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UNESCO: Development of the Media and Information Literacy Indicators

A timeline from 2003 to 2013 documenting the Indicators development process and documents generated by it.

 

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Digital Media Creation Learning, Production & Distribution Centers are coming online around the World to fill the Need for Content
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Pixar: the algorithms behind the art | Mark Feeney | The Boston Globe

Pixar: the algorithms behind the art | Mark Feeney | The Boston Globe | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Since every Pixar movie consists of computer-generated animation, every Pixar movie is an act of science. As for the really good Pixar movies, which is to say most of them, they’re miracles of science. So “The Science Behind Pixar,” the exhibition that runs at the Museum of Science through Jan. 10, is a natural.

It’s also a wonder.

One of the first things a visitor sees is a quote from John Lasseter, who in addition to having directed the first two “Toy Story” movies and the two “Cars” movies is chief creative officer of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. “The art challenges the technology,” Lasseter has said, “and the technology inspires the art.” Those words set a tone for the show and neatly summarize it. What that summary leaves out, of course, is just how the challenge and inspiration work. That’s where the rest of the show comes in. You could argue that it’s like one big ad for the studio. But that’s OK, since that’s like saying it’s one big ad for magic.

“The Science Behind Pixar,” which the studio and the museum jointly developed, will tour nationally after its Boston debut. Smartly organized, the show begins with a five-minute introductory video. A pair of Pixar employees offer an overview of how the studio works, taking us into its Emeryville, Calif., operation. Like the show as a whole, the intro is lively, humorous, and informative.

The rest of the exhibition is divided into eight sections or clusters. Each focuses on a key element in the production process of a Pixar film. Examples come from all 15 of the studio’s features, including the latest, “Inside Out,” and at least one Pixar short, “Geri’s Game.”

The elements are modeling, rigging, surfaces, sets and cameras, animation, simulation, lighting, and rendering. Lighting is self-explanatory, as are sets and cameras, and surfaces. Well, sometimes not so self-explanatory. For “A Bug’s Life,” Pixar technicians came up with what they called a “bug cam”: a miniature camera that rolled on Lego wheels so animators could see what the world looked like from an ant’s perspective.


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IN: Planetarium, Astronomical Society plan Pluto celebration | Fort Wayne Biz Weekly

IN: Planetarium, Astronomical Society plan Pluto celebration | Fort Wayne Biz Weekly | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

With the New Horizons spacecraft just days away from its July 14 flyby of the dwarf planet, it’s almost time to celebrate the first close-up images and scientific observations ever taken of Pluto and its system of large and small moons.

To help everyone prepare for that date, the Schouweiler Planetarium at the University of Saint Francis and the Fort Wayne Astronomical Society have scheduled a “Pluto, Up Close and Personal” program for 7:30 p.m. July 8 at the Gunderson Auditorium in USF’s Achatz Hall of Science, 2701 Spring St.

The program is free and those attending will be eligible for door prizes. An announcement described it as “an evening of Pluto lore, explaining why it is a binary dwarf planet, reviewing New Horizons Mission details, recent images from the New Horizons spacecraft and much more.”

All of the planetarium’s shows scheduled in connection with the Three Rivers Festival July 10-18 in downtown Fort Wayne will include a “Pluto-New Horizons Update” during the customary pre-show held in the auditorium while visitors wait for planetarium seating.

To complete the Pluto celebration, all of the society’s two-hour Saturday night public observation periods will be free during July and will include attempts to see the dwarf planet through its 16-inch telescope.


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Why the next Russian space mission is suddenly so critical | Christian Davenport | WashPost.com

Why the next Russian space mission is suddenly so critical | Christian Davenport | WashPost.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The last two attempts to resupply the International Space Station in unmanned rockets have gone kablooey. First the Russian Progress 59 went spinning out of control in April after it hit orbit. Then SpaceX’s Falcon 9 did an imitation of a Fourth of July fireworks celebration on Sunday two minutes into flight. Those failures followed an Orbital ATK explosion last year.

Now, it’s the Russians’ turn.

At 12:55 a.m. Friday, the Russian space agency will try again to fly more than three tons of food, water and supplies to the three astronauts on the station in an incredibly important mission that could end a streak of failures -- or further shake the confidence in space flight and raise more questions about the safety of the astronauts aboard the station.

NASA has said the station has plenty of supplies for now and that the astronauts are in no danger of running out. But if something happens with this mission, there could be serious trouble.

The three failed mission have all been cargo flights with no passengers on board. But later this month, Russia plans to fly three more astronauts to the station -- a mission that officials said would likely be postponed if Friday's resupply mission goes awry.

