Digital Literacy in the Library
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How To Get People To Care: Anatomy Of A Trending Hashtag

How To Get People To Care: Anatomy Of A Trending Hashtag | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Angry Kid-Lit Readers Demonstrate Why Hashtag Activism Isn't Always Useless. Here's What You Can Learn About Sharing Your Message.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A good summary of how to have an impact on social media.  I will be sharing this with students next year!

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How to NOT Get Duped By Fake News

How to NOT Get Duped By Fake News | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

William Colglazier writes: "Asking simple and logical questions can destroy a lunch-time rumor, and it’s exactly what needs to be done when engaging with updates to your newsfeed on Facebook and Twitter. Rumors and lies are not a 21st century invention, and neither is fake news."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Advice on fake news written to a teen audience. I like how Colglazier compares fake news to high school rumors and think it would be a good comparison to share with students. How about getting them to write their own pledge of allegiance to be more critical thinkers?

 

I've been presenting the Staten Island Ferry Disaster and the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus to 6th graders (Octopi: Heartless Killer or Adorable and Endangered?) I will be adding some points from this article in our discussion.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, January 19, 9:17 AM
Intertesting article on the topic of the day that appeared in Teen Vogue. Given these times, it is essential to include media literacy in our curriculums so that social media alone is not a source our young rely on for information.
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A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights

A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Amy B. Wang writes: "It’s no secret that teenagers love social media.

 

Members of “Generation Z” can spend up to nine hours a day sharing photos on Instagram, consuming “content” on YouTube and talking to friends on Snapchat. (Just don’t ask them to get excited about Facebook.)

 

But how much do these teens understand what they’ve agreed to give up when they start an account with those sites?

 

Probably very little, according to a report released last week — and dense terms and conditions that are “impenetrable and largely ignored” are partly to blame."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Be sure to click on the report to see the rewritten terms and conditions. Do your students understand all their DMs are mined by Instagram (and do they care?) 

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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 8, 4:41 PM

This is super cool!

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Hoaxy: How claims spread online

Hoaxy: How claims spread online | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

From the website: "Hoaxy visualizes the spread of claims and related fact checking online. A claim may be a fake news article, hoax, rumor, conspiracy theory, satire, or even an accurate report. Anyone can use Hoaxy to explore how claims spread across social media."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

An interesting site to explore with students. It works best when you can compare a claim and fact check as one data set. When I looked at the claim and fact check on "Obama signs Christmas bill making alternative media illegal," the data showed how the claim appeared and was shared for two days before any fact checking was shared. That alone could be a great discussion point for students. Share the quote often attributed to Winston Churchill: "A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth gets its pants on," or the updated versions in this New York Times headline: "A Lie Races Across Twitter Before the Truth Can Boot Up." (And that four year old article is also a fine one to add to your fake news discussion!)

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, January 9, 10:00 AM
this provides an interesting visual to begin a conversation regarding fake news.
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How Data And Information Literacy Could End Fake News

How Data And Information Literacy Could End Fake News | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Kalev Leetaru writes: "Technology alone cannot solve the fake news problem – only through teaching society to be data and information literate can we improve citizens’ ability to interpret the world around them."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Things that stood out for me:

 

  • While the idea of an extension or plug-in that would flag fake news is appealing, Leetaru notes that fake news is "not black and white, it is a hundred shades of gray." The emotional language and the political disposition of the reader both play a part in the interpretation of fake news. (Although I'm still not clear how one can "interpret" facts differently, I get that two people could have different conclusions based on those facts.)
  • Leetaru's idea of a 3D graph to analyze coverage of a topic is intriguing, and easily adaptable for a class project. Looking at an organization's coverage of a topic and determining, on average, how positive or negative it is, how often (and in what detail) the topic is covered, and finally how emotionally charged the coverage is could be a fascinating project in a middle or high school classroom.  I'd love to tie this to the project we did with 7th grade science classes on using social media to sway public opinion on environmental issues.(And this year, I'd love to explore developing bots for that!) This all would be a great tie-in for anyone using Paul Fleischman's Eyes Wide Open book and website. 
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 15, 2016 11:11 AM
Fake news ... we here about it everyday. this whole idea needs to be added to the idea of the need for a variety of literacies, not just digital literacy. This provides a challenge to educators, but something we need to step up about.
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Fake News Recommendations - Media Literacy Clearinghouse

