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New skills for changing times | chat2lrn

The environment in which Learning Professionals work has changed considerably in recent years. During a tough economic climate, there is continued pressure on budgets. Business agility and improved performance have become increasingly important. There is also recognition that an organisation’s learning strategy should to be aligned to business objectives with the focus moving from the L&D process to business outcomes.

 

Clive Shepherd, a leading learning consultant, believes that corporate learning and development is at a crossroads and whilst there are many challenges there are also lots of opportunities. Shepherd has identified that six areas of change for L&D are around whether or not learning is:

 

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Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
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Is Wi-Fi killing us...slowly? | Mark Gibbs Opinion | NetworkWorld.com

Is Wi-Fi killing us...slowly? | Mark Gibbs Opinion | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

What would it take to get you to not use Wi-Fi? I don’t mean simply not connecting to it; I mean not having Wi-Fi switched on. At all. And what about cellphones? I know that the issue of cellphone safety has come and gone and most authorities have dismissed the risks as negligible. But what if the risks to you are trivial, but not to your children? Would you stop using these devices? I ask because an academic paper has recently been published that concludes that electromagnetic radiation generated by humans is far more dangerous to children and babies than we think.


Now, human-generated EMR in the general environment was negligible at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, but by 1933 the problem of electromagnetic interference was becoming significant. In that year, the International Electrotechnical Commission in Paris “recommended the International Special Committee on Radio Interference (CISPR) be set up to deal with the emerging problem of EMI.” (Wikipedia)


Since then, despite much legislation and regulation, the general EMR background has increased significantly in the Western hemisphere and even more dramatically in suburban and urban areas, with radio and television being among the greatest contributors. That said, the general suburban and urban EMR levels are to the order of few tens of µW/m² which has been thought to be a harmless level of exposure.


For example, according to Kenneth R. Foster, Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, wrote:


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3D Printing Through Collaboration and Education | Inside3DP.com

3D Printing Through Collaboration and Education | Inside3DP.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

After 33 wonderful years of science teaching, I now find myself retired and busier than ever. What keeps me so busy you ask?


Last year I started up Creative 3D Printing with a very talented engineer named Jon Monath who I met through a “Meetup” I organized on Long Island, N.Y. We both have a frenzied passion for 3D printing and scanning, as well as an affinity for working with kids, teachers and tech enthusiasts.


Over the last few months we have started selling 3D printers, as well as providing “open the box” set-up, training workshops, and educational demonstrations.  Training workshops include the all- important Professional Development courses for teachers and librarians. There is tremendous interest in developing “Makerspaces” in schools and libraries and we are becoming specialized in this arena.


Some of my favorite memories from my teaching career in Great Neck Schools involved the many different local and global projects that I developed for my students and for my school at large.


Many of these projects grew out of an idea that emerged from my Earth Science curriculum. This desire to build a project that transcended a lesson plan in order to bring about a larger and more dramatic learning experience has been part of me forever. I am part teacher, part showman and part publicist. This same mindset has followed me into my new 3D printing business with fantastic results.


Last year, while surfing the internet looking for interesting projects to offer to our clients, I came across Michiel van der Kley’s Project Egg website. It immediately resonated with me as an amazing opportunity to create a 3D printing global, collaborative, educational project.


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Detroit Public School's School of The Week: Communication and Media Arts High School | MI Chronicle Online

Detroit Public School's School of The Week: Communication and Media Arts High School | MI Chronicle Online | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Derrious Hunter, a 12th grade student at Communication and Media Arts High School,Many of the students from Detroit Public Schools’ Communication & Media Arts (CMA) High School may one day grace the airwaves of your local radio station. The seemingly shy 17-year-old gets a boost of confidence each time he places those black headphones over his ears and turns on the radio equipment inside of CMA’s broadcast studio.


Then again, Hunter may become a your local veterinarian or business owner. It’s a career field that’s always piqued his interest.


“I still have a little time to figure it out,” he said. “But whichever one I choose, I know I’ll be good at it.”


This is the advantage that CMA students have over others in the area — options.


Exposing her roughly 600 students to college preparatory and career track programs — even those outside of the communication and media arts sector —is something Principal Donya Odom said makes CMA stand out from competing high schools.


