Digital Literacy in the Library
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Common Core ELA Standards and Library Collaboration

Common Core ELA Standards and Library Collaboration | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Let your teachers know you and your library are ready for the Common Core! Feel free to edit for your own use.  

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:55 PM

After seeing Mrs. Sike's excellent K-5 handouts for teachers here <http://mrssikes.wordpress.com/2013/08/10/collaboration-with-common-core-state-standards>, I decided to make something for my 6th grade ELA teachers. Feel free to copy and adapt!

Jay Bansbach's curator insight, August 13, 2013 9:41 AM

Great promotional item!!

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How to seek truth in the era of fake news

How to seek truth in the era of fake news | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Known worldwide for her courage and clarity, Christiane Amanpour has spent the past three decades interviewing business, cultural and political leaders who have shaped history. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Amanpour discusses fake news, objectivity in journalism, the leadership vacuum in global politics and more, sharing her wisdom along the way. "Be careful where you get information from," she says. "Unless we are all engaged as global citizens who appreciate the truth, who understand science, empirical evidence and facts, then we are going to be wandering around -- to a potential catastrophe."
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What an insightful talk from Christiane Amanpour. 

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Fake News And Scams Are Going Around About The Deadly Storm In Texas

Fake News And Scams Are Going Around About The Deadly Storm In Texas | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Insurance scams, rumors of water shutoffs, and fake restrictions on when people can return are all bouncing around the internet.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Some current news and social media to share with students to demonstrate why we need to check our sources. Also why, if it sounds too good or too crazy to be true, you're probably right! (Just be aware there's an F-bomb in one of the tweets. I wouldn't share the entire article with students.)

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GwynethJones's curator insight, September 5, 6:08 PM

So sad that this always happens when disaster strikes, SCAMS abound.

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NASA Denies That It’s Running a Child Slave Colony on Mars

NASA Denies That It’s Running a Child Slave Colony on Mars | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
On Thursday, Alex Jones welcomed a guest to talk about how kidnapped children have been sent on a two-decade mission to space. NASA now denies the interplanetary conspiracy.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

OK, so this article might teeter on the edge of topics you'd feel uncomfortable discussing with middle schoolers, but there's enough here to make a great example for a media literacy lesson. The headline alone would be great a great clickbait example!

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How Filter Bubbles Distort Reality: Farnam Street

How Filter Bubbles Distort Reality: Farnam Street | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

"Many sites offer personalized content selections, based on our browsing history, age, gender, location, and other data. The result is a flood of articles and posts that support our current opinions and perspectives to ensure that we enjoy what we see. Even when a site is not offering specifically targeted content, we all tend to follow people whose views align with ours. When those people share a piece of content, we can be sure it will be something we are also interested in.

That might not sound so bad, but filter bubbles create echo chambers. We assume that everyone thinks like us, and we forget that other perspectives exist." (Emphasis added.)

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Shane Parrish takes a deep dive into filter bubbles. I found several great quotes that I'll be using in a lesson on this topic. Some of the best:

  • I've always loved The New Yorker cartoon on internet anonymity. Parrish quotes Eli Pariser's book Filter Bubbles: "The new Internet doesn’t just know you’re a dog; it knows your breed and wants to sell you a bowl of premium kibble." What a great way to  introduce this topic to middle schoolers!
  • Another quote from Pariser: "Your computer monitor is a kind of one-way mirror, reflecting your own interests while algorithmic observers watch what you click." 
  • Also Pariser: "Your identity shapes your media. There’s just one flaw in this logic: Media also shape identity. And as a result, these services may end up creating a good fit between you and your media by changing … you."
  • Pariser again: "Personalized filters play to the most compulsive parts of you, creating “compulsive media” to get you to click things more."
  • From a study on filter bubbles and voting by Jacob N. Shapiro: "The results of these experiments demonstrate that (i) biased search rankings can shift the voting preferences of undecided voters by 20% or more, (ii) the shift can be much higher in some demographic groups, and (iii) search ranking bias can be masked so that people show no awareness of the manipulation." (emphasis added.)
  • A quote from President Obama: "And increasingly, we become so secure in our bubbles that we start accepting only information, whether it’s true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that is out there."
  • And finally, a great summary for middle schoolers from Pariser: “A world constructed from the familiar is the world in which there's nothing to learn.”
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Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To?

Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Perry Bacon Jr. writes: "In the first part of our guide to unnamed sources, we laid out some general tips for making sense of these kinds of stories. In this part, we want to get more specific, to help you to essentially decode these stories. We also want you to be able to know which stories you should rely on based on the different kinds of sourcing used.

So we’re going to divide anonymous sources into six general types and give the pros and cons of each, in terms of reliability. We ordered the types of unnamed sources, roughly speaking, from most reliable to least reliable (at least in my experience.)"

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I'm not sure how many of my middle schoolers read news, either in a newspaper, magazine, or online (I am sure I'd be disappointed in the number!) This article would be good to share with high schoolers or middle school teachers who want to broaden their students' informational text reading. 

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News Literacy for All

News Literacy for All | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Veronica Arellano Douglas writes: "I’m not really here for discussions about “fake news,” but I’m all for critical information literacy, including critical news literacy, and so are a group of librarians at Washtenaw Community College’s Bailey Library. Meghan Rose, Martha Stuit, and Amy Lee presented a poster recently at the Michigan Academic Library Association’s annual conference on their recent efforts to overhaul a News Literacy Libguide and use it as a springboard for instruction."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

The librarians at Washtenaw Community College are awesome! Their presentation can easily be adapted for secondary school students, and everything is shared via Google Drive. I shamelessly admit to coveting those buttons!

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How Google measures the authority of web pages

How Google measures the authority of web pages | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Danny Sullivan writes: "When Google first began, it did have a single authority figure. That was called PageRank, which was all about looking at links to pages. Google counted how many links a page received to help derive a PageRank score for that page....These days, links and content are still among the most important ranking signals. However, artificial intelligence — Google’s RankBrain system — is another major factor. In addition, Google’s ranking system involves over 200 major signals. Even our Periodic Table of SEO Success Factors that tries to simplify the system involves nearly 40 major areas of consideration."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Darn. I guess this means I have to stop showing the Matt Cutts video about how a Google search works! Using AI to improve Google search is fascinating to me. 

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This Is Not Fake News (but Don’t Go by the Headline)

This Is Not Fake News (but Don’t Go by the Headline) | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Sydney Ember writes: "Fake news — a neologism to describe stories that are just not true, like Pizzagate, and a term now co-opted to characterize unfavorable news — has given new urgency to the teaching of media literacy. Are Americans less able to assess credibility? Can they discern real news from disinformation?"

 

Image via Toa Heftiba on Unsplash.com

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I look forward to hearing more from Paul Mihailidis. I love the idea of not just teaching students to critique news but to understand that they have agency. This quote reminds me of Paul Fleischman's work in Eyes Wide Open: "Media literacy needs to be about connectivity, about engagement — and it needs to be intentionally civic." (Emphasis added.) Let's make sure this generation understands this!

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Critical thinking instruction in humanities reduces belief in pseudoscience 

Critical thinking instruction in humanities reduces belief in pseudoscience  | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

"A recent study by North Carolina State University researchers finds that teaching critical thinking skills in a humanities course significantly reduces student beliefs in "pseudoscience" that is unsupported by facts."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Teaching students to apply critical thinking skills across the curriculum is exactly what we do in the library! It's great to see research that supports what we do every day.

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Developing a “Healthy” Skepticism of Media Claims

Developing a “Healthy” Skepticism of Media Claims | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Tom McFadden writes: "Health journalism is a mess, which provides a great opportunity for science teachers. For my middle school science class, specifically, it provided the context and motivation for everything we did from our body systems unit to our culminating public health project.

Last summer, WNYC’s On the Media launched their “Skeptic’s Guide to Health News.” In the accompanying podcast episode, they tell the story of how a Ph.D-toting journalist laid a trap for health reporters with a study on chocolate and health risks. He did purposefully awful science (small sample size, mining a huge data set for correlations, etc.) in order to prove that he could find a journal to publish it and then garner worldwide media coverage. Soon, the Daily Mail was running the headline “Pass the Easter Egg! New study reveals that eating chocolate doesn’t affect your Body Mass Index!