Fake News Recommendations - Media Literacy Clearinghouse | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Frank Baker writes: "From the various news stories and blog posts recently about “fake news,” I have culled the following recommendations and advice." 

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A great summary from Frank of various strategies for analyzing online "news."

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GwynethJones's curator insight, December 8, 2016 7:54 AM

Teaching our kids to be savvy curators of information!

Martha Bongiorno's curator insight, December 8, 2016 8:59 AM
You can never have too many resources for this topic!
Vicki Hansen's curator insight, December 8, 2016 9:13 AM
Frank Baker provides lots of resources and insight into the many ways we can help our kids recognize fake news.
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We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Laura Sydell writes: "A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. One that got a lot of traffic had this headline: "FBI Agent Suspected In Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead In Apparent Murder-Suicide." The story is completely false, but it was shared on Facebook over half a million times.

We wondered who was behind that story and why it was written. It appeared on a site that had the look and feel of a local newspaper. Denverguardian.com even had the local weather. But it had only one news story — the fake one."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Why can't we just do an entire semester on this topic? Every day I find more articles about fake news, post-truth, social media, etc. that I want to share with students. This election cycle should wake us up to the fact that so many of us--adults, not just students--are simply illiterate when it comes to media. It is such a critical role for librarians!

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Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds

Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Sue Shellenbarger writes: "However, fewer schools now have librarians, who traditionally taught research skills. And media literacy has slipped to the margins in many classrooms, to make room for increased instruction in basic reading and math skills."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I don't think the results would be much different if we asked adults to complete the survey! I still remember this post because I was so shocked that adults gave credence to comments on an article about vaccines because they assumed the person commenting must know something about the topic if they took the time to say something!

 

And why can't "increased instruction in basic reading and math skills" include media literacy? The focus on text-based evidence and informational text in the Common Core lends itself to finding credible sources, determining bias, etc., which is the very core of becoming media literate. Teaching media literacy shouldn't be a stand-alone topic: critical thinking should imbue every subject area.

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How Fake News Goes Viral: A Case Study

How Fake News Goes Viral: A Case Study | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Sapna Maheshwari writes: "While some fake news is produced purposefully by teenagers in the Balkans or entrepreneurs in the United States seeking to make money from advertising, false information can also arise from misinformed social media posts by regular people that are seized on and spread through a hyperpartisan blogosphere.

Here, The New York Times deconstructs how Mr. Tucker’s now-deleted declaration on Twitter the night after the election turned into a fake-news phenomenon. It is an example of how, in an ever-connected world where speed often takes precedence over truth, an observation by a private citizen can quickly become a talking point for a world leader, even as it is being proved false."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

This is a great timeline to share with students, and a reminder that once you post something on social media, you no longer control the narrative. 

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Why Students Can't Google Their Way to the Truth

Why Students Can't Google Their Way to the Truth | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew write: "In search of answers, many of us ask our kids to "Google" something. These so-called digital natives, who've never known a world without screens, are the household's resident fact-checkers. If anyone can find the truth, we assume, they can.

 

Don't be so sure.

 

True, many of our kids can flit between Facebook and Twitter while uploading a selfie to Instagram and texting a friend. But when it comes to using the Internet to get to the bottom of things, Junior's no better than the rest of us. Often he's worse."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

While the comments on the article may dispute the "bias" of the authors, I think the points they share about researching like a fact checker are well worth sharing with students:

 

  • Before you spend time on a website, determine who sponsors or writes it. (Reading laterally, checking the site on other sites, rather than vertically, scrolling through the site as if it's already vetted.)
  • The "About" page doesn't tell you everything, or perhaps anything of value. Don't rely on it to determine if a source is reputable.
  • On any search engine, first doesn't equal best! Scroll through a few pages of results (or use search limiters in the first place!) to see what sites show up. Scrutinize the URL to see if you can get some information about the site before you even click on the link.

