Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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5 Myths and Truths About Kids' Internet Safety

5 Myths and Truths About Kids' Internet Safety | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Advice from Common Sense Media editors. Help keep your kids' online experiences positive and productive by learning the truth (and ignoring the rumors) about what really makes them safe.

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Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, June 9, 2014 9:06 AM

I have to agree with Gwyneth Jones in that, "there is no safety, only awareness" when teaching kids digital literacy. These are some great myths that need to be understood so that we can better equip our kids to navigate both the real and virtual world effectively.  

Linda Dougherty's curator insight, June 9, 2014 2:00 PM

Good information to also share with parents, especially about their child's digital footprint and how to keep it private.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, June 11, 2014 9:30 AM

Learning about truths and  ignoring rumours  about internet safety for  children and young people.

Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Questions about the Creative Mind

Questions about the Creative Mind | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
What does creativity mean? If you were to ask 10 people to define creativity, you are likely to get 10 unique and different perspectives. There are a number of creativity theorists who have made a career trying to define and study creativity. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management at the Quality of Life Research Center, suggested that exceptionally creative people are described as individuals who work hard for long periods of time with a clearly set intention in a domain in which they have a deep interest. Keith Sawyer, author of Group Genius, agrees that creativity consists of a lot of hard work but added that creativity is enhanced by consistently engaging in practices that develop good ideas. Eva Hoff, Lund University, positions creativity as the combination of two or more elements of reality in a new way with the intention to do something original. Thomas R. Fisher, Dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota, relates creativity to the thought process; however, Mark Runco, Professor at UGA, links creativity to bringing something new into existence, such as an invention, design, or work of art. Some theorists characterize creativity as a state of mature emotional intelligence, mental flexibility, and field independence (not relying on information provided by others).

When defining creativity, should it be characterized as personal creativity in order to consider individual differences? Does a child’s style preference (selfish vs. altruistic), attitude, level of curiosity, imagination, emotional maturity, stress tolerance, and self-efficacy impact creativity? Do birth order, extracurricular activities, cultural background, peer pressure, socioeconomic status, parental style (rigid vs. relaxed), and school culture influence creativity? How do all these individual differences work together in group creativity? Christophe Mouchiroud and Frank Zenasni, René Descartes University, have studied the individual differences in the development of social creativity, and determined that novel thinking can lead to behaviors which have a benefit to efficiently solving problems occurring in groups.

What role does imagination play in creativity? Are child paracosms (pretend play and imaginary worlds) a precursor to adult creativity? Eva Hoff stated that pretend play is a “necessary” part of the creative process in both adults and children. Marjorie Taylor, Professor of Psychology at the University of Oregon, studied the perspectives of a variety of theorists and found conceptual agreement that “imagination is a multifaceted capacity that emerges early in life, develops substantially during the preschool years, and continues to be fundamental to human thought throughout life.” Jerome and Dorothy Singer, Yale University, highlighted that “our human capacity for mental imagery representations, reenactments, and anticipatory constructions, which are all elaborations of our direct sensory experiences, may well be a defining characteristic of our species.” Another benefit of imagination is future thinking: the ability to contemplate the future, including theory of mind and inhibitory control.

As you can see from above, imagination and creativity are necessary for child development and success. I believe that imagination is the foundation for a creative mind. Programs, like Destination Imagination, enhance creative behavior and enable students to be flexible and adaptive in their thinking. Destination Imagination is unique in that it strives to teach the creative process from imagination to innovation. What do you think when you “imagine” a creative mind?

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Jim Lerman, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Faith Kirsten Ferrer De Vera's curator insight, March 22, 6:54 AM

What does creativity mean to you?

Do you believe that creative people are people who work hard for a long time? If not, why?

What do you think about imagination?

Is imaging a creative mind true?

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 23, 12:19 PM
There are more questions than answers about creativity. That should be considered in teaching.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, Today, 3:07 PM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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If You Want Creative Kids, Hand Them Something Simple - Wired.com via @wterral

If You Want Creative Kids, Hand Them Something Simple - Wired.com via @wterral | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
“Children go out in the world, they look, they see—and a camera is another way for them to capture that,” says Tovah P. Klein, director of the Barnard College Center for Toddler Development and author of How Toddlers Thrive. “You were putting him in the world to look around.” And the stamps and games? “Those took him out of it.” The digital add-ons are a distraction that pulls their focus (literally) away from picture-taking and into a world of silly hats and goofy effects. And developmentally, little kids are very bad at filtering out distractions. “The more simple the toy they’re given,” Klein says, “the more they discover for themselves.”