“We cater to the interests of our students to offer specific programs to ensure they’re ready for college when they walk out of those doors,” Odom said. “This is a college preparatory school. Starting in 9th grade, we work with our students to plan for college and beyond. If you want your child to come to a competitive school that has an outstanding attendance rate, graduation rate and a four-year scholarship opportunity, CMA is your school.”


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Relationship Building Through Culturally Responsive Classroom Management | Todd Finley Blog | Edutopia.com

Relationship Building Through Culturally Responsive Classroom Management | Todd Finley Blog | Edutopia.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

School behavior problems often originate outside of the classroom. For example, asthma is the number one cause of absenteeism. When asthmatics are unable to sleep at night, they miss class or arrive at school so sleep drunk and irritable that disruptive behavior ensues, getting them tossed out of class. Consequently, they fall more behind in classwork, which increases academic struggle. More outbursts and further truancy results.


Poverty and race nitro-accelerate the cycle. Compared to only 1% of white children, 17% of black children suffer from asthma because low-income African-Americans are more likely to live in substandard, allergen-dense housing. Also, they have less access to preventative medicine. And that’s just one cause of classroom misbehavior.


Don’t blame asthmatic students, their parents, or their teachers. Blame a brutal ecosystem that is riddled with the following inequities:


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Sheen Fades as NCLB Waivers Near Three-Year Mark | Alyson Klein | EdWeek.org

Back in 2011, states chafing under the badly outdated No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act leapt at the Obama administration's offer of relief from the mandates at the center of the law—and the chance to forge a new and innovative partnership with the federal government to bolster standards, pinpoint good teachers, and fix low-performing schools.


Three years later, much of the political sheen has come off the resulting NCLB waivers.


The waiver initiative has been marked by policy backtracks, political pushback, and wildly divergent, complicated approaches to school accountability. The system also has generated its own set of bewildering buzzwords: "extension" vs. "renewal," for instance, and even a subcategory of "waiver-waivers."


Waivers "gave states room to breathe," said Andy Smarick, who served as the deputy education commissioner in New Jersey in 2011 when that state applied for the flexibility, and who later urged Congress to let the new waivers take hold before tackling an NCLB renewal.


"But what's left feels extremely messy," he said. "At this point, I couldn't even begin to define what federal K-12 policy is in the age of waivers. It seems incoherent."


The biggest policy pothole experts identify over and over again: The waivers tied together the controversial Common Core State Standards, new aligned assessments, and teacher performance. The Obama administration initially expected states to roll out new tests at the exact moment new educator-evaluation plans incorporating student outcomes were also coming on line.


The combination has led to political strife in states and course corrections by the U.S. Department of Education.


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Techno-Vernacular Creativity: The Thesis Defense | Nettrice Gaskins| Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Techno-Vernacular Creativity: The Thesis Defense | Nettrice Gaskins| Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Yesterday, I successfully defended my dissertation (see slides above) and earned a Ph.D in Digital Media. This is a culmination of four years of research, learning and struggle. With this defense I reached a HUGE milestone in my life and career. I think the best part is the connections I’ve made across disciplines/areas and new opportunities to interact and collaborate with artists, researchers and educators. A graduating Georgia Tech engineering student (Janelle) posted an interview she did with me on her blog, Artistically Engineered.


The overarching theme of my research is mapping, or diagramming as a communication device, art form, and technology platform. From Lukasa personal memory boards, to Afro-traditional quilts and mandalas/cosmograms, cultures from around the world have used mapping to understand or frame their worlds and the Universe.


After the defense, I traveled to Indianapolis for the WeAreCity Summit to talk about urban science fiction and fantasy (see slides above). Along the way I saw exhibits of quilts at two airports, in Philly and Indianapolis, respectively. Tectonic Quilt, by Benjamin Volta and students from Grover Washington Jr. Middle School in Philadelphia is in Terminal C. This project reminded me of Augmented Reality in Open Spaces (AROS), the project we did in Albuquerque, NM for ISEA2012.


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A bad week for Common Core | Stephanie Simon | POLITICO.com

A bad week for Common Core | Stephanie Simon | POLITICO.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

This has not been a great week for the Common Core.


