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13 Van Gogh’s Paintings Painstakingly Brought to Life with 3D Animation & Visual Mapping

Earlier this month, we told you how you can download hundreds of Van Gogh paintings in high resolution, courtesy of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Now, the question is, what will you do with those images? You're a little tech savvy?
Hans Wernke's insight:

3D Animation and Visual Mapping at its best.

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Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health

Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
We selected the Top 10 companies doing super innovative research and offering revolutionary services in digital health.

Via Philippe Loizon, Celine Sportisse
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Patriots poised to enhance practice with virtual reality technology - The Boston Globe

Patriots poised to enhance practice with virtual reality technology - The Boston Globe | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
STRIVR Labs’ new system is designed to improve the play of quarterbacks — and every other position on the field.
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How Pixar Came Up With A Whole New Way Of Showing A Child's Mind

How Pixar Came Up With A Whole New Way Of Showing A Child's Mind | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 17, 2015 5:35 AM



Lauren Davis:  "Even for Pixar, Inside Out is an ambitious film. After all, it’s largely set inside the mind of an 11-year-old girl, and tries to metaphorically explain all of the wonderful, frustrating, and confusing things that go on inside the human head while exploring a sort of emotional truth. So how on Earth did it all come together?"

jose antonio gabelas's curator insight, June 17, 2015 7:59 AM

añada su visión ...

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Novartis's 'robotic pill'

Novartis's 'robotic pill' | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Novartis is collaborating with Rani Therapeutics, a US start-up in an endeavour to produce a so-called ‘robotic pill’ enabling a convenient administration of complex biotech drugs that are otherwise, normally given by injection.

 

Rani’s capsule looks very much like a conventional pill, and is swallowed in the same way. However, the underlying mechanism of action differs in that the pill contains tiny needles made of sugar that are pushed into the wall of the intestine to deliver the drug.


Via Andrew Spong
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Pacific Cove's curator insight, May 28, 2015 12:19 PM

Rani’s capsule looks very much like a conventional pill, and is swallowed in the same way. However, the underlying mechanism of action differs in that the pill contains tiny needles made of sugar that are pushed into the wall of the intestine to deliver the drug.  #Seniors #SeniorCare #Drugs #Caregivers #Caregiving

Jerome Leleu's curator insight, May 30, 2015 2:46 AM

ajouter votre perspicacité ...

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How Patients Use Digital Healthcare [Infographic]

How Patients Use Digital Healthcare [Infographic] | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

If you’re a healthcare provider, it’s important to pay attention to how people are using online resources to research and choose their caregivers. It may surprise you to know what a big role social media plays in their decision-making.

What U.S. adults consider when searching for healthcare online:

WebsitesSocial MediaHealth infoDoctor and Hospital recommendationsReviews and Ratings

Digital Healthcare Check-Up from National Research Corporation:


Via Plus91, Celine Sportisse
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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, April 29, 2015 2:24 PM

I was expecting higher ratios although already 34% asked for medical advice. Shoudl increase with services like Boddy, health advisor

Ginny Dillon's curator insight, June 5, 2015 2:12 AM

Patients also seek out each other and engage in online discussions and relationships around healthcar3 issues and chronic/acute and rare medical conditions.

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Brands Struggle In Social Media, Data Shows Sobering Stats

Brands Struggle In Social Media, Data Shows Sobering Stats | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Take a quick tour around the web and you’ll find no shortage of social media junkies and innovation addicts listing the myriad of things financial institutions could do in social channels. While they pound the drum of “potential and possibilities,” financial marketers are seldom (if ever) offered any hardcore stats on actual rates of engagement.

Via The Learning Factor, Kimberley Tuapawa, Ivo Nový
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Google pulls plug on Glass, but the idea lives on | ZDNet

Google pulls plug on Glass, but the idea lives on | ZDNet | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Google is ending sales of Glass, but insists it is still committed to launching smartglasses as a consumer product.
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Ebola Watch: 3-D video game developed for safer training

Ebola Watch: 3-D video game developed for safer training | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
No, this game is not for fun. This 3-D training video game, created by Shift Labs, a Seattle-based startup, could make the preparation process for many healthcare workers in West Africa much safer and more effective, in terms of identifying the dos and don’ts of treating patients.