 

NB: Thanks to The Healthy Librarian for this article.

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C Kennedy's curator insight, November 18, 2016 5:29 AM

While the comments on the article may dispute the "bias" of the authors, I think the points they share about researching like a fact checker are well worth sharing with students:

 

  • Before you spend time on a website, determine who sponsors or writes it. (Reading laterally, checking the site on other sites, rather than vertically, scrolling through the site as if it's already vetted.)
  • The "About" page doesn't tell you everything, or perhaps anything of value. Don't rely on it to determine if a source is reputable.
  • On any search engine, first doesn't equal best! Scroll through a few pages of results (or use search limiters in the first place!) to see what sites show up. Scrutinize the URL to see if you can get some information about the site before you even click on the link.

 

NB: Thanks to The Healthy Librarian for this article.

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Media’s Next Challenge: Overcoming the Threat of Fake News

Media’s Next Challenge: Overcoming the Threat of Fake News | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Jim Rutenberg writes: "It could be Pollyannaish to think so, but maybe this year’s explosion in fake news will serve to raise the value of real news. If so, it will be great journalism that saves journalism.

 

“People will ultimately gravitate toward sources of information that are truly reliable, and have an allegiance to telling the truth,” Mr. Baron said. “People will pay for that because they’ll realize they’ll need to have that in our society.”

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I hope Mr. Baron's optimism in this quote is warranted. I've seen far too many  people sharing information about the election from what I consider biased sources. If we continue to read only what supports our political beliefs, regardless of whether the article is based on facts, we will get the government we deserve. 

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Millennials Fall for More Tech Scams Than Their Grandparents

Millennials Fall for More Tech Scams Than Their Grandparents | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Marshall Honorof writes: "Even with technology, it seems that age may bring wisdom after all. A recent study suggests that old folks aren't falling for tech support scams all that often — but their grandchildren are. Millennials, far from the inherently tech-savvy caricatures as portrayed by the media, are actually somewhat gullible when it comes to calls, e-mails or popup ads claiming to offer tech support, but delivering only scams.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

This would be a great article to share with students! Ask their opinions first, as I'd bet they'd be surprised by the results of the study.

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Martha Bongiorno's curator insight, October 19, 2016 1:04 PM
Fascinating for Digital Citizenship Week!
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Digital Literacy Tips: Strategies for Online Fact Checking

Digital Literacy Tips: Strategies for Online Fact Checking | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Wes Fryer: "Has someone you know shared an article link via email, Facebook, or another social media website that seems too outlandish to be true? Before liking, favoriting, or re-sharing the article link, did you take a few moments to fact-check it by searching online for other sources which either corroborate or refute the article’s claims? If so, congratulations! Your actions in fact-checking links suggest you have some good digital literacy skills. In this post we’ll highlight several useful, online fact-checking strategies and discuss a recent article which can be used with students to highlight this important digital literacy skill."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Wes poses several good questions for a student discussion on digital literacy. I've used the DHMO and the Guinea Worm Foundation sites with students. This year, I may lead off this discussion with a sober introduction of the new Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Museum.

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8 Must-Try Creative Image Maker Tools for Class Projects

8 Must-Try Creative Image Maker Tools for Class Projects | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Try these 8 cool creative image maker tools on for size and have students incorporate them into dozens of PBL lessons for some extra creative visual punch.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I've already played with three of these for orientation presentations. I'm not a design guru by any means, but I do want students to understand the power of good visuals in their work. I would also add Adobe Spark and PicMonkey to the list.