Two new national polls, released Wednesday and Tuesday, found the public souring on the academic standards, which are meant to elevate math, reading and writing instruction across the nation. One of the polls, conducted by the journal Education Next, also found a steep plunge in support for the standards among public school teachers.


There’s no denying that this is bad news for supporters of the Common Core,” said Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and a proponent of the standards.


Common Core backers did get a bit of good news from Louisiana late Tuesday, when a district judge slapped down Gov. Bobby Jindal’s effort to repeal the standards by executive order. But in Ohio, the Legislature took up a bill to join the five other states that have repealed the standards in recent months.


Fearful that they’re losing the public debate, Common Core supporters have vowed to revamp their campaign. They’ll unveil the first step on Friday, when Latino evangelical pastors from across the country will come forward with plans to rally their congregations behind the Common Core.


Even that event, however, is likely to carry reminders of how radioactive the standards have become in some quarters.


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Back To Schools White People Cannot See | Education Opportunity Network

As the season for new school openings rolls out, there are reasons for a new consciousness-raising about those schools – the kind of consciousness-raising that can be brought about when there’s a shock to the system like Ferguson, Missouri.


Of the many heartfelt, well thought-out, and clearly written responses to the ongoing travesty happening in Ferguson, one of the most insightful was “Dear White People: The Race You Can’t See Is Your Own” that appeared on Blue Nation Review.


Written by author and communications consultant Anat Shenker-Osorio, the post delved into the issue of race and perceptions of race – the starting point for understanding not only what caused events in Ferguson but also what conditions the different ways people have responded to those events.


From a scientific perspective, Shenker-Osorio explained, people “formulate judgments by race. Not only does race constrain our ability to recall and differentiate among faces and constrain empathy for physical pain, it structures our desired responses to public policies.”

These are just the facts of the matter – with one notable exception, as Shenker-Osorio noted: “whites don’t see race … when they’re looking at other whites.”


To illustrate this phenomenon, Shenker-Osorio recalled a focus group she had run in which “we showed different groups an all white image and asked them to discuss it. None of the white folks remarked upon the lack of people of color, but for the African American, Latino and Asian-Pacific Island groups, it was the first thing they said.”


Shenker-Osorio also pointed out how the “oxymoronic” term “majority-minority” is another “clear indicator” of how white people continue to perceive themselves as a “majority” even when statistically they no longer are, in many respects.


Public education, in particular, is now one of those “majority-minority” arenas. As numerous recent reports have recently conveyed, this new school year will be the first in which white students are no longer a majority in public schools.


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You can't write a CV on a smartphone – digital literacy is no help to unemployed youth | TheConversation.com

You can't write a CV on a smartphone – digital literacy is no help to unemployed youth | TheConversation.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Concerns have been raised for some time about the UK government’s “digital by default” approach to welfare reforms. More and more public services are being shifted online and many fear that this will marginalise people who are not computer literate.


But our research demonstrates that even the so-called digital generation – young people who seem to spend half their life online – are struggling just as much. They may be incredibly digitally literate in terms of social media, photo sharing and instant messaging; they may be highly discerning about the apps they use, but their digital culture is no help when they try to find a job.


It is becoming clear that more and more people are being affected by welfare reforms. In a survey conducted by Advice Leeds in 2013, for example, 68% of respondents said the reforms had affected their ability to meet living costs or pay bills; 50% said their ability to pay for food was affected, and 44% said fuel costs had been affected.


For our research, we spent time in Leeds with young NEETS – the term used to refer to people who are not in education, employment or training. We were involved in two ethnographic projects with community arts organisations and young people on benefits, and we have been interviewing charities and public sector organisations who help them.


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Seeking teachers to help develop model news-literacy lesson plans | ASNE's Youth Journalism Initiative

Teachers interested in helping develop model news-literacy lesson plans for English, social studies, science, math, health and technology should contact Le Anne Wiseman at lwiseman@asne.org. Teachers selected for the project will be compensated $3,000 each from a grant funded by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.


Interested teachers will be provided with news literacy lesson plans and activities that they can modify and adapt for their academic discipline. The teachers may also create original lesson plans.


