Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Talking About Failure: What Parents Can Do to Motivate Kids in School By Tara Haelle

Talking About Failure: What Parents Can Do to Motivate Kids in School By Tara Haelle | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
By Tara Haelle

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation

The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
The Definition Of Intrinsic Motivation

A decent working definition of intrinsic motivation is “motivation that stems directly from an action rather than a reward.” Dr. Richard Ryan and Edward Deci explain in their Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions & New Directions.

“Intrinsic motivation is defined as the doing of an activity for its inherent satisfaction rather than for some separable consequence. When intrinsically motivated, a person is moved to act for the fun or challenge entailed rather than because of external products, pressures, or rewards….In Self-Determination Theory, we distinguish between different types of motivation based on the different reason or goals that give rise to an action. The most basic distinction is between intrinsic motivation, which refers to doing something because it is inherently interesting or enjoyable, and extrinsic motivation, which refers to doing something because it leads to a separable outcome. Extrinsic motivation thus contrasts with intrinsic motivation, which refers to doing an activity simply for the enjoyment of the activity itself, rather than its instrumental value.”

Put another way, if a student studies for a test to make a qualifying grade to play for the basketball team, that would be an example of extrinsic motivation. Another example? Studying to “get good grades.” And as you probably know by now, its polar opposite, intrinsic motivation, is the more powerful of the two, though not necessarily more common.

In the following video, Daniel Pink explores the incredible impact of intrinsic motivation on performance, innovation, and the way we learn. While he frames the idea around “business,” he is clearly discussing learning and performance, which is why we’re all here, yes?

 


Via Sharrock, Tony Meehan
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Sharrock's curator insight, February 20, 2015 8:43 AM


Kyle Pearce • 2 years ago writes: "we've all heard teachers say that their students lack "intrinsic motivation" without realizing that our delivery of course content is a huge factor in whether we will ever see students motivated intrinsically."

Tony Meehan's curator insight, February 20, 2015 4:11 PM

As @DanielPink says, this is something which has been proven time and time again and has been written about at least since the early 90s by @alfiekohn. Rewards (or extrinsic motivators) kill the creative instinct or the natural intrinsic motivation we have to learn and to love learning for itself.  We have to find what it is that pupils are interested in, awaken a passion in them for learning and work with them from that point.  The world we live in now is far less certain but far more exciting.  We have no idea what will happen in five, 10, 20 years (as @SirKenRobinson said about 10 years ago) that we need to foster creativity and the capacity to think way, way outside the box. That requires we stop churning out rewards to pupils in the hope that they will be masters of their own learning.  How much more proof is needed to demonstrate that rewards don't work? The reward is in the learning. We educators have to make learning rewarding.


In SCHOOLS we need to develop in our learners:

"Autonomy: the urge to direct our own lives

Mastery: the desire to get better and better at something that matters

Purpose: the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves"


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What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation

What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science — specifically Dr. Edward Deci, hundreds of Self-Determination Theory researchers, and thousands of studies — instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Roger Francis, David Hain
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Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, November 28, 2014 4:55 PM

This struck such a cord with me.  I can pin point the moment when I recognised that my life was my responsibility, and can see the energy that flowed from that realisation and how it's influenced every decision and action in my life. We introduce the idea to our students in a general way, (Why is it your Mum's fault that you left your homework at home?Isn't it your responsibility?) but certainly don't help them to appreciate it deeply in their lives.

Jason Leong's curator insight, January 3, 2015 12:14 AM

"Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science [...] instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to [take] advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence."

Steven Verjans's curator insight, April 15, 2016 10:04 AM
Harvard Business Review article about Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and Deci & Ryan's self-determination theory.
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A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation

A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation

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Amy Burns's curator insight, February 26, 2015 6:39 AM

Interesting take on factors contributing to student motivation.

 

Zina Alaswad's curator insight, October 24, 2015 4:11 PM

I came across another framework for student motivation. Out of the 8 aspects if the framework, I find ownership and meaning are the 2 most important factors for improving and igniting student motivation. When the learning experience is personalized and meaningful for the student, internal motivation kicks in to lead the student through the completion of the learning requirements.

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This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED

This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"The past year has illuminated many things about the way the brain works, including how it responds to games. It is now erroneous to conflate ten hours of Super Mario with minor head trauma. We know that you won’t go blind if you’re looking for coins and bananas and rings on a screen all day. Your motivation and attention span will remain intact no matter what level you reach in Skyrim. In fact, the very latest science is telling us the exact opposite of what we thought all along: video games actually increase brain function."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 29, 2015 9:35 PM

Brain research now shows that action video games impact "brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision." What does this mean? That video games may make the brain bigger, as in increasing brain volume.

Along with information on how video games may make the brain "bigger, better, faster, stronger" the post also shares information on "using the neuroscience of games to boost learning" and "how to ditch your biases."

A number of studies are quoted in the post with links to additional information.

luc taesch's curator insight, February 7, 2015 6:23 AM

game your biais away ! #antifragile #agile

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Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: 5 Things Learners Expect From Their Educators

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: 5 Things Learners Expect From Their Educators | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Quoted from post:

More and more in recent years, we've started referring to the kids in our classes as "learners" rather than "students." It began unintentionally but became more and more frequent. We gradually realized that the relationship between learner and educator is not always the same as between student and teacher.


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:31 PM

Do you think of the children in your class as learners or students? Do you think of yourself as a teacher or an educator? And how do you define these words: learner, student, teacher, educator. This post explores how the word learner differs from the word student. One statement in the post "The word "learner" suggests an open-mindedness and a self-initiation. The word "student," however, implies a hierarchy. It defines a status, where one is the instructor and the other is the pupil."

If we view our classroom as individuals whom are learners then what is the role of the educator? The five ideas listed below are explored:

* Expertise
* Clearly delineated goals

* Mentorship

* Feedback

* Deftness with necessary tools

The first post in this series (of two) explored '5 Things Students Expect from their Teacher'  was scooped here). This post continues the dialogue and may provide you with some new insights into how you view yourself in your classroom this year...food for though.