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I just finished a lesson on hoax websites, using the Save the Guinea Worm site as an introduction. I think next year I may use some pseudoscience sites instead. After all, the Carter Center just declared that as of January 2017, there are no cases of dracunculiasis in the world! There are lots of good ideas in Tom's article to get me started.

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10 Visual Storytelling Rules Every Digital Marketer--and Student-- Needs to Know

10 Visual Storytelling Rules Every Digital Marketer--and Student-- Needs to Know | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Samantha Lile writes: "Long ago, storytellers were wise old men and women who conveyed tales of the ancients and lessons learned through the ages. Later, stories were told by authors, playwrights and directors. But thanks to technology, anyone can now become a storyteller, a reporter and a publisher.

 

Visual storytelling, in particular, has emerged as an important trend in web and graphic design, as well as other forms of marketing in the digital era – and for good reason. The visual cortex is the largest section of the human brain. According to a 2008 study, the average person remembers about 10 percent of what they hear when tested 72 hours later. But when visuals are added into the mix, the figure increases to 65 percent."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I found this via Lee Watanabe Crockett's post, but wanted to share Samantha Lile's full version. Lately I've been focused on students as consumers of digital information. It's important to remember they will be--indeed, they already are--creators of digital information, too! 

 

We'll be doing a digital storytelling project later this year, so I'll be sharing these tips with our student authors. 

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How to NOT Get Duped By Fake News

How to NOT Get Duped By Fake News | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

William Colglazier writes: "Asking simple and logical questions can destroy a lunch-time rumor, and it’s exactly what needs to be done when engaging with updates to your newsfeed on Facebook and Twitter. Rumors and lies are not a 21st century invention, and neither is fake news."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Advice on fake news written to a teen audience. I like how Colglazier compares fake news to high school rumors and think it would be a good comparison to share with students. How about getting them to write their own pledge of allegiance to be more critical thinkers?

 

I've been presenting the Staten Island Ferry Disaster and the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus to 6th graders (Octopi: Heartless Killer or Adorable and Endangered?) I will be adding some points from this article in our discussion.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, January 19, 9:17 AM
Intertesting article on the topic of the day that appeared in Teen Vogue. Given these times, it is essential to include media literacy in our curriculums so that social media alone is not a source our young rely on for information.
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A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights

A lawyer rewrote Instagram’s terms of use ‘in plain English’ so kids would know their privacy rights | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Amy B. Wang writes: "It’s no secret that teenagers love social media.

 

Members of “Generation Z” can spend up to nine hours a day sharing photos on Instagram, consuming “content” on YouTube and talking to friends on Snapchat. (Just don’t ask them to get excited about Facebook.)

 

But how much do these teens understand what they’ve agreed to give up when they start an account with those sites?

 

Probably very little, according to a report released last week — and dense terms and conditions that are “impenetrable and largely ignored” are partly to blame."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Be sure to click on the report to see the rewritten terms and conditions. Do your students understand all their DMs are mined by Instagram (and do they care?) 

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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 8, 4:41 PM

This is super cool!

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From Sex Object to Gritty Woman: The Evolution of Women in Stock Photos

From Sex Object to Gritty Woman: The Evolution of Women in Stock Photos | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

From Claire Cain Miller, on the image above on the left : “It really feels like an image about power, about freedom, about trusting oneself,” said Pam Grossman, director of visual trends at Getty Images. “Who cares what you even look like? Let’s focus on what you’re doing.”

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great article to share with students! (I'm not too worried about the towel-clad woman in middle school.) When I choose photos for presentations to students, I am very deliberate about choosing diverse images of people. This article would be a great conversation starter for a media literacy lesson!

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Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
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Reader Idea | Before Tackling Shakespeare, Students Analyze Puzzling Photos

Reader Idea | Before Tackling Shakespeare, Students Analyze Puzzling Photos | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Christa Forster writes:  "In the month leading up to our study of Shakespeare’s plays “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Othello,” I use the “What’s Going On in This Picture?” activity in my ninth- and 10th-grade English classes to help prepare students to read the plays and to write the analytical papers that are the culmination of our Shakespeare unit.