What is news and information literacy? Simply put, it is the ability to use critical-thinking skills to judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and information sources. In the information age, more data is produced in a single second than can possibly be consumed in a lifetime, so the need for news and information literacy has never been more important.


Research suggests that students who develop news and information literacy skills become more active and engaged citizens. Many schools across the nation already teach news literacy, and more research on the impact of these efforts is underway.


One way to approach news literacy is with the REALLY technique developed by Al Tompkins of the Poynter Institute. See REALLY? Teaching Students to Ask Critical Questions.


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Lafayette, LA: Superintendent Cooper spills the beans on the SB’s investigation against him | The Advocate

Lafayette, LA: Superintendent Cooper spills the beans on the SB’s investigation against him | The Advocate | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Superintendent Pat Cooper ended the yearlong silence shrouding the cause of the School Board’s investigation into his leadership, disclosing seven management decisions an attorney hired by the board questioned him about earlier Wednesday.


None of the issues was surprising, Cooper told the board Wednesday.


He then listed the items the attorney discussed with him:


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NASA’s green rocket fuel set for major space test | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com

NASA’s green rocket fuel set for major space test | Michael Cooney | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA said today it would launch a spacecraft that would for the first time test fire green propellant technology in space.


NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will use a small satellite using a Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate fuel/oxidizer mix, developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory, is also is known as AF-M315E propellant. This fuel may replace the highly toxic hydrazine and complex bi-propellant systems in-use today, NASA said.


The green propulsion system will fly aboard a Ball Aerospace & Technologies Configurable Platform 100 satellite and is slated for launch on a Space X rocket in 2016.


Developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory the green propellant is less harmful to the environment, increases fuel efficiency, and diminishes operational hazards. The propellant offers nearly 50% higher performance for a given propellant tank volume compared to a conventional hydrazine system and will feature a catalyst technology, pioneered by Aerojet Rocketdyne, NASA stated.


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20 Things Educators Need To Know About Digital Literacy Skills | Innovation Excellence

20 Things Educators Need To Know About Digital Literacy Skills | Innovation Excellence | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Widely understood to be essential to success in the workplace and modern life, digital literacy is beginning to emerge as a necessary component of curricula across the globe. As current undergraduates have never known a life without the internet, it’s only natural that universities should nurture their familiarity with technology, encouraging its use in teaching and learning. Instructors should also be prepared to offer guidance on what students aren’t as familiar with–turning their technical skills into skills for lifelong learning and employability.


But where does one begin? Teaching digital literacy is about more than just integrating technology into lesson plans; it’s about using technology to understand and enhance modern communication, to locate oneself in digital space, to manage knowledge and experience in the Age of Information.


"Digital literacy isn’t about knowing computers inside and out; it’s about using technology to change the way you think. If critical thinking skills haven’t yet become a part of your students’ digital citizenship, it’s time to rethink your teaching strategy."


These are vague descriptions, as are most of the descriptions you’ll find of digital literacy in blog posts and journal articles online. What teachers need, more than a fancy synopsis of how digital publication affects the meaning of a text, is a practical and applicable guide to helping students think productively about the digital world.


Below are the top do’s and don’ts we’ve come across–in research and in our own experience–when it comes to making students digitally literate.


Literacy specialists at Central Michigan University and the Fordham Graduate School of Education published a report in 2013 entitled “No Longer a Luxury: Digital Literacy Can’t Wait” which identified the following practices as harmful to the growth of the movement.


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Digital textbooks adapt to your level as you learn | Ed Tech | New Scientist

Digital textbooks adapt to your level as you learn | Ed Tech | New Scientist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Struggling with chapter 3? Adaptive textbooks will give you extra, personalised help when you need it


Tired of learning from a dusty old textbook? Try a book that learns from you. Students in Houston, Texas, are about to get their hands on the first digital schoolbooks that use artificial intelligence to personalise lessons. The aim, says the books' creator, is to "explode the book" and rethink how students learn from texts.


"We want to be able to create the perfect book for every person," says Richard Baraniuk, director of the OpenStax project at Houston's Rice University, which is behind the books. "Ultimately, we want a system that turns reading the book into an exploration of knowledge."