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When Play Decreases,  There Is a Rise in Children's Mental Disorders

When Play Decreases,  There Is a Rise in Children's Mental Disorders | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Today five to eight times as many young people meet the criteria for diagnosis of major depression and/or an anxiety disorder as was true half a century ago or more. Why?

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 21, 10:24 PM

What Factors Do You Think Relate to a 60 Year Rise in Children's Mental Disorders? -Lon

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An Educator's Social Media Guide

An Educator's Social Media Guide | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Every educator has his or her own reasons for being on Twitter. For me, the really short version of why I engage in professional conversation on social media is that Twitter is a space where educators reject isolation, celebrate together, and continue professional growth.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 19, 12:41 AM

More of a guide to Twitter.

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3 Ways Schools Can Be Supportive of Students’ Mental Health

3 Ways Schools Can Be Supportive of Students’ Mental Health | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Dealing with students' mental health looks different at every school. But experts say doing it well requires a strategy that gets everyone involved.
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Jane Boothman's curator insight, September 21, 4:36 AM
I like the idea of greeting students every morning.
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Parenting in the Digital Age Infographic

Parenting in the Digital Age Infographic | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Parenting in the Digital Age Infographic Parents are facing completely new challenges in the digital age. With kids being more tech-savvy than any other previous generation, parents need to make an extra effort to understand how their little ones are using the technology at their fingertips. The... http://elearninginfographics.com/parenting-in-the-digital-age/
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Report: STEM's Future Is Play, Inclusiveness, Lifelong Education

A new report shares its vision for lifelong, equitable STEM education in the United States.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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What is “Four-Dimensional” Education?

What is “Four-Dimensional” Education? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Insights to learn what should students learn for the 21st century and what is Four-Dimensional Education?


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Nathalie Ferret's curator insight, September 23, 4:22 AM
"In order to deepen and enhance the learning in these three dimensions — Knowledge, Skills, and Character qualities–there is an important additional fourth dimension needed for a fully comprehensive twenty-first century education: Meta-Learning (often called learning to learn–the internal processes by which we reflect on and adapt our learning)"
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 23, 6:55 AM
Useful post, presenting an interesting concept. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in continuing education, please visit http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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The Power of Parental Influence in Child Development

The Power of Parental Influence in Child Development | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Years ago, I saw an interview with a rockstar where he confessed that all of his songs were about what happened in his life from birth until age twelve

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 17, 1:29 PM

Do parents take their power of influence on their children seriously enough? -Lon

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A telling experiment reveals high school grads do not know how to study. ~ Willingham

A telling experiment reveals high school grads do not know how to study. ~ Willingham | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Forty percent of students who will begin work on a four-year college degree this September will finish in four years.  If you allow six years, the figure rises to 59 percent. For two-year degrees, the completion rate is 30 percent. Before spending billions to get more kids in college we should make sure that won’t simply lead to a boom in college failure.

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Can Teenage Defiance Be Manipulated for Good?

Can Teenage Defiance Be Manipulated for Good? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
A study shows teenagers make wiser choices if they are encouraged to reimagine healthy behavior as an act of rebellion.

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How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices?

How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Librarians may be a teacher's best resource when it comes to implementing inquiry-based teaching strategies.
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How active learning spaces support an evolving pedagogy

How active learning spaces support an evolving pedagogy | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
One of the most meaningful recent shifts in higher education is the increased interest in and adoption of active learning. Discover three lessons learned by early movers, and how you can implement these student-focused spaces on your campus.
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8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Why the brain actually benefits from reflection is a matter of neurology, but the extensive research is clear: Prediction, reflection, and metacognition are pillars for the thoughtful classroom. The questions below were created to be, as much as possible, useful with most students at most ages and grade levels with a little rewording.