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Sue Alexander's curator insight, September 5, 2016 2:19 PM
Oh yeah, new tools! I love Global Digital Citizen's resources.
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What Happened When Dylann Roof Asked Google For Information About Race?

What Happened When Dylann Roof Asked Google For Information About Race? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Rebecca Hersher writes: "The most emphatic statements on Roof's behalf came from defense attorney David Bruck. For weeks, the prosecution had presented evidence that Roof is a white supremacist whose violent racism drove him to kill black people. Bruck asked the jury to consider how the 22-year-old came to believe the things he did.

As NPR reported: " 'There is hatred all right, and certainly racism, but it goes a lot further than that,' [Bruck] said." 'Every bit of motivation came from things he saw on the internet. That's it. ... 'He is simply regurgitating, in whole paragraphs, slogans and facts — bits and pieces of facts that he downloaded from the internet directly into his brain.' "

Bruck was referring to Roof's assertion in his confession and in a manifesto that a Google search shaped his beliefs.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I'd be interested to hear students' reactions to this article. We talk a lot about Google search results, and how first page results doesn't mean best results(and I'm not happy that the Stormfront website on Martin Luther King still shows up on the first page of Google's results.) What a horrific example of what can happen when someone can't think critically about information they're exposed to. 

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The challenge facing libraries in an era of fake news

The challenge facing libraries in an era of fake news | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Donald Barclay writes: "Thirty or 40 years ago, a student writing a research paper on the topic of acid rain might have needed to decide whether an article from a scientific journal like Nature was a more appropriate source than an article from a popular magazine like Time.

 

Today’s students, however, must know how to distinguish between articles published by genuine scholarly journals and those churned out by look-alike predatory and fake journals that falsely claim to be scholarly and peer-reviewed."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

There's a link in this article to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education from the Association of College and Research Libraries. Barclay notes that, "This new approach asks students to put in the time and effort required to determine the credibility and appropriateness of each information source for the use to which they intend to put it." If we in the primary and secondary libraries haven't educated students on how to do this, I don't think they'll have the mental stamina to do it in college! This makes me even more excited about the workshop our local state university is offering to get secondary library staff to understand what info literacy skills college students need, and to design collaborative lessons to help our students strengthen (or build) those skills.

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School Libraries Fight Fake News | Knowledge Quest

School Libraries Fight Fake News | Knowledge Quest | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Mica Johnson writes: "Fake news has been all over the real news lately. From Mark Zuckerburg to Pizzagate, fake news is a huge problem, and it’s not going away on its own."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Mica shares some ideas you can adopt in your library. Our role is always changing, so I was immediately intrigued by Mica's suggestion to shift from "website evaluation" to "resource evaluation." After all, so much of the information we're evaluating doesn't come from a website anymore--think of memes, shared items on social media, etc. It would be interesting to have students analyze a week of their "news" exposure to see how much of it comes from traditional sources such as The New York Times compared to social media, etc. 

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Truthy Lies and Surreal Truths: A Plea - Hybrid Pedagogy

Truthy Lies and Surreal Truths: A Plea - Hybrid Pedagogy | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Kris Shaffer writes: "Help awaken your students to these new practices of digital deception, and help them face them effectively. They need this knowledge."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I am aware I am sharing this without doing the deep reading and reflection that the article calls for (I will go back and read again later when I have uninterrupted time) but I wanted to save and share it now.

 

Kris gives some examples of the insidious nature of misinformation, of the need for better "crap detection", and some thoughtful guidelines for how to combat the false information being spread. What jumped out at me was his recommendation to thoughtfully curate resources that provide accurate information and keep them visible in the social media stream. This is something librarians should excel at, right? I feel that responsibility more than ever!

 

And speaking of curation, thanks to School Library Connection for reposting this article from Joyce Valenza. If you don't curate, Joyce thoughtfully outlines why you should!

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GwynethJones's curator insight, December 10, 2016 7:29 PM

Digital deception, outright lies, and bogus news - now more than EVER we need to teach how discernment & authority.