The activity also prepares students to think critically and creatively about how to physically embody a character from the play to prepare for the group performance activity they’ll also do."


Via Jim Lerman
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great way to get students to analyze and think critically! Students aren't the only ones who feel uncomfortable when they interact with unfamiliar text or images. Having a strategy to analyze new material can help students move past that initial feeling of discomfort, which is where many of them give up. I love the simplified version of VTS cited here:

 

  • what is going on in this picture/text?
  • what do you see that makes you say that?
  • what more can you find?

 

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After a Frank Ocean Set, a Week of Big Sales and Copyright Questions

After a Frank Ocean Set, a Week of Big Sales and Copyright Questions | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Valeriya Safronova writes: "Frank Ocean gave a rare, intimate performance at Panorama Music Festival on Friday that enraptured his fans — and had some unexpected consequences that went far beyond music.

 

Four days later the event has raised questions around the issue of copyright in an era of viral sharing and what happens to a young, creative business when placed in the spotlight."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

An interesting view of copyright and media literacy. I like this idea from Christine Weller, an intellectual property rights attorney: ' “There’s an open question about whether a short, pithy tweet falls under copyright protection.” Her suggestion: When in doubt, reach out.' I imagine high schoolers would be more engaged in a discussion of this rather than some plagiarized term papers!

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63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Terry Heick writes: "... in an increasingly connected and digital world, the things a student needs to know are indeed changing—fundamental human needs sometimes drastically redressed for an alien modern world. Just as salt allowed for the keeping of meats, the advent of antibiotics made deadly viruses and diseases simply inconvenient, and electricity completely altered when and where we slept and work and played, technology is again changing the kind of “stuff” a student needs to know."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Jim Lerman
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I wish we had a class in digital literacy, because these 63 points could be the bedrock of the curriculum. In the meantime, I will be sharing this list with my Library Advisory Board. I'd love to see them develop short videos for our TV news on specific topics or infographics to display in the library.

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The Secret Social Media Lives of Teenagers

The Secret Social Media Lives of Teenagers | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Ana Homayoun writes: "Many people — adults and kids alike — view likes, loves, comments and followers as a barometer for popularity, even within a smaller, closed group. Teens can quickly get caught up in the feedback loop, posting and sharing images and videos that they believe will gain the largest reaction. Over time, teens’ own values may become convoluted within an online world of instantaneous feedback, and their behavior online can become based on their “all about the likes” values rather than their real-life values."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Let's work to teach (and show) students that validation doesn't come from likes on social media. Also, let's take over memes for educational use, too! I'd love to see students creating memes for historical figures or characters in novels. 

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Doctors have decades of experience fighting "fake news." Here’s how they win.

Doctors have decades of experience fighting "fake news." Here’s how they win. | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Julia Belluz writes: "Long before Hilda Bastian was a health researcher, she endorsed a practice she believes may have cost lives.

 

“I think people died because of me,” she said recently. “And I'll spend my whole life trying not to do it again and to make amends.”

 

In the 1980s, Bastian was skeptical of the medical establishment. As the head of Homebirth Australia, she traveled the country and appeared on TV programs arguing that moms should have their babies outside the cold confines of hospital rooms."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Belluz shares several lessons learned by medical researchers and doctors in fighting misinformation about health issues. 

  • Take time to explain your beliefs (shouting that someone else is wrong doesn't work, oddly enough.)
  • Make sure your information is reliable and accessible (This is where WE come in! It can be frustrating to attempt to clarify a position when faced with too many sources. That reference librarian who helped you find a microfiche 20 years ago? She's now combing the internet and databases to find what you need!)
  • Teach them while they're young. Again, our role is crucial in helping students develop critical thinking skills when evaluating information. 
  • Evidence is necessary but not sufficient. In this case, medical research can't happen in a vacuum. In education, the comparisons of the American and Finnish school systems don't work, when we realize how profound the impacts of stress and poverty on IQ are.
  • Don't be afraid to hold those spreading misinformation to account. This is a tough one for students, but can you imagine how powerful it would be? Just like the students who made the 13 Reasons Why Not videos, our students need to know they can engage with, respond to and fight back against misleading or false stories. 