Perhaps most crucially, by shifting their reflection from content to thought, students have the chance to put themselves back at the center of the learning process. When they reflect, students reimagine what happened in both 1st and 3rd person–as they were seen, and as they saw through their own eyes. How? A sample response for a 7th or 8th grader might be:

I guess I was most creative today when we were given a chance to create our own metaphors for the ways rain forests help the planet “breathe.” Why? Maybe because it forced me to think about something visually, which meant we could come up with our own answers! 

In reflecting, the student had to think both about their own feelings (when they felt something), and how they might be perceived (what others might consider ‘creative’).

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Helen Teague's curator insight, September 24, 8:14 AM
great scoop on the importance and power of reflection
Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 24, 8:55 AM
Prediction, Reflection, and Metacognition. We can make this a regular practice in any grade level classroom. These questions and others can provide the pathway.
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“Mistakes are ‘Learning in Action'”

“Mistakes are ‘Learning in Action'” | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Mistakes are ‘Learning in Action’ is part two in my Education Week Teacher series. In it, Warren Schnack, Jenny Edwards, Michael Thornton, Annie Ward, and Cathy L.
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Create an Amazing Low-tech Library Makerspace

Create an Amazing Low-tech Library Makerspace | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Unless you live under a rock or are completely off the grid when it comes to technology, you’re probably aware of the maker movement. However, if you need a refresher, I made an infographic. The maker movement is such an exciting time for students and teachers alike! Yet, while a part of you is excited, the other part of you is flooded with the reasons why you just can’t start a makerspace right now.

“I have no money.”
“I’m just not super comfortable with technology.”
“We don’t have devices at my school.”
“I don’t have the space.”
“I don’t have the schedule that allows me to teach the kids how to do the stuff.” 


I find this to be incredibly unfortunate. Not unfortunate in that I wish you had more money and were more comfortable with technology (although I sympathize), but unfortunate in that you think you need both of those to start a makerspace. With the massive amount of information out there about makerspaces, somewhere along the way, the term “maker” became synonymous with words like “3-D printing” and “robots.”

My husband loves woodworking and I like building computers. Am I more of a “maker” than he is? Am I being less of a maker when I use zip-ties and soda caps to fix my son’s toy car rather than 3-D printing a replacement part? Absolutely not!


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kathymcdonough's curator insight, September 22, 5:49 AM
Share your insight
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Teachers Engaging in Research

Teachers Engaging in Research | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Teachers Engaging in Research Edited by Kenan Dikilita ş , Mark Wyatt, Judith Hanks and Deborah Bullock, published by IATEFL in June 2016 Click on the front cover image to the left to freel

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Helping the Reluctant Reader

Helping the Reluctant Reader | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Students in the age of digital screens often face significant reading challenges. A library’s large print collection can be instrumental in helping them change their habits for the better.
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For Kids, Anxiety About School Can Feel Like 'Being Chased By A Lion'

For Kids, Anxiety About School Can Feel Like 'Being Chased By A Lion' | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Anxiety is the most frequently diagnosed mental disorder in children. A unique school in Fairfax, Va., tries to help students with severe anxiety who have trouble going to class.

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8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started via TeachThought | iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)

8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started via TeachThought | iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation) | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
| iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Make-believe play boosts creative thinking in children: study

Make-believe play boosts creative thinking in children: study | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
“ New U.K. research from has found that make-believe fantasy play could boost children's creative thinking. Carried out by researchers from Oxford Brookes University, the team presented their findings at the British Psychological Society's Developmental Psychology Section annual conference in Belfast, Northern Ireland.”
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Christine DiPaulo's curator insight, September 23, 5:05 AM
Teachers need to PLAY too. Let's bring the joy back to learning and create playtime for teachers to imagine and create. #joyofpl @joyofpl @bethesquarepeg
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5 Tips to Create a Cost-Effective Makerspace Quickly - EdTech Magazine

5 Tips to Create a Cost-Effective Makerspace Quickly - EdTech Magazine | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
In the 2015 New Media Consortium Horizon Report, makerspaces were recognized as one the six most important educational technology developments.

“Makerspaces are increasingly being looked to as a method for engaging learners in creative, higher-order problem-solving through hands-on design, construction, and iteration,” the report says.