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Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world

Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Joyce Valenza writes: "We were guaranteed a free press,  We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state.  We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses.

But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make the reliability and credibility decisions."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Joyce has gathered so many great resources here that you could design an entire media literacy unit without looking elsewhere. I love this focus she provides: "We need to teach the important lessons of everyday civics for new consumption and production landscapes. These lessons involve sustained critical thinking, a practice to engage in regularly as we read and view and inquire with learners of all ages across disciplines." It may feel like an added responsibility to our job in the library, but it's certainly a critical one. I've been asked by a few teachers to address this, and I don't see it as something that can be taught as a stand-alone lesson. How can we embed this into our instruction throughout the school year so that our students are more critical consumers--and producers--of information? 

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New Media Literacy Skills Empower Learners

New Media Literacy Skills Empower Learners | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Mercer Hall and Patricia Russac write: "The media literacy program at our school has been in place for over 16 years, and it starts with the first graders. We’re fortunate, too, that our students are permitted to use social media for learning; it allows us to update our program to include new media literacy skills as part of the learning process. In an age of media bombardment, learners must be permitted to practice skills not only for today’s world, but also for their future."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

There are some good resources here. While I think the We the Voters video might be too intense for my 6th graders, I would love to use the "New Media Literacies" video with 7th graders.  Students could explore the terms the narrators list to describe what's involved in being media literate-- judgment, negotiation, appropriation, play, etc.--and create examples to foster understanding for other students (and staff!)

 

I wish that media literacy was embedded in our curriculum. I work with a few teachers who address it, but it's such a critical skill that every subject area teacher could find a way to work it into their classroom. Addressing it once a month in the library is not enough!

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Students Need Our Help Detecting Fake News

Students Need Our Help Detecting Fake News | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Frank W. Baker writes: "If I were addressing this problem in a 21st century classroom, I think I would start by asking students: what is news and who delivers it? Can your students distinguish between purposeful, legitimate news and the other stuff out there? This seems a good place to start."

 

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Frank speaks about calling out the fake news by challenging the sender of the message. I would love to discuss that with students to come up with wording that would both make clear the fake news is just that AND not put the sender on the defensive. My approach, of sharing a link to Snopes or another site that refutes the fake news, has not been well received. I've been told I should share the correction privately. I get that no one likes to be corrected publicly, but so few people post corrections, or even delete the fake news. (Of course, this man tried to fix his mistake, but again, a retraction in social media was far too late to stop the damage.) I'd be very interested to hear how students would approach this!

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This researcher programmed bots to fight racism on Twitter. It worked.

This researcher programmed bots to fight racism on Twitter. It worked. | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Kevin Munger writes: "Overall, I found that it is possible to cause people to use less harassing language. This change seems to be most likely when both individuals share a social identity. Unsurprisingly, high status people are also more likely to cause a change."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

There's a lot to dig into here. I'm not sure most students are aware of bots or of buying followers, which is a good place to start. When I talk about digital citizenship, I always address cyberbullying. I emphasize that being an upstander by making a comment of support to the person being bullied, or by merely commenting that the bully is being unkind, can go a long way. Now, here is some statistical proof of that, with some caveats. It would be interesting to hear students' take on what "sharing a social identity" means to them. Thanks to Diane Main, @Dowbiggin on Twitter for sharing this.

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GwynethJones's curator insight, November 19, 2016 6:51 PM

Programming for good.

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In the age of Trump, why bother teaching students to argue logically? | David Tollerton

In the age of Trump, why bother teaching students to argue logically? | David Tollerton | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

David Tollerton writes: "Such statements [Muslims celebrated in New Jersey on 9/11, Mexico will willingly pay for a wall], and an array of others, were credible within the campaign’s own inner logic because the criteria for credibility did not include a basis in reality or even coherence." (Emphasis added)

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

The irony of spending the week of the election presenting to my 6th graders on digital citizenship and digital literacy did not escape me. That slide on how cyberbullying can destroy relationships? Or the one on keeping your language clean online because you're creating a digital tattoo? It all seems so quaint now. David Tollerton reflects on this post-election effect as he begins grading his university students' essays.