Another catastrophic failure would raise even more questions about the ability of the Russian and U.S. governments to keep a critical supply line open to the station. Both of the contractors that the U.S. government relies on are now on the sidelines after their failures. Since its explosion last year, Orbital has been unable to fly. SpaceX is investigating what went wrong with its rocket and has already had to postpone at least one flight.

But NASA officials aren't panicking. In addition to Friday’s Progress flight, a Japanese spacecraft is scheduled to make a delivery run in August. And Orbital is expected to fly again later this year.


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Minorities in STEM Are in Short Supply--Why We Need to Fix That | Sophia Shaw | AlterNet

Demand for Stem-trained (science, technology, engineering and math) workers continues to grow. Stem job vacancies take more than twice as longto fill as those in other fields and many businesses have a hard time finding qualified Stem applicants. Yet there is a great potential pool of Stem talent: America’s minorities.

If you are a student from a minority background, you are muchless likely to know someone in a Stem career than other students and more likely to be the first in your family to go to college. If you find yourself interested in a Stem degree and career, chances are you will need to look beyond your immediate family – and even your schools – for guidance. I know I felt this way as a young woman interested in science and math.

Nearly 75% of US scientists and engineers are white. And, despite comprising 26% of the workforce, African Americans and Hispanics represent only 11% of all Stem employees. Addressing this lack of diversity is key if the US wants to be a leader in Stem fields.

Everyone benefits when we produce talented Stem employees and many of the United States’ best opportunities for economic growth come from jobs that require Stem skills. Recognizing this need, the White House launched Educate to Innovate to “provide students at every level with the skills they need to excel in the high-paid, highly-rewarding fields of science, technology, engineering and math.” Faced with the effects of climate change, we will need even more Stem graduates to protect the environment and address the detrimental impact of increased greenhouse gases on the planet.

If you take a closer look at programs outside of school that are successful at generating interest in Stem subjects among students from a variety of backgrounds, one common element - structured, intentional mentoring – becomes clear.

At-risk young adults who have a mentor are more likely to enroll in and graduate from college than those who do not. Programs like Girls Who Code, the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Science Career Continuum and the Sphinx Organization offer formal mentoring structures – whether mentors are paid or volunteers – through which youth are given access to people who are committed to supporting the success of the next generation.


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Parents Fight Conservative Zealots and Charter School Advocates For Control of Their Kids' Education | Jeff Bryant | AlterNet

Parents Fight Conservative Zealots and Charter School Advocates For Control of Their Kids' Education | Jeff Bryant | AlterNet | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

It's Tuesday evening, and people have come to church — but not for religion.

What's bringing people to Green Mountain United Methodist Church in the heart of Lakewood, Colorado, is a meeting modestly titled "Church and society: Stand up for students."

In a cramped, wood-paneled room on the second floor, two dozen attendees rise, one after another, to introduce themselves and say why they are here. "I'm concerned," say a few. "Scary," "outrageous," say others.

A neatly dressed elderly man speaks up: "When you've been given a lot for the education of your own children, it's important that the children after yours get that same level of education, or better. I don't believe we're doing that."

"I have two children in school," a younger woman says. "I hear things that are troubling. So I'm here to learn more."

The last woman to introduce herself, wearing a T-shirt declaring she is a "Jeffco Rebel," starts a stack of handouts circulating around the room. That's when a woman seated at the head of the room says, "We're here to arm you with information."

This is Jefferson County, Colorado.

Sprawling westward from the Denver skyline, where the front range of the Rockies sharpens its ascension to the peaks, Jeffco, as the locals call it, is experiencing an acrimonious debate about its public schools.

At scores of house parties like this one, parents and public school activists circulate flyers and repeat a well-rehearsed message of dissent. They complain of a new school board majority that is secretive, disrespectful to parents and teachers and irresponsible with tax dollars. They warn of the influence of right-wing groups, some with connections to evangelical Christianity. They complain of a powerful charter school industry, different from the "organic charters" Jeffco parents already send their kids to.

Behind every grassroots issue they identify lies a much "bigger thing," as more than one parent will tell you.

It's a complicated narrative that defies stereotypes and neat polarities.


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Giant sinkholes may dot a comet heading toward the sun | Miriam Kramer | Mashable

Giant sinkholes may dot a comet heading toward the sun | Miriam Kramer | Mashable | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Huge pits spotted on a comet millions of miles from Earth may actually be sinkholes, a new study suggests.

The European Space Agency's (ESA) Rosetta spacecraft has been orbiting Comet 67P since last year, and in that time, the probe has spotted about 24 holes on the cosmic body's surface.

Some scientists now think that those pits, which are clumped together on various parts of the comet, may have formed much the same way sinkholes do on Earth: The interior of the comet wears away until its roof collapses in on itself.