OpenStax already offers an array of online and printed textbooks on subjects including economics, biology and history. For the past three years, researchers have tracked how students in 12 US schools use the books in their studies, including information on how they scored on questions.


That work is now being used to train machine-learning algorithms that give OpenStax's biology and physics textbooks the ability to adapt to individuals. If a reader seems to be struggling with a particular topic – acceleration, say – the book will slot in additional explanations and practice questions, and increase emphasis on related subjects, such as centripetal force, that could otherwise trip that person up.


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5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | Warren Berger Blog | Edutopia.org

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | Warren Berger Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change.


That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated.


To change that is easier said than done. Working within an answers-based education system, and in a culture where questioning may be seen as a sign of weakness, teachers must go out of their way to create conditions conducive to inquiry. Here are some suggestions (based on input from question-friendly teachers, schools, programs, and organizations) on how to encourage more questioning in the classroom and hopefully, beyond it.


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Real Reporting Is About Revealing Truth; Not Granting 'Equal Weight' To Bogus Arguments | Techdirt.com

Real Reporting Is About Revealing Truth; Not Granting 'Equal Weight' To Bogus Arguments | Techdirt.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Journalism Professor Jay Rosen has long been the leading advocate in condemning the prominence of "he said/she said" journalism in the mainstream media. This kind of journalism is driven by a complete distortion of what it means to be an "objective" journalist. Bad journalists seem to think that if someone is making a claim, you present that claim, then you present an opposing claim, and you're done. They think this is objective because they're not "picking sides." But what if one side is batshit crazy and the other is actually making legitimate claims? Shouldn't the job of true journalists be to ferret out the truth and reveal the crazy arguments as crazy?


Rosen's latest calls out the NY Times for falling into the bogus "he said/she said" trap yet again. This time it's on an article about plagiarism and copyright infringement charges being leveled from one biographer of Ronald Reagan against another. We wrote about this story as well, and we looked at the arguments of both sides, and then noted that author Craig Shirley's arguments made no sense at all, as he was trying to claim ownership of facts (something you can't do).


Furthermore, his claims of plagiarism were undermined by the very fact that he admitted that competing biographer Rick Perlstein's quotes were different. Shirley claimed that "difference" in the quotes showed that Perlstein was trying to cover up the plagiarism, but... that makes no sense.

Of course, when the NY Times reported on this, it did the "he said/she said" thing, providing no enlightenment whatsoever to the public who was reading it about whose argument actually was legit, and whose was ridiculous. Reporter Alexandra Alter played the false equivalence card:


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What Do We Teach When Kids Are Dying? #MichaelBrown | Chris Lehmann | PracticalTheory.org

[After the trial where the man who killed Jordan Davis was not found guilty of his murder, a group of amazing educators and education activists (I was lucky to be one of the folks involved) came together to create a teaching guide for talking about Jordan Davis' killing and the trial that followed. Many of the resources -- and equally as important, the frameworks for thinking about creating curriculum -- are equally applicable for creating conversations and curriculum around talking about Mike Brown. And we need to talk about Mike Brown.]


When I heard that Mike Brown was shot – unarmed, multiple times – by a police officer, my thoughts immediately went to the many stories I have heard over the years from my students of color about their experiences with the police. Their stories are not monolithic, and I have students of color who are the sons and daughters of police officers who often bring a different lens to these conversations, but overwhelmingly, the conversations I have heard have spoken to a deep level of distrust and fear between students of color and the police.


With the acquittal of George Zimmerman in Trayvon Martin’s death, with Michael Dunn not getting convicted of murder in Jordan Davis’ death and now with Mike Brown’s death, many of SLA’s students of color have come to the understandable conclusion that the systems of American justice – from the police to the courts – are not there for them. Clearly, there are too many statistics that support that conclusion.


And the reaction of the authorities in Ferguson, MO since Mike Brown was shot by a police officer despite being unarmed has looked more like a police state than anything I can remember in America in my lifetime. All over the country, students are on social media asking - what kind of country does this to its own citizens?