 

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Guinea Worm Attacks! Fake News, Website Evaluation, and Critical Thinking

Guinea Worm Attacks! Fake News, Website Evaluation, and Critical Thinking | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Presentation on fake news and website evaluation

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

My 7th graders love this lesson. When they take notes, I tell them to leave space for a title, which they will come up with after the presentation. I'm constantly mixing things up on this lesson (just added the EasyBib Website Evaluator link after a co-worker in my district found it during a library conference this week.) Today one class was very focused on the fake news slide, so I had them come up with a clickbait headline for their notes. It certainly generated more conversation than when I asked for a title! 

 

Most classes go to the computers after the presentation and look at Media Bias Fact Check to choose two news sources that are far right and far left, then compare stories on similar topics. If I have time, I let students work in pairs, so each student reads one article, takes notes and summarizes. I ask them to focus on word choice, since often the only difference in the articles are the adjectives used. 

 

I added detailed notes at the bottom of the slides. Feel free to make a copy and use, share or modify.

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Can You Spot Bad Science Reporting?

Can You Spot Bad Science Reporting? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

How can you spot bad science reporting? Host Myles Bess helps you do just that by following this simple acronym: G - L - A - D. 

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

This episode of the series might need a little editing for middle school (I had divided opinions from teachers about the use of the "BS" abbreviation) but I think the GLAD acronym is a good one to use along with the points in the On the Media handbook . I subscribed to the Above the Noise YouTube channel and look forward to seeing more episodes.

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Where to find what's disappeared online, and a whole lot more: the Internet Archive

Where to find what's disappeared online, and a whole lot more: the Internet Archive | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

MaryKay Magistad writes: "The Internet Archive's Wayback Machine is much beloved by investigative reporters and others, looking to find out what a webpage looked like at some point in the past, even if it's since disappeared. But the Internet Archive's work is much more ambitious than that. Founder Brewster Kahle says through scanning books and recording video feeds around the world, it aims to make all human knowledge universally available on a decentralized Web, and illiberal impulses among leaders in America and elsewhere are only 'putting a fire under our butts"'to do the work, swiftly and effectively."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I listened to this story on the way home from work, and smiled all the way. A ray of hope in this era of alternative facts. 

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Website Evaluation Lesson

Website Evaluation Lesson | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

 If it’s on the Internet, it must be true! Watch this absolutely true video!

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I did a quick presentation for 6th graders on website evaluation. The link is the the Slides. I have added some notes on each slide to give a better idea of what I'm telling students. Here's a link to the bookmark I give them. I couldn't fit both "Appropriate" and "Accurate" on it, but most 6th graders at our school keep a JAR (Journal of Academic Research) so they paste the bookmark in their JAR and take notes next to it. 

 

I also have students look at other sites and analyze in small groups, using what they learned in the presentation. Interestingly, I just spent the day at the local university learning from the librarians there about how they present research to freshman. One of the librarians mentioned she doesn't like the CRAP acronym because she doesn't want students to think currency is most important. So I will be sure to stress that to students. Could be a good discussion question for them, too!

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What Happened When Dylann Roof Asked Google For Information About Race?

What Happened When Dylann Roof Asked Google For Information About Race? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Rebecca Hersher writes: "The most emphatic statements on Roof's behalf came from defense attorney David Bruck. For weeks, the prosecution had presented evidence that Roof is a white supremacist whose violent racism drove him to kill black people. Bruck asked the jury to consider how the 22-year-old came to believe the things he did.

As NPR reported: " 'There is hatred all right, and certainly racism, but it goes a lot further than that,' [Bruck] said." 'Every bit of motivation came from things he saw on the internet. That's it. ... 'He is simply regurgitating, in whole paragraphs, slogans and facts — bits and pieces of facts that he downloaded from the internet directly into his brain.' "

Bruck was referring to Roof's assertion in his confession and in a manifesto that a Google search shaped his beliefs.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I'd be interested to hear students' reactions to this article. We talk a lot about Google search results, and how first page results doesn't mean best results(and I'm not happy that the Stormfront website on Martin Luther King still shows up on the first page of Google's results.) What a horrific example of what can happen when someone can't think critically about information they're exposed to. 

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