Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from Educational Psychology & Technology
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3 Generations Answer Same Question About What They Did For Fun as a Kid //

"Our relationship with nature is disappearing. That is what we found out when we talked to 3 generations and asked them one simple question: "What did you like to do for fun as a kid?"

At Nature Valley, we believe childhood belongs in nature. Join us on our mission to pass on the joy of nature to the next generation. #RediscoverNature"...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is5W6GxAI3c 


Via Roxana Marachi, PhD
Dean J. Fusto's insight:

For a subset of articles related to Screen Time in the EdPsych/Tech collection check out: http://www.scoop.it/t/educational-psychology-technology?q=screen+time 

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 1, 2015 3:27 PM

For a subset of articles related to Screen Time in the EdPsych/Tech collection check out: http://www.scoop.it/t/educational-psychology-technology?q=screen+time 

Rescooped by Dean J. Fusto from Eclectic Technology
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Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.