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Denmark: See an Entire Muddy River Bed Transplanted Inside an Art Museum | Gizmodo.com

Denmark: See an Entire Muddy River Bed Transplanted Inside an Art Museum | Gizmodo.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If you've ever been to the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, you know it's one of the most dramatic museum locations around: Perched on a rocky cliff above Øresund, looking out over the ocean, it's easy to find yourself staring out to sea instead of at the art. Now, Olafur Eliasson has brought the landscape inside the museum.


As part of Eliasson's new show at Louisiana, he's installed a sprawling creekbed inside one of its cavernous gallery spaces—called Riverbed, it is exactly what it sounds like: A warren of water-darkened paths that wind that runs down a slight, muddy slope.


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Schools Find Justice Panels More Effective Than Suspending Students | AlterNet.org

Schools Find Justice Panels More Effective Than Suspending Students | AlterNet.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it
 

On a Monday afternoon, Kemi Karim, a 10th-grader at Lyons Community School in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, was asked to step out of class by a school administrator. Though some students would have registered concern at such a request, Karim wasn’t worried.


“I'm a goody two-shoes,” she said. “I never get in trouble.”


Karim was serving on that day’s “justice panel,” a rotating group of students addressing disciplinary incidents in the school. She headed to an empty classroom where three more students later joined her: 10th-grader Ezequiel Collado and 12th-graders, Rolman Guzman and Shanice Green.


The case before the students involved an eighth-grader who had smeared a roll covered in sauce over a sixth-grader’s face during lunch. The panel’s task was to investigate the incident and recommend a “consequence”—a way for the eighth-grader to make up for her behavior.


The idea of repairing harm is central to restorative justice, a concept that drives justice panels such as the one at Lyons. The goal is for students to accept responsibility for their behavior and make amends by apologizing, resolving differences through dialogue and doing community service. The school holds such panels at least twice a week.


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Obama losing public support on education issues, new poll finds | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com

Obama losing public support on education issues, new poll finds | Valerie Strauss | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Anybody paying attention to the roiling education reform debate won’t be especially surprised by the results of a well-regarded annual poll: Support for President Obama on education issues is waning — with only 27 percent giving him an A or B — and a majority of the public saying they oppose the Common Core State Standards and have more trust in their local school board than in the federal government when it comes to deciding what students should learn.


Obama and his education secretary, Arne Duncan, came into office in 2009 with reform agenda that included using standardized test scores to evaluate educations, promoting common standards across states and increasing the number of charter schools. According to the poll, support for Obama in education has fallen every year since 2011.


The newly released 46th annual PDK-Gallup poll, which for decades has been seen as presenting a solid picture of where public sentiment lies on public education issues, also reveals a growing distrust of the federal government when it comes to education issue.  A majority of Americans cite the biggest problem facing public schools today as lack of financial support.


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Internet Use May Protect Your Brain Against Aging | Yagana Shah | HuffPost.com

Internet Use May Protect Your Brain Against Aging | Yagana Shah | HuffPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Turns out, your smartphone isn't so bad for you after all. In fact, it may help protect your brain against age-related cognitive decline.


Brazilian researchers say results of a new study prove digital literacy could contribute to lowered brain aging and memory loss that comes with age. Researchers from the Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina looked at data from over 6,400 British adults over age 50 as part of the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing and found "digital literacy increases brain and cognitive reserve or leads to the employment of more efficient cognitive networks to delay cognitive decline."


The study, published in the Journals of Gerontology, looked at the link between Internet and email use, and delayed memory recall. Participants were evaluated by testing their memory with a 10-word list. Higher wealth, education, and Internet use were all found to be factors in lower cognitive decline.


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Arts + Prison: Transforming Lives Behind Bars through the Arts | NEA | Arts.gov

Arts + Prison: Transforming Lives Behind Bars through the Arts | NEA | Arts.gov | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it
The California Arts Council received quite the Valentine's Day surprise from one of its fellow state agencies last February. The head of rehabilitation programs for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) called with a proposal: help coordinate an 18-month, $2.5 million Arts-in-Corrections pilot program in California state prisons. CDCR would provide the funding, and the Arts Council would provide the know-how and coordination. Like most Valentine’s Day proposals, CDCR’s was happily accepted.
 
