the country. The Middle Class Health Benefits Tax Repeal Act would repeal an excise tax, originally known as the “Cadillac Tax,” for health care coverage that exceed a certain amounts.

“The excise tax is a poorly designed penalty that will put a dent in the pocketbooks of many families and businesses with health insurance plans that do not resemble the ‘Cadillac’ plans originally targeted when this policy was adopted—instead, the excise tax will punish people living in higher cost areas, with ‘Ford Focus’ level plans,” said Courtney.

The bill would repeal a 40 percent excise tax of employer-sponsored health coverage which will go into effect in 2018. The tax is thought to go after high-end and overly-generous health plans. In reality, the tax would have a disproportionate impact on older workers, women and workers in high-cost regions.

“The excise tax is not a smart reform—it is a flawed, one-size-fits-all penalty that will degrade workers’ benefits, lead employers to choose less comprehensive plans and force families to pay more out-of-pocket health care costs,” said Courtney. “Fortunately, we have the opportunity to eliminate this tax before it goes into effect, and I am proposing this legislation to ensure that America’s working families are protected from an uneven, unnecessary cut to their hard-earned health care benefits.”


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Funding needed for school nurses to keep students physically, mentally healthy | Katie Kanner | NEA.org

Funding needed for school nurses to keep students physically, mentally healthy | Katie Kanner | NEA.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“As cuts have deepened and essential personnel have been reduced, schools are quickly finding that nurses are a significant component in addressing not only the health needs of students, but also in creating an emotionally and physically safe learning environment,” says School Nurse Practitioner Maggie Beall, who serves in Pennsylvania.

Maggie has witnessed firsthand just how detrimental these cuts have been for students and their access to proper medical care. In some cases, multiple schools share one nurse by means of daily rotations. In other cases, schools are not even required to have nurses on staff.

School nurses serve as strong influences in promoting healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining positive health outcomes for all of our students. More importantly, nurses serve as vital assets in the daily routines for many of America’s students.

Some estimates claim that nearly 25 percent of the student population has a chronic health condition (CHC). These conditions can range from physical impairments to emotional and developmental disabilities. Children with CHCs may need insulin for diabetes, an inhaler for asthma, or other routine medications. School nurses are the only qualified experts who can care for and evaluate these conditions. So what happens when they’re not around?

“You hear these horror stories of preventable tragedies. Soon schools are going to be held liable; they need to make the investment not only for students’ well-being, but also for their own protection.”

By supporting school nurses, we can keep our students healthy, as well as encourage their overall academic achievement.

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Skeleton Sound | Rajinder Sodhi | Projection Mapping Central

Skeleton Sound | Rajinder Sodhi | Projection Mapping Central | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you’re looking to surround yourself with projection mapping, look no further than Noisy Skeleton (Skeleton Sound), by David-Alexandre Chanel and Jonathan Richer’s studio Theoriz. They created a fun and immersive installation that gives users the chance to control a projected 360 cave and its accompanying sound. David Guerra was the musician and composer for the piece, putting together an experience that mixes projected light with sound in a way that also reacts to a user’s whole body gesture.

In their own words:

“Skeleton Sound uses the human body as a means of expression to explore the audiovisual landscape. We deliberately opted for a minimalist approach both from a visual standpoint. Our goal is to give the impression to viewers that the sound passes through their fingers. “

“It’s a real dialogue between man and machine, with minimalist aesthetic resonance and vibration that allows you to feel the tiniest disturbances of sound and space, plunging the interpreter in an experiment of both physical and virtual.”

The installation uses a 3D camera, tracking a user’s skeleton (position, joint data, etc.) and uses data like the distance between the user’s hands to change the video and audio. Awesome work!


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NASA teams scientific experts to find life on exoplanets | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com

NASA teams scientific experts to find life on exoplanets | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As the amount of newly discovers planets and systems outside our solar systems grows, NASA is assembling a virtual team of scientific experts to search for signs of life.

The program, Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS) will cull the collective expertise from each of NASA’s science communities including Earth, Planetary, Heliophysicists, Astrophysicists and key universities to better analyze all manner of exoplanets, as well as how the planet stars and neighbor planets interact to support life, the space agency stated.

The need is obvious: Since the launch of NASA’s Kepler space telescope six years ago, more than 1,800 exoplanets have been confirmed. There are thousands more exoplanet candidates waiting for confirmation, the space agency said.

“With our current technologies, we have primarily measured the physical and astronomical properties of exoplanets -- such as their masses or sizes, and their orbital properties,” said Natalie Batalha, NASA’s Kepler mission scientist and co-director of NExSS at NASA in a statement.

Scientists are developing ways to confirm the habitability of these worlds and search for biosignatures, or signs of life, NASA said. And key to this effort is understanding how biology interacts with the atmosphere, geology, oceans, and interior of a planet, and how these interactions are affected by the host star. This “system science” approach will help scientists better understand how to look for life on exoplanets.


