Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Teaching About Plagiarism In The Online Classroom

Teaching About Plagiarism In The Online Classroom | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
How To Teach About Plagiarism In The Online Classroom
The video does not preach; it avoids the use of terms like “do” and “do not”. The video format presents me, the professor, as one with passion for what I teach and who cares about student success.

Via Becky Roehrs, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, July 22, 2015 9:52 AM

Good idea to start the class with examples of what plagiarism is..and the real world consequences..

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Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier

Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Instead of focusing our concerns on technology as an aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, says Jen Carey.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 1, 2014 3:10 PM

As teachers we know how easy it is for students to plagiarize today. We are asked to have students work collaboratively and use tools where students may see others thoughts. How to we deal with these issues, the need for collaboration and using tools which promote this and the issue of students plagiarizing? And when it comes to assessment how do we ask students to collaborate yet also demand that they not plagiarize?

This post explores these issues and discusses how to "transform cheating into collaboration"?  There is also a question that each of us might ask ourselves (and I suspect many of us have): If you can Google an answer is it a good question for an assessment?