Initially, scientists thought that these holes — some of which are as large as two football fields and as deep as the Washington Monument — were formed during explosive "outburst" events, University of Maryland astronomer Dennis Bodewits, a co-author of the sinkhole study , said. The study was published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

During explosive outbursts, ice in the comet heat up, expelling trapped dust and material out into the space around the comet's nucleus.


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Craziest Part Of Apple's Price Fixing Ruling: Publishers Knew They Were Encouraging Piracy, Didn't Care | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Craziest Part Of Apple's Price Fixing Ruling: Publishers Knew They Were Encouraging Piracy, Didn't Care | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

For many years, despite claims from legacy copyright industry extremists who sought to blame everyone else for any piracy issues, we've pointed out that the reality is almost always that piracy is their own fault for failing to provide convenient, reasonably priced alternatives to the public. When they actually do that, piracy rates almost always drop significantly. And now we have even more proof that these legacy industry insiders know this and don't care.

You may remember that, two years ago, Apple was found guilty of price fixing for ebooks, in an effort to break Amazon's hold on the market and to artificially inflate the price of ebooks, creating significant consumer harm. Apple agreed to settle with the government last year, but dependent on how its appeals process went.


Well, the Second Circuit appeals court was... unimpressed with Apple's appeal and has upheld the original ruling. The ruling (and the dissent) are interesting reads, but perhaps most interesting is the tidbit in which the big publishers admit that what they're doing will increase piracy, but they don't care because they so badly want to raise prices from Amazon's established $9.99 per ebook.


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5 Characteristics of an Effective School Team | Elena Aguilar Blog | Edutopia.org

5 Characteristics of an Effective School Team | Elena Aguilar Blog | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

I've been thinking a lot about what makes a good team in a school context. I'll share some of these thoughts, but I really want to hear your ideas on this subject.

I'm going to admit that it's taken me a while to feel convinced by the power of teams. Until recently, I didn't have great experiences in teams. I felt that alone I could produce whatever needed to be created better, and quicker, than working with others. I often felt frustrated working in teams -- the process felt so slow and cumbersome. I felt like I was usually given (or took) the bulk of the work. I didn't really know what an effective team looked like, how one worked together, or what the benefits could be.

In the last few years, however, my experience in a couple different teams shifted these beliefs. Now, I'm compelled to figure out how to create and develop good teams -- and to identify the specific moves that a coach or facilitator makes in this process. I want to figure out how to grow powerful teams that can transform schools.


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Texas Board of Education to be headed by a homeschooler | Laura Clawson | Daily Kos

Texas Board of Education to be headed by a homeschooler | Laura Clawson | Daily Kos | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Texas Board of Education creates "policies and standards for Texas public schools." Gov. Greg Abbott's choice to head this body setting policies and standards for Texas public schools is a woman whose own children never attended those public schools—they were homeschooled and then sent to a private high school. But hey, she's a former aide to the state's Republican lieutenant governor.

The problem here seems obvious.

Even Republican State Board member Thomas Ratliff called the move a mistake.

“Public school isn’t for everybody, but when 94 percent of our students in Texas attend public schools I think it ought to be a baseline requirement that the chair of the State Board of Education have at least some experience in that realm, as a parent, teacher, something,” Ratliff argued.

Bahorich's relevant experience, as listed on her LinkedIn profile, includes "founder/director/board member" of Home Ed Plus, which "provides the opportunity for homeschool families and Christian teachers to come together in support of a high quality academic education for homeschooled students." Naturally she's also a huge supporter of charter schools. Basically any way of getting students out of public schools ... the public schools for which she'll play a major role in setting policy.


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Scientists Discover Another Earth! | Gregg Prescott | The Mind Unleashed

Scientists Discover Another Earth! | Gregg Prescott | The Mind Unleashed | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope recently discovered an Earth-like planet orbiting a nearby star within the habitable zone of our galaxy. Kepler-186f is approximately 500 light-years from Earth in the Cygnus constellation.

The habitable zone, also known as the Goldilocks zone, is the region around a star within which planetary-mass objects with sufficient atmospheric pressure can support liquid water at their surfaces. While it has been estimated that there are at least 40 billion Earth-sized planets orbiting in our Milky Way Galaxy, this particular discovery is labeled the first Earth-sized planet to be found in the habitable zone of another star.


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GA: Mercer technician fashions fossil replicas with 3-D printer | Jeremy Timmerman | Macon.com

GA: Mercer technician fashions fossil replicas with 3-D printer | Jeremy Timmerman | Macon.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Like the throngs of people who’ve gone to see “Jurassic World,” Mercer University’s Jeremy Barker grew up fascinated with prehistoric animals.