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Vloasis's curator insight, May 2, 11:06 PM

Good stuff. A couple thousand new confirmed exoplanets and a whole lotta research to be done.

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Dear Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad: An Open Letter to My Educator Parents | Micaela Nicol | Edutopia.org

Dear Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad: An Open Letter to My Educator Parents | Micaela Nicol | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Dear Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad,

As you know, stereotypically, preachers are viewed as stringent parents who typically shield their children from the outside world. And more often than not, it is to prevent the ideals of society from corrupting their engrained morals and to navigate them towards their desired path of life. Mom, as you reminisced and shared with me your experiences as a young girl with two sets of parents involved in ministry, I couldn’t help but think of myself. Replacing my grandparents with you and dad to better represent my scenario, I came to the realization that both teachers’ and preachers’ kids live a fairly identical life.

As a 16 year-old high school teen, I am gradually developing into adulthood. I have reached the age where I feel compelled to pursue all areas of interest as I dive in to what my reality will soon be as I transition into the college life. Being a teen of two well-established educators, the pressure to portray an exact model of your existence is undoubtedly present.


There is always fear of creating disappointment for failing to be a replica of you, an expectation I feel the need to exceed every day I step foot into the classroom. I am not only a daughter of two educators, but I am a daughter of two African-American educators who attends a majority white-populated high school. This in itself takes pressure to excel to a whole other level, as I feel the obligation to represent myself and my family, socially and academically.

  • Mom and Dad, are you proud of who I am becoming?
  • Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad, how do I successfully balance the pressure of performing academically with my social life, sports, and extracurricular activities?


Your Loving Daughter,

Micaela

As I wait for a response, I would like to provide some tips and suggestions for other kids with educator-parents (Teacher’s Kids) on how to deal with the pressures of performing.


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ESO Astronomers create first 3D image of iconic Pillars of Creation | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

ESO Astronomers create first 3D image of iconic Pillars of Creation | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have used data from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument to compile the first 3D image of the Pillars of Creation, uncovering some key characteristics of the structures in the process. A shot of the magnificent formations composed of interstellar gas was first captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, and remains one of the most iconic images of space exploration to date.

Located in the Eagle nebula, the pillars gained their distinctive appearance when enormous, newly-created O type and B type stars emitted a powerful mixture of ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds that have served to sculpt the surrounding matter. The distinctive pillars that we see today are made from denser pockets of material that are better equipped to resist the violent conditions created by the young stars.


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Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin launches its first rocket | Erik Mack | GizMag.com

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin launches its first rocket | Erik Mack | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Billionaires who made their cash in dot-coms from the 1990s successfully launching commercial rockets is officially a trend, now that Jeff Bezos has followed in the footsteps of Elon Musk with Wednesday's successful test flight of Blue Origin's New Shepard space vehicle.

Bezos' company has been slowly working up to the launch, with tests of its liquid hydrogen BE-3 engine over the past few years, both at the Blue Origin test facility in Van Horn, Texas and at NASA facilities.

According to a blog post by Bezos, the engine successfully powered the unmanned crew capsule at speeds reaching Mach 3 to the planned test altitude of 307,000 feet where separation was successful.

"Any astronauts on board would have had a very nice journey into space and a smooth return," writes Bezos.

However, the test was not a complete success. Much like Musk's Falcon 9, one of Blue Origin's goals is for its rockets to be reusable, and the test module was unable to be recovered due to a loss of pressure in its hydraulic system during descent.


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VA: MBC Deploys Infinera for Terabit Network Upgrade for Education, Research & Development and Big Data Projects | Mid-Atlantic Broadband Communities Corporation

Infinera, provider of Intelligent Transport Networks, and Mid-Atlantic Broadband Communities Corporation (MBC), a successful wholesale open-access transport provider, announced the deployment of the Infinera DTN-X packet optical transport networking platform. The Infinera Intelligent Transport Network, featuring the DTN-X platform, enables MBC to increase network scale to several terabits per second of connectivity across Virginia.

MBC has partnered with the Mid-Atlantic Research Infrastructure Alliance (MARIA) who co-invested in the network upgrade to support their 100 gigabit per second (Gb/s) connections to Internet2 and collaborations with Research and Development institutions. MARIA is a non-profit corporation that brings together Virginia’s major research universities to facilitate access to shared technology infrastructure for research, also known as cyberinfrastructure. MARIA members include the College of William and Mary, George Mason University, James Madison University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University and Virginia Tech. Internet2 is currently the United States’ largest and fastest, globally connected Research and Education network.

The design of Infinera DTN-X platform enables MBC’s core transport network backbone to grow by tenfold, meeting the rapidly advancing needs of high-performance, data intensive research and collaboration for biotech and big data applications now and in the future. This network enhancement positions MBC and the Southern Virginia region as among the best-connected in the country.