By June the first phase of the program was launched. The Arts Council contracted seven arts organizations with dozens of artists scheduled to provide more than 10,000 hours of arts programming in 14 state prisons in the first year, and even more planned for the following year.
 
The current Arts-in-Corrections pilot isn't exactly new, but rather is a revival of a previously successful program. Arts programs in California prisons started in the late 1970s, and became world-renowned through the 1980s and early 1990s. But due to various budgetary and policy decisions, the program dwindled to next to nothing during the first decade of the 21st century and was officially closed by CDCR in 2010.

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Teaching Is Not a Business | David Kirp Opinion | NYTimes.com

Teaching Is Not a Business | David Kirp Opinion | NYTimes.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

TODAY’S education reformers believe that schools are broken and that business can supply the remedy. Some place their faith in the idea of competition. Others embrace disruptive innovation, mainly through online learning. Both camps share the belief that the solution resides in the impersonal, whether it’s the invisible handof the market or the transformative power of technology.


Neither strategy has lived up to its hype, and with good reason. It’s impossible to improve education by doing an end run around inherently complicated and messy human relationships. All youngsters need to believe that they have a stake in the future, a goal worth striving for, if they’re going to make it in school. They need a champion, someone who believes in them, and that’s where teachers enter the picture. The most effective approaches foster bonds of caring between teachers and their students.


Marketplace mantras dominate policy discussions. High-stakes reading and math tests are treated as the single metric of success, the counterpart to the business bottom line. Teachers whose students do poorly on those tests get pink slips, while those whose students excel receive merit pay, much as businesses pay bonuses to their star performers and fire the laggards. Just as companies shut stores that aren’t meeting their sales quotas, opening new ones in more promising territory, failing schools are closed and so-called turnaround model schools, with new teachers and administrators, take their place.


This approach might sound plausible in a think tank, but in practice it has been a flop. Firing teachers, rather than giving them the coaching they need, undermines morale. In some cases it may well discourage undergraduates from pursuing careers in teaching, and with a looming teacher shortage as baby boomers retire, that’s a recipe for disaster. Merit pay invites rivalries among teachers, when what’s needed is collaboration. Closing schools treats everyone there as guilty of causing low test scores, ignoring the difficult lives of the children in these schools — “no excuses,” say the reformers, as if poverty were an excuse.


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‘Jaws of an earth monster’ among treasures discovered at newly unearthed Mayan cities | RawStory.com

‘Jaws of an earth monster’ among treasures discovered at newly unearthed Mayan cities | RawStory.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Archaeologists have unearthed two ancient Mayan cities hidden for centuries in thick vegetation in the heart of the Yucatan peninsula.


Aerial photographs helped the researchers locate the sites in the southeastern part of Mexico’s Campeche state, near a large Mayan site discovered last year by the same team.


No other site has been found in this 1,800-square-mile area between the Rio Bec and Chenes regions.


One of the newly discovered sites features an extraordinary façade with an entrance that resembles the open jaws of an earth monster, reported Discovery News.


American archaeologists documented the façade and other stone monuments in the 1970s, although their drawings have never been published.


The exact location of the city, known as Lagunita, has remained lost, and previous attempts at locating it had failed.


“The information about Lagunita were vague and totally useless,” said expedition leader Ivan Sprajc, of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. “In the jungle you can be as little as 600 feet from a large site and do not even suspect it might be there; small mounds are all over the place, but they give you no idea about where an urban center might be.”


The façade is one of the best-preserved examples of its type, which was commonly found in late-terminal Classic Rio Bec architecture.


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Benkirane Nabil's comment, August 21, 1:59 PM
nice thank you
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Five ways to keep your student's digital life safe | Christopher Breen | NetworkWorld.com

Five ways to keep your student's digital life safe | Christopher Breen | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

As students return to school, technology goes with them. That technology—and the data generated by it—is valuable not simply as a means for getting school work done, but also as entertainment for those brief hours between one assignment and the next. It’s for this reason that it pays to plan for disaster.


With a single massive power burst, storage media that suddenly heads south, or interaction with a light-fingered ne’er-do-well, the technology your student depends on can vanish.


Take these five tips to heart, however, and the loss of a device or data need not be catastrophic.


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