The difference is that Barker, a technician in the engineering school’s electronics lab, is getting to take that interest to another level. He’s partnering with Virginia Commonwealth University’s Bernard Means to create fossil replicas with a 3-D printer.

“It makes my inner 8-year-old very, very happy,” Barker said. “Ever since I was 8, I thought it would be really cool to be an archaeologist, and now I’m working with archaeologists to put stuff into a museum.”

Barker said the project is an extension of work he’s been doing on the side for a few years. While his title involves technology and helping students with projects, he has also studied history.

“I’m really into history, and when I started working here at Mercer about three years ago, I saw an opportunity to combine the two fields. So I started scanning artifacts, whatever I could get my hands on.”

Once he got connected with Means, that effort took off. Means was looking for help creating a skeleton from a bootherium bombifrons, a musk ox from the Pleistocene era, and Barker took on the task.

Means had been working on the skeleton, part of an exhibit at the Virginia Museum of Natural History that also involves a saber-tooth cat, since 2011, and Barker found his work on the Internet. The two exchanged emails, and Barker even went to Means’ lab to see his work in person.


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LA: 10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans Schools Continue to Flounder | Jeff Bryant | AlterNet

As the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina approaches, you can count on seeing a lot of glowing stories about the great education progress made in New Orleans since a natural disaster killed nearly 2,000 people, emptied a beloved city, and gave public school reformers what they always wanted: a “clean slate” to have their way unencumbered by the messiness of school boards, local politics, and the voices of teachers and parents.

It really was the “best thing that could have happened,” to use Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s now infamous quote, if you were a fan of creating something that would have little to no consequence for your family.

You’ll also hear many more politicians and pundits touting the NOLA model of education reform for school districts everywhere else.

You should be very suspicious of this marketing campaign.

Advocates for the NOLA model claim it has gotten “results,” but what passes for results is subject to a mad game of interpreting data in a way to make a case rather than to reveal any real truth.


Reform advocates like to say they’ve created a better system, but it is a system that seems void of democracy and deaf to the voices of teachers, parents, and students who have to live with the system.


And to those people who initially backed the plan for NOLA school reform – but who demurred from becoming blatant propagandists for it – there now appears to be a sense of frustration and disappointment with a realization that there’s a long way to go before this product should go to market.


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American History X-ed: How The Confederate Flag Was Divorced From Slavery & Segregation | Daily Kos

American History X-ed: How The Confederate Flag Was Divorced From Slavery & Segregation | Daily Kos | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

From a physical standpoint, Alexander Stephens made a rather ironic spokesman for the superiority of the white race. Standing 5 feet 7 inches in height, Stephens wasn't terribly short or tall by 19th century American standards, but he possessed a frame more suited to a 12 year old boy than a grown man.


Weighing a shade under 100 lbs soaking wet and perpetually in bad health, Stephens looked like a young Southern Benjamin Button. With his well-worn, yet somehow puckish features and his spindly limbs peeking out from underneath his two-sizes-too-big suits, Stephens truly looked like a man who was aging in reverse—a small child living in a shriveled old man's body.


Upon first encountering him, Abraham Lincoln described Stephens as, “a little slim, pale faced, consumptive man,” but went on to say that whatever physical deficiencies he possessed were more than outweighed by his skills as an orator. “[Stephens] has just concluded the very best speech, of an hour's length, I ever heard”, Lincoln wrote in the winter of 1848. “My old, withered, dry eyes are full of tears yet.”


13 years after Lincoln first heard him speak, Stephens took to the stage at the old Athenaeum in Savannah to deliver a speech that would justify the praise lauded on him in easier days by the newly elected President of the United States and to outline in no uncertain terms the causes and conditions that had led the country to the brink of civil war.


It was March 21st when Stephens spoke—the first full day of a spring that both the speaker and the captive audience filling the Athenaeum beyond capacity surely felt was being mirrored in the birth of their new nation, the Confederate States of America.


When Stephens, who had just been elected as the vice president of this new—yet unrecognized—nation, spoke to the people of Georgia that night, he did so in the uneasy limbo that lay between the formation of the Confederacy and the hostilities at Fort Sumter that would signal the start of the Civil War.


Just 10 days earlier Stephens and other members of the Confederate brain trust had put the final touches on the country's constitution and the newly elected vice president took it upon himself to explain to his people the raison d'etre of the Confederacy. What followed was the now infamous 'Cornerstone Speech'.