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Latest Pointless Moral Panic: Minecraft Is Ruining Our Children | Karl Bode | Techdirt

Latest Pointless Moral Panic: Minecraft Is Ruining Our Children | Karl Bode | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Like many people, video games have been an integral part of my life for about as long as I can remember. From my days visiting Wildcat! BBS systems where I'd play Trade Wars 2000 -- to obsessing over the Apple IIe, IIc and IIgs -- video games were not only an integral part of my childhood, they actually helped forge an adult career path.


Swapping out graphics cards and building new PCs to play Quake 2 led to a job in Manhattan legal IT, which in turn resulted in a life focused on writing about technology. Aside from a few tics, I like to believe I wound up relatively normal, and video games have made my life immeasurably more rewarding.

That background usually forces me into the role of video game evangelist when surrounded by folks that, all too frequently, are engaged in hand wringing over the diabolical moral dangers games purportedly present.


At a party recently, some friends expressed muted shock because a colleague's kid was, instead of being social, playing a game in which he was "herding human beings and keeping them in a barn to eat." I had to explain (skipping the part about how you'd need a mod to actually eat them) how this behavior wasn't indicative of a Jeffrey Dahmer in training, he was simply engaged in normal problem solving behavior on the new frontier:


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Panel: Government should invest in video games to help students learn | Sarah Dinell | Arizona Capitol Times

Panel: Government should invest in video games to help students learn | Sarah Dinell | Arizona Capitol Times | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

A panel of experts was in Washington last week advocating for more fun in schools – more “hard fun.”

That is the term that was being used by industry and government officials who were part of a panel Thursday that talked about how video games and gaming can help students learn.

“We’ve been trying to find a way to put those two together for centuries,” said Greg Toppo, a national education writer for USA Today.

“I think one of the most exciting things is that this movement has that at its forefront,” he said. “It’s always thinking about hard fun.”

Hard fun is a goal that game designers at New York-based Electric Funstuff keep in mind for their projects, said CEO and co-founder David Langendoen. He believes that games are much more than just an activity.

“You’re not just making a game – it’s a much broader, bigger experience,” Langendoen said. “You’re not just designing what’s engaging, or this interaction, you’re designing a whole ecosystem of materials, professional development, lesson plans and ways that the teacher can use this.”

Panelists at the National Press Club event said schools have not always been eager to incorporate games into the curriculum. But that outlook is beginning to change.


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Some Very Good Tutorials to Help Students Develop Online Search Skills | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Some Very Good Tutorials to Help Students Develop Online Search Skills | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The key to unlocking the educational potential of the virtual world is through knowing how to effectively search it with the minimum time and efforts possible. Effective search in this sense refers to the ability to locate targeted information online using ‘informed search queries’. It does take time and practice to develop such an ability but it is worth every single second you spend learning it. Once you learn the skill, you will save so much time that would be have been wasted tracing those search queries that render six figure number of responses.

We have been sharing several tutorials, tips, and graphics on how to help students develop effective search strategies which you can access from this page. Today we are adding another excellent resource from USC Beaufort Library. This is basically a tutorial made up of 20 well crafted lessons all geared towards helping learners build effective web search skills. The lessons are very short and feature only the basic things learners need to get started in the right direction. We have been browsing this collection of lessons and we found them a real treasure trove that teachers should definitely access and share with their students.


Here is a round-up of the lessons covered by USCB Library’s Bare Bones Tutorial:


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No One Trusts Advertising or Media (Except Fox News) | Maureen Morrison | AdAge.com

Hey adland: Consumers don't trust you, they think you are lying to them and they say gratuitous sex cheapens what you're selling. In fact, you rank lower than Congress.

These discomfiting findings are from a new survey from the 4As called "Sex, Lies & News," which outlines Americans' attitudes toward advertising; how much they trust the news media; and their attitudes on sex in advertising. The survey did not specifically ask about agencies, which create the advertising the survey says is not trusted.

Only 4% of Americans think the marketing industry behaves with integrity, and nearly half of consumers surveyed say they don't trust any news source. "Consumers are getting more astute about the news media and advertising," said 4As Chief Marketing Officer Alison Fahey. "But we found that only a small percentage of consumers trust advertisers and the media."

In fact the survey found Americans believe that integrity is at a low and that people are lying to them.

The 4As commissioned research company IpsosOTX in January 2015 to field a random and representative sample of Americans online. It surveyed 1,005 people -- 48% of them males and 52% females; 30% were aged 18-to-34, 35% were aged 35-to-54 and 35% were ages 55 or over. The geographic breakout of the respondents: 18% from the Northeast; 21% from the Midwest; 37% from the South and 23% from the West.

Virtually no one in the survey said the ad industry acts with integrity; it was ranked at the bottom of the list of other industries including financial institutions, the legal profession, the pharmaceutical industry and the newspaper industry. The survey asked respondents how they defined integrity, giving them three options. The most popular definition by far was, "For me, integrity means always keeping promises," selected by 69% of respondents.


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