Via Philippe Marchal, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Find Out What Doctors Are Going To Do To You With These Video-Game-Inspired Graphics

Find Out What Doctors Are Going To Do To You With These Video-Game-Inspired Graphics | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Patients facing scary procedures can finally have a clue what their doctor is saying.

Via Celine Sportisse, eMedToday
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Santé Digitale 's curator insight, November 3, 2014 3:49 AM

"Say you or a loved one are about to have a complex surgery. The doctor might draw you a sketch or direct you to an online diagram explaining what's going to happen. But these can be hard for non-medical professionals to understand, especially during times when it's hard to concentrate on anything (i.e. right before a surgery). A 3-D animation created using video game techniques, however, could be easier to grasp."

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3D-printed heart saves baby's life - CNET

3D-printed heart saves baby's life - CNET | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Doctors have saved the life of a newborn baby with the aid of a 3D printed model that helped them plan his heart surgery.
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How an interactive book, 'Alice,' is making $70K a week on iOS

How an interactive book, 'Alice,' is making $70K a week on iOS | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:33 PM


Tom Cheredar:  "With the growing number of digital distractions vying for the attention of your kids, reading books might seem far less appealing. Interactive books can bridge the gap, and some of them are having real success."

marc augier's comment, October 9, 2014 4:21 PM
For me this looks more like multimedia than transmedia. Still waiting for Alice in Wonderland with Google Glasses where I play Alice (or Alex...)
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As Doctors Lose Clout, Drug Firms Redirect the Sales Call - Wall Street Journal

As Doctors Lose Clout, Drug Firms Redirect the Sales Call - Wall Street Journal | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

“Wall Street JournalAs Doctors Lose Clout, Drug Firms Redirect the Sales CallWall Street JournalOne such market is San Diego.”


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The digital revolution: eight technologies that will change health and care

The digital revolution: eight technologies that will change health and care | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

The past decade has seen rapid development and adoption of technologies that change the way we live. But which technologies will have a similarly transformative impact on health and care?

The King’s Fund has looked at some examples of innovative technology-enabled care that are already being deployed in the NHS and internationally to transform care. Now, we examine the technologies most likely to change health and care over the next few years.


Via eMedToday, Olivier Delannoy
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Your Patient Engagement Team's curator insight, January 5, 11:44 AM

A good look at the crossroads of digital technology and healthcare applications that we will see in the coming years. 

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Inside the insane and beautiful 'Instagram for doctors,' where surgeons post photos of freak cases and help each other save lives

Inside the insane and beautiful 'Instagram for doctors,' where surgeons post photos of freak cases and help each other save lives | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Figure 1 is a photosharing app that actually saves lives.

Via Philippe Loizon, eMedToday
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Future Doctors Could Be Taught With Holograms - YouTube

A medical school is partnering with Microsoft to bring their augmented-reality headsets to the classroom.

Via Art Jones, eMedToday
Hans Wernke's insight:

Great use of HoloLens!

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Art Jones's curator insight, July 11, 2015 9:45 AM

Microsoft 

#Innovation

#TheFutureofHealthcare

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Google Intensifies Focus on Its Cardboard Virtual Reality Device

Google Intensifies Focus on Its Cardboard Virtual Reality Device | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
The search giant is introducing several initiatives to highlight its inexpensive virtual reality viewer, including a partnership with GoPro and plans to post VR videos on YouTube.
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Microsoft shows off HoloLens' 5 most fundamental features - CNET

Microsoft shows off HoloLens' 5 most fundamental features - CNET | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
The software maker sheds light on the developing process for the ambitious holographic headset at its annual Build developer conference -- by making us develop an app in real-time.
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Oschner Health Pilots Apple Watch to Manage Chronic Diseases

Oschner Health Pilots Apple Watch to Manage Chronic Diseases | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Ochsner Health System has announced it is now the first hospital in the nation to use the Apple Watch for managing patients suffering from chronic diseases.

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Our Exclusive Hands-On With Microsoft's Unbelievable New Holographic Goggles | WIRED

Our Exclusive Hands-On With Microsoft's Unbelievable New Holographic Goggles | WIRED | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
The prototype is amazing. It amplifies the special powers that Kinect introduced, using a small fraction of the energy. Project HoloLens’ key achievement—realistic holograms—works by tricking your brain into seeing light as matter.
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Microsoft appears to be working on something pretty cool. 