The Cornerstone Speech got its name from a line in Stephens's oratory that left no doubt as to why the states of the lower South had seceded. After describing slavery as, “the immediate cause of [this] late rupture and present revolution”, and going on a long diatribe about why Thomas Jefferson and the Founding Fathers were fundamentally wrong in their presumption that the enslavement of African Americans was a moral and political evil that would eventually fade away,


Stephens told the assembled crowd that, “Our new Government is founded upon exactly the opposite ideas; its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.”

There is no ambiguity in such a statement. Just as there is no ambiguity when Mississippi's Declaration of Secession states that, “Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery– the greatest material interest of the world” or when Jefferson Davis, in his farewell speech to Congress, proclaims that his home state is leaving the Union because “the theory that all men are created free and equal [has] made the basis of an attack upon her social institutions.”


Any man or woman who endeavors to argue that anything other than slavery was the primary cause of the Civil War is simply engaging in that magical thinking promulgated after the fact by groups like the United Daughters of the Confederacy in order to create a narrative that not only lionizes the actions of the Confederate soldier, but serves as a tool to promote the aims of white supremacy.

Today, in the wake of what appears to be a tipping point in the public acceptance of Confederate iconography after the brutal murder of 9 black parishioners of Mother Emanuel AME church in Charleston by a self-avowed white supremacist, there are many who are trying to keep alive the fallacious notion that the Stars and Bars is about anything but the representation of a failed state created out of the desire to maintain the peculiar institution of slavery.


Such a strange notion is based on the idea that the Confederate flag represents some sort of nebulous Southern heritage or inheritance that is miraculously divorced from the ubiquity of slavery in antebellum Southern life. However, even if we grant these modern day Southern patriots the premise that the Confederate flag has nothing to do with mass enslavement of black life that was the impetus for its creation, the argument that the Confederate flag is free from the stain of racism falls apart under the weight of history.


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‘What, to the American Slave, Is Your 4th of July?’ | Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan | Truthdig.com

‘What, to the American Slave, Is Your 4th of July?’ | Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan | Truthdig.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July?” asked Frederick Douglass of the crowd gathered at Corinthian Hall in Rochester, N.Y., on July 5, 1852. “I answer,” he continued, “a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which lie is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham.”

Douglass escaped slavery in 1838 and became one of the most powerful and eloquent orators of the abolitionist movement. His Independence Day talk was organized by the Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Sewing Society. Douglass extolled the virtues of the Founding Fathers, those who signed the Declaration of Independence. Then he brought the focus to the present, to 1852. He said:

“I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak today?”

Of course, the Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Sewing Society had no intention of mocking him. Proceeds from their events were devoted primarily to supporting Douglass’ newspaper. They championed Douglass, and saw the need to take action, whatever action they could muster. The United States was, at the time of the speech, less than a decade away from a brutal civil war. The war would formally start with the Confederate bombardment of Fort Sumter, just off the coast of Charleston, S.C.

Independence Day is a fitting time to reflect on the role that grass-roots organizing for social change has played in building this nation. The horrific massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Charleston, S.C., also compels us to question just how far we have progressed toward the ideals enshrined in that document signed on July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence.


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Technological Soundings & Portals to the Future | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Technological Soundings & Portals to the Future | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Portals are a doorways, gates, or other entrances, we pass through from one space to another. In the physical realm we pass through a portal by stepping over a threshold. Portals are also metaphysical, representing different states of being and how these states relate to each other. They can help us navigate space, explore cultural practices and belief systems. For example, the cosmogram/mandala is a type of portal that moves people from one phase of a life cycle to another.


Time portals are doorways in time, employed in various genres such as science fiction and fantasy, to transport people to the past or future. Time portals can be represented as vortices of energy that allow matter to travel from one point in time to another by passing through the portal. So my questions are: What if sound could also be a portal to different realities and experiences? What if it told a story?


If no slave ship survived to become a site for memory, Liverpool did generate one image in which its slave ships were to be remembered through the centuries and across continents. The famous Description represented in cross-section, front-view and side view, and in a series of overviews of both slave decks, the manner in which slaves could legally be packed into the Liverpool slaver Brookes. – Marcus Wood, Blind Memory. Visual Representations of Slavery in England and America 1780-1865


Dancer and friend Brigette Dunn-Korpela’s ECHO is an “interdisciplinary multidimensional dance performance that examines issues of race, identity and the value of black life.” The set features video projection mapping with Isadora – an interactive media presentation tool – on the floor and on screens in the shape of abstracted sails. Dunn-Korpela writes that, due to Middle Passage of the Trans-Atantic Slave Trade, the displacement of bodies shifts from the “visibility of the African Diaspora” to a singular narrative that


Only displays the western perspective of the African American or Black experience… dismissing the influence of the multiplicity within the layers of languages, heritage, and geographical regions that holds the bodies of African Diaspora communities. – Brigette Dunn-Korpela


The technical director projects the famous drawing of the Brookes slave ship on the floor, which Woods describes as a mathematical visualization. In another scene, a dancer seems to emerge from a white square portal mapped on center of the stage.


