Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works

9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Intriguing speakers share psychological studies- from asking kids to wait to eat marshmallows to planting false memories through a single word.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 7, 2015 8:37 AM

These fascinating and bizarre psych experiments show how our minds really work.


Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, May 24, 2015 11:07 AM

For the psyc student...

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Neuroscientists identify brain mechanisms that predict generosity in children

Neuroscientists identify brain mechanisms that predict generosity in children | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
We know that generosity in children increases as they get older,” said Decety. He added that neuroscientists have not yet examined the mechanisms that guide the increase in generosity. “The results of this study demonstrate that children exhibit both distinct early automatic and later more controlled patterns of neural responses when viewing scenarios showing helping and harmful behaviors. It’s that later more controlled neural response that is predictive of generosity.”

Via Carlos Fosca
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The Science of Smart | American RadioWorks |

The Science of Smart | American RadioWorks | | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 20, 2014 7:44 PM

This radio documentary focuses on current research on how we learn. You may listen to the documentary, or you may read the transcripts. There are three programs that discuss:

* This is Your Brain on Language - This portion focuses on raising a bilingual child. It turns out that children whom are bilingual have higher executive functioning skills.

* Learning to Love Tests - That's right, we can teach students to love tests, but only if we use them correctly!

* Variation is Key to Deeper Learning - Trial and error is one way to learn, but it turns out that if you "build a level of desirable difficulty" into the learning process (and tests) students may retain more knowledge and skills.

Choose to listen to the interviews with experts in these areas, or read through the transcripts to learn more about this new research and how it may impact your teaching and your students.

diane gusa's comment, October 20, 2014 7:48 PM
your curation is the best!
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This Is Your Brain On Literature

This Is Your Brain On Literature | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"Research shows that reading rich narratives and metaphors activates areas of our brain outside of language, and frequent fiction reading is correlated with empathy. Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life. The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated." | by Amir Aczel


Via Todd Reimer, Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:38 AM

From time.com - Today, 9:56 AM
This Is Your Brain on Great Literature
TIME

These findings will affirm the experience of readers who have felt illuminated and instructed by a novel, who have found themselves comparing a plucky young woman to Elizabeth Bennet or a tiresome pedant to Edward Casaubon. Reading great literature, it has long been averred, enlarges and improves us as human beings. Brain science shows this claim is truer than we imagined.

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This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED

This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"The past year has illuminated many things about the way the brain works, including how it responds to games. It is now erroneous to conflate ten hours of Super Mario with minor head trauma. We know that you won’t go blind if you’re looking for coins and bananas and rings on a screen all day. Your motivation and attention span will remain intact no matter what level you reach in Skyrim. In fact, the very latest science is telling us the exact opposite of what we thought all along: video games actually increase brain function."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 29, 2015 9:35 PM

Brain research now shows that action video games impact "brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision." What does this mean? That video games may make the brain bigger, as in increasing brain volume.

Along with information on how video games may make the brain "bigger, better, faster, stronger" the post also shares information on "using the neuroscience of games to boost learning" and "how to ditch your biases."

A number of studies are quoted in the post with links to additional information.

luc taesch's curator insight, February 7, 2015 6:23 AM

game your biais away ! #antifragile #agile

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Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult - PsyPost

Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult - PsyPost | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences

Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
You wouldn't eat one food all the time, so why do you spend all of your workday in front of a screen?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 6, 2014 10:48 PM

Encapsulated in the phrase - ''Variety is the spice of life".

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, August 7, 2014 12:15 AM

Good ideas - cognitive diversity to keep  our brain in shape

54321ignition's curator insight, August 7, 2014 7:39 AM

Yes, I'd recommend parachuting to everyone afraid of heights! It cured mine.

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The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
'The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction is not the right one when it comes to understanding how creativity is implemented in the brain.

Via Beth Dichter
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Gary Faust's curator insight, August 30, 2013 8:53 PM

In experience creativity seems to be volitional not physiological, now there is some science to counteract this socially accepted point of view. 

Regis Elo's comment, September 18, 2013 7:01 PM
Sorry again for the delay.thankx for your comments. I add that it seems coherent to agree with both of you Kathy and Louise , inclueing the possibility to care about the individual self-consciousness and empathy as a specific human condition to be eternally unsatisfied WITHOUT SPIRITUALITY?....IT'S BEYOND! i guess
Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's comment, September 19, 2013 1:18 PM
Thanks for the comments.