 

Tollerton writes about how both the presidential and Brexit campaigns were based on emotion and the ignorance of facts. As I've worked with students doing research and writing essays, I've tried to help them focus on proving their arguments with reputable sources. One of the things I like most about Common Core is that emphasis on text-based evidence. If Common Core is one of the many things the Trump administration tosses overboard, I hope that at least some states continue to teach the importance of facts, expertise, research, etc. Because right now, reality really does bite.

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How the Internet Is Loosening Our Grip on the Truth

How the Internet Is Loosening Our Grip on the Truth | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Farhad Manjoo writes: "A wider variety of news sources was supposed to be the bulwark of a rational age — “the marketplace of ideas,” the boosters called it.

But that’s not how any of this works. Psychologists and other social scientists have repeatedly shown that when confronted with diverse information choices, people rarely act like rational, civic-minded automatons. Instead, we are roiled by preconceptions and biases, and we usually do what feels easiest — we gorge on information that confirms our ideas, and we shun what does not."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great article to open a media literacy conversation! Have lies become institutionalized? Where do students seek information? Do they know how to check sources? 

 

When I look at my own Facebook feed, I am amazed at how many adults repost or share articles that are hoaxes. Just today on LM_NET, someone asked about an article that mentioned a dubious news site. I can't find any verifiable information about the site itself or who is behind it, and I feel I have decent research skills. How do we expect our students to keep up with a flow of misinformation? 

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Who backs the site? Dan Russell on Digital Literacy

Who backs the site? Dan Russell on Digital Literacy | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Dan Russell writes: "An important skill to have...

... is that of knowing how to figure out who's posting this article.  

In other words, a really important skill is that of being able to figure out who's behind an article.  

Although this is something we should have learned in elementary school, it's a continuous surprise to me how often searchers DO NOT do this! "

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I think this is such a critical skill--we could give hundreds of examples of the lack of this most basic vetting of sites from the current presidential election! Our 6th graders recently looked at Stormfront to determine if it was a valid site for research on Martin Luther King, and many had a difficult time with the steps required to find out who was behind the site. Sharing Dan's examples would demonstrate to students there isn't a one-click answer to these questions, even for experts. 

 

I can't wait to share the EPA example with 8th graders when we do our social media and environmental issues project. I used to provide vetted sites for students to use, but this time, I'll give them a list of sites and make them do an evaluation to find the most informative and credible sites.  

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These students didn’t know Bin Laden was dead. How did we get so clueless about news?

These students didn’t know Bin Laden was dead. How did we get so clueless about news? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Margaret Sullivan writes: "Every bit as dead as bin Laden, it sometimes seems, is many American citizens’ basic knowledge of news. Young people, especially, get their news in isolated bursts on their phones (the experts call this disaggregation). That makes it harder than ever to tell established truth from opinion, propaganda or pure fiction.

In this fact-challenged presidential campaign, these skills are needed more than ever."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

So much good stuff here! Not only Sullivan's insights--be sure to check out Media Breaker Studios from The Lamp. You can create units for students, using videos and links to articles, then have students "break" the video commercials or create their own. Having students analyze a wide range of sources to determine which are reliable is a large part of digital literacy.

 

I can see many uses for the Media Breaker tool. Last year I did a project with a 7th grade science teacher, in which students chose topics and created persuasive presentations. We discussed this article from The Smithsonian, and students worked collaboratively to determine which emotion they wanted to evoke from viewers. (Those against fracking chose rage, while the coral reef protection and endangered species groups tried to evoke awe.)  

 

Using the Media Breakers studio allows for a one stop set-up for teachers. Students should enjoy exploring the Breaker Gallery of commercials and videos, too!

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