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Signs of Water Ice Detected on Comet Surface | Elizabeth Howell | Scientific American

Signs of Water Ice Detected on Comet Surface | Elizabeth Howell | Scientific American | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Patches of water ice appear to be speckled across the surface of a comet, according to a new study using observations from a European space probe.

The Rosetta spacecraft, currently orbiting Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, spotted 120 bright, reflective spots on the surface of the comet that were at least a few meters (about 6 feet) in size. While their composition is still being examined, the spots tend to appear in areas that are shaded by the sun, scientists noted. The researchers also note that there have been no significant changes to the spots after a month of observations.

"Water ice is the most plausible explanation for the occurrence and properties of these features," said Antoine Pommerol, a physicist at the University of Bern, in a statement. [Photos: Europe's Rosetta Comet Mission in Pictures]

"At the time of our observations, the comet was far enough from the sun such that the rate at which water ice would sublimate would have been less than 1 mm per hour of incident solar energy," said Pommerol, who is lead author on a study analyzing the bright spots. "By contrast, if carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide ice had been exposed, it would have rapidly sublimated when illuminated by the same amount of sunlight. Thus, we would not expect to see that type of ice stable on the surface at this time."

The spots are up to 10 times brighter than the average surface brightness of the comet, as measured by Rosetta. Sometimes they appear together, particularly when they are at the bottom of cliffs. The research team speculates this is because the cliff wall recently eroded or collapsed, revealing material below the dusty surface.


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Pacific Ocean Ring of Fire | Education | National Geographic

Pacific Ocean Ring of Fire | Education | National Geographic | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean. Roughly 90% of all earthquakes occur along the Ring of Fire, and the ring is dotted with 75% of all active volcanoes on Earth.

The Ring of Fire isn’t quite a circular ring. It is shaped more like a 40,000-kilometer (25,000-mile) horseshoe. A string of 452 volcanoes stretches from the southern tip of South America, up along the coast of North America, across the Bering Strait, down through Japan, and into New Zealand. Several active and dormant volcanoes in Antarctica, however, “close” the ring.

Plate Boundaries


The Ring of Fire is the result of plate tectonics. Tectonic plates are huge slabs of the Earth’s crust, which fit together like pieces of a puzzle. The plates are not fixed but are constantly moving atop a layer of solid and molten rock called the mantle. Sometimes these plates collide, move apart, or slide next to each other. Most tectonic activity in the Ring of Fire occurs in these geologically active zones.


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NASA to test Mars flying wing drone | David Szondy | GizMag.com

NASA to test Mars flying wing drone | David Szondy | GizMag.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

If a NASA experimental program pans out, the first aircraft on Mars could be a flying wing. Under development at NASA Armstrong, the Prandtl–m is a flying wing glider designed to fly piggyback with a future Mars rover mission to provide low-altitude reconnaissance. It's scheduled to begin test flights later this year.

Up to now, Mars missions have operated at two altitudes: orbital and on the ground. NASA hopes to fill that gap with the Preliminary Research Aerodynamic Design to Land on Mars (Prandtl–m) prototype flying wing glider, that would lead to a version that would deploy prior to landing to provide images and telemetry for very low altitudes.

Based on the earlier Prandtl-d, the Prandtl-m flying wing glider is being developed under NASA Armstrong's Flight Opportunities Program. The Prandtl-m is of a very simple design, capable of self-correcting its attitude during descent. Made of composite material, it has a 24-in (61-cm) wingspan and weighs up to 2.6 lb (1.8 kg) on Earth. It's designed to fold up and deploy from a 3U CubeSat in the aeroshell of a future Mars rover. The acronym 3U refers to the number of CubeSat units that would make up the drop vehicle. A CubeSat is miniature satellite about 4 in (10 cm) on a side.


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New Teachers: A Primer on Assessment | Edutopia.org

New Teachers: A Primer on Assessment | Edutopia.org | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In order to effectively plan instruction, it’s important to determine students’ current level of knowledge and state of academic, social, and emotional skills. There are a variety of ways for teachers and students to arrive at this understanding and gauge student progress through assessment.

View the video "Five Keys to Comprehensive Assessment" for a helpful overview of the various types and purposes of assessment. Then explore the resources below for tips and strategies to help you plan and craft assessments to guide teaching and learning in your classroom.


After you have seen the video, make sure to read "The 5 Keys to Successful Comprehensive Assessment in Action" for a better understanding of what these elements look like in practice.