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10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine

10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it


More More: Health Medicine Innovation Future
10 Ideas That Are About To Revolutionize Medicine

    Erin Brodwin

    Nov. 5, 2014, 6:00 AM
    1,070
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elizabeth holmes theranosCourtesy Theranos

The future of medicine has arrived.

No, we're not talking about robot surgeons, implantable memory-augmentation devices, or doctors wearing Google Glass. The game-changing innovations on this list are more than distant dreams or inventions no one really knows what to with yet. Most should be available as early as 2015.

Every year, the Cleveland Clinic comes up with a list of new devices or treatments that are expected to help improve our daily lives and reduce our risks of developing disease. Only time will tell whether their considerable promise pans out.

Here are the top 10 new medications, treatments, and technologies to watch for in 2015, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
1. Mobile Stroke Unit

What if there were a drug that could lessen the brain damage caused by a stroke by targeting the blood clot that caused it and breaking it up?

As it turns out, there is. It's called tPA, and the faster it's given after a stroke, the safer and more effective it is. Here's the problem: Most people don't get the drug in time, and it can only be administered via IV. Lack of access to quick treatment can have dire consequences — someone in the US dies from stroke every four minutes.

Mobile stroke treatment units solve this problem by taking tPA directly to the patient. The units are essentially ambulances outfitted with everything health professionals need to treat a patient suffering from a stroke and staffed by an onboard paramedic, a critical care nurse, and a CT technologist. A broadband video link allows the onboard team to virtually contact a hospital stroke neurologist to guide treatment.
2. Dengue Vaccinepolio vaccine afghanistan childMohammad Ismail/Reuters

Close to half the world's population is at risk for developing dengue, a disease characterized by high fever, nausea and vomiting, and pain behind the eyes and in the muscles, bones, and joints. The virus kills some 20,000 people each year and is spread by mosquitoes. One of the biggest challenges in creating a vaccine against dengue is that it is caused by five different related, but not identical, strains. Even protection from one type will still leave you susceptible to the four other forms.

But scientists have reason to be hopeful this year.

A vaccine that just went through the last phase of testing was found to be 60% effective, on average, in protecting people against the disease, and 95.5% protective against the disease in its most severe form, as dengue hemorrhagic fever. While the vaccine is far from perfect, "it’s the best dengue vaccine so far," MIT immunologist Jianzhu Chen told The Verge. The new vaccine also reduced the number of people who needed to be hospitalized by bringing down the onset of fever by 80%. Fever is one of the virus's most potentially fatal complications, especially when it occurs in children under age 10. The vaccine is expected to be available in early 2015.
3. One-Drop Blood Testing

Bye, bye, needles.

Instead of getting blood drawn the conventional way, a new technology will let doctors — or pharmacists, even — run hundreds of tests with a single drop of blood from a finger prick. While a standard lipid panel, one of the most common blood tests done in the US, can cost between $10 and $100 depending on where it's done, the current advertised cost of the new test is $2.99.
4. Better Cholesterol-Reducing Drugs

Too much cholesterol in the blood can collect inside our arteries and plug them up, causing heart disease and death. While many people use statins, a special type of drug that can help lower cholesterol, some people's cholesterol levels simply don't respond to treatment.

There's a new type of injectable drug just for those patients called PCSK9. In studies, the drug has been successful at reducing cholesterol levels in people whose high cholesterol levels didn't respond to statins.

The best part? No trip to the hospital or clinic required. The drug can be injected at home, like insulin, and only requires one or two treatments a month. The FDA is expected to approve the first PCSK9 in 2015.

Cancer cellsjovan vitanovski/Shutterstock

5. Precision Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy and radiation can save lives, but the intense treatment harms healthy cells in the process of taking down cancerous ones. As a result, many cancer patients experience side effects ranging from hair loss to crippling nausea and extreme fatigue.

But a new class of drugs targets cancer cells and leaves healthy tissues alone.

The drugs are a form of precision treatment that combines antibodies — the molecules the immune system uses to locate and stop harmful viruses — with a powerful toxin that kills a cancerous cell from within.

