Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
An exploration of the connections between research, learning theory, practice and the various constructs of literacy.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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Why Peer Teachers Learn More - InformED

Why Peer Teachers Learn More - InformED | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
We're hard-wired to learn from our interactions with others. Not only do we get information from listening to other people, we also learn a lot from teac

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Extraordinary schooling begins, ends with student work

Extraordinary schooling begins, ends with student work | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Content series: Making the extraordinary ordinary This SmartBlog on Education content series written by education change-maker Josh Thomases will explor

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Tony Palmeri's curator insight, October 24, 2015 12:28 PM

I chose this resource because I like the implications of the title. A manufacturing plant's ultimate product is whatever rolls off the end of the production line. In education, learning is the ultimate product, but conceptual understanding is not tangibly apparent without a "product" that we can see or recognize. What evidence that students are producing suggests that they understand? Also, i like the implication that substantial and worthwhile work results in learning for both the student AND the teacher. 

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Can university professors benefit from K-12 progressive teaching tactics?

Can university professors benefit from K-12 progressive teaching tactics? | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"Some university teaching practices are held sacred, but perhaps college professors can learn from progressive teaching tactics of K-12 classrooms ..."


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If digital literacy is a basic skill, who's responsible for teaching it? | CTQ

If digital literacy is a basic skill, who's responsible for teaching it? | CTQ | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

"...Like many of my students, younger and older, she does not use computer or Internet on a regular basis. In many cases, my students are learning to use the internet or their devices–beyond updating Facebook or texting—for the first time ..."

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Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier

Plagiarism vs. Collaboration on Education’s Digital Frontier | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Instead of focusing our concerns on technology as an aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, says Jen Carey.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 1, 2014 3:10 PM

As teachers we know how easy it is for students to plagiarize today. We are asked to have students work collaboratively and use tools where students may see others thoughts. How to we deal with these issues, the need for collaboration and using tools which promote this and the issue of students plagiarizing? And when it comes to assessment how do we ask students to collaborate yet also demand that they not plagiarize?

This post explores these issues and discusses how to "transform cheating into collaboration"?  There is also a question that each of us might ask ourselves (and I suspect many of us have): If you can Google an answer is it a good question for an assessment?

 

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The 6 types of Questions your Students Need to Know about

The 6 types of Questions your Students Need to Know about | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

Via Maria Zappa Kasapidi, Nicholas Fragkias, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Maria Zappa Kasapidi's curator insight, August 24, 2013 1:28 AM

Η γνωση προέρχεται από ερωτήσεις και τις απαντήσεις που θα δώσουμε σ' αυτές. Τα ανήσυχα πνεύματα ψάχνουν πέρα από τα συνηθισμένα και κάτω από την επιφάνεια.

Για να δημιουργήσουμε όμως τέτοιους μαθητές σαν εκπαιδευτικοί ή εκπαιδευτές πρέπει να δουλέψουμε πολύ και να προετοιμάσουμε το κατάλληλο περιβάλλον.
Βάλτε το στα πλάνα σας για τη σχολική χρονιά που ξεκινά. Μάθετε τους μαθητές σας ή τους εκπαιδευόμενους σας να κάνουν διαφορετικών ειδών ερωτήσεις ανάλογα με την περίσταση. 

(via Educational Technology and Mobile Learning).

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:13 PM

Now, if only we did this as adults.

Judy Beemer's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:18 PM

An overview of Inquiry

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New research helps explain why girls do better in school

New research helps explain why girls do better in school | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Why do girls get better grades in elementary school than boys -- even when they perform worse on standardized tests?

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 4, 2013 7:41 AM

This really is an engagement issue.  As a former preschool, toddler and first grade teacher- I firml believe students "look different" based on gender at these early ages. 

 

So then what?  

 

Again.........I question the content we teach and the timeline we put boys on for learning that content.  I suspect more damage is done by expecting them to be something they aren't.  

 

I can vision a different reality where boys are allowed to be boys with strong men supporting and guiding along the way.  Yes.  We need more men in elementary schools.  

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 8, 2015 6:41 PM

This really is an engagement issue.  As a former preschool, toddler and first grade teacher- I firml believe students "look different" based on gender at these early ages. 

 

So then what?  

 

Again.........I question the content we teach and the timeline we put boys on for learning that content.  I suspect more damage is done by expecting them to be something they aren't.  

 

I can vision a different reality where boys are allowed to be boys with strong men supporting and guiding along the way.  Yes.  We need more men in elementary schools.  

Luciana Viter's curator insight, August 8, 2015 10:34 PM

This really is an engagement issue.  As a former preschool, toddler and first grade teacher- I firml believe students "look different" based on gender at these early ages. 

 

So then what?  

 

Again.........I question the content we teach and the timeline we put boys on for learning that content.  I suspect more damage is done by expecting them to be something they aren't.  

 

I can vision a different reality where boys are allowed to be boys with strong men supporting and guiding along the way.  Yes.  We need more men in elementary schools.  

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(Research on Learning) This Will Revolutionize Education - YouTube

Many technologies have promised to revolutionize education, but so far none has. With that in mind, what could revolutionize education? These ideas have been...

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Alex's curator insight, January 6, 2015 10:17 AM

Couldn't agree with him any more on his description of a teacher, as far for revolutionizing education I believe its already done , with teachers teaching through technology or teaching hospital showing students around the world with video procedures .

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Carol Dweck: Mindset interview - YouTube

For more videos explaining evidence-based teaching, visit http://www.youtube.com/user/oakbellUK Prof. Dweck explains research which shows how important it is...

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T. Vogel's curator insight, August 14, 2014 10:22 AM

#Read26 get ready for Mindset by Dr. Carol Dweck - we start together on Saturday  http://tanyavogel7.wix.com/read26 ;

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9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it

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Learning cursive writing: Is it worthwhile or a waste of time? - Today.com (blog)

Learning cursive writing: Is it worthwhile or a waste of time? - Today.com (blog) | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
Learning cursive writing: Is it worthwhile or a waste of time?
Today.com (blog)
Last week, elementary school students returned to the classroom in Archdale, N.C., with a new subject on the mandatory agenda: cursive writing.
Dean J. Fusto's insight:

An often controversial topic with folks taking some tough stances. In essence, all tools (including cursive) have a life cycle. I recall a colleague lamenting the demise of cursive at a recent faculty meeting and attributing this to the increase in technology use amongst students.  I wondered if he felt the same way about heiroglyphics. 

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12 Benefits of Music Education

12 Benefits of Music Education | Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice | Scoop.it
The 12 Benefits of Music Education http://t.co/5uLSe2Yb1T

Via Heidi-Tuulia Eklund, Sharla Shults, Mac Cagle
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Mac Cagle's curator insight, May 1, 2013 11:49 PM

This is a simple one but I always like lists like these. It proclaims that musical education early in ones life can help children learn and think in different ways. As well as little fun fact I found interesting, that students with an art background tend to do better on the SAT test.

Belinda Garcia's comment, May 7, 2013 9:29 PM
I can atest to music helping with learning and thinking differently, I have my two younger siblings to show for this.
Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, February 4, 2014 4:19 AM

Only 12? ;-)