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Apple loses e-book antitrust appeal | Blair Hanley Frank | NetworkWorld.com

Apple loses e-book antitrust appeal | Blair Hanley Frank | NetworkWorld.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

An appeals court ruled against Apple’s challenge of a lower court’s decision which found the company liable for illegally conspiring with ebook publishers to jack up prices.

A 3-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit voted 2 to 1 against Apple. Writing for the majority, Judge Debra Ann Livingston said that Apple illegally orchestrated a conspiracy between book publishers, upholding a district court ruling from 2013. The lawsuit was filed by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Additionally, she said that the injunction imposed by District Court Judge Denise Cote was appropriate and left it in place. It’s the latest strike against Apple in this long-running case, which stems from agreements the company set up with publishers around the launch of its online ebook marketplace.

At the time, Amazon held a dominant position in this market, and often sold ebooks for $9.99, even when it was buying them wholesale from publishers for more than that. Publishers were unhappy about that, and Apple offered them an alternative with the iBookstore. Publishers were able to set their own prices and Apple would give them a percentage of sales under an agency pricing model.

As part of that agreement, the publishers also agreed to abide by a “most-favored nation” clause that required prices on Apple’s ebook store be equal to the lowest price available elsewhere. In other words, if Amazon was selling a book for $9.99, Apple would be able to do the same. That encouraged publishers to move all of their contracts with ebook sellers like Amazon to an agency model, which the court said led to increased prices.

Judge Dennis Jacobs dissented from the majority, arguing that Apple needed to work with publishers to raise prices in order to compete with Amazon, and that holding it responsible for the publishers’ collusion was inappropriate.

“A further and pervasive error (by the district court and by my colleagues on this appeal) is the implicit assumption that competition should be genteel, lawyer-designed, and fair under sporting rules, and that antitrust law is offended by gloves-off competition,” he wrote.

Livingston had little patience for Jacobs’ reasoning in her opinion, criticizing his justifications as being unsupported by Apple’s own arguments and being disconnected from antitrust law. In her view, his opinion “endorses a concept of marketplace vigilantism that is wholly foreign to the antitrust laws.”


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Augmented Reality Redux: From Bearden to Manovich | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist

Augmented Reality Redux: From Bearden to Manovich | Nettrice Gaskins | Musings of a Renegade Futurist | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

The function of the artist is to organize the facets of life according to his imagination. – Romare Bearden

Although historically built environments were almost always covered with ornament, texts, and images, the phenomenon of the dynamic multimedia information in these environments is new. – Lev Manovich

I’ve always been interested in collage. My Light, Color & Design professor said my undergraduate artwork reminded her of Romare Bearden (and Edward Hopper). There is something more textural and textual about the process of creating collages. The artist chops up, rearranges, mixes and layers images from disparate sources to create one composition. There is also a narrative, ex. Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey, the artist’s 1977 series of 20 collages based on episodes from Homer’s epic tale The Odyssey.


For the past five years, I’ve explored and experimented with augmented reality (AR), which the overlaying of digital information on the physical world. In 2011, I made the transition from Second Life (SL) to mobile AR using cultural heritage artifacts. In 2012, I worked with Georgia Tech and the city of Albuquerque on a mobile AR enhanced mural. Around that time I was also toying with the idea of augmented acoustics (see Inception the App).


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Captive virgins, polygamy and sex slaves: What marriage would look like if we actually followed the Bible | Valerie Tarico | RawStory.com

Captive virgins, polygamy and sex slaves: What marriage would look like if we actually followed the Bible | Valerie Tarico | RawStory.com | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

Bible believers are beside themselves about the prospect that marriage norms and laws are changing, but let me tell you a secret about Bible believers that I know because I was one. Most don’t actually read their Bibles.

If they did, they would know that the biblical model of sex and marriage has little to do with the one they so loudly defend. Sex in the Bible includes rape, incest, master-slave sexual relations, captive virgins, and more. Of course, just because a story is told in the Bible doesn’t mean it is intended as a model for moral behavior. Does God forbid or command the behavior? Is it punished or rewarded? In the New Testament stories, does Jesus change the rules or leave them alone? By these criteria, the Bible not only describes many forms of sexual relationships (including sexually coercive relationships), it gives them the divine thumbs up.

Not One Man, One Woman

The God of the Bible explicitly endorses polygamy and sexual slavery and coerced marriage of young virgins along with monogamy. In fact, he endorses all three to the point of providing detailed regulations. Based on stories of sex and marriage that God rewards and appears to approve one might add incest to the mix of sexual contact that receives divine sanction.