While these drugs, called antibody-drug conjugates, won't be a cure-all, more than 24 are in clinical trials for solid tumors and blood cancer. Some that have been designed to treat other types of cancer, including HER2-positive breast cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, are already available.
6. Wireless Pacemaker

The first pacemaker was implanted in 1958. Since then, doctors have continued using pacemakers connected electrically to the heart via a complex system of tiny wires. Unfortunately, those wires can break or get dislodged in the body. Their insulation can also become cracked and lead to an infection.

This new pacemaker is wireless, 10% of the size of a conventional pacemaker (about the size of a large vitamin), and is implanted directly in the heart — no lengthy surgery required.

Doctors simply use a catheter in a leg vein to steer the device into the heart, a process that takes about 20 minutes. The lithium-battery-powered device lasts up to 7 years and is currently undergoing late stage clinical trials. It was first implanted into a patient in Ohio in February.

Pills
8. New Medications For Deadly Lung Disease

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis is a deadly, untreatable disease whose cause remains unknown. Scar tissue builds up inside the lungs, thickening its tissues and making breathing difficult. Many people diagnosed with IPF only live another 3-5 years; more than 30,000 Americans get such a diagnosis each year.

Two new drugs found to reduce scar tissue and improve lung function in patients got FDA approval in October. One appears to work by calming inflammation while the other blocks a protein that tells the lungs to make scar tissue. We don't yet know if these drugs will work for all patients, but they're the first that show promise in slowing the disease's progression.
9. Cheaper, More Convenient Breast Cancer Treatment

Close to a quarter million people will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, according to the American Cancer Society; 40,000 women will die from the disease. Radiation therapy, the leading treatment used to beat back the disease, can be inconvenient and expensive. As a result, some people simply stop getting treatment, according to researchers at the Cleveland Clinic.

The Cleveland Clinic estimates that intraoperative radiation therapy, which would involve giving a patient a single dose of radiation after surgery to remove tumors, would cost one-fifth the sticker price of traditional radiation treatment, which can sometimes involve up to 20 doses.
10. A Pill That Protects The Heart From Failing

Nearly 55,000 people die each year when their hearts become too weak to pump blood. Today, most people at risk of heart failure treat their condition with two drugs: ACE inhibitors and beta blockers, which work by opening up the blood vessels and making it easier for the heart to push blood throughout the body. But they're not a perfect fix.

A new drug could further reduce the risk of heart failure. In a study of 8,000 patients, researchers testing the new treatment, called Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI), had to stop testing because the patients receiving the new drug had far better health outcomes than those taking traditional drugs. Compared to people taking traditional heart failure drugs, people getting ARNI were 20% less likely to be hospitalized for heart failure and 16% less likely to die from any cause during the study.

Read more: http://uk.businessinsider.com/how-will-medicine-change-in-2015-2014-11?r=US#ixzz3MBXjZYhr

 

 


Via ReactNow, Laurentiu Bogdan, dbtmobile, eMedToday
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Matt Coleman's curator insight, December 19, 2014 3:24 AM

Let's hope some of these amazing new options make it to market in 2015

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The Practical Guide to the Future of Medicine

The Practical Guide to the Future of Medicine | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
I see enormous technological changes heading our way. If they hit us unprepared, which we are now, they will wash away the medical system we know and leave it a purely technology–based service with...
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Windowless planes are coming, and they look amazing

Windowless planes are coming, and they look amazing | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
What will replace those small, fogged-up plastic windows is awesome.
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Study using unique 3D lab cultures appears to confirm how Alzheimers begins in brain

Study using unique 3D lab cultures appears to confirm how Alzheimers begins in brain | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it
Research using unique 3D lab cultures holds promise for testing drugs to treat or cure disease
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How an interactive book, 'Alice,' is making $70K a week on iOS

How an interactive book, 'Alice,' is making $70K a week on iOS | Digital Marketing | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:33 PM


Tom Cheredar:  "With the growing number of digital distractions vying for the attention of your kids, reading books might seem far less appealing. Interactive books can bridge the gap, and some of them are having real success."

marc augier's comment, October 9, 2014 4:21 PM
For me this looks more like multimedia than transmedia. Still waiting for Alice in Wonderland with Google Glasses where I play Alice (or Alex...)