As Laura Fleming, a library media specialist from New Milford (Conn.) High School, said in the Spring 2016 issue of EdTech: Focus on K–12, a good makerspace is one that puts the learner first.

That being said, creating a makerspace that teaches students the skills to aid them in creative and technological futures doesn’t necessarily require renovations and a rollout of new tech.

Fleming’s space, for example, thrives on donations of old computers from her school’s IT department. Here are five other ways to create a makerspace now.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 15, 8:14 PM

Should come in handy! Thanks to John Evans. 

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Preparing Students for the Computational Future | #ComputationalTHINKing #ICT

Preparing Students for the Computational Future | #ComputationalTHINKing #ICT | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
One might think that computational thinking is somehow only relevant to STEM education. But it’s not true. Computational thinking is relevant across the whole curriculum. To social studies. To language arts. To music. To art. Even to sports. In every one of these areas there are very powerful—and often very clarifying—things that can be done with computation and computational thinking.

For instance, you can talk about a Shakespeare play and try to get a general sense of the flow in it. Well, with computational thinking you can imagine creating a social network for the play (for instance, who “knows” who through being in the same scene). And pretty soon you have a nice summary, that’s a place to launch from in talking about the nuances of the play and its themes.

Imagine you’re talking about different language families. Well, you can just take some words and use WordTranslation to translate them into hundreds of languages. Then you could make a dendrogram to show how the forms of those words cluster in different languages—and you can discover the Indo-European language family.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Computational+Thinking

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 15, 6:32 PM
One might think that computational thinking is somehow only relevant to STEM education. But it’s not true. Computational thinking is relevant across the whole curriculum. To social studies. To language arts. To music. To art. Even to sports. In every one of these areas there are very powerful—and often very clarifying—things that can be done with computation and computational thinking.

For instance, you can talk about a Shakespeare play and try to get a general sense of the flow in it. Well, with computational thinking you can imagine creating a social network for the play (for instance, who “knows” who through being in the same scene). And pretty soon you have a nice summary, that’s a place to launch from in talking about the nuances of the play and its themes.

Imagine you’re talking about different language families. Well, you can just take some words and use WordTranslation to translate them into hundreds of languages. Then you could make a dendrogram to show how the forms of those words cluster in different languages—and you can discover the Indo-European language family.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Computational+Thinking

 

 

Manuela Mejia's curator insight, September 21, 11:10 PM
I totally agree with the author’s perspective, computational thinking is relevant across the whole curriculum. For instance, you can talk about almost every topic but you need to create and adapt the social networks, platforms, blogs and websites with the learning material. In other words, computational thinking is about formulating ideas in a structured way. Nevertheless, as the author said, because it is so new, some people are using computational thinking. 

As learner and as teacher in development, I want to contribute in this process. The first step is to stop thinking that technology is just about online courses, for instance we need to learn how we can include the technological component in our lessons. We need to be conscious that we are in the 21th century in which technology surrounds us all day and all the time. If we first understand that computational thinking is about thinking, then we are able to teach students how to think through computational thinking. This means that we need to learn how to connect our questions with the outside world.
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Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols

Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
I am a bit of a collector — some may say hoarder — of craft supplies or anything that I think my kids, myself, or my students can create or build with.  I love to hunt for cool items and I LOVE to get a good deal.  Before recycling or throwing anything away, I think, “What could we make with that?”  I realize that not everyone is like this and some people don’t want to sort through trash to find that cool treasure.  If you think that STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) education is costly, I’m here to let you know it doesn’t have to be. Please let me share some money-saving resources with you to help make incorporating STEAM into your home or classroom easy and affordable.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 11, 9:25 PM

Perfect timing! Thanks to John Evans.

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A School Replaces Curriculum with Exploration

A School Replaces Curriculum with Exploration | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
A School Without Multiple Choice

The Agile Learning Center (ALC) rejects basing education on rote memorization and standardized test preparation. In fact, there is no standard curriculum at ALC, nor are there distinct classes grouped by ages. Instead, students learn what they want when they want. One group of students might devote time to learning code in order to create a video game, while another might want to write and act in their own theatrical production. Perhaps one group simply wants to play with hula-hoops. All are acceptable and encouraged at ALC, which currently has one location in Manhattan and four others in the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

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