New Testament Endorses Old Testament

Nowhere does the Bible say, “Don’t have sex with someone who doesn’t want to have sex with you.” Consent, in the Bible, is not a thing. Furthermore, none of the norms that are endorsed and regulated in the Old Testament law – polygamy, sexual slavery, coerced marriage of young girls—are revised, reversed, or condemned by Jesus. In fact, the writer of Matthew puts these words in the mouth of Jesus:


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Gamification in K-12 Education: Brain Growth, Tenacity, & Rising to the Challenge | Jessica Oaks | Emerging Education Technologies

Gamification in K-12 Education: Brain Growth, Tenacity, & Rising to the Challenge | Jessica Oaks | Emerging Education Technologies | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

“I could not believe how tenacious students were. They would try and try again …”

There’s still some debate about the effectiveness of game-based learning but there is now plenty of proof demonstrating the power of play. The global market for mobile games continues to grow – Newzoo predicts the mobile segment of the overall video game industry will generate $30.3b worldwide in 2015 – as does the market for educational games, which may reach nearly $3b by 2017. But more importantly, research suggests that when students treat learning like a game, they learn faster and retain more.

Teachers in K-12 classrooms have long used play with a purpose to engage students and appear to be adopting mobile gaming as one more classroom tool. The study Empowering Educators: Supporting Student Progress in the Classroom with Digital Games found that 57% of teachers use digital games weekly or more frequently in their curriculums and 18% use them every day.


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How computer science education has changed | Josh Fruhlinger | NetworkWorld

How computer science education has changed | Josh Fruhlinger | NetworkWorld | Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks | Scoop.it

In 1950, fifty-one people attended the Summer School on Programme Design for Automatic Digital Computing Machines at Cambridge University. Over the previous decade, engineering and mathematical researchers had developed the first stored-program computers, and figured out how to operate them as they went; the students who came to Cambridge that summer were the first to sign up to specifically learn the art on Cambridge's EDSAC computer.

The students that attended were a varied lot, with a varying goals -- one was actually a salesman for Ferranti, the company that was going to release the first commercial computer the next year, and he spent more time chatting up potential customers than learning how to program. The physical experience of programming was radically different from how we'd understand it today, as this remarkable film illustrates. Still, they are the predecessors of every young person on summer vacation today who's waiting for college -- and their education in computer science -- to start.

With tech changing so quickly, many aspects of these young people's education will be different from those on a similar track just a decade or so ago -- different, in other words, from those who will be their peers and co-workers once they reach the job market. If you're a long-time IT professional, some of what you did in school will look as outdated to these new students as those keypunch EDSAC programming techniques look to you. It's instructive to see what has -- and hasn't -- changed over the decades.


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I used to lead tours at a plantation. You won’t believe the questions I got about slavery. | Margaret Biser | Vox.com

Up until a few weeks ago, I worked at a historic site in the South that included an old house and a nearby plantation. My job was to lead tours and tell guests about the people who made plantations possible: the slaves.

The site I worked at most frequently had more than 100 enslaved workers associated with it— 27 people serving the household alone, outnumbering the home's three white residents by a factor of nine. Yet many guests who visited the house and took the tour reacted with hostility to hearing a presentation that focused more on the slaves than on the owners.

The first time it happened, I had just finished a tour of the home. People were filing out of their seats, and one man stayed behind to talk to me. He said, "Listen, I just wanted to say that dragging all this slavery stuff up again is bringing down America."

I started to protest, but he interrupted me. "You didn't know. You're young. But America is the greatest country in the world, and these people out there, they'd do anything to make America less great." He was loud and confusing, and I was 22 years old and he seemed like a million feet tall.

Lots of folks who visit historic sites and plantations don't expect to hear too much about slavery while they're there. Their surprise isn't unjustified: Relatively speaking, the move toward inclusive history in museums is fairly recent, and still underway. And as the recent debates over the Confederate flag have shown, as a country we're still working through our response to the horrors of slavery, even a century and a half after the end of the Civil War.

The majority of interactions I had with museum guests were positive, and most visitors I encountered weren't as outwardly angry as that man who confronted me early on. (Though some were. One favorite: a 60-ish guy in a black tank top who, annoyed both at having to wait for a tour and at the fact that the next tour focused on slaves, came back at me with, "Yeah, well, Egyptians enslaved the Israelites, so I guess what goes around comes around!")

Still, I'd often meet visitors who had earnest but deep misunderstandings about the nature of American slavery. These folks were usually, but not always, a little older, and almost invariably white. I was often asked if the slaves there got paid, or (less often) whether they had signed up to work there. You could tell from the questions — and, not less importantly, from the body language — that the people asking were genuinely ignorant of